13 records – page 1 of 1.

Aerial View of Chinese Market Gardens on Marine Drive

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto4296
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[between 1950 and 1959] (date of original), 2017 (date of duplication)
Collection/Fonds
Herbert Yee Law family fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (jpg) : b&w
Scope and Content
Photograph is an aerial view looking south over the Chinese Market Gardens along Marine Drive in the Big Bend area of Burnaby.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Herbert Yee Law family fonds
Date
[between 1950 and 1959] (date of original), 2017 (date of duplication)
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (jpg) : b&w
Accession Code
BV017.40.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph is an aerial view looking south over the Chinese Market Gardens along Marine Drive in the Big Bend area of Burnaby.
Subjects
Agriculture - Crops
Agriculture - Farms
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Aerial Photographs
Names
Chinese Market Gardens
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
11/19/2017
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph.
Images
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A Family Farm

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14268
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:13:57 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part one in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part one is titled “A Family Farm”. The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land an…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:13:57 min)
Material Details
Podcasts hosts: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Persons from recorded extracts: Denise Fong; Josephine Chow Music: prod. riddiman Podcast Date: October 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:13:57 min Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.3
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part one in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part one is titled “A Family Farm”. The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia Faculty and while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. In this series the students connect their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. 00:00-02:21 The podcast opens with Wei Yan Yeong and Rose Wu introducing themselves and their topic- the Chinese Canadian experience in Burnaby and the people who have made important contributions to the city’s development. “A Family Farm” talks about Chinese-owned businesses which are family run. “The family-oriented nature of Chinese-owned businesses also extend to many of the early (and current) Chinese-owned farms in the Burnaby Big Bend area. When Chinese men first began farming in BC in the 1860s, a lot of them worked as labourers because they weren’t allowed to own land. After World War II many of these farmers were allowed to purchase lots, thanks to the Veterans Land Grant. These grants allowed returning veterans to purchase small parcels of land with government loans. Eventually, these men would start families on the farm, and many Chinese-owned farms became family-operated businesses where every member, male, female, child, and extended relatives were enlisted to work the grounds. And it was hard work, often from dawn to dusk, 6-7 days a week.” 02:23 – 07:50 This portion includes excerpts from Oral History interview with Josephine Chow (nee Hong) of Hop On Farms in the Burnaby Big Bend area. The interview was conducted by Burnaby Village Museum researcher Denise Fong. Josephine recalls growing up on the family farm with her six siblings. She tells of how the family pulled together money to purchase twelve acres along Marine Drive in 1951, her family’s background, daily life on the farm , responsibilities on the farm for her and her siblings and of how her mother had to balance working on the farm and providing for a family of ten to twelve people. 