11 records – page 1 of 1.

A Family Farm

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14268
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:13:57 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part one in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part one is titled “A Family Farm”. The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land an…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:13:57 min)
Material Details
Podcasts hosts: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Persons from recorded extracts: Denise Fong; Josephine Chow Music: prod. riddiman Podcast Date: October 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:13:57 min Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.3
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part one in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part one is titled “A Family Farm”. The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia Faculty and while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. In this series the students connect their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. 00:00-02:21 The podcast opens with Wei Yan Yeong and Rose Wu introducing themselves and their topic- the Chinese Canadian experience in Burnaby and the people who have made important contributions to the city’s development. “A Family Farm” talks about Chinese-owned businesses which are family run. “The family-oriented nature of Chinese-owned businesses also extend to many of the early (and current) Chinese-owned farms in the Burnaby Big Bend area. When Chinese men first began farming in BC in the 1860s, a lot of them worked as labourers because they weren’t allowed to own land. After World War II many of these farmers were allowed to purchase lots, thanks to the Veterans Land Grant. These grants allowed returning veterans to purchase small parcels of land with government loans. Eventually, these men would start families on the farm, and many Chinese-owned farms became family-operated businesses where every member, male, female, child, and extended relatives were enlisted to work the grounds. And it was hard work, often from dawn to dusk, 6-7 days a week.” 02:23 – 07:50 This portion includes excerpts from Oral History interview with Josephine Chow (nee Hong) of Hop On Farms in the Burnaby Big Bend area. The interview was conducted by Burnaby Village Museum researcher Denise Fong. Josephine recalls growing up on the family farm with her six siblings. She tells of how the family pulled together money to purchase twelve acres along Marine Drive in 1951, her family’s background, daily life on the farm , responsibilities on the farm for her and her siblings and of how her mother had to balance working on the farm and providing for a family of ten to twelve people. 07:51 – 08:10 In this portion, hosts comment and reflect on their own experiences. “While it’s likely that a lot of this was done out of necessity and not being able to afford additional paid labourers, having grown up in Chinese households ourselves, we can definitely understand the rationale for these family-operated businesses and how it connects back to the Chinese understanding of family and kinship.” 08:11 – 09:06 In this portion, Rose and Wei provide information on the roots of the Chinese character for family “jia” in mandarin or “gah” in Cantonese. They explain that the term family is composed of two parts: the upper element is like a roof, symbolizing shelter, and the bottom part represents a pig which symbolizes food, whereby the Chinese character for family represents that of a farm. They provide a quote from the writings of Francois de Martin-Donos “In ancient China, the farm is an enterprise, a shelter that insures one food and work. The farm is a place to rely on, but in return, needs to be maintained, including a set of responsibilities. In other words, “family” is the insurance of a stable life.” 09:07 – 10:27 In this portion, the hosts speak about how traditional Chinese thought is heavily influenced by the teachings of Confucius and Confucius philosophy. They explain how Confucius emphasized five sets of human relationships that form the basis for society: ruler and minister, husband and wife, parents and child, sibling and sibling, friend and friend. Of these five, three are familial relationships also known as Filial piety – the respect and care for one’s familial superiors (such as parents, elders, and ancestors). They speak of how this is one of Confucianism’s main teachings and in this respect caring for family members is seen as a moral obligation. In China housing arrangements are in the form of siheyuan”s — a type of residence that featured a courtyard surrounded on all four sides with buildings. These traditionally housed one large extended family if they were wealthy enough. 10:28 – 13:08 In this portion, hosts provide further information on Josephine Chow’s family experience working and living on the “Hop On” family farm through the decades. An excerpt from the interview with Josephine Chow conducted by Denise Fong is included. In this excerpt, Josephine reflects on her past experiences on the farm and her present day experiences of her siblings running the farm. 13:09 -13:56 Final summary, credits and acknowledgements.
History/Biography
Podcast hosts, Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Rose Wu
Wei Yan Yeong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture
Gardens - Market Gardens
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Fong, Denise
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Responsibility
Burnaby Village Museum & Univeristy of British Columbia
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Notes
Title based contents of sound recording
See also Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020 - BV020.6.1
Compilation of Research Resources used by authors Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong include:
Why is family important in China? https://medium.com/@francois_dmd/why-is-family-so-important-in-china-1617b13a67
Burnaby Village Museum - Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong Feb. 7, 2020. BV020.6.1 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording12337
Covered Roots: The History of Vancouver's Chinese Farms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4WHS2Uf3JU
Burnaby Village Museum Shares Chinese-Canadian Farming History This Summer https://westcoastfood.ca/burnaby-village-museum-shares-chinese-canadian-farming-history-this-summer/
Chinese Market Gardeners in the City of Burnaby BC Continue to Practice Urban Agriculture https://cityfarmer.info/chinese-market-gardeners-in-the-city-of-burnaby-bc-continue-to-practice-urban-agriculture/
Chinese Market Gardening in BC https://www.bcfoodhistory.ca/chinese-market-gardening-bc/
Images
Audio Tracks
Less detail

