684 records – page 1 of 35.

Quotes of parliamentry speeches given by Ernest Winch

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording15555
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:01:52 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording of Burnaby Village Museum interpreter, Eric Damer personifying Ernest "Ernie" Winch by delivering excerpts of quotes from parliamentry speeches in the 1950s. Quotes in this recording, speak to the need and importance of affordable housing for senior citizens. The…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Agents of Change subseries
Date
2021
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:01:52 min)
Accession Code
BV021.14.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording of Burnaby Village Museum interpreter, Eric Damer personifying Ernest "Ernie" Winch by delivering excerpts of quotes from parliamentry speeches in the 1950s. Quotes in this recording, speak to the need and importance of affordable housing for senior citizens. The recording was part of the Burnaby Village Museum temporary exhibit, titled "Agents of Change".
History/Biography
Burnaby Village Museum curator, Jane Lemke compiled a script consisting of various quotes that were gathered from newspaper articles of Ernest Winch’s parliamentary speeches in the 1950s. Ernest E. Winch was a long-time member of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation as a Member of the British Columbia Legistlative Assembly (for Burnaby). Ernest Winch was instrumental in the founding of the New Vista Society which provided housing for Seniors living in Burnaby. A recording of the script was on exhibit as part of the "Agents of Change" exhibit at Burnaby Village Museum in the Summer of 2021.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Housing
Social Issues
Persons - Seniors
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Winch, Ernest "Ernie"
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Images
Audio Tracks

