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Interview with Leonard Evenden and Allen Seager by Kathy Bossort November 18, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory621
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Evenden and Dr. Seager’s description of their early years at Simon Fraser University. They talk about the challenges to commuting up and down Burnaby Mountain and the solutions people used, particularly hitchhiking. Dr. Seager talks about living in Monteci…
Date Range
1925-2015
Length
0:12:50
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Evenden and Dr. Seager’s description of their early years at Simon Fraser University. They talk about the challenges to commuting up and down Burnaby Mountain and the solutions people used, particularly hitchhiking. Dr. Seager talks about living in Montecito in the 1980s. Dr. Evenden talks about the early use of Burnaby Mountain and its undeveloped state when the site for SFU was proposed in 1963.
Date Range
1925-2015
Length
0:12:50
Name
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Education
Transportation
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Sperling-Broadway Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 18, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Dr. Leonard Evenden and Dr. Allen Seager conducted by Kathy Bossort. Leonard Evenden and Allen Seager were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about aspects of Simon Fraser University’s history that is related to its site on Burnaby Mountain, as told by two retired SFU professors, Dr. Evenden of the Geography Department and Dr. Seager of the Department of History. The interview ranges over campus access and housing issues created by the isolated mountain site; the relationship of the university to the local community and the dispute over land ownership and control with the City of Burnaby; SFU’s environmental stewardship; the development of UniverCity; and the future of parkland in the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Dr. Leonard J. Evenden was born 1937 in Beijing, China, to parents and Salvation Army missionaries Leonard Evenden and Elsie Pearl March. Dr. Evenden attended McMaster University (B.A. 1960), University of Georgia (M.A. 1962) and University of Edinburgh (Ph.D. 1970). He was appointed to Simon Fraser University’s Department of Geography in 1966, shortly after SFU opened in the fall of 1965, and retired in 2002. Dr. Evenden’s research has focused on Canadian urban geography. He edited a collection of essays about Burnaby titled “Suburb of Happy Homes: Burnaby centennial themes” (1995), and directed “Voices of Burnaby”, an SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee oral history project (1992). Dr. Evenden is married with three children. Dr. Allen Seager was born 1953 in Montreal, Quebec, to parents C.F.B. Seager and Evelyn DeGex Chesam. Dr. Seager is a retired Simon Fraser University professor, being a member of SFU’s Department of History from 1981 to 2014, and has current links with SFU as an instructor for Continuing Studies. His research interests include history of Canada and Western Canada, and labour and working class history, particularly in the coal mining and railway industries. Dr. Seager moved to Burnaby and the Montecito area in 1981 where he continues to live and enjoy the hiking trails on Burnaby Mountain and the amenities at SFU. Dr. Seager is a member of the Burnaby North NDP, and has volunteered with Scouts Canada and the Burnaby Centennial Committee.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:11:28
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Evenden, Leonard J.
Seager, Allen
Interview Location
Clubhouse at Burnaby Mountain Golf Course Restaurant
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-011_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Dr. Leonard Evenden and Dr. Allen Seager

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Interview with Tony Fabian by Kathy Bossort October 29, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory599
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Tony Fabian’s description of the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain, the creation of the Pavilion area in 1957, the history of proposals for how Burnaby Mountain could be used, the land transfer to SFU in 1963, and difficulty accessing the m…
Date Range
1860-1995
Length
0:15:57
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Tony Fabian’s description of the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain, the creation of the Pavilion area in 1957, the history of proposals for how Burnaby Mountain could be used, the land transfer to SFU in 1963, and difficulty accessing the mountain for recreation prior to 1965. He also talks about the dispute between SFU and the City of Burnaby over land ownership and control.
Date Range
1860-1995
Length
0:15:57
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 29, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Tony Fabian conducted by Kathy Bossort. Tony Fabian was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Tony Fabian’s part in park creation and protection of natural areas in Burnaby, particularly as a member of the Park and Recreation Commission in the 1970s; his childhood and how that contributed to his land ethic; and the history of the uses made of and setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Tony S. Fabian was born in 1934 in north Saskatchewan. At less than a year old Tony, along with his siblings, was removed from his family home and eventually placed with an immigrant farm family. As a child he worked on the farm and witnessed what he considered abusive treatment of the land and farm animals. When he was about 12 years old his adoptive family moved to the BC coast where he went on his own, working for a variety of farmers in Richmond and Delta. At 19 he contracted polio, quit farm work, and found work with the telephone company. In 1956 Tony married, and in 1957 he and his wife moved to a home on Hardwick Street in Burnaby where he still lives. Tony entered civic politics in the 1960s when he objected to development on Hardwick Park and became concerned about the destruction of Burnaby’s natural landscapes. He became a life long advocate for preserving natural areas and helped to create large parks in Burnaby on the foreshore of the Fraser River and on Burrard Inlet. He served as a member of the Parks and Recreation Commission 1970-1975, is a long time volunteer with the Burnaby Lake Park Association, and continues to stay current on local and regional environmental issues. In 2008 Tony was presented with the City of Burnaby Environment Award for Community Stewardship.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:43:22
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Fabian, Tony S.
Interview Location
Tony Fabian's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-007_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Tony Fabian

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Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[1910] (date of original) -1993
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Description Level
Series
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records + 813 photographs : b&w + 11 screened negatives + 5 videocassettes + 8 data cassettes + 1 computer disc + 1 optical disc
Scope and Content
Series consists of the SFU (Simon Fraser University)/Burnaby Centennial Committee's Image Bank project records including; The Image Bank database and backups in a variety of formats, eight hundred and thirteen photographs collected by the Simon Fraser University Archives staff, eleven screened nega…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[1910] (date of original) -1993
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records + 813 photographs : b&w + 11 screened negatives + 5 videocassettes + 8 data cassettes + 1 computer disc + 1 optical disc
Description Level
Series
Series
Burnaby Image Bank series
Access Restriction
Open Access
Scope and Content
Series consists of the SFU (Simon Fraser University)/Burnaby Centennial Committee's Image Bank project records including; The Image Bank database and backups in a variety of formats, eight hundred and thirteen photographs collected by the Simon Fraser University Archives staff, eleven screened negatives from the Burnaby Image Bank that were used for the publication "Burnaby- A Cultural Inventory and Resource Guide", and one VHS tape and DVD access copy of "Burnaby's Photographic Family Album / Burnaby Image Bank Collection / Volume 1 / 1992" which was created by the SFU (Simon Fraser University)/Burnaby Centennial Committee for public viewing and purchase. The collection of photographs for the Image Bank project were gathered from various donors to commemorate the Centennial of the City of Burnaby. All photographs were collected from Burnaby families' personal albums by Simon Fraser University Archives staff during 1991 with a focus on the history of the people and the landscape of Burnaby. Photographs were collected from every decade for every neighbourhood in effort to describe the City's evolving ethnic, cultural and physical landscape. In March of 1992 twenty of these images were selected by a jury for their aesthetic quality and displayed at the Bennett Library Gallery at Simon Fraser University for the "Images of Burnaby". This exhibit travelled to various locations between 1992-1993 within Burnaby and Douglas College in New Westminster.The entire collection of eight hundred and twelve images was made available for public purchase and viewing on Video Home System (VHS) format. As well, each Burnaby school and each branch of the Burnaby Public Library received their own (VHS) copy for information and research purposes. The "Image Bank" video collection was buried together with the video "Images and Voices of Burnaby" in the City of Burnaby's time capsule which was mounted at City Hall in 1992.
Media Type
Photograph
Textual Record
Notes
Title based on contents of series
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Aerial photograph of Douglas Road and Sperling Avenue