A Pig's Tale

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo14365
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Oct. 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
3 video recordings (mp4) (5 min., 28 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo, subtitles
Scope and Content
Item consists of part two in a two part video series "A Taste of History" created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates from the Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies program (ACAM). Part two is titled "A Pig's Tale". The film highlights the history o…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
A Taste of History Video series - 2020 subseries
Date
Oct. 2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
3 video recordings (mp4) (5 min., 28 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo, subtitles
Material Details
Script: Debbie Liang; Joty Gill Narration: Joty Gill Editor: Debbie Liang Subtitles: English; Simplified Chinese; Traditional Chinese Video Appearances: Kathy Lee; Eleanor Lee Illustrations and Animations: Debbie Liang Photos, Images & B-roll: Piggery photo, image courtesy of Elwin Xie; Douglas Road: City of Burnaby Archives, 477-841; Canada Way, City of Burnaby Archives, 556-522, photo by Peg Campbell; Red pig by Debbie Liang; Piglets sleeping, image courtesy of RoyBuri from pixabay, free to use; Chinese Zodiac, image courtesy of RoofOfAllLight from wikimedia, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license; Pictograph for Home by Debbie Liang; Pigs lying down, image courtesy of Elwin Xie; Council minutes all from heritageburnaby.com; Cleanliness illustration set by Debbie Liang; "The Heathen Chinese in British Columbia" from Library and Archives Canada; Laundryman spitting from Daily News, Prince Rupert in 1911; Slicer on counter at Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co., Burnaby Village Museum BV017.7.290; Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co. Store front, Burnaby Village Museum BV017.7.191; Medical Practices Disagreement illustration by Debbie Liang; Butchering pig, image courtesy of Elwin Xie; Chinatown brolls, courtesy of Food2 group from UBC's 2019 ACAM 390 Class; Black Rotary telephone beside ball pen on white printed paper, image courtesy of Pixabay from pexels.com, free to use; Burnaby Lake on a cloudy day, image courtesy of Flying Pegunin from wikipedia; The Vancouver Sun May 4, 1921 from newspapers.com; Vancouver Daily May 3, 1921 from newspapers.com; Reduce number of pigs illustration by Debbie Liang; Black and white photo of piggery, image courtesy of Elwin Xie; 2019 Piggery illustration by Debbie Liang Music and Sound Effects: "Acoustic Mediation 2" from audionautix; Pig Grunting sounds from Kiddopedia Animasl, Creative Commons 0; "Piano moment" & "November" from bensound.com; "Ding sound effect" from freesoundlibrary; Wuxia2_Guzheng_Pipa by PeriTune http://peritune.com; Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com; Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Video adapted from 2019 BVM intern project by Debbie Liang and Marcela Gomez Special thanks to: UBC: Joanna Yang, Jenny Lu, Denise Fong, Henry Yu; BVM: Kate Petrusa, Amy Wilson Changes to music may have been made for the purposes of this video
Accession Code
BV020.28.7
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of part two in a two part video series "A Taste of History" created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates from the Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies program (ACAM). Part two is titled "A Pig's Tale". The film highlights the history of Chinese pig farms also known as "Piggeries" in Burnaby. The film tells the story of how many of these farms were established by Chinese immigrants along Douglas Road (now Canada Way) between the 1890s and 1920s; the importance of the pig in the Chinese Culture as well as a way for Chinese immigrants to make a living and the racism and discriminatory bylaws that the Chinese pig farmers suffered that finally led to the closure of many of these farms. Content references three documented piggery ranches along Douglas Road: Ah Sam; Young Chung and Hop Hin Yen. The films are supported with voice over in english, subtitles, animation along with historical photographs. One version of the film is supported with subtitles in English while two other versions of the film are supported with subtitles in Simplified Chinese and Traditional Chinese.
History/Biography
In 2020, due to the restrictions of COVID-19, University of British Columbia student interns with the Burnaby Village Museum Chinese Canadian History in Burnaby project were asked to create virtual experiences to reimagine Burnaby Village Museum's historical Chinese Canadian programming in remote online spaces. Debbie Liang and Joty Gill (UBC alumni and graduates of Dr. Henry Yu's 2019 summer ACAM 390A Global Seminar to Aisa) returned to work with Burnaby Village Museum to create two short films showcasing the history of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants and piggeries in Burnaby.
Creator
Joty Gill
Debbie Liang
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Regulations
Agriculture
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture - Ranches
Animals - Pigs
Names
Liang, Debbie
Gill, Joty
Burnaby Village Museum
University of British Columbia
Xie, Elwin
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Ah Sam
Young Chung
Hop Hin Yen
Responsibility
University of British Columbia
UBC Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadian Studies
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Burnaby - Canada Way
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Notes
Transcribed title
Video
Less detail

A Taste of History Video series - 2020 subseries

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo14272
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Subseries
Physical Description
6 video recordings (mp4)
Scope and Content
Subseries consists of a two part video series "A Taste of History". Part one is titled "A Taste of History - Scraps and Dragons" and part two is titled " A Taste of History - A Pig's Tale". The films were created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates fro…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
A Taste of History Video series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Subseries
Physical Description
6 video recordings (mp4)
Accession Code
BV020.28
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Subseries consists of a two part video series "A Taste of History". Part one is titled "A Taste of History - Scraps and Dragons" and part two is titled " A Taste of History - A Pig's Tale". The films were created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates from the Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies program (ACAM). "Scraps and Dragons" provides information on the origins of the Chinese-Canadian culinary dish "chop suey" and tells the story of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants, highlighting the history of the "Dragon Inn" chop suey restaurant owned by Larry Lee. "A Pig's Tale" shares informaton on the history of Chinese pig farms also known as "Piggeries" in Burnaby, highlighting the experiences of Chinese Pig farmers along Douglas Road. Films include versions with English, Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese subtitles.
History/Biography
In 2020, due to the restrictions of COVID-19, UBC interns were asked to create virtual experiences to reimagine Burnaby Village Museum's historical Chinese Canadian programming in remote online spaces. Debbie Liang and Joty Gill (UBC alumni and graduates of Dr. Henry Yu's 2019 summer ACAM 390A Global Seminar to Asia) returned to work with Burnaby Village Museum to create two short films showcasing the history of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants and piggeries in Burnaby
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Racism
Social Issues - Discrimination
Buildings - Commercial - Restaurants
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture - Ranches
Animals - Pigs
Regulations
Names
Liang, Debbie
Gill, Joty
Burnaby Village Museum
University of British Columbia
Notes
Title based on contents of subseries
Less detail

Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museummultipleformat14271
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Subseries
Physical Description
4 sound recordings (mp3) + 1 video recording (mp4)
Scope and Content
Subseries consists of a three episode podcast series "Back to the Roots" and two research interviews conducted using the video communication platform, "Zoom". The three podcasts which delve into the topics of Chinese family operated businesses, Chinese contributions to early local and alternative …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Description Level
Subseries
Physical Description
4 sound recordings (mp3) + 1 video recording (mp4)
Scope and Content
Subseries consists of a three episode podcast series "Back to the Roots" and two research interviews conducted using the video communication platform, "Zoom". The three podcasts which delve into the topics of Chinese family operated businesses, Chinese contributions to early local and alternative food systems, and Traditional Chinese Medicine and herbalism. The three podcasts are titled "A Family Farm"; "Where is your food from?" and "Chinese Herbalist Shops & TCM". The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Facutly of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia Faculty and while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. The two interviews were conducted by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Facutly of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia, while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. The recorded interviews include Dr. John Yang (doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine) and Denise Fong (Burnaby Village Museum's Chinese-Canadian History researcher, co curator of the Accross the Pacific exhibit and UBC PHD candidate). The interviews were conducted as part of Rose and Wei Yan's research in support of a three episode podcast series "Back to the Roots" which delves into the topics of Chinese family operated businesses, Chinese contributions to early local and alternative food systems, and Traditional Chinese Medicine and herbalism.
Creator
Rose Wu
Wei Yan Yeong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture
Gardens - Market Gardens
Names
Fong, Denise
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Burnaby Village Museum
Yang, Dr. John
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Accession Code
BV020.28
Date
2020
Media Type
Sound Recording
Moving Images
Notes
Title based on contents of subseries
Interviews were originally recorded as mp4 videos on zoom. One of the interviews is made available for public access on Heritage Burnaby as an mp3 sound recording. Contact the Burnaby Village Museum to access the recording of the other interview.
Less detail

Burnaby Village Museum fonds

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museummultipleformat13037
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1990-2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
Over 3000 photographs + approx. 100 architectural drawings + technical drawings + 25 videocassettes + 43 video recordings (mp4) + 2 video recordings (m4v) + 56 sound recordings (mp3) + 5 audio cassettes + approx. 2 m. of textual records
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of a selection of curatorial records created and collected by the Burnaby Village Museum in the course of their work. Records pertain to the village site, exhibits, programs, curatorial projects, outreach and special events. Fonds is arranged in the following series: 1) Museum photo…
Administrative History
Burnaby Village Museum is an open air museum that represents a typical tram-stop community. Museum interpreters welcome visitors, provide demonstrations and on site programming. The museum’s collection consists of thousands of artifacts, community records as well as several original Burnaby heritag…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
Over 3000 photographs + approx. 100 architectural drawings + technical drawings + 25 videocassettes + 43 video recordings (mp4) + 2 video recordings (m4v) + 56 sound recordings (mp3) + 5 audio cassettes + approx. 2 m. of textual records
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of a selection of curatorial records created and collected by the Burnaby Village Museum in the course of their work. Records pertain to the village site, exhibits, programs, curatorial projects, outreach and special events. Fonds is arranged in the following series: 1) Museum photographs series 2) Museum film collection series 3) Museum architectural records series 4) Museum Marketing photographs series 5) Museum exhibits series 6) Museum reports series 7) Curatorial Collections adminstrative records series 8) Museum Oral Histories series 9) Jesse Love farmhouse series 10) Bell's Dry Goods series 11) Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series 12) C.W. Parker no. 119 carousel series 13) Royal Bank exhibit series 14) UBC Partnership series 15) Burnaby Community Heritage Commission 125 Video Collection series
Administrative History
Burnaby Village Museum is an open air museum that represents a typical tram-stop community. Museum interpreters welcome visitors, provide demonstrations and on site programming. The museum’s collection consists of thousands of artifacts, community records as well as several original Burnaby heritage buildings, a 1912 carousel, 1912 B.C. Electric Railway interurban tram, a Chinese Market Garden and Indigenous Learning House and Matriarch's Garden. In 1990, the Corporation of the District of Burnaby assumed the operation and management of Burnaby Village Museum from the Burnaby Village Museum Association. Burnaby Village Museum (formerly named Heritage Village) was originally created by the Burnaby Centennial '71 Committee in 1971 as a commemorative project for British Columbia's Centennial. A concept for an open-air museum was developed near Deer Lake on Districts Lots 79/ 85. The official sod turning for Heritage Village took place on the site on April 11, 1971. In the spring of 1971, a museum director and curator were hired to oversee the development of the project and the acquisition of artifacts with funding from the Parks and Recreation Commission. The Century Park Museum Association (later named Burnaby Village Museum Association) was formed on October 26, 1971 as a governing body for Heritage Village Museum. The museum opened on November 19, 1971 with Mayor Bob Pritte and Canada's Governor General Roland Michener. IN July 1972, the museum opened for it's first public season. The Village was described as depictive of the 1890 to 1920 era of the lower mainland. Since 1990, the site expanded from it’s original four acre size to it's current ten acres. In the 1990s and early 2000s staff and volunteers created exhibits and programs about Burnaby with an emphasis on the 1920s. Since it's 40th anniversary in 2011, the museum has implemented changes to make the museum more interactive and inclusive in telling the story of Burnaby's history.
Accession Code
X2294
X5124
X5125
BV013.19
BV017.39
BV017.45
BV018.6
BV018.12
BV018.14
BV018.18
BV018.41
BV019.2
BV019.13
BV019.15
BV019.18
BV019.19
BV019.36
Bv019.39
BV019.52
BV019.61
BV020.4
BV020.5
BV020.12
BV020.28
BV020.29
BV021.5
BV021.7
BV021.14
BV021.17
BV021.31
BV022.1
BV022.2
BV022.27
Date
1990-2019
Media Type
Architectural Drawing
Moving Images
Photograph
Sound Recording
Technical Drawing
Textual Record
Arrangement
The following series have been arranged into subseries: Exhibits series; Oral History series; Jesse Love farmhouse series; Bell's Dry Goods exhibits series; Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series; C.W. Parker no. 119 carousel series; Royal Bank exhibits series; UBC Partnership series
Notes
Title based on contents of fonds
Further accruals expected
For other records pertaining to the history of Burnaby Village Museum see: Don Copan collection; Burnaby Centennial '71 Committee collection; Century Park Museum Association fonds; Don Wrigley fonds
See Artifacts descriptions for Publications and Newsletters produced by Burnaby Village Museum and Century Park Museum Association
Less detail

Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14274
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:16:19 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part three in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts where the hosts Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, "Dig up the roots of the past to unearth the foundations of the Chinese Canadian experience in Burnaby." This episode three is titled "Chinese Herbalist Shops and …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:16:19 min)
Material Details
Podcasts hosts: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Persons from recorded extracts: Denise Fong; Josephine Chow; Julie Lee Guest: Dr. John Yang Podcast Date: October 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:16:19 min Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.5
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part three in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts where the hosts Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, "Dig up the roots of the past to unearth the foundations of the Chinese Canadian experience in Burnaby." This episode three is titled "Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM". The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia Faculty and while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. In this series the students connect their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. 00:00 - 01:34 Podcast opens with an introduction to this episode in the podcast series. 01:35 - 03:43 This portion of the podcast consists of segments of pre-recorded interviews between Denise Fong and Chinese-Canadians Julie Lee and Josephine Chow who grew up in Burnaby. Josephine and Jule recall visiting herbalist shops in Vancouver's Chinatown during the nineteen fifties and sixties. Due to the lack of herbalist shops in the Burnaby community during that time, it was common for a Chinese farming family to travel to Vancouver’s Chinatown in order to obtain herbal prescriptions or dried goods. Julie speaks briefly about what the type of Traditional Chinese medical care and advice her mother and family received. Josephine Chow tells of a female Chinese doctor from Vancouver, Madeline Chung who was responsible for delivering a lot of Chinese babies including Josephine and describes how her mother would take members of the family to the herbalist in Vancouver's Chinatown. 03:44 - 04:44 In this portion, the hosts tell of how aside from its medicinal purposes, herbalist shops also have a major socio-cultural significance to the Chinese community. The hosts describe the traditional layout of Chinese herblist shops, with a table set up for the game Ma Jong in the back and a seating area where customers could chat while waiting and be served tea. The hosts provide an example of the "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co." herbalist shop in Victoria that was open between 1905 and 1967 and of how the shop and contents are now part of a permanent exhibit at the Burnaby Village Museum. 04:45 - 09:21 In this portion, the hosts describe "Traditional Chinese Medicine" also known as "TCM". In order to better understand the importance of TCM in Chinese culture, and specifically to Chinese-Canadian immigrants, the hosts interview Dr John Yang, the chairperson and program director of Kwantlen Polytechnic University's TCM program. Holding a PHD in TCM before migrating with his family to Canada, Dr Yang came here 30 years ago and immediately started his journey as a TCM practitioner at his home basement in Burnaby. Dr. Yang tells of how he worked with the lobbying group, ATCMA (The British Columbia Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture Practitioners) to help legitimize TCM as a recognized form of medical health care. In 1996, the Canadian government finally approved the legitimization of TCM in Canada, where one is required to take a licensing exam before they’re allowed to start their practices in Canada. 09:22 - 15:17 In this portion of the podcast, Dr. Yang and hosts describe how Traditional Chinese Medicine and treatments differ from Western medicine, how TCM is a way of life and regularly incorporated into recipes and diets, the lack of social acceptance and the import of Chinese medicinal herbs and misconceptions. 15:18 - 16:19 Conclusion, credits and acknowledgements.
History/Biography
Podcast hosts, Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Rose Wu
Wei Yan Yeong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Public Services - Health Services
Names
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Lee, Julie Cho Chan
Chow, Josephine
Fong, Denise
Yang, Dr. John
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Burnaby Village Museum
Responsibility
Burnaby Village Museum & Univeristy of British Columbia
Notes
Title based contents of sound recording
See also Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020 - BV020.6.1; Interview with Julie Lee by Denise Fong February 6, 2020 - BV020.6.2
For associated video recording of research interview with Dr. John Yang - see BV020.28.1
Compilation of Research Resources used by authors Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong include:
B.C. to recognize doctors of Chinese medicine: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/b-c-to-recognize-doctors-of-chinese-medicine-1.396806
B.C. takes steps to legitimize traditional Chinese medicine: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/bc-takes-steps-to-legitimize-traditional-chinese-medicine/article18428851/
Traditional Chinese medicine moves into the mainstream https://www.straight.com/life/415386/traditional-chinese-medicine-moves-mainstream
Burnaby Village Museum - Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong Feb. 7, 2020. BV020.6.1 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording12337
Burnaby Village Museum, Interview with Julie Lee by Denise Fong Feb. 6, 2020. BV020.6.2 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording12338
Images
Audio Tracks
Less detail