07:51 – 08:10 In this portion, hosts comment and reflect on their own experiences. “While it’s likely that a lot of this was done out of necessity and not being able to afford additional paid labourers, having grown up in Chinese households ourselves, we can definitely understand the rationale for these family-operated businesses and how it connects back to the Chinese understanding of family and kinship.” 08:11 – 09:06 In this portion, Rose and Wei provide information on the roots of the Chinese character for family “jia” in mandarin or “gah” in Cantonese. They explain that the term family is composed of two parts: the upper element is like a roof, symbolizing shelter, and the bottom part represents a pig which symbolizes food, whereby the Chinese character for family represents that of a farm. They provide a quote from the writings of Francois de Martin-Donos “In ancient China, the farm is an enterprise, a shelter that insures one food and work. The farm is a place to rely on, but in return, needs to be maintained, including a set of responsibilities. In other words, “family” is the insurance of a stable life.” 09:07 – 10:27 In this portion, the hosts speak about how traditional Chinese thought is heavily influenced by the teachings of Confucius and Confucius philosophy. They explain how Confucius emphasized five sets of human relationships that form the basis for society: ruler and minister, husband and wife, parents and child, sibling and sibling, friend and friend. Of these five, three are familial relationships also known as Filial piety – the respect and care for one’s familial superiors (such as parents, elders, and ancestors). They speak of how this is one of Confucianism’s main teachings and in this respect caring for family members is seen as a moral obligation. In China housing arrangements are in the form of siheyuan”s — a type of residence that featured a courtyard surrounded on all four sides with buildings. These traditionally housed one large extended family if they were wealthy enough. 10:28 – 13:08 In this portion, hosts provide further information on Josephine Chow’s family experience working and living on the “Hop On” family farm through the decades. An excerpt from the interview with Josephine Chow conducted by Denise Fong is included. In this excerpt, Josephine reflects on her past experiences on the farm and her present day experiences of her siblings running the farm. 13:09 -13:56 Final summary, credits and acknowledgements.
History/Biography
Podcast hosts, Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Rose Wu
Wei Yan Yeong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture
Gardens - Market Gardens
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Fong, Denise
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Responsibility
Burnaby Village Museum & Univeristy of British Columbia
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Notes
Title based contents of sound recording
See also Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020 - BV020.6.1
Compilation of Research Resources used by authors Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong include:
Why is family important in China? https://medium.com/@francois_dmd/why-is-family-so-important-in-china-1617b13a67
Burnaby Village Museum - Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong Feb. 7, 2020. BV020.6.1 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording12337
Covered Roots: The History of Vancouver's Chinese Farms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4WHS2Uf3JU
Burnaby Village Museum Shares Chinese-Canadian Farming History This Summer https://westcoastfood.ca/burnaby-village-museum-shares-chinese-canadian-farming-history-this-summer/
Chinese Market Gardeners in the City of Burnaby BC Continue to Practice Urban Agriculture https://cityfarmer.info/chinese-market-gardeners-in-the-city-of-burnaby-bc-continue-to-practice-urban-agriculture/
Chinese Market Gardening in BC https://www.bcfoodhistory.ca/chinese-market-gardening-bc/
Images
Audio Tracks
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Burnaby Village Museum fonds