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto1165
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1938]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 19 x 24 cm
Scope and Content
Aerial photograph of the area surrounding Douglas Road and Sperling Avenue.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 19 x 24 cm
Scope and Content
Aerial photograph of the area surrounding Douglas Road and Sperling Avenue.
Subjects
Aerial Photographs
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Burnaby - Sperling Avenue
Accession Code
BV992.47.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Date
[1938]
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
01-Jun-09
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Notes on verso of photograph read: "Burnaby Image Bank #532" and "DOUGLAS ROAD AND SPERLING c. 1938"
Stamp on verso of photograph reads: "Copyright Simon Fraser/ University Archives"
Images
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Interview with Kathleen Rose July 14, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory146
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's first memories of coming to North Burnaby as well as of her husband's employment. She discusses quilt-making among families experiencing economic hardship.
Date Range
1897-1934
Length
0:10:37
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's first memories of coming to North Burnaby as well as of her husband's employment. She discusses quilt-making among families experiencing economic hardship.
Date Range
1897-1934
Length
0:10:37
Subject
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Albert Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Capitol Hill Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 14, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Kathleen Rose by SFU (Simon Fraser University) student Bettina Bradbury, July 14, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
Kathleen Rose was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1897 and immigrated to Prince Albert, Saskatchewan in 1907 with her family. Kathleen lived on the Prairie for eighteen years before getting married in 1923 and moving to Burnaby to be with her husband. The couple moved to the 4600 block of Albert Street in North Burnaby, where Kathleen’s husband cleared all of the land by hand. The Roses had help putting in the foundation but otherwise built their house themselves. Kathleen’s husband was a longshoreman at that time. They had a son, born in 1925, who suffered from rheumatic fever during the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:35:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Rose, Kathleen
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-21_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Kathleen Rose

Less detail

Interview with Kathleen Rose July 14, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory147
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's reaction to her husband going on strike as well as the process of going on Relief and the restrictions imposed upon you once you were. She explains how she sent a letter of protest to Council when her family was facing the possibility of bei…
Date Range
1934-1944
Length
0:09:40
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's reaction to her husband going on strike as well as the process of going on Relief and the restrictions imposed upon you once you were. She explains how she sent a letter of protest to Council when her family was facing the possibility of being taken off Relief.
Date Range
1934-1944
Length
0:09:40
Subject
Protests and Demonstrations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 14, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Kathleen Rose by SFU (Simon Fraser University) student Bettina Bradbury, July 14, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
Kathleen Rose was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1897 and immigrated to Prince Albert, Saskatchewan in 1907 with her family. Kathleen lived on the Prairie for eighteen years before getting married in 1923 and moving to Burnaby to be with her husband. The couple moved to the 4600 block of Albert Street in North Burnaby, where Kathleen’s husband cleared all of the land by hand. The Roses had help putting in the foundation but otherwise built their house themselves. Kathleen’s husband was a longshoreman at that time. They had a son, born in 1925, who suffered from rheumatic fever during the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:35:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Rose, Kathleen
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-21_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Kathleen Rose

Less detail

Interview with Kathleen Rose July 14, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory148
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's memories of her son's ill health and of dealing with doctors during the Depression. She also comments on the radical nature of the time period.
Date Range
1932-1944
Length
0:10:00
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's memories of her son's ill health and of dealing with doctors during the Depression. She also comments on the radical nature of the time period.
Date Range
1932-1944
Length
0:10:00
Subject
Occupations - Physicians
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 14, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Kathleen Rose by SFU (Simon Fraser University) student Bettina Bradbury, July 14, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
Kathleen Rose was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1897 and immigrated to Prince Albert, Saskatchewan in 1907 with her family. Kathleen lived on the Prairie for eighteen years before getting married in 1923 and moving to Burnaby to be with her husband. The couple moved to the 4600 block of Albert Street in North Burnaby, where Kathleen’s husband cleared all of the land by hand. The Roses had help putting in the foundation but otherwise built their house themselves. Kathleen’s husband was a longshoreman at that time. They had a son, born in 1925, who suffered from rheumatic fever during the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:35:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Rose, Kathleen
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-21_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Kathleen Rose

Less detail

Interview with Kathleen Rose July 14, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory149
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's memories of the Unemployment situation during the Depression years.
Date Range
1934-1944
Length
0:05:30
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's memories of the Unemployment situation during the Depression years.
Date Range
1934-1944
Length
0:05:30
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 14, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Kathleen Rose by SFU (Simon Fraser University) student Bettina Bradbury, July 14, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
Kathleen Rose was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1897 and immigrated to Prince Albert, Saskatchewan in 1907 with her family. Kathleen lived on the Prairie for eighteen years before getting married in 1923 and moving to Burnaby to be with her husband. The couple moved to the 4600 block of Albert Street in North Burnaby, where Kathleen’s husband cleared all of the land by hand. The Roses had help putting in the foundation but otherwise built their house themselves. Kathleen’s husband was a longshoreman at that time. They had a son, born in 1925, who suffered from rheumatic fever during the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:35:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Rose, Kathleen
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-21_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Kathleen Rose