Interview with Denise Fong by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14276
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:60:38 min.)
Scope and Content
Item consists of an audio recording of a Zoom interview with Denise Fong conducted by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at UBC. The interview was conducted with Denise Fong as part of the students' research for their podcast "Where is your food from?". This podcast…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:60:38 min.)
Material Details
Interviewers: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Interviewee: Denise Fong Interview Date: September 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:60:38 Recording device: Zoom video communication platform Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.2
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of an audio recording of a Zoom interview with Denise Fong conducted by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at UBC. The interview was conducted with Denise Fong as part of the students' research for their podcast "Where is your food from?". This podcast was part two in a series of three "Back to the Roots" podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. In this series the students connected their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. "Where is your food from?" explores contemporary versus historical alternative food movements and how early Chinese farmers in the lower mainland had to be creative in their business tactics in order to survive in a local food system that discriminated against their race. 00:00 - 4:51 Denise Fong introduces herself and provides a summary of the work that she has done while working as a researcher on the Chinese Canadian History Research project for the Burnaby Village Museum. Denise explains how much of her research has focused on the history of Chinese Canadian market gardeners and green grocers and their presence in Burnaby. Denise tells of how many Chinese immigrants found it hard to find work due to racial discrimination which led many Chinese men to work in agriculture and farming. Her research has shown that many of the Chinese farms were located in the Big Bend area of Burnaby. 04:52 – 08:24 In this segment, Denise elaborates on the “truck” or “market” farming industry for Chinese farmers in Burnaby. Denise explains how “truck” farming was a mode for distributing produce from Chinese farms and some of the challenges the Chinese farmers faced. 08:25 – 14:10 In this segment Denise talks about peddling as another mode to distribute farm produce and how this was often dominated by Chinese Canadians since they were restricted from accessing other jobs. Denise explains how the Chinese peddlers would have their own routes with customers who depended on them to bring the produce to them. Denise provides an example of racial discrimination whereby a Burnaby Bylaw prevented people of Chinese descent from working for the city. 14:11 – 22: 39 In this segment, Denise describes how in the 1950s and 1960s, produce distribution networks for Chinese Canadian farmers in Burnaby expanded to larger stores and wholesalers including Woodward’s, Safeway in Burnaby, MacDonald’s Consolidated and Kelly Douglas. Denise provides specific examples of Burnaby families and tells the story of Chinese Canadian Cecil Lee, a produce buyer for Kelly Douglas. In the mid 1970s Lee, was asked to oversee the import of Chinese mandarin oranges into Canada and was responsible for the design of a new cardboard box to replace the wooden crates that held the mandarin oranges. 22:40 – 33:28 In this segment, Denise provides information on Chinese farming methods and practices that she gathered through her research. Information gathered from interviews, research papers and an article in Harrowsmith magazine suggest that many of the Big Bend farms in Burnaby relied on crop rotation, companion planting and intercropping along with traditional organic fertilizers that were available. Denise also tells of how Chinese farmers often relied on traditional methods that they brought from Southern China including the creation of raised beds to avoid damage due to flooding. Wei Yan comments that many of these traditional methods are being reintroduced as a new sustainable way of farming. Research done by Wei Yan found that when chemical fertilizers were introduced informational brochures included Chinese translations. 33:29 – 38:30 In this segment Rose and Wei Yan speak to Denise about the cultural demographic of farmers in the Big Bend area of Burnaby and what types of crops were grown. Denise comments that to her knowledge there were mostly Chinese farmers in this area but there were some European farmers as well. Produce that was grown on the farms was mostly market driven by the local consumers and it wasn’t until the 1970s that there was a bigger demand to grow Chinese vegetables to supply the growing Chinese population. Denise shares personal experience of what she learned after a visit to a local farm and the different methods that the farmer used for growing crops. The three discuss the importance of innovation and adaptability in growing techniques that Chinese farmers have used. 38:31 – 46:23 In this segment, Rose and Wei Yan speak to Denise about the discrimination barriers that Chinese farmers had to face. Denise speaks about discriminatory bylaws and regulations that targeted Chinese farmers including the Peddling tax. She tells of how this tax, persecution to peddlers and restrictions resulted in the emergence of a new industry of Chinese green grocers. Denise names Chinese trade organizations that were formed in response to the social and economic segregation and marginalization that Chinese farmers and retailers faced. Denise references research done by Natalie Gibb and Hannah Wittman from their article “Parallel Alternatives: Chinese-Canadian farmers and the Metro Vancouver local food movement” as well as research by Harry Con and Edgar Wickberg. Denise also provides information that she has gathered from Chinese farmers in Burnaby including the Yip family who were able to purchase land after World War II through the Veterans Land Act and how prior to World War II it was very difficult for Chinese immigrants to purchase land. 46:24 – 1:00:38 In this segment the group discusses how Chinese farmers have adapted in the market garden farm distribution system and the introduction of retail spaces on their farms as part of the new local food movement. Denise, Rose and Wei Yan reflect on how their interview with Denise Fong and research resources will support their podcast series and exhibits at Burnaby Village Museum.
History/Biography
Interviewer biographies: Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. Interviewee biography: Denise Fong is a historical researcher at Burnaby Village Museum. She has degrees in Anthropology (BA) and Archaeology (MA), and is completing her doctoral degree at UBC in Interdisciplinary Studies. Her primary research interests are in Chinese Canadian history and critical heritage studies. She is the co-curator of the Burnaby Village Museum “Across the Pacific” exhibition, and the Museum of Vancouver’s “A Seat at the Table – Chinese Immigration and British Columbia”.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Agriculture
Agriculture - Crops
Agriculture - Farms
Gardens - Market Gardens
Foods
Names
Fong, Denise
Yeong, Wei Yan
Wu, Rose
Notes
Title based on contents of recording
Item was originally recorded as an mp4 video and converted to an mp3 sound recording for public access on Heritage Burnaby. To access the video recording, contact Burnaby Village Museum.
For recording of podcast "Where is your food from?" see BV020.28.4
Images
Audio Tracks

Interview with Denise Fong by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong

Less detail

Interview with Dr. John Yang by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo14277
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
August 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (66 min., 57 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a Zoom interview with Dr, John Yang conducted by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, UBC students in the UBC Faculty of Land and Food Systems. The interview was conducted with Dr. Yang as part of the students' research for "Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM", part three i…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
August 2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (66 min., 57 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo
Material Details
Interviewers: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Interviewee: Dr. John Yang Interview Date: August 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 01:06:57 Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Accession Code
BV020.28.1
Access Restriction
Restricted access
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a Zoom interview with Dr, John Yang conducted by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, UBC students in the UBC Faculty of Land and Food Systems. The interview was conducted with Dr. Yang as part of the students' research for "Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM", part three in a series of "Back to the Roots" podcasts. The podcast series explores the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. In this series the students connected their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. The majority of the interview was conducted in english with occasional comments spoken in mandarin by Wei Yan Yeong and Dr. John Yang. 00:00 – 15:13 The video interview opens with Wei Yan Yeong providing a brief synopsis of the project that she is working on in partnership with Rose Wu. She explains to Dr. John Yang that the content from this interview will help inform podcast episode number three “Chinse Herbalist Shops and TCM”. Dr. Yang responds to questions asked by Wei Yan and Rose. Dr. Yang explains why he first came to Canada from China more than thirty years ago and provides information on his educational background. He describes how he first earned a degree in western medicine in China and became an assistant professor at a medical school before turning to study Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) by completing a PHD from Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine. When he immigrated to Canada with his wife more than thirty years ago, he decided to continue to practice TCM . 15:14 – 21:53 In this segment of the interview, Rose Wu asks if he joined an existing TCM business or whether he started his own practice. Dr. Yang explains that he practiced on his own and that TCM wasn’t licensed in Canada until 1996. He further explains how Western medicine was the only regulated medical practice used in Canada and it took a long time to lobby the government to recognize the benefits of TCM and why it should be a licensed profession. 21:58 – 25:00 In this segment of the interview Dr. Yang speaks about his experience as a doctor of TCM in Burnaby, his role as the president of the Federation of Traditional Chinese Medicine Colleges of Canada and how they lobbied the government for more recognition and his professional work as a dean and clinical director of the Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s Traditional Chinese Medicine program. 27:36 – 47:07 In this segment Dr. Yang explains how Traditional Chinese Medicine is ingrained in the Chinese culture and part of daily life which is why many Chinese immigrants rely on TCM to protect their immune system. He explains how TCM is based on four different energies (cold, hot, warm and cool) and different from traditional western medicine. He provides examples of different energies from certain foods. 47:08 – 52:13 In this segment, Dr. Yang speaks about his experience as a practitioner of TCM in the treatment of patients, how many of his patients are not Chinese and how he treats many of his patients with acupuncture. Dr. Yang provides an example of a patient being treated with acupuncture for a frozen shoulder. 52:14 – 56:43 In this segment, Dr. Yang is asked if he also uses Western medicine. Dr. Yang shares his positive experiences treating fever with acupuncture and how growing up in China that there was no access to western medicine – no antibiotics or penicillin until the last 50 years or so. He explains that this is why Chinese people have always relied on TCM. 56:44 - 1:06:57 Dr. Yang provides information on the education required to become a registered acupuncturist and a licensed TCM practitioner. He explains that herbs used in TCM can be purchased from herbalist shops in Chinatown or you can purchase concentrations of the herbs directly from your TCM doctor. He clarifies how animal products that are restricted (including shark fins) are no longer included for treatments in TCM, all TCM herbs are regulated in Canada by the FDA whereas herbs that you buy in Chinatown are treated as food and not drugs.
History/Biography
Interviewer biographies: Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. Interviewee biography: Dr. John Yang is a chairperson and program director of Kwantlen Polytechnic University's Traditional Chinese Medicine program. Dr. John Yang graduated from Hainan University Medical School, Haikou, China. He received his TCM training at Hainan Provincial Hospital of TCM, Haikou, China and a PhD from Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, China. For the past 11 years, John has been the Dean and Clinic Director at the PCU College of Holistic Medicine, Burnaby. As an expert in the field, John has given many national and international presentations and lectures on TCM. Dr. Yang is the current Vice-President at the Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture of British Columbia (ATCMA). He is also the Chair of the Academic/Educational Committee of ATCMA. Dr. Yang is the current President of the Federation of Traditional Chinese Medicine Colleges of Canada and a committee member on the Standards Council of Canada, Canadian Advisory Committees for International Organization for Standardization for TCM. John was elected as professional board member at the College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists of British Columbia (CTCMA). He was also a member of the Audit Team (Topic Specialist) for the Private Career Training Institution Agency of British Columbia (PCTIA), along with numerous past appointments to other TCM provincial, national and international committees.
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Public Services - Health Services
Regulations
Names
Yang, Dr. John
Yeong, Wei Yan
Wu, Rose
Notes
Title based on contents of video recording
For recording of podcast "Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM" - see BV020.28.5
Contact Burnaby Village Museum to view content
Less detail