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museummultipleformat13037
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1990-2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
Over 3000 photographs + approx. 100 architectural drawings + technical drawings + 25 videocassettes + 43 video recordings (mp4) + 2 video recordings (m4v) + 56 sound recordings (mp3) + 5 audio cassettes + approx. 2 m. of textual records
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of a selection of curatorial records created and collected by the Burnaby Village Museum in the course of their work. Records pertain to the village site, exhibits, programs, curatorial projects, outreach and special events. Fonds is arranged in the following series: 1) Museum photo…
Administrative History
Burnaby Village Museum is an open air museum that represents a typical tram-stop community. Museum interpreters welcome visitors, provide demonstrations and on site programming. The museum’s collection consists of thousands of artifacts, community records as well as several original Burnaby heritag…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
Over 3000 photographs + approx. 100 architectural drawings + technical drawings + 25 videocassettes + 43 video recordings (mp4) + 2 video recordings (m4v) + 56 sound recordings (mp3) + 5 audio cassettes + approx. 2 m. of textual records
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of a selection of curatorial records created and collected by the Burnaby Village Museum in the course of their work. Records pertain to the village site, exhibits, programs, curatorial projects, outreach and special events. Fonds is arranged in the following series: 1) Museum photographs series 2) Museum film collection series 3) Museum architectural records series 4) Museum Marketing photographs series 5) Museum exhibits series 6) Museum reports series 7) Curatorial Collections adminstrative records series 8) Museum Oral Histories series 9) Jesse Love farmhouse series 10) Bell's Dry Goods series 11) Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series 12) C.W. Parker no. 119 carousel series 13) Royal Bank exhibit series 14) UBC Partnership series 15) Burnaby Community Heritage Commission 125 Video Collection series
Administrative History
Burnaby Village Museum is an open air museum that represents a typical tram-stop community. Museum interpreters welcome visitors, provide demonstrations and on site programming. The museum’s collection consists of thousands of artifacts, community records as well as several original Burnaby heritage buildings, a 1912 carousel, 1912 B.C. Electric Railway interurban tram, a Chinese Market Garden and Indigenous Learning House and Matriarch's Garden. In 1990, the Corporation of the District of Burnaby assumed the operation and management of Burnaby Village Museum from the Burnaby Village Museum Association. Burnaby Village Museum (formerly named Heritage Village) was originally created by the Burnaby Centennial '71 Committee in 1971 as a commemorative project for British Columbia's Centennial. A concept for an open-air museum was developed near Deer Lake on Districts Lots 79/ 85. The official sod turning for Heritage Village took place on the site on April 11, 1971. In the spring of 1971, a museum director and curator were hired to oversee the development of the project and the acquisition of artifacts with funding from the Parks and Recreation Commission. The Century Park Museum Association (later named Burnaby Village Museum Association) was formed on October 26, 1971 as a governing body for Heritage Village Museum. The museum opened on November 19, 1971 with Mayor Bob Pritte and Canada's Governor General Roland Michener. IN July 1972, the museum opened for it's first public season. The Village was described as depictive of the 1890 to 1920 era of the lower mainland. Since 1990, the site expanded from it’s original four acre size to it's current ten acres. In the 1990s and early 2000s staff and volunteers created exhibits and programs about Burnaby with an emphasis on the 1920s. Since it's 40th anniversary in 2011, the museum has implemented changes to make the museum more interactive and inclusive in telling the story of Burnaby's history.
Accession Code
X2294
X5124
X5125
BV013.19
BV017.39
BV017.45
BV018.6
BV018.12
BV018.14
BV018.18
BV018.41
BV019.2
BV019.13
BV019.15
BV019.18
BV019.19
BV019.36
Bv019.39
BV019.52
BV019.61
BV020.4
BV020.5
BV020.12
BV020.28
BV020.29
BV021.5
BV021.7
BV021.14
BV021.17
BV021.31
BV022.1
BV022.2
BV022.27
Date
1990-2019
Media Type
Architectural Drawing
Moving Images
Photograph
Sound Recording
Technical Drawing
Textual Record
Arrangement
The following series have been arranged into subseries: Exhibits series; Oral History series; Jesse Love farmhouse series; Bell's Dry Goods exhibits series; Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series; C.W. Parker no. 119 carousel series; Royal Bank exhibits series; UBC Partnership series
Notes
Title based on contents of fonds
Further accruals expected
For other records pertaining to the history of Burnaby Village Museum see: Don Copan collection; Burnaby Centennial '71 Committee collection; Century Park Museum Association fonds; Don Wrigley fonds
See Artifacts descriptions for Publications and Newsletters produced by Burnaby Village Museum and Century Park Museum Association
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Chinese Canadian history in Burnaby resource guide