Less detail

SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivemultipleformat88249
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[191-?] (date of original) -2015
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
16 folders of textual records + 813 photographs + 10 audio cassettes + 5 videocassettes + 8 data cassettes + 1 computer disk + 2 optical discs
Storage Location
Photo catalogue 370
Photo catalogue 576
Photo catalogue 577
Photo catalogue 578
MSS088
MSS131
MSS187
Moving image catalogue 579
Scope and Content
Records consist of material created and collected by the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee in celebration of Burnaby's Centennial in 1992. The fonds is arranged into four series; 1) Burnaby Image Bank Photograph series, 2) SFU/Centennial Committee Manuscript series, 3) Centennial Oral History Projec…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[191-?] (date of original) -2015
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Physical Description
16 folders of textual records + 813 photographs + 10 audio cassettes + 5 videocassettes + 8 data cassettes + 1 computer disk + 2 optical discs
Description Level
Fonds
Storage Location
Photo catalogue 370
Photo catalogue 576
Photo catalogue 577
Photo catalogue 578
MSS088
MSS131
MSS187
Moving image catalogue 579
Access Restriction
Open Access
Scope and Content
Records consist of material created and collected by the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee in celebration of Burnaby's Centennial in 1992. The fonds is arranged into four series; 1) Burnaby Image Bank Photograph series, 2) SFU/Centennial Committee Manuscript series, 3) Centennial Oral History Project series and 4) Video Project series.
History/Biography
The SFU (Simon Fraser University)/Burnaby Centennial Committee was established in 1990 and obtained initial funding from the President of Simon Fraser University which was matched by a grant authorized by the Mayor and Council of the Municipality of Burnaby. Further funding came from the Burnaby (civic) Centennial Committee after the projects had been accepted as part of the recognition for Burnaby's Centennial celebrations in 1992. The suggestion for this committee originated with Professor Robert Anderson from the School of Communications and he was joined by Professors, Veronica Strong-Boag from the Department of History and Leonard J. Evenden from the Department of Geography. Primary responsibilities ended up falling jointly to Professor Leonard J. Evenden and Susan Jamieson-McLarnon. The Committee was made up of the following members who helped to carry out the projects to completion: Rodney Fowler (SFU Department of Geography), Terry Fowler (Adler School of Professional Psychology, Chicago), Edward Gibson (SFU Department of Geography and Director of the Simon Fraser Gallery), James Ross (SFU Archivist), Allen Seager (Department of History), Grant Strate (SFU Fine and Performing Arts), and Arthur Wirick (representing Burnaby Municipal Centennial Committee). Other members of the university community contributed their expertise in a variety of ways, including: Jack Corse (SFU Librarian), Stephen Duguid (Institute of Humanities), Christine Hearn (Continuing Studies), Ken Mennel (Media and Public Relations), Jane Parkinson (Historian and Researcher), Stanley Shapiro (Business Administration) and Jerry Zaslove (Institute for the Humanities). Rodney Fowler also filled the position of committee coordinator. The committee's first undertaking was to explore the extent and availability of historical resources in the community of Burnaby. Two graduate students were hired to help carry out this work in the summer of 1991 which took two forms: a document based study and an oral history project. The documents based history resulted in an inventory of ‘archival’ resources titled "Burnaby: A Cultural Inventory and Resource Guide" and the Oral History Project consisted of interviews with eleven Burnaby citizens. With the culmination of these two projects a day long workshop was held with both the SFU and the Burnaby municipal committees and other members of the Burnaby community who were pursuing various centennial projects of their own. Following the workshop, and several meetings, the committee proposed other projects in addition to the Cultural Inventory and Oral History Project. The other completed projects consisted of; "The Burnaby Image Bank" which included an exhibition titled, "Images of Burnaby", a finding aid video titled, "Burnaby's Photographic Family Album / Burnaby Image Bank Collection / Volume 1 / 1992", a video titled "Burnaby at 100: Images and Voices", a book of essays titled, "Suburb of Happy Homes: Burnaby Centennial Themes" and a dance festival sponsored by The Centre for the Arts. Suburb of happy Homes: Burnaby Centennial Themes", dedicated to the citizens and students of Burnaby, and to the students of Simon Fraser University, was published in 1995. For this project, Leonard Evenden received the City of Burnaby Heritage Award in 1997.A companion project to the book of essays consisted of a map project which illustrated the development of settlement within the city but it never came to fruition due to funding constraints.
Media Type
Textual Record
Photograph
Sound Recording
Moving Images
Notes
Title based on contents of fonds
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Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory36
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's teen years including the early passing of his father.
Date Range
1927-1930
Length
0:08:22
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's teen years including the early passing of his father.
Date Range
1927-1930
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:08:22
Subject
Geographic Features - Gardens
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Formby Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Richmond Park Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory38
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's memories of Burnaby during the Depression years including his sister's personal and work history.
Date Range
1929-1938
Length
0:09:54
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's memories of Burnaby during the Depression years including his sister's personal and work history.
Date Range
1929-1938
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:09:54
Name
McGeachie, Florence Mary
Subject
Occupations - Nurses
Recreational Activities - Dancing
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory39
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's positive opinion towards the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) (later the NDP) as well as his experience of the Relief Camp Workers' Union (RCWU) and their protest at Hudson's Bay Company Store in Vancouver.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:10:39
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's positive opinion towards the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) (later the NDP) as well as his experience of the Relief Camp Workers' Union (RCWU) and their protest at Hudson's Bay Company Store in Vancouver.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:10:39
Name
Winch, Ernest "Ernie"
Winch, Harold
Subject
Organizations
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Vancouver
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory40
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's political views, giving voice to the widely held antagonism people held towards the R.B. Bennett government and its attitude toward the unemployed. Jack also discusses the great snow storm of 1933, brush fires in Burnaby and…
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:05:19
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's political views, giving voice to the widely held antagonism people held towards the R.B. Bennett government and its attitude toward the unemployed. Jack also discusses the great snow storm of 1933, brush fires in Burnaby and the Richmond Street Fire.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:05:19
Subject
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_6
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
Less detail

SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivetextualrecord88254
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1934 (date of original), predominant 1989-1992
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Description Level
File
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Item No.
MSS187-004
Storage Location
69-7-8-4
Scope and Content
File consists of SFU (Simon Fraser University)/Burnaby Centennial Committee records including; a list of "Burnaby Ethnic Associations prior to 1945", committee correspondence, information regarding demographics of Burnaby, project proposal drafts for; "Images of Burnaby", "Visions of Burnaby", "Bu…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1934 (date of original), predominant 1989-1992
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Description Level
File
Series
Manuscript series
Item No.
MSS187-004
Storage Location
69-7-8-4
Access Restriction
Subject to FOIPPA
Reproduction Restriction
Reproductions subject to FOIPPA
Accession Number
2014-28
Scope and Content
File consists of SFU (Simon Fraser University)/Burnaby Centennial Committee records including; a list of "Burnaby Ethnic Associations prior to 1945", committee correspondence, information regarding demographics of Burnaby, project proposal drafts for; "Images of Burnaby", "Visions of Burnaby", "Burnaby Discovery", "Images Bank", "Burnaby Unfolding", "Developing Burnaby" and "Futures of Burnaby"; biographical highlights for nine of the oral history interviewees including; Bill Lewarne, Bill Copeland, Ed Apps, Merrill Gordon, Severin Morin, Toki Myashita, Al Nixon, Don Brown and Kay Zimmerman; a report for Heritage Canada re: "SFU involvement in Burnaby Centennial Celebration"; a list of "... Vernacular Community Areas of Burnaby Derived from Interviews" and photocopies of newspaper clippings about Councillor Tom Douglas.
Media Type
Textual Record
Notes
Transcribed title
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory12
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's positive attitude towards fellow citizens during the Depression, her husband's work and pay cuts at Fraser Mills and the issues of unemployment in general.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:04:34
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's positive attitude towards fellow citizens during the Depression, her husband's work and pay cuts at Fraser Mills and the issues of unemployment in general.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:04:34
Name
Godwin, Harold
Subject
Industries - Pulp and Paper
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_3
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory13
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's volunteer work with the Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) with Nurse Woodward and the Well Baby Clinic.
Date Range
1922-1942
Length
0:09:04
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's volunteer work with the Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) with Nurse Woodward and the Well Baby Clinic.
Date Range
1922-1942
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:09:04
Name
Victorian Order of Nurses
Woodward, Maude
Subject
Organizations - Womens' Societies and Clubs
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Stride Avenue Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory14
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's thoughts on the impact of the Depression on the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON) as well as information on the first Health Officer of Burnaby, Dr. Watson. Florence mentions recieving the support of then municipal treasurer, Mr. Caf…
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:07:27
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's thoughts on the impact of the Depression on the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON) as well as information on the first Health Officer of Burnaby, Dr. Watson. Florence mentions recieving the support of then municipal treasurer, Mr. Cafferky.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:07:27
Name
Victorian Order of Nurses
Cafferky, Emmet J.
Subject
Organizations - Womens' Societies and Clubs
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Stride Avenue Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory15
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin and her husband Hal's involvement with the VON and how they managed to carry on during the Depression, partially with the support of then municipal treasurer, Mr. Bolton.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:06:16
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin and her husband Hal's involvement with the VON and how they managed to carry on during the Depression, partially with the support of then municipal treasurer, Mr. Bolton.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:06:16
Name
Godwin, Harold
Bolton, Richard
Victorian Order of Nurses
Subject
Organizations - Womens' Societies and Clubs
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Stride Avenue Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_6
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory16
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's thoughts on Municipal politics of the time.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:05:09
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's thoughts on Municipal politics of the time.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:05:09
Name
Pritchard, William A.
Subject
Elections
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_7
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory17
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's memories of entertainment on offer during the Depression as well as her overall experience of that time, where she mentions the birth of her daughter in 1929.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:05:54
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's memories of entertainment on offer during the Depression as well as her overall experience of that time, where she mentions the birth of her daughter in 1929.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:05:54
Name
Godwin, Elizabeth
Subject
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Richmond Street
Burnaby - Elwell Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_8
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory18
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's early childhood including the reasons why his family first moved to Burnaby, his first experiences of unemployment and what initially drew him to the Working Organization in Burnaby and their protest against evictions.
Date Range
1914-1932
Length
0:08:44
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's early childhood including the reasons why his family first moved to Burnaby, his first experiences of unemployment and what initially drew him to the Working Organization in Burnaby and their protest against evictions.
Date Range
1914-1932
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:08:44
Subject
Organizations
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Inman Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory19
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's decision to join the Army of the Common Good and its Cooperative (CG Co-op) as well as the South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed. Harry discusses his father's work as caretaker at Central Park and helping to deal with wood cutting per…
Date Range
1932-1936
Length
0:09:26
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's decision to join the Army of the Common Good and its Cooperative (CG Co-op) as well as the South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed. Harry discusses his father's work as caretaker at Central Park and helping to deal with wood cutting permits and land clearing by men who were on script.
Date Range
1932-1936
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:09:26
Name
Central Park
Subject
Organizations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Central Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory20
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on how the Union of the Unemployed was organized and what its main focus was. Harry discusses the Union of the Unemployed's dealings with the Commissioner.
Date Range
1935-1936
Length
0:08:41
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on how the Union of the Unemployed was organized and what its main focus was. Harry discusses the Union of the Unemployed's dealings with the Commissioner.
Date Range
1935-1936
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:08:41
Subject
Organizations
Protests and Demonstrations
Officials - Commissioners
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_3
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory21
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's memories on the reaction of the community to the Union of the Unemployed. Harry mentions other Unemployed organizations throughout Metro Vancouver as well as the Workers Unity League and the Vancouver Trades and Labour Council and the…
Date Range
1935-1938
Length
0:07:04
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's memories on the reaction of the community to the Union of the Unemployed. Harry mentions other Unemployed organizations throughout Metro Vancouver as well as the Workers Unity League and the Vancouver Trades and Labour Council and their purpose.
Date Range
1935-1938
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:07:04
Subject
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory22
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the practices and philosophies of Army of the Common Good.
Date Range
1932
Length
0:06:39
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the practices and philosophies of Army of the Common Good.
Date Range
1932
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:06:39
Subject
Organizations
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory23
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores and their beginnings. Harry mentions the Credit Union.
Date Range
1932-1938
Length
0:09:14
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores and their beginnings. Harry mentions the Credit Union.
Date Range
1932-1938
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:09:14
Subject
Organizations
Persons - Volunteers
Geographic Access
Burnaby - McKay Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_6
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory24
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the reasons for the closing of the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores. Harry mentions other Cooperative stores throughout Metro Vancouver.
Date Range
1938
Length
0:08:23
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the reasons for the closing of the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores. Harry mentions other Cooperative stores throughout Metro Vancouver.
Date Range
1938
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:08:23
Subject
Organizations
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_7
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory25
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the formation of the Army of the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union).
Date Range
[1932]-1936
Length
0:11:12
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the formation of the Army of the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union).
Date Range
[1932]-1936
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:11:12
Name
Darling, Gordon
Phillips, Turnie
Subject
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_8
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory26
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Cooperative Commonweath Federation (CCF) as well as his mother and father's involvement in politics.
Date Range
1933-1935
Length
0:08:46
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Cooperative Commonweath Federation (CCF) as well as his mother and father's involvement in politics.
Date Range
1933-1935
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:08:46
Name
Weaver, George
Subject
Elections
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_9
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory27
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's early days working at Burnaby's Municipal Hall, first as an office boy.
Date Range
1909-1938
Length
00:07:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's early days working at Burnaby's Municipal Hall, first as an office boy.
Date Range
1909-1938
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
00:07:15
Subject
Occupations - Civic Workers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory28
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's memories of municipal pay cuts endured during the Depression.
Date Range
1928-1938
Length
00:09:56
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's memories of municipal pay cuts endured during the Depression.
Date Range
1928-1938
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
00:09:56
Subject
Occupations - Civic Workers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory29
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's memories of working with Reeve William A. Pritchard.
Date Range
1930-1932
Length
0:08:14
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's memories of working with Reeve William A. Pritchard.
Date Range
1930-1932
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:08:14
Name
Pritchard, William A.
Subject
Officials - Mayors and Reeves
Occupations - City Clerks
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_3
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory30
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of Mr. Feedham and the action against the Council in the Courts and the resulting Commissionership.
Date Range
1931-1932
Length
0:06:40
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of Mr. Feedham and the action against the Council in the Courts and the resulting Commissionership.
Date Range
1931-1932
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:06:40
Subject
Government - Local Government
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory31
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of the Ward System in Burnaby as well as his experiences with the Unemployed Organization.
Date Range
1928-1938
Length
0:06:51
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of the Ward System in Burnaby as well as his experiences with the Unemployed Organization.
Date Range
1928-1938
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:06:51
Subject
Organizations
Protests and Demonstrations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory32
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's comparisons between working for a Council versus working for a Commissionership.
Date Range
1923-1938
Length
0:06:27
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's comparisons between working for a Council versus working for a Commissionership.
Date Range
1923-1938
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:06:27
Subject
Officials - Commissioners
Officials - Aldermen and Councillors
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_6
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory33
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of various Commissioners.
Date Range
1933-1942
Length
0:06:35
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of various Commissioners.
Date Range
1933-1942
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:06:35
Subject
Officials - Commissioners
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_7
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory34
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's experiences with tax sales and a description of how they functioned.
Date Range
1928-1945
Length
0:06:03
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's experiences with tax sales and a description of how they functioned.
Date Range
1928-1945
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:06:03
Subject
Government - Local Government
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_8
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell 24-Jun-75 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory51
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne's memories of living through the Depression with her husband's job loss, three children and an unfinished house.
Date Range
1931
Length
0:05:37
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne's memories of living through the Depression with her husband's job loss, three children and an unfinished house.
Date Range
1931
Photo Info
Leer family; Ethel Leer Lewarne is standing on the far right, 1911. Item no. 204-052
Length
0:05:37
Subject
Construction - House Construction
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
24-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Ethel (Leer) Lewarne and Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 24, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Ethel Cecilia Leer was born in 1899 in London, England to George Frederick and Sarah Ann Leer. In 1908, the Leer family immigrated to Vancouver, Canada. George Frederick Leer began working for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Ethel’s younger brother George Leer was born about this time. A third child was born but unfortunately did not live past infancy. The Leers arrived in Burnaby in 1911 and bought two lots in Alta Vista at the corner of Portland and McGregor. George Frederick and Sarah Ann were active members of the All Saints Anglican Church on Royal Oak. Ethel went to Dundonald school from 1911 to 1913 with Miss Bowell as her teacher, then on to Britannia High School from 1913 to 1915. Ethel’s father, George Frederick Leer died March 23, 1919 at the age of forty-one. Ethel Cecilia Leer married Alfred Lewarne on December 26, 1921 in Burnaby. Alfred was born February 9, 1893 in Cornwall, England. Before marriage he worked for a creamery in Vancouver. After marriage, Alfred began his own ice cream business in Burnaby. The Lewarnes bought a lot along Nelson Avenue and built a house. Their first child Patricia "Tricia" (later McCleod) was born in 1923, their second was Beverley “Bev” (later Burrell). Their third child, William A. “Bill” Lewarne was born in 1926. Bill grew up to become one of the most popular Mayors in Burnaby’s history, serving from 1981 to 1987. He also served as a member of Council from 1973 to 1975 and 1977 to 1981. After Alfred Lewarne’s death on May 5, 1962 at the age of sixty-nine, Ethel continued living in the family home. Ethel’s mother, Sarah Ann Leer died May 11, 1963 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:00:59
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lewarne, Ethel Leer
Burrell, Beverley "Bev" Lewarne
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-13_Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell

Images
Less detail

Interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell 24-Jun-75 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory52
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne and her daughter Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell's memories of Ethel's survival strategies during the Depression.
Date Range
1931-1935
Length
0:08:52
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne and her daughter Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell's memories of Ethel's survival strategies during the Depression.
Date Range
1931-1935
Photo Info
Leer family; Ethel Leer Lewarne is standing on the far right, 1911. Item no. 204-052
Length
0:08:52
Subject
Occupations - Entrepreneurs
Historic Neighbourhood
Alta Vista (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
24-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Ethel (Leer) Lewarne and Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 24, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Ethel Cecilia Leer was born in 1899 in London, England to George Frederick and Sarah Ann Leer. In 1908, the Leer family immigrated to Vancouver, Canada. George Frederick Leer began working for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Ethel’s younger brother George Leer was born about this time. A third child was born but unfortunately did not live past infancy. The Leers arrived in Burnaby in 1911 and bought two lots in Alta Vista at the corner of Portland and McGregor. George Frederick and Sarah Ann were active members of the All Saints Anglican Church on Royal Oak. Ethel went to Dundonald school from 1911 to 1913 with Miss Bowell as her teacher, then on to Britannia High School from 1913 to 1915. Ethel’s father, George Frederick Leer died March 23, 1919 at the age of forty-one. Ethel Cecilia Leer married Alfred Lewarne on December 26, 1921 in Burnaby. Alfred was born February 9, 1893 in Cornwall, England. Before marriage he worked for a creamery in Vancouver. After marriage, Alfred began his own ice cream business in Burnaby. The Lewarnes bought a lot along Nelson Avenue and built a house. Their first child Patricia "Tricia" (later McCleod) was born in 1923, their second was Beverley “Bev” (later Burrell). Their third child, William A. “Bill” Lewarne was born in 1926. Bill grew up to become one of the most popular Mayors in Burnaby’s history, serving from 1981 to 1987. He also served as a member of Council from 1973 to 1975 and 1977 to 1981. After Alfred Lewarne’s death on May 5, 1962 at the age of sixty-nine, Ethel continued living in the family home. Ethel’s mother, Sarah Ann Leer died May 11, 1963 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:00:59
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lewarne, Ethel Leer
Burrell, Beverley "Bev" Lewarne
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-13_Track_3
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell

Images
Less detail

Interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell 24-Jun-75 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory53
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne's shopping habits during the Depression and memories of being on relief. Ethel and Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell discuss the occupations of their neighbours.
Date Range
1931-1938
Length
0:05:42
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne's shopping habits during the Depression and memories of being on relief. Ethel and Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell discuss the occupations of their neighbours.
Date Range
1931-1938
Photo Info
Leer family; Ethel Leer Lewarne is standing on the far right, 1911. Item no. 204-052
Length
0:05:42
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Grocery Stores
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
24-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Ethel (Leer) Lewarne and Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 24, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Ethel Cecilia Leer was born in 1899 in London, England to George Frederick and Sarah Ann Leer. In 1908, the Leer family immigrated to Vancouver, Canada. George Frederick Leer began working for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Ethel’s younger brother George Leer was born about this time. A third child was born but unfortunately did not live past infancy. The Leers arrived in Burnaby in 1911 and bought two lots in Alta Vista at the corner of Portland and McGregor. George Frederick and Sarah Ann were active members of the All Saints Anglican Church on Royal Oak. Ethel went to Dundonald school from 1911 to 1913 with Miss Bowell as her teacher, then on to Britannia High School from 1913 to 1915. Ethel’s father, George Frederick Leer died March 23, 1919 at the age of forty-one. Ethel Cecilia Leer married Alfred Lewarne on December 26, 1921 in Burnaby. Alfred was born February 9, 1893 in Cornwall, England. Before marriage he worked for a creamery in Vancouver. After marriage, Alfred began his own ice cream business in Burnaby. The Lewarnes bought a lot along Nelson Avenue and built a house. Their first child Patricia "Tricia" (later McCleod) was born in 1923, their second was Beverley “Bev” (later Burrell). Their third child, William A. “Bill” Lewarne was born in 1926. Bill grew up to become one of the most popular Mayors in Burnaby’s history, serving from 1981 to 1987. He also served as a member of Council from 1973 to 1975 and 1977 to 1981. After Alfred Lewarne’s death on May 5, 1962 at the age of sixty-nine, Ethel continued living in the family home. Ethel’s mother, Sarah Ann Leer died May 11, 1963 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:00:59
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lewarne, Ethel Leer
Burrell, Beverley "Bev" Lewarne
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-13_Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell

Images
Less detail

Interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell 24-Jun-75 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory54
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell's memories of Nelson Avenue School, including enrolment boundaries during the Depression. Ethel describes making clothes and other items from flour sacks.
Date Range
1934
Length
0:09:06
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell's memories of Nelson Avenue School, including enrolment boundaries during the Depression. Ethel describes making clothes and other items from flour sacks.
Date Range
1934
Photo Info
Leer family; Ethel Leer Lewarne is standing on the far right, 1911. Item no. 204-052
Length
0:09:06
Name
Nelson Avenue School
Subject
Buildings - Schools - Elementary School
Historic Neighbourhood
Alta Vista (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
24-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Ethel (Leer) Lewarne and Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 24, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Ethel Cecilia Leer was born in 1899 in London, England to George Frederick and Sarah Ann Leer. In 1908, the Leer family immigrated to Vancouver, Canada. George Frederick Leer began working for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Ethel’s younger brother George Leer was born about this time. A third child was born but unfortunately did not live past infancy. The Leers arrived in Burnaby in 1911 and bought two lots in Alta Vista at the corner of Portland and McGregor. George Frederick and Sarah Ann were active members of the All Saints Anglican Church on Royal Oak. Ethel went to Dundonald school from 1911 to 1913 with Miss Bowell as her teacher, then on to Britannia High School from 1913 to 1915. Ethel’s father, George Frederick Leer died March 23, 1919 at the age of forty-one. Ethel Cecilia Leer married Alfred Lewarne on December 26, 1921 in Burnaby. Alfred was born February 9, 1893 in Cornwall, England. Before marriage he worked for a creamery in Vancouver. After marriage, Alfred began his own ice cream business in Burnaby. The Lewarnes bought a lot along Nelson Avenue and built a house. Their first child Patricia "Tricia" (later McCleod) was born in 1923, their second was Beverley “Bev” (later Burrell). Their third child, William A. “Bill” Lewarne was born in 1926. Bill grew up to become one of the most popular Mayors in Burnaby’s history, serving from 1981 to 1987. He also served as a member of Council from 1973 to 1975 and 1977 to 1981. After Alfred Lewarne’s death on May 5, 1962 at the age of sixty-nine, Ethel continued living in the family home. Ethel’s mother, Sarah Ann Leer died May 11, 1963 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:00:59
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lewarne, Ethel Leer
Burrell, Beverley "Bev" Lewarne
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-13_Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell

Images
Less detail

Interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell 24-Jun-75 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory55
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Beverley Burrell's memories of school activities such as sports days and band trips, instruments she and her sister played and the types of parties they attended.
Date Range
1934-1936
Length
0:07:41
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Beverley Burrell's memories of school activities such as sports days and band trips, instruments she and her sister played and the types of parties they attended.
Date Range
1934-1936
Photo Info
Leer family; Ethel Leer Lewarne is standing on the far right, 1911. Item no. 204-052
Length
0:07:41
Subject
Recreational Activities
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
24-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Ethel (Leer) Lewarne and Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 24, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Ethel Cecilia Leer was born in 1899 in London, England to George Frederick and Sarah Ann Leer. In 1908, the Leer family immigrated to Vancouver, Canada. George Frederick Leer began working for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Ethel’s younger brother George Leer was born about this time. A third child was born but unfortunately did not live past infancy. The Leers arrived in Burnaby in 1911 and bought two lots in Alta Vista at the corner of Portland and McGregor. George Frederick and Sarah Ann were active members of the All Saints Anglican Church on Royal Oak. Ethel went to Dundonald school from 1911 to 1913 with Miss Bowell as her teacher, then on to Britannia High School from 1913 to 1915. Ethel’s father, George Frederick Leer died March 23, 1919 at the age of forty-one. Ethel Cecilia Leer married Alfred Lewarne on December 26, 1921 in Burnaby. Alfred was born February 9, 1893 in Cornwall, England. Before marriage he worked for a creamery in Vancouver. After marriage, Alfred began his own ice cream business in Burnaby. The Lewarnes bought a lot along Nelson Avenue and built a house. Their first child Patricia "Tricia" (later McCleod) was born in 1923, their second was Beverley “Bev” (later Burrell). Their third child, William A. “Bill” Lewarne was born in 1926. Bill grew up to become one of the most popular Mayors in Burnaby’s history, serving from 1981 to 1987. He also served as a member of Council from 1973 to 1975 and 1977 to 1981. After Alfred Lewarne’s death on May 5, 1962 at the age of sixty-nine, Ethel continued living in the family home. Ethel’s mother, Sarah Ann Leer died May 11, 1963 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:00:59
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lewarne, Ethel Leer
Burrell, Beverley "Bev" Lewarne
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-13_Track_6
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell

Images
Less detail

Interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell 24-Jun-75 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory56
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell's memories of the programs they attended such as PROREC (Provincial Government Organization for Recreation) and going to the Digney movie house.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:09:30
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell's memories of the programs they attended such as PROREC (Provincial Government Organization for Recreation) and going to the Digney movie house.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Leer family; Ethel Leer Lewarne is standing on the far right, 1911. Item no. 204-052
Length
0:09:30
Subject
Recreational Activities
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
24-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Ethel (Leer) Lewarne and Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 24, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Ethel Cecilia Leer was born in 1899 in London, England to George Frederick and Sarah Ann Leer. In 1908, the Leer family immigrated to Vancouver, Canada. George Frederick Leer began working for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Ethel’s younger brother George Leer was born about this time. A third child was born but unfortunately did not live past infancy. The Leers arrived in Burnaby in 1911 and bought two lots in Alta Vista at the corner of Portland and McGregor. George Frederick and Sarah Ann were active members of the All Saints Anglican Church on Royal Oak. Ethel went to Dundonald school from 1911 to 1913 with Miss Bowell as her teacher, then on to Britannia High School from 1913 to 1915. Ethel’s father, George Frederick Leer died March 23, 1919 at the age of forty-one. Ethel Cecilia Leer married Alfred Lewarne on December 26, 1921 in Burnaby. Alfred was born February 9, 1893 in Cornwall, England. Before marriage he worked for a creamery in Vancouver. After marriage, Alfred began his own ice cream business in Burnaby. The Lewarnes bought a lot along Nelson Avenue and built a house. Their first child Patricia "Tricia" (later McCleod) was born in 1923, their second was Beverley “Bev” (later Burrell). Their third child, William A. “Bill” Lewarne was born in 1926. Bill grew up to become one of the most popular Mayors in Burnaby’s history, serving from 1981 to 1987. He also served as a member of Council from 1973 to 1975 and 1977 to 1981. After Alfred Lewarne’s death on May 5, 1962 at the age of sixty-nine, Ethel continued living in the family home. Ethel’s mother, Sarah Ann Leer died May 11, 1963 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:00:59
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lewarne, Ethel Leer
Burrell, Beverley "Bev" Lewarne
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-13_Track_7
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell

Images
Less detail

Interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell 24-Jun-75 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory57
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell's thoughts on how the Depression years impacted their family.
Date Range
1929-1938
Length
0:06:16
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell's thoughts on how the Depression years impacted their family.
Date Range
1929-1938
Photo Info
Leer family; Ethel Leer Lewarne is standing on the far right, 1911. Item no. 204-052
Length
0:06:16
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
24-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Ethel (Leer) Lewarne and Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 24, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Ethel Cecilia Leer was born in 1899 in London, England to George Frederick and Sarah Ann Leer. In 1908, the Leer family immigrated to Vancouver, Canada. George Frederick Leer began working for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Ethel’s younger brother George Leer was born about this time. A third child was born but unfortunately did not live past infancy. The Leers arrived in Burnaby in 1911 and bought two lots in Alta Vista at the corner of Portland and McGregor. George Frederick and Sarah Ann were active members of the All Saints Anglican Church on Royal Oak. Ethel went to Dundonald school from 1911 to 1913 with Miss Bowell as her teacher, then on to Britannia High School from 1913 to 1915. Ethel’s father, George Frederick Leer died March 23, 1919 at the age of forty-one. Ethel Cecilia Leer married Alfred Lewarne on December 26, 1921 in Burnaby. Alfred was born February 9, 1893 in Cornwall, England. Before marriage he worked for a creamery in Vancouver. After marriage, Alfred began his own ice cream business in Burnaby. The Lewarnes bought a lot along Nelson Avenue and built a house. Their first child Patricia "Tricia" (later McCleod) was born in 1923, their second was Beverley “Bev” (later Burrell). Their third child, William A. “Bill” Lewarne was born in 1926. Bill grew up to become one of the most popular Mayors in Burnaby’s history, serving from 1981 to 1987. He also served as a member of Council from 1973 to 1975 and 1977 to 1981. After Alfred Lewarne’s death on May 5, 1962 at the age of sixty-nine, Ethel continued living in the family home. Ethel’s mother, Sarah Ann Leer died May 11, 1963 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:00:59
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lewarne, Ethel Leer
Burrell, Beverley "Bev" Lewarne
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-13_Track_8
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell

Images
Less detail

Interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright June 27, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory105
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Amy Wright's memories of growing up in North Burnaby, as well as Logan Wright and Jim Haddon's memories of Blind Lake (also known as Squint Lake), where the clubhouse now stands at the golf course at Simon Fraser University (SFU).
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:09:18
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Amy Wright's memories of growing up in North Burnaby, as well as Logan Wright and Jim Haddon's memories of Blind Lake (also known as Squint Lake), where the clubhouse now stands at the golf course at Simon Fraser University (SFU).
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:09:18
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 27, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with James "Jim" Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright by Simon Fraser University student Bettina Bradbury, June 27, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
James "Jim", "Jimmy" Haddon was born in 1914 at Royal Columbian Hospital in New Westminster. Jim's father used to hunt in Burnaby as a boy and liked it so much that when he grew up, he built a house at Government Road and Piper Avenue and moved his young family there. Jim's father was a logger and contractor with a team of two horses. Jim began his schooling at Sperling Avenue School in 1921. He attended Sperling for one year, then switched to Seaforth School from 1922 on. Jim's older brother Art hauled gravel for the municipality while Jim was at Seaforth. In 1929, at sixteen years old, Jim left school to work for his father driving the truck, helping to haul logs, wood and gravel. Throughout the 1930s, he did contracting for the municipality. Jim Haddon met his wife Jean when her family moved into the neighbourhood in the 1930s. Jean Haddon was born in Saskatchewan in 1914. Her father's work had gone into receivership and so the family of nine packed up and drove out west in a Dodge Touring car. With two brothers and four sisters, Jean was the oldest. The family settled on Government Road and Phillips Avenue. Jean and her husband Jim Haddon were at a dance together at Cultus Lake when the war broke out. Logan Wright was born in 1915 and moved with his family from Mount Pleasant to Burnaby in 1923 to Phillips Avenue and Greenwood. The Wright family had five acres of land that held one hundred and twenty fruit trees. His father worked for BC Electric in Vancouver, and faced a ten dollar a month cut in pay during the Depression. Logan began at Sperling Avenue School in 1923, then Seaforth School in 1924. He attended Seaforth until 1932 when he left to begin working, first as a farmer, then a gold miner, and a construction worker before securing a job at BC Electric. Amy Wright was born in 1920. Her family lived at the 4300 block of Cambridge Street in the Vancouver Heights neighbourhood of North Burnaby, moving there just a year before she was born. Her father worked at Mac and Mack's in downtown Vancouver five and a half days a week. On the weekends, her family took the Union Steamship to Gibson's. Amy's mother was an active member of the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON). Amy graduated high school in 1938 and went on to University. Logan Wright met his wife Amy in 1946 through Logan's sister Francis, who invited her neighbour Amy to dinner.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:16:28
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Haddon, James "Jimmy"
Haddon, Jean
Wright, Amy
Wright, Logan
Interview Location
Gibsons, British Columbia
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-15_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright

Less detail

Interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright June 27, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory106
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Haddon's memories of first coming to Burnaby with her family, as well as Jim Haddon's memories of working for the municipality as a contractor during the Depression. He also briefly mentions the Edmonds riot of 1932.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:10:01
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Haddon's memories of first coming to Burnaby with her family, as well as Jim Haddon's memories of working for the municipality as a contractor during the Depression. He also briefly mentions the Edmonds riot of 1932.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:10:01
Historic Neighbourhood
Lozells (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 27, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with James "Jim" Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright by Simon Fraser University student Bettina Bradbury, June 27, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
James "Jim", "Jimmy" Haddon was born in 1914 at Royal Columbian Hospital in New Westminster. Jim's father used to hunt in Burnaby as a boy and liked it so much that when he grew up, he built a house at Government Road and Piper Avenue and moved his young family there. Jim's father was a logger and contractor with a team of two horses. Jim began his schooling at Sperling Avenue School in 1921. He attended Sperling for one year, then switched to Seaforth School from 1922 on. Jim's older brother Art hauled gravel for the municipality while Jim was at Seaforth. In 1929, at sixteen years old, Jim left school to work for his father driving the truck, helping to haul logs, wood and gravel. Throughout the 1930s, he did contracting for the municipality. Jim Haddon met his wife Jean when her family moved into the neighbourhood in the 1930s. Jean Haddon was born in Saskatchewan in 1914. Her father's work had gone into receivership and so the family of nine packed up and drove out west in a Dodge Touring car. With two brothers and four sisters, Jean was the oldest. The family settled on Government Road and Phillips Avenue. Jean and her husband Jim Haddon were at a dance together at Cultus Lake when the war broke out. Logan Wright was born in 1915 and moved with his family from Mount Pleasant to Burnaby in 1923 to Phillips Avenue and Greenwood. The Wright family had five acres of land that held one hundred and twenty fruit trees. His father worked for BC Electric in Vancouver, and faced a ten dollar a month cut in pay during the Depression. Logan began at Sperling Avenue School in 1923, then Seaforth School in 1924. He attended Seaforth until 1932 when he left to begin working, first as a farmer, then a gold miner, and a construction worker before securing a job at BC Electric. Amy Wright was born in 1920. Her family lived at the 4300 block of Cambridge Street in the Vancouver Heights neighbourhood of North Burnaby, moving there just a year before she was born. Her father worked at Mac and Mack's in downtown Vancouver five and a half days a week. On the weekends, her family took the Union Steamship to Gibson's. Amy's mother was an active member of the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON). Amy graduated high school in 1938 and went on to University. Logan Wright met his wife Amy in 1946 through Logan's sister Francis, who invited her neighbour Amy to dinner.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:16:28
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Haddon, James "Jimmy"
Haddon, Jean
Wright, Amy
Wright, Logan
Interview Location
Gibsons, British Columbia
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-15_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright

Less detail

Interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright June 27, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory107
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Logan and Amy Wright's thoughts on why Burnaby went into receivership, the (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and their family's politics. Amy also touches on her mother's involvement with the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON).
Date Range
1929-1938
Length
0:10:02
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Logan and Amy Wright's thoughts on why Burnaby went into receivership, the (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and their family's politics. Amy also touches on her mother's involvement with the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON).
Date Range
1929-1938
Length
0:10:02
Name
Victorian Order of Nurses
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 27, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with James "Jim" Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright by Simon Fraser University student Bettina Bradbury, June 27, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
James "Jim", "Jimmy" Haddon was born in 1914 at Royal Columbian Hospital in New Westminster. Jim's father used to hunt in Burnaby as a boy and liked it so much that when he grew up, he built a house at Government Road and Piper Avenue and moved his young family there. Jim's father was a logger and contractor with a team of two horses. Jim began his schooling at Sperling Avenue School in 1921. He attended Sperling for one year, then switched to Seaforth School from 1922 on. Jim's older brother Art hauled gravel for the municipality while Jim was at Seaforth. In 1929, at sixteen years old, Jim left school to work for his father driving the truck, helping to haul logs, wood and gravel. Throughout the 1930s, he did contracting for the municipality. Jim Haddon met his wife Jean when her family moved into the neighbourhood in the 1930s. Jean Haddon was born in Saskatchewan in 1914. Her father's work had gone into receivership and so the family of nine packed up and drove out west in a Dodge Touring car. With two brothers and four sisters, Jean was the oldest. The family settled on Government Road and Phillips Avenue. Jean and her husband Jim Haddon were at a dance together at Cultus Lake when the war broke out. Logan Wright was born in 1915 and moved with his family from Mount Pleasant to Burnaby in 1923 to Phillips Avenue and Greenwood. The Wright family had five acres of land that held one hundred and twenty fruit trees. His father worked for BC Electric in Vancouver, and faced a ten dollar a month cut in pay during the Depression. Logan began at Sperling Avenue School in 1923, then Seaforth School in 1924. He attended Seaforth until 1932 when he left to begin working, first as a farmer, then a gold miner, and a construction worker before securing a job at BC Electric. Amy Wright was born in 1920. Her family lived at the 4300 block of Cambridge Street in the Vancouver Heights neighbourhood of North Burnaby, moving there just a year before she was born. Her father worked at Mac and Mack's in downtown Vancouver five and a half days a week. On the weekends, her family took the Union Steamship to Gibson's. Amy's mother was an active member of the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON). Amy graduated high school in 1938 and went on to University. Logan Wright met his wife Amy in 1946 through Logan's sister Francis, who invited her neighbour Amy to dinner.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:16:28
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Haddon, James "Jimmy"
Haddon, Jean
Wright, Amy
Wright, Logan
Interview Location
Gibsons, British Columbia
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-15_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright

Less detail

Interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright June 27, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory108
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Haddon's and Logan Wright's memories of growing up in a large family. Logan Wright also discusses his employment history, including his time prospecting up near Alberni.
Date Range
1929-1938
Length
0:09:00
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Haddon's and Logan Wright's memories of growing up in a large family. Logan Wright also discusses his employment history, including his time prospecting up near Alberni.
Date Range
1929-1938
Length
0:09:00
Subject
Occupations - Gold Miners
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 27, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with James "Jim" Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright by Simon Fraser University student Bettina Bradbury, June 27, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
James "Jim", "Jimmy" Haddon was born in 1914 at Royal Columbian Hospital in New Westminster. Jim's father used to hunt in Burnaby as a boy and liked it so much that when he grew up, he built a house at Government Road and Piper Avenue and moved his young family there. Jim's father was a logger and contractor with a team of two horses. Jim began his schooling at Sperling Avenue School in 1921. He attended Sperling for one year, then switched to Seaforth School from 1922 on. Jim's older brother Art hauled gravel for the municipality while Jim was at Seaforth. In 1929, at sixteen years old, Jim left school to work for his father driving the truck, helping to haul logs, wood and gravel. Throughout the 1930s, he did contracting for the municipality. Jim Haddon met his wife Jean when her family moved into the neighbourhood in the 1930s. Jean Haddon was born in Saskatchewan in 1914. Her father's work had gone into receivership and so the family of nine packed up and drove out west in a Dodge Touring car. With two brothers and four sisters, Jean was the oldest. The family settled on Government Road and Phillips Avenue. Jean and her husband Jim Haddon were at a dance together at Cultus Lake when the war broke out. Logan Wright was born in 1915 and moved with his family from Mount Pleasant to Burnaby in 1923 to Phillips Avenue and Greenwood. The Wright family had five acres of land that held one hundred and twenty fruit trees. His father worked for BC Electric in Vancouver, and faced a ten dollar a month cut in pay during the Depression. Logan began at Sperling Avenue School in 1923, then Seaforth School in 1924. He attended Seaforth until 1932 when he left to begin working, first as a farmer, then a gold miner, and a construction worker before securing a job at BC Electric. Amy Wright was born in 1920. Her family lived at the 4300 block of Cambridge Street in the Vancouver Heights neighbourhood of North Burnaby, moving there just a year before she was born. Her father worked at Mac and Mack's in downtown Vancouver five and a half days a week. On the weekends, her family took the Union Steamship to Gibson's. Amy's mother was an active member of the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON). Amy graduated high school in 1938 and went on to University. Logan Wright met his wife Amy in 1946 through Logan's sister Francis, who invited her neighbour Amy to dinner.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:16:28
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Haddon, James "Jimmy"
Haddon, Jean
Wright, Amy
Wright, Logan
Interview Location
Gibsons, British Columbia
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-15_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright

Less detail

Interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright June 27, 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory109
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Logan and Amy Wright's and Jim and Jean Haddon's thoughts the changes that occurred when Burnaby went into receivership. The group also discusses recreational activities that they took part in during the Depression years.
Date Range
1929-1938
Length
0:10:05
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Logan and Amy Wright's and Jim and Jean Haddon's thoughts the changes that occurred when Burnaby went into receivership. The group also discusses recreational activities that they took part in during the Depression years.
Date Range
1929-1938
Length
0:10:05
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 27, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with James "Jim" Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright by Simon Fraser University student Bettina Bradbury, June 27, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
James "Jim", "Jimmy" Haddon was born in 1914 at Royal Columbian Hospital in New Westminster. Jim's father used to hunt in Burnaby as a boy and liked it so much that when he grew up, he built a house at Government Road and Piper Avenue and moved his young family there. Jim's father was a logger and contractor with a team of two horses. Jim began his schooling at Sperling Avenue School in 1921. He attended Sperling for one year, then switched to Seaforth School from 1922 on. Jim's older brother Art hauled gravel for the municipality while Jim was at Seaforth. In 1929, at sixteen years old, Jim left school to work for his father driving the truck, helping to haul logs, wood and gravel. Throughout the 1930s, he did contracting for the municipality. Jim Haddon met his wife Jean when her family moved into the neighbourhood in the 1930s. Jean Haddon was born in Saskatchewan in 1914. Her father's work had gone into receivership and so the family of nine packed up and drove out west in a Dodge Touring car. With two brothers and four sisters, Jean was the oldest. The family settled on Government Road and Phillips Avenue. Jean and her husband Jim Haddon were at a dance together at Cultus Lake when the war broke out. Logan Wright was born in 1915 and moved with his family from Mount Pleasant to Burnaby in 1923 to Phillips Avenue and Greenwood. The Wright family had five acres of land that held one hundred and twenty fruit trees. His father worked for BC Electric in Vancouver, and faced a ten dollar a month cut in pay during the Depression. Logan began at Sperling Avenue School in 1923, then Seaforth School in 1924. He attended Seaforth until 1932 when he left to begin working, first as a farmer, then a gold miner, and a construction worker before securing a job at BC Electric. Amy Wright was born in 1920. Her family lived at the 4300 block of Cambridge Street in the Vancouver Heights neighbourhood of North Burnaby, moving there just a year before she was born. Her father worked at Mac and Mack's in downtown Vancouver five and a half days a week. On the weekends, her family took the Union Steamship to Gibson's. Amy's mother was an active member of the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON). Amy graduated high school in 1938 and went on to University. Logan Wright met his wife Amy in 1946 through Logan's sister Francis, who invited her neighbour Amy to dinner.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:16:28
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Haddon, James "Jimmy"
Haddon, Jean
Wright, Amy
Wright, Logan
Interview Location
Gibsons, British Columbia
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-15_Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright

Less detail

Interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright June 27, 1975 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory110
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Logan and Amy Wright's and Jim and Jean Haddon's thoughts on unemployment and the impact of the Depression on their lives.
Date Range
1929-1938
Length
0:11:34
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Logan and Amy Wright's and Jim and Jean Haddon's thoughts on unemployment and the impact of the Depression on their lives.
Date Range
1929-1938
Length
0:11:34
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 27, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with James "Jim" Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright by Simon Fraser University student Bettina Bradbury, June 27, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
James "Jim", "Jimmy" Haddon was born in 1914 at Royal Columbian Hospital in New Westminster. Jim's father used to hunt in Burnaby as a boy and liked it so much that when he grew up, he built a house at Government Road and Piper Avenue and moved his young family there. Jim's father was a logger and contractor with a team of two horses. Jim began his schooling at Sperling Avenue School in 1921. He attended Sperling for one year, then switched to Seaforth School from 1922 on. Jim's older brother Art hauled gravel for the municipality while Jim was at Seaforth. In 1929, at sixteen years old, Jim left school to work for his father driving the truck, helping to haul logs, wood and gravel. Throughout the 1930s, he did contracting for the municipality. Jim Haddon met his wife Jean when her family moved into the neighbourhood in the 1930s. Jean Haddon was born in Saskatchewan in 1914. Her father's work had gone into receivership and so the family of nine packed up and drove out west in a Dodge Touring car. With two brothers and four sisters, Jean was the oldest. The family settled on Government Road and Phillips Avenue. Jean and her husband Jim Haddon were at a dance together at Cultus Lake when the war broke out. Logan Wright was born in 1915 and moved with his family from Mount Pleasant to Burnaby in 1923 to Phillips Avenue and Greenwood. The Wright family had five acres of land that held one hundred and twenty fruit trees. His father worked for BC Electric in Vancouver, and faced a ten dollar a month cut in pay during the Depression. Logan began at Sperling Avenue School in 1923, then Seaforth School in 1924. He attended Seaforth until 1932 when he left to begin working, first as a farmer, then a gold miner, and a construction worker before securing a job at BC Electric. Amy Wright was born in 1920. Her family lived at the 4300 block of Cambridge Street in the Vancouver Heights neighbourhood of North Burnaby, moving there just a year before she was born. Her father worked at Mac and Mack's in downtown Vancouver five and a half days a week. On the weekends, her family took the Union Steamship to Gibson's. Amy's mother was an active member of the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON). Amy graduated high school in 1938 and went on to University. Logan Wright met his wife Amy in 1946 through Logan's sister Francis, who invited her neighbour Amy to dinner.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:16:28
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Haddon, James "Jimmy"
Haddon, Jean
Wright, Amy
Wright, Logan
Interview Location
Gibsons, British Columbia
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-15_Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with James Haddon, Jean Haddon, Amy Wright and Logan Wright

Less detail

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