Scraps and Dragons

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo14273
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Oct. 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
3 video recordings (mp4) (11 min., 19 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo, subtitles
Scope and Content
Item consists of part one in a two part video series "A Taste of History" created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates from the Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies program (ACAM). Part one is titled "Scraps and Dragons". The film provides backgroun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
A Taste of History Video series - 2020 subseries
Date
Oct. 2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
3 video recordings (mp4) (11 min., 19 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo, subtitles
Material Details
Script: Debbie Liang; Joty Gill Narration: Debbie Liang Editor: Debbie Liang Subtitles: English; Simplified Chinese; Traditional Chinese Video Appearances: Kathy Lee; Eleanor Lee Interviews filmed by: Eleanor Lee Interview questions: Eleanor Lee; Debbie Liang Illustrations and Animations: Debbie Liang Photos, Images & B-roll: Vegetable letters from Shutterstock; Green onion and carrot footage from Debbie Liang; Chop Suey image courtesy of pulaw from Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC By 2.0); Chop Suey from Shutterstock; Menus by Amy Wilson; Gold Dragon booklet cover and menu image- courtesy of UBC RBSC Chung Collection (RBSC-ARC-1679-CCTX-309-122); Chop Suey Nation book cover, image courtesy of Douglas & MacIntyre; Dragon Inn: City of Burnaby Archives, 556-239 photo by John McCarron; Larry Lee, image courtesy of Eleanor Lee; VanTech, image courtesy of Mike from Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0); Bamboo Terrace, image courtesy of Rob from Flickr, public domain; Map image courtesy of Sentinel 2 from wikimedia Creative Commons; Salad bar inside of Dragon Inn Restaurant, Burnaby Village Museum, BV017.37.3; John Lee: City of Burnaby Archives, 535-0415, photo by Brian Langdeau; Photograph - Bar Inside the Dragon Inn Restaurant - Burnaby Village Museum, BV017.37.2; Chopping Mushrooms, footage courtesy of Pressmaster from pexels.com; Chopping Parsley, footage courtesy of Pressmaster from pexels.com; Kwan Luck from Debbie Liang; Crystall Mall as taken from the north side of Kingsway in Burnaby, image courtesy of w:en: Colin Keigher from wikimedia, Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license; Lok's Produce at Crystal mall (Burnaby) in the Underground Chinese Produce Market image courtesy of William Chen from wikimedia, Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 4.0 International license; Crystal Mall foodcourt, image courtesy of Jay Friedman, Gastrolust; Restaurant and Dragon Innn art by Debbie Liang Music and Sound Effects: "Alison", "Acoustic Mediation 2" from audionautix; "Slow Motion", "Creative Minds" & "Cute" from bensound.com; "Kitchen sounds" & "Pop" from Debbie Liang; "Ding sound effect" from freesoundlibrary Video adapted from 2019 BVM intern project by Debbie Liang and Marcela Gomez Special thanks to: UBC: Joanna Yang, Jenny Lu, Denise Fong, Henry Yu; BVM: Kate Petrusa, Amy Wilson Changes to music may have been made for the purposes of this video
Accession Code
BV020.28.6
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of part one in a two part video series "A Taste of History" created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates from the Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies program (ACAM). Part one is titled "Scraps and Dragons". The film provides background information on the origins of the Chinese-Canadian culinary dish "chop suey" and tells the story of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants, highlighting the history of the "Dragon Inn" chop suey restaurant owned by Larry Lee. The film is supported with voice over in english, subtitles, animation, historical and family photographs and interviews with family members, Kathy Lee and Eleanor Lee. One version of the film is supported with subtitles in English while two other versions of the film are supported with subtitles in Simplified Chinese and Traditional Chinese.
History/Biography
In 2020, due to the restrictions of COVID-19, University of British Columbia student interns with the Burnaby Village Museum Chinese Canadian History in Burnaby project were asked to create virtual experiences to reimagine Burnaby Village Museum's historical Chinese Canadian programming in remote online spaces. Debbie Liang and Joty Gill (UBC alumni and graduates of Dr. Henry Yu's 2019 summer ACAM 390A Global Seminar to Aisa) returned to work with Burnaby Village Museum to create two short films showcasing the history of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants and piggeries in Burnaby. Larry Lee was born in Kaiping, Guangdong, China and immigrated to Canada in 1949 at the age of sixteen to reunite with his father, Lee Soon. Larry Lee's father had been in Canada for years before his son immigrated to join him. Larry attended Vancouver Technical Secondary School and learned English and carpentry. After he graduated, he was hired by Mr. Wong. Larry and Mr. Wong operated an IGA grocery store at Lonsdale in North Vancouver. Following this, Larry worked as a cashier for his father at "Bamboo Terrace" Chinese restaurant in Vancouver's Chinatown. In 1958, he married his wife Kathy and one year later, in 1959 he started a new business of his own. Larry opened the "Dragon Inn" chop suey restaurant at 2516 Kingsway (at Slocan) in Vancouver. Once the restaurant was doing well, Larry opened the "Park Inn" at Kingsway and 25th Avenue. The "Park Inn" was the first Chinese food restaurant with a smorgasboard in Vancouver. With the success of these restaurants and subsequent restaurants Larry Lee opened three other "Dragon Inn" chop suey restaurants located at; 4510 Kingsway and Willingdon in Burnaby (1964); 250 Columbia Street in New Westminster (1971) and Hastings and Willingdon (1990s). In the 1990s Larry retained ownership of the Dragon Inn at 4510 Kingsway and Willingdon and sold the other restaurants. In 1996, Larry sold the property of the Dragon Inn and surrounding lots located at Kingsway and Willingdon to make way for the construction of Crystal Mall. Larry and Kathy Lee had eight children who all worked in the family run restaurants until they were sold.
Creator
Joty Gill
Debbie Liang
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Buildings - Commercial - Restaurants
Names
Lee, Larry
Lee, Kathy
Lee, Eleanor
Liang, Debbie
Gill, Joty
Burnaby Village Museum
University of British Columbia
Responsibility
University of British Columbia
UBC Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadian Studies
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 4510 Kingsway
British Columbia - Vancouver
British Columbia - New Westminster
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Marlborough Area
Notes
Transcribed title
Video
Less detail

UBC Partnership series

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museummultipleformat14269
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Series
Physical Description
7 video recordings (mp4) + 4 sound recordings (mp3)
Scope and Content
Series consists of a collection of films and sound recordings created by students at the UBC of British Columbia's Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies department and Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadian Studies in partnership with Burnaby Village Museum. Recordings …
Administrative History
Beginning in 2018, students at the University of British Columbia's Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies department and Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadians Studies have participated in a research partnership with Burnaby Village Museum, which focuses on learning mo…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Description Level
Series
Physical Description
7 video recordings (mp4) + 4 sound recordings (mp3)
Scope and Content
Series consists of a collection of films and sound recordings created by students at the UBC of British Columbia's Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies department and Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadian Studies in partnership with Burnaby Village Museum. Recordings include Chinese Canadian research generated for an online audience in 2020. The fonds includes a series of three "Back to the Roots" podcasts titled "A Family Farm", "Where is your food from?" and "Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM" around the topics of family-operated farming, Chinese contributions to early local and alternative food systems and Traditional Chinese Medicine and herbalism; two interviews (conducted as research for podcasts) with Chinese Medicine Dr. John Yang and Burnaby Village Museum researcher and PHD candidate, Denise Fong ; and a two part video series titled a "A Taste of History" with part one, "Scraps and Dragons" showcasing the history of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants and part two "A Pig's Tale" about the history of Chinese pig farms also known as "Piggeries" in Burnaby. Films include versions with English, Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese subtitles. The fonds is arranged into the following subseries: 1) Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries 2) A Taste of History Video series - 2020 subseries
Administrative History
Beginning in 2018, students at the University of British Columbia's Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies department and Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadians Studies have participated in a research partnership with Burnaby Village Museum, which focuses on learning more about the stories of Asian Canadians who have lived in Burnaby. Each summer, a cohort of student interns have worked at or with the Museum to expand our research goals. In the first two years of the project, student interns created historical interpretive experiences in the museum including "a Story Garden" and "Story Harvest Station". These were intended to educate museum visitors on Chinese Canadian history in the market garden site. In 2019, interactive tours were designed and led by the team of interns. These included a three panel art piece of early Chinese Canadian industries, a visual compilation of migration stories involving a comic strip and family friendly activities. In 2020, due to the restrictions of COVID-19, the interns were asked to create virtual experiences to reimagine Burnaby Village Museum's historical Chinese Canadian programming in remote online spaces. Debbie Liang and Joty Gill (UBC alumni and graduates of Dr. Henry Yu's 2019 summer ACAM 390A Global Seminar to Asia) returned to work with Burnaby Village Museum to create two short films showcasing the history of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants and Piggeries in Burnaby. Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong (students in the UBC Faculty of Land and Food Systems) created a three episode podcast series "Back to the Roots" which delved into the topics of family-operated farming businesses, Chinese contributions to early local and alternative food systems, and Traditional Chinese Medicine and herbalism. During their research the interns interviewed Dr. John Yang and Burnaby Village Museum researcher and PHD candidate, Denise Fong.
Accession Code
BV020.28
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
2020
Media Type
Sound Recording
Moving Images
Related Material
See also: The Fecundity of Food and Family: A Natural Niche for Chinese Canadians in Burnaby - BV020.29.5
Notes
Title based on contents of series
Item level and file level descriptions available
Further accruals are expected
Less detail