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumlibrary7608
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Publication Date
[2022]
Call Number
971.1 CHI
to grow crops to feed newcomer communities. Big Bend is one place where Chinese farmers leased small plots of land to grow food for sale. By 1974, there were approximately 27 Chinese market gardens concentrated in the Big Bend area, and many of them were family farms. “As a produce buyer for Kelly Douglas
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection
Digital Reference Collection
Material Type
Digital Resource
Accession Code
BV022.8.1
Call Number
971.1 CHI
Contributor
City of Burnaby
Place of Publication
Burnaby, BC
Publisher
City of Burnaby
Publication Date
[2022]
Physical Description
36 p. ; ill. (some col.), maps, ports
Subjects LoC
Burnaby (B.C.)--History
Burnaby (B.C.)--Social Life and Customs
Chinese Canadians--British Columbia--Burnaby--History
Chinese--British Columbia--History
Pharmacy--Canada
Pharmacy--United States
Pharmaceutical museums
Directories
Object History
Chinese Canadians have contributed to Burnaby’s growth for over a century. The long and intertwining histories between Chinese Canadians, Indigenous people and other communities have shaped the founding of Burnaby and British Columbia. This resource guide was created because their life experiences and important contributions to Burnaby’s development are not widely known.
Digital Books
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Chinese Market Gardens