Quotes of parliamentry speeches given by Ernest Winch

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A Family Farm

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14268
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:13:57 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part one in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part one is titled “A Family Farm”. The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land an…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:13:57 min)
Material Details
Podcasts hosts: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Persons from recorded extracts: Denise Fong; Josephine Chow Music: prod. riddiman Podcast Date: October 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:13:57 min Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.3
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part one in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part one is titled “A Family Farm”. The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia Faculty and while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. In this series the students connect their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. 00:00-02:21 The podcast opens with Wei Yan Yeong and Rose Wu introducing themselves and their topic- the Chinese Canadian experience in Burnaby and the people who have made important contributions to the city’s development. “A Family Farm” talks about Chinese-owned businesses which are family run. “The family-oriented nature of Chinese-owned businesses also extend to many of the early (and current) Chinese-owned farms in the Burnaby Big Bend area. When Chinese men first began farming in BC in the 1860s, a lot of them worked as labourers because they weren’t allowed to own land. After World War II many of these farmers were allowed to purchase lots, thanks to the Veterans Land Grant. These grants allowed returning veterans to purchase small parcels of land with government loans. Eventually, these men would start families on the farm, and many Chinese-owned farms became family-operated businesses where every member, male, female, child, and extended relatives were enlisted to work the grounds. And it was hard work, often from dawn to dusk, 6-7 days a week.” 02:23 – 07:50 This portion includes excerpts from Oral History interview with Josephine Chow (nee Hong) of Hop On Farms in the Burnaby Big Bend area. The interview was conducted by Burnaby Village Museum researcher Denise Fong. Josephine recalls growing up on the family farm with her six siblings. She tells of how the family pulled together money to purchase twelve acres along Marine Drive in 1951, her family’s background, daily life on the farm , responsibilities on the farm for her and her siblings and of how her mother had to balance working on the farm and providing for a family of ten to twelve people. 07:51 – 08:10 In this portion, hosts comment and reflect on their own experiences. “While it’s likely that a lot of this was done out of necessity and not being able to afford additional paid labourers, having grown up in Chinese households ourselves, we can definitely understand the rationale for these family-operated businesses and how it connects back to the Chinese understanding of family and kinship.” 08:11 – 09:06 In this portion, Rose and Wei provide information on the roots of the Chinese character for family “jia” in mandarin or “gah” in Cantonese. They explain that the term family is composed of two parts: the upper element is like a roof, symbolizing shelter, and the bottom part represents a pig which symbolizes food, whereby the Chinese character for family represents that of a farm. They provide a quote from the writings of Francois de Martin-Donos “In ancient China, the farm is an enterprise, a shelter that insures one food and work. The farm is a place to rely on, but in return, needs to be maintained, including a set of responsibilities. In other words, “family” is the insurance of a stable life.” 09:07 – 10:27 In this portion, the hosts speak about how traditional Chinese thought is heavily influenced by the teachings of Confucius and Confucius philosophy. They explain how Confucius emphasized five sets of human relationships that form the basis for society: ruler and minister, husband and wife, parents and child, sibling and sibling, friend and friend. Of these five, three are familial relationships also known as Filial piety – the respect and care for one’s familial superiors (such as parents, elders, and ancestors). They speak of how this is one of Confucianism’s main teachings and in this respect caring for family members is seen as a moral obligation. In China housing arrangements are in the form of siheyuan”s — a type of residence that featured a courtyard surrounded on all four sides with buildings. These traditionally housed one large extended family if they were wealthy enough. 10:28 – 13:08 In this portion, hosts provide further information on Josephine Chow’s family experience working and living on the “Hop On” family farm through the decades. An excerpt from the interview with Josephine Chow conducted by Denise Fong is included. In this excerpt, Josephine reflects on her past experiences on the farm and her present day experiences of her siblings running the farm. 13:09 -13:56 Final summary, credits and acknowledgements.
History/Biography
Podcast hosts, Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Rose Wu
Wei Yan Yeong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture
Gardens - Market Gardens
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Fong, Denise
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Responsibility
Burnaby Village Museum & Univeristy of British Columbia
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Notes
Title based contents of sound recording
See also Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020 - BV020.6.1
Compilation of Research Resources used by authors Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong include:
Why is family important in China? https://medium.com/@francois_dmd/why-is-family-so-important-in-china-1617b13a67
Burnaby Village Museum - Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong Feb. 7, 2020. BV020.6.1 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording12337
Covered Roots: The History of Vancouver's Chinese Farms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4WHS2Uf3JU
Burnaby Village Museum Shares Chinese-Canadian Farming History This Summer https://westcoastfood.ca/burnaby-village-museum-shares-chinese-canadian-farming-history-this-summer/
Chinese Market Gardeners in the City of Burnaby BC Continue to Practice Urban Agriculture https://cityfarmer.info/chinese-market-gardeners-in-the-city-of-burnaby-bc-continue-to-practice-urban-agriculture/
Chinese Market Gardening in BC https://www.bcfoodhistory.ca/chinese-market-gardening-bc/
Images
Audio Tracks
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Where is your food from?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14270
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:17:10 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part two in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part two is titled “Where is your food from?" The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:17:10 min)
Material Details
Podcasts hosts: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Guest: Denise Fong Music: prod. riddiman Podcast Date: October 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:17:10 min Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.4
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part two in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part two is titled “Where is your food from?" The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia Faculty and while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. In this series the students connect their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. "Where is your food from?" explores contemporary versus historical alternative food movements and how early Chinese farmers in the lower mainland had to be creative in their business tactics in order to survive in a local food system that discriminated against their race. 00:00-02:45 The podcast opens with an audio clip from Harvard University professor and world renowned food journalist and author of "The Ominvore's Dilemma", Michael Pollan. Wei Yan Yeong and Rose Wu introduce themselves and their topic "Where is your food from?" They comment on the global philosophy "Eat local, think global" and question whether this philosphy ignores the struggles faced by local farms operated by immigrant workers back in the day. They comment "Unlike how these alternative food movements are heralded as sustainable, healthy, and even sometimes trendy now in today’s standards, for Chinese farmers, these alternative food movements were necessary for survival against discriminatory practices entrenched in the food system they were servicing." 02:46 - 06:21 This portion provides background on Chinese immigrant farmers and the establishment of "market gardens" or "truck farms". Rose and Wei Yan tell of how up to the 1970s, Chinese farms produced mostly European staples such as potatoes, carrots, tomatoes, corn and cabbage because there was no market for Chinese crops. Many of the Chinese immigrants were forced into farming and other menial jobs due to discriminatory practices that excluded them from other types of employment. The hosts provide a synopsis of Burnaby Bylaw Number 4, created in 1892, "The Chinese and Japanese Exclusion Bylaw" which prohibited any