Where is your food from?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14270
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:17:10 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part two in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part two is titled “Where is your food from?" The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:17:10 min)
Material Details
Podcasts hosts: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Guest: Denise Fong Music: prod. riddiman Podcast Date: October 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:17:10 min Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.4
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part two in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part two is titled “Where is your food from?" The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia Faculty and while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. In this series the students connect their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. "Where is your food from?" explores contemporary versus historical alternative food movements and how early Chinese farmers in the lower mainland had to be creative in their business tactics in order to survive in a local food system that discriminated against their race. 00:00-02:45 The podcast opens with an audio clip from Harvard University professor and world renowned food journalist and author of "The Ominvore's Dilemma", Michael Pollan. Wei Yan Yeong and Rose Wu introduce themselves and their topic "Where is your food from?" They comment on the global philosophy "Eat local, think global" and question whether this philosphy ignores the struggles faced by local farms operated by immigrant workers back in the day. They comment "Unlike how these alternative food movements are heralded as sustainable, healthy, and even sometimes trendy now in today’s standards, for Chinese farmers, these alternative food movements were necessary for survival against discriminatory practices entrenched in the food system they were servicing." 02:46 - 06:21 This portion provides background on Chinese immigrant farmers and the establishment of "market gardens" or "truck farms". Rose and Wei Yan tell of how up to the 1970s, Chinese farms produced mostly European staples such as potatoes, carrots, tomatoes, corn and cabbage because there was no market for Chinese crops. Many of the Chinese immigrants were forced into farming and other menial jobs due to discriminatory practices that excluded them from other types of employment. The hosts provide a synopsis of Burnaby Bylaw Number 4, created in 1892, "The Chinese and Japanese Exclusion Bylaw" which prohibited any Chinese or Japanese person from working for the Municipality of Burnaby. Burnaby Village Museum researcher Denise Fong provides information on Chinese immigrants in Burnaby, how many of them were farmers in the Big Bend area and how hard it was for them to own land due to racial discrimination. Denise also refers to an article in"Harrowsmith" magazine (c.1980s) where thirty five Chinese-Canadians operated farms in Burnaby. 06:22 - 09:24 This portion provides a description of Chinese market farms and vegetable peddling. Background information about the history of market farms, truck farms and vegetable peddling in Burnaby and the lower mainland provided by Denise Fong. 09:24 - 12:03 This portion talks about the policies put in place to create further barriers to Chinese farmers. Denise Fong provides information regarding the civic bylaws that were created to restrict produce sales, fines and fees that were imposed on peddlers, establishment of green grocers, the Chinese Marketing Act, the establishment of organizations to support Chinese farmers including the Chinese Growers Assocation. 12:04 - 15:00 This portion talks about how Chinese-Canadians played important roles in conventional "long" food networks. Denise Fong provides information in how Chinese Canadians participated in the larger food distribution network in British Columbia. Denise shares a story of Chinese-Canadian Cecil Lee and how he introduced the import of Chinese mandarin oranges into British Columbia. 15:01 - 16:29 Final summary regarding the contraditions in our local food system that continue to persist today and how despite the improved status of Chinese-Canadians in British Columbia, cheap, migrant labourers continue to be an overlooked part of our local food system. This portion includes a recorded excerpt from M.L.A. Mabel Elmore regarding Temporary Foreign Workers (presented before the NDP caucous in 2015). 16:29 - 17:22 Credits, thanks and acknowledgements. Special thanks to Duncan McCue and M.LA. Mabel Elmore. Music created by P. Ruderman
History/Biography
Podcast hosts, Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. Guest, Denise Fong is a historical researcher at Burnaby Village Museum. She has degrees in Anthropology (BA) and Archaeology (MA), and is completing her doctoral degree at UBC in Interdisciplinary Studies. Her primary research interests are in Chinese Canadian history and critical heritage studies. She is the co-curator of the Burnaby Village Museum “Across the Pacific” exhibition, and the Museum of Vancouver’s “A Seat at the Table – Chinese Immigration and British Columbia”.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Rose Wu
Wei Yan Yeong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture
Gardens - Market Gardens
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Fong, Denise
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Burnaby Village Museum
McCue, Duncan
Elmore, Mabel
Responsibility
Burnaby Village Museum & Univeristy of British Columbia
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Notes
Title based contents of sound recording
For associated video recording of research interview with Denise Fong - see BV020.28.2
Compilation of Research Resources used by authors Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong include:
Lim, S. (2015). Feeding the "Greenest City": Historicizing "Local," Labour, and the Postcolonial Politics of Eating. Canadian Journal of Urban Research, 24(1), 78-100. Retrieved October 22, 2020, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/26195279
Mable Elmore’s statement on the plight of temporary foreign workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LF4_js0R-Mo&ab_channel=BCNDPCaucus
Michael Pollen’s speech at UBC Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1n-kRJhPPQ&feature=emb_title&ab_channel=LFSLearningCentre
Gibb, Natalie & Wittman, Hannah. (2012). Parallel alternatives: Chinese-Canadian farmers and the Metro Vancouver local food movement. Local Environment. 18. 1-19. 10.1080/13549839.2012.714763.
Yu, J. (2014, March 31). The integration of the Chinese market gardens of southern British Columbia, 1885-1930 [R]. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0228676
Burnaby Village Museum, Interview with Denise Fong by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, 2020. BV020.28.2 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumvideo14276
Images
Audio Tracks
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 1.