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark772
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Heritage Value
The importance of the Chinese-Canadian market gardens in the Big Bend area of Burnaby was described in 1912 by The British Columbian as such: "The Chinese farmers have been for years developing and reaping the benefits of the rich soil. By draining the land with a series of ditches, the [growers] have reduced what was once little better than a cranberry marsh into a richly productive farming area which is one of the most valuable assets to...Burnaby." Many Chinese-Canadian families who had for years leased their farms began to purchase land in the 1950s and cultivated small parcels of up to 10 acres for growing assorted Canadian and Chinese vegetables for sale - either wholesale or in the market's roadside stands on Marine Drive, frequented by many loyal Burnaby customers.
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Images
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Chinese Market Gardens

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivephoto70542
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1950-1955
Collection/Fonds
Gail Yip fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (jpeg) : b&w
Scope and Content
Photograph is an aerial view looking south over the Chinese Market Gardens along Marine Drive. The farm on the south side of Marine Drive, second from the east, is 4930 Marine Drive.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1950-1955
Collection/Fonds
Gail Yip fonds
Description Level
Item
Record No.
529-001
Accession Number
2012-04
Physical Description
1 photograph (jpeg) : b&w
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Photograph is an aerial view looking south over the Chinese Market Gardens along Marine Drive. The farm on the south side of Marine Drive, second from the east, is 4930 Marine Drive.
Subjects
Agriculture - Crops
Agriculture - Farms
Names
Chinese Market Gardens
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4930 Marine Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Images
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Fraser Arm Neighbourhood

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark708
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Heritage Value
By the late 1920s, the Fraser Arm Neighbourhood in Burnaby was developing into an industrial and manufacturing district. In 1931, the Canadian National Railway built a bridge over the Fraser River from Burnaby to Lulu Island and advertised that over 30 industries were currently operating along the North Fraser. Along with industries, this district remained an important agricultural area for the Lower Mainland. Chinese market gardens continued to develop and thrive and in 1926, the Vancouver Sun estimated that that Chinese farms in the Lower Fraser Valley then supplied 90 per cent of all green vegetables consumed in the Vancouver market area.
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Images
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Gail Yip fonds

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivephoto70540
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1949
Collection/Fonds
Gail Yip fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
1 photograph
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of one photograph showing the Chinese Market Gardens on southeast Marine Drive.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1949
Collection/Fonds
Gail Yip fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Accession Number
2012-04
Physical Description
1 photograph
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of one photograph showing the Chinese Market Gardens on southeast Marine Drive.
Creator
Yip, Gail
Notes
Photo catalogue 529
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Herbert Yee Law family fonds

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museummultipleformat18929
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1938-1959] (date of originals), 2017-2019 (date of duplication)
Collection/Fonds
Herbert Yee Law family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
4 photographs (tiffs + jpgs)
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of a collection of photographs of Herbert Yee Law, United Fruit Growers, his farm on Marine Drive and a scanned copy of a survey plan of District Lots 163, 162, 157, 158 and 165.
Administrative History
Herbert (Yee) Law was born in New Westminster British Columbia in 1916. Between 1938 and 1945, Yee Law worked for the United Fraser Growers Limited in Vancouver. The company was a wholesaler that purchased produce from Chinese farmers. In 1948 Yee Law purchased land from another Chinese family alon…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Herbert Yee Law family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
4 photographs (tiffs + jpgs)
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of a collection of photographs of Herbert Yee Law, United Fruit Growers, his farm on Marine Drive and a scanned copy of a survey plan of District Lots 163, 162, 157, 158 and 165.
Administrative History
Herbert (Yee) Law was born in New Westminster British Columbia in 1916. Between 1938 and 1945, Yee Law worked for the United Fraser Growers Limited in Vancouver. The company was a wholesaler that purchased produce from Chinese farmers. In 1948 Yee Law purchased land from another Chinese family along Marine Drive in the Big Bend Area of Burnaby. From this location, Yee Law operated a Chinese market garden. Yee Law and his wife Jean had five daughters who attended schools in the area including Riverway West School, McPherson Park School and Burnaby South High School. In 1954, Yee Law continued to live in the area but left his farm to work for a plastic bag company on Annacis Island. Herbert (Yee) Law died in 2003.
Accession Code
BV017.40
BV019.11
Date
[1938-1959] (date of originals), 2017-2019 (date of duplication)
Media Type
Photograph
Cartographic Material
Notes
Title based on contents of fonds
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Inkwells to Internet: A History of Burnaby Schools

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumlibrary7551
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection
Reference Collection
Digital Reference Collection
Material Type
Book
ISBN
978-0-9781979-2-6
Call Number
371 CAR
Author
Carter, David
Cooke, Rosemary
Pride, Harry, 1925-
White, Janet
Yip, Gail
Place of Publication
Burnaby
Publisher
City of Burnaby
Publication Date
2020
Physical Description
vii, 35 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
Subjects LoC
Burnaby (B.C.)--History
Schools--British Columbia--Burnaby
Subjects
Education
Notes
"Includes index"
A history of the Burnaby school district and individual school buildings in Burnaby, BC, between 1893 and 2013.
Digital Books
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Planning Map of Chinese Market Gardens on Marine Drive

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumcartographicmaterial4297
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[between 1950 and 1959] (date of original), 2017 (date of duplication)
Collection/Fonds
Herbert Yee Law family fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col. ; 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Scanned copy of a survey plan of district lots 163, 162, 157, 158, and 165, near the Chinese Market Gardens along Marine Drive.
Administrative History
Survey plan of district lots 163, 162, 157, 158, and 165, which is primarily the area farmed by Chinese and Chinese-Canadian market gardeners around Marine Drive between Royal Oak and Mandeville (present-day Nelson). Two Chinese/Chinese Canadian land owners can be seen on the map: N.G. Wah Sing (or…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Herbert Yee Law family fonds
Date
[between 1950 and 1959] (date of original), 2017 (date of duplication)
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col. ; 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV017.40.2
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Scanned copy of a survey plan of district lots 163, 162, 157, 158, and 165, near the Chinese Market Gardens along Marine Drive.
Administrative History
Survey plan of district lots 163, 162, 157, 158, and 165, which is primarily the area farmed by Chinese and Chinese-Canadian market gardeners around Marine Drive between Royal Oak and Mandeville (present-day Nelson). Two Chinese/Chinese Canadian land owners can be seen on the map: N.G. Wah Sing (or Ng Wah Sing) and Yee Law (or Herbert Law).
Subjects
Agriculture - Crops
Agriculture - Farms
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Law, Yee "Herbert"
Chinese Market Gardens
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Media Type
Cartographic Material
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Scan Resolution
300
Scan Date
11/19/2017
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of copy scan of map
Herbert Yee Law was donor's father and this map may have originally been his copy of the city planning/engineering documents.
Images
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Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo18877
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
22 Sep. 2022
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (91 min., 5 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Curator, Jane Lemke with presentations and discussions by Megan Innes, Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra and Denise Fong. The webinar is titled "Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Fall 2022 subseries
Date
22 Sep. 2022
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (91 min., 5 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Host: Jane Lemke
Presenters: Meagan Innes; Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra; Denise Fong
Date of Presentation: Tuesday, September 22, 2022. 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks: 91 min., 5 sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Original recording of 91 min., 5 sec.was edited to 79 min., 2 sec. for viewing on Heritage Burnaby
Accession Code
BV022.27.4
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Curator, Jane Lemke with presentations and discussions by Megan Innes, Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra and Denise Fong. The webinar is titled "Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum". The webinar is the fourth in a series of six webinars presented in partnership by Burnaby Village Museum and Burnaby Public Library. The live webinar was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. Community members were invited to participate by bringing questions during the interactive online sessions. In this webinar speakers and host discuss what it takes to bring more diverse stories into the Burnaby Village Museum and explore the history of discriminatory practices and museological trends at the Burnaby Village Museum and other museums. Speakers highlight recent projects taking place at Burnaby Village Museum to ensure that other diverse stories of communities are being represented and told. Speakers each provide a ten minute presentation followed by discussions. The first speaker in the webinar is Meagan Innes. When talking about place, Meagan talks about her ancestral ties to certain places including the site where Burnaby Village Museum now stands and what it means to her Indigenous ancestors. Meagan shares stories from her grandfather John Cordocedo of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation and how her grandfather, her great grandfather and ancestors have lived, hunted, gathered and traveled on this land. Meagan talks about the work that she’s been involved with at the Burnaby Village Museum including the development of the Indigenous Learning House, the Matriarch’s Garden, the Indigenous History in Burnaby Resource Guide and development of Indigenous educational programing and projects. Meagan reflects on the collaboration and relationships that have developed during this work with Indigenous artists and Indigenous knowledge keepers. The second speaker in the webinar is Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra “Sharn”. Sharn's presentation is titled “From Orientalism and Colonialism to hope and future possibility”. Sharn speaks of her personal experience visiting the Burnaby Village Museum’s Chinese herbalist exhibit with her son and his school in 2019. Sharn expresses the racist impressions that she witnessed from the young students who visited the exhibit and her reaction re-visiting the exhibit in 2021 after the exhibit was revitalized. Sharn describes the much more positive aspects of the revitalized exhibit which transformed it from “Nostalgic Colonialism” to a place of meaningful belonging for racialized communities that includes faces and personal stories. Sharn looks forward to being a part of Burnaby’s next venture which looks at the history of Burnaby’s South Asian Canadian Community and shares some of her research while working on this project. The third speaker in the webinar is Denise Fong. Denise’s presentation is titled “Chinese Canadian History in Burnaby”. Denise provides some background regarding her work as a researcher working for the City of Burnaby. Denise takes us on a journey of her research in compiling non white experiences in Burnaby as well as uncovering personal stories from Burnaby families living and working in Burnaby. Denise points out discriminatory practices within Burnaby including the Chinese and Japanese Exclusion Bylaw in 1892 and the history of Chinese immigration to Canada including the Chinese Head Tax. Denise reflects on her own work, the work of students from UBC and volunteers from the Chinese Canadian History Advisory committee in building relationships with Chinese Canadian families within Burnaby to obtain stories and family records. Denise points out the various projects that these relationships and research have contributed to including; Heritage interpretive plaques installed at the Riverway Golf Course and in the Big Bend area of Burnaby, an award winning exhibit at Burnaby Village Museum “Across the Pacific”, new Chinese Canadian resources available on “Heritage Burnaby”, the revitalization of the Chinese Herbalist shop exhibit “Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee and Co.” at Burnaby Village Museum, the Chinese Market Garden at Burnaby Village Museum, the creation of a "Burnaby Farm Tour" map highlighting Chinese farms in the Big Bend area and a publication titled "Chinese Canadian History in Burnaby Resource Guide". Following the presentations, host Jane Lemke enters a conversation with Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra and Denise Fong. Jane intiates the conversations with questions regarding further work that is necessary for Burnaby Village Museum and other museums to move forward in readdressing the narratives beyond white colonial settler perspectives to include stories of marginalized and racialized people who are under represented and often forgotten.
History/Biography
Jane Lemke has worked in various museums in the Lower Mainland and has been the Curator at Burnaby Village Museum since 2019. Her educational background includes a Master of Arts degree in History and a Master of Museum Studies degree. Her research focus has been on trauma and memory and its role in shaping Canadian identity. She loves sharing memories and stories of Burnaby with the public. Jane sits on the Council of the BC Museums Association and is the Chair of the BC Museums Association Professional Development and Education Committee.
Meagan Innes is from Xwmélts'tstn úxwumixw (Capilano Village). She is a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh First Nation Educator and a multidisciplinary Artist. Meagan completed her Masters of Education around examining connection to place, kinship and to spén´em (plant) s7ek_w’í7tel (siblings) pén´em (plant things). She is an emerging artist who is waking up her Ancestral skills and practicing the ways of her Ancestors. She is exploring reshaping pedagogy to embody traditional ways of knowing and being, more specifically Sḵwx̱wú7mesh traditional ways of learning, knowing and being. She had recently completed the First Nations Language Program at Simon Fraser University to become a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh langauge speaker which is the language of her Ancestors.
Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra (Sharn) is Coordinator of the South Asian Studies Institute at the University of the Fraser Valley, co-curator of exhibits at the Sikh Heritage Museum, located in the National Historic Site Gur Sikh Temple in Abbotsford, BC, and a sessional faculty in the Department of History at UFV. Sharn’s PhD looks at the affective experiences of racialized museum visitors through a critical race theory lens. She’s a passionate activist, building bridges between community and academia through museum work. She is a past member of the BC Museums Association, and currently a Director with the Pacific Canada Heritage Centre - Museum of Migration.
Denise Fong is a historical researcher with the City of Burnaby and Ph.D. candidate at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on Chinese Canadian identity and meaning making in heritage spaces. Since 2009, Denise has coordinated a number of historical research and public history projects, including SFU’s From C to C: Chinese Canadian Stories of Migration and UBC’s Chinese Canadian Stories: Uncommon Histories from a Common Past. She co-curated two award-winning Chinese Canadian exhibitions locally — Burnaby Village Museum’s Across the Pacific exhibition and the Chinese Canadian Museum of BC/Museum of Vancouver’s A Seat at the Table exhibition. She is a UBC Public Scholar and currently serves as the research director for UBC's Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadian Studies
Creator
Burnaby Village Museum
Subjects
Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Food
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - First contact with Europeans
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Social life and customs
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Art
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Languages
Indigenous peoples - Canada - , Treatment of
Plants
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Buildings - Civic - Museums
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Fong, Denise
Lemke, Jane
Innes, Meagan
Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation
Sandhra, Sharanjit Kaur "Sharn" Dr.
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Video

Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum, 22 Sep. 2022

Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum, 22 Sep. 2022

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/media/hpo/_Data/_BVM_Moving_Images/2022_0027_0004_002.mp4
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Where is your food from?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14270
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:17:10 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part two in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part two is titled “Where is your food from?" The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:17:10 min)
Material Details
Podcasts hosts: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Guest: Denise Fong Music: prod. riddiman Podcast Date: October 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:17:10 min Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.4
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part two in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part two is titled “Where is your food from?" The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia Faculty and while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. In this series the students connect their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. "Where is your food from?" explores contemporary versus historical alternative food movements and how early Chinese farmers in the lower mainland had to be creative in their business tactics in order to survive in a local food system that discriminated against their race. 00:00-02:45 The podcast opens with an audio clip from Harvard University professor and world renowned food journalist and author of "The Ominvore's Dilemma", Michael Pollan. Wei Yan Yeong and Rose Wu introduce themselves and their topic "Where is your food from?" They comment on the global philosophy "Eat local, think global" and question whether this philosphy ignores the struggles faced by local farms operated by immigrant workers back in the day. They comment "Unlike how these alternative food movements are heralded as sustainable, healthy, and even sometimes trendy now in today’s standards, for Chinese farmers, these alternative food movements were necessary for survival against discriminatory practices entrenched in the food system they were servicing." 02:46 - 06:21 This portion provides background on Chinese immigrant farmers and the establishment of "market gardens" or "truck farms". Rose and Wei Yan tell of how up to the 1970s, Chinese farms produced mostly European staples such as potatoes, carrots, tomatoes, corn and cabbage because there was no market for Chinese crops. Many of the Chinese immigrants were forced into farming and other menial jobs due to discriminatory practices that excluded them from other types of employment. The hosts provide a synopsis of Burnaby Bylaw Number 4, created in 1892, "The Chinese and Japanese Exclusion Bylaw" which prohibited any Chinese or Japanese person from working for the Municipality of Burnaby. Burnaby Village Museum researcher Denise Fong provides information on Chinese immigrants in Burnaby, how many of them were farmers in the Big Bend area and how hard it was for them to own land due to racial discrimination. Denise also refers to an article in"Harrowsmith" magazine (c.1980s) where thirty five Chinese-Canadians operated farms in Burnaby. 06:22 - 09:24 This portion provides a description of Chinese market farms and vegetable peddling. Background information about the history of market farms, truck farms and vegetable peddling in Burnaby and the lower mainland provided by Denise Fong. 09:24 - 12:03 This portion talks about the policies put in place to create further barriers to Chinese farmers. Denise Fong provides information regarding the civic bylaws that were created to restrict produce sales, fines and fees that were imposed on peddlers, establishment of green grocers, the Chinese Marketing Act, the establishment of organizations to support Chinese farmers including the Chinese Growers Assocation. 12:04 - 15:00 This portion talks about how Chinese-Canadians played important roles in conventional "long" food networks. Denise Fong provides information in how Chinese Canadians participated in the larger food distribution network in British Columbia. Denise shares a story of Chinese-Canadian Cecil Lee and how he introduced the import of Chinese mandarin oranges into British Columbia. 15:01 - 16:29 Final summary regarding the contraditions in our local food system that continue to persist today and how despite the improved status of Chinese-Canadians in British Columbia, cheap, migrant labourers continue to be an overlooked part of our local food system. This portion includes a recorded excerpt from M.L.A. Mabel Elmore regarding Temporary Foreign Workers (presented before the NDP caucous in 2015). 16:29 - 17:22 Credits, thanks and acknowledgements. Special thanks to Duncan McCue and M.LA. Mabel Elmore. Music created by P. Ruderman
History/Biography
Podcast hosts, Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. Guest, Denise Fong is a historical researcher at Burnaby Village Museum. She has degrees in Anthropology (BA) and Archaeology (MA), and is completing her doctoral degree at UBC in Interdisciplinary Studies. Her primary research interests are in Chinese Canadian history and critical heritage studies. She is the co-curator of the Burnaby Village Museum “Across the Pacific” exhibition, and the Museum of Vancouver’s “A Seat at the Table – Chinese Immigration and British Columbia”.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Rose Wu
Wei Yan Yeong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture
Gardens - Market Gardens
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Fong, Denise
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Burnaby Village Museum
McCue, Duncan
Elmore, Mabel
Responsibility
Burnaby Village Museum & Univeristy of British Columbia
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Notes
Title based contents of sound recording
For associated video recording of research interview with Denise Fong - see BV020.28.2
Compilation of Research Resources used by authors Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong include:
Lim, S. (2015). Feeding the "Greenest City": Historicizing "Local," Labour, and the Postcolonial Politics of Eating. Canadian Journal of Urban Research, 24(1), 78-100. Retrieved October 22, 2020, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/26195279
Mable Elmore’s statement on the plight of temporary foreign workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LF4_js0R-Mo&ab_channel=BCNDPCaucus
Michael Pollen’s speech at UBC Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1n-kRJhPPQ&feature=emb_title&ab_channel=LFSLearningCentre
Gibb, Natalie & Wittman, Hannah. (2012). Parallel alternatives: Chinese-Canadian farmers and the Metro Vancouver local food movement. Local Environment. 18. 1-19. 10.1080/13549839.2012.714763.
Yu, J. (2014, March 31). The integration of the Chinese market gardens of southern British Columbia, 1885-1930 [R]. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0228676
Burnaby Village Museum, Interview with Denise Fong by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, 2020. BV020.28.2 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumvideo14276
Images
Audio Tracks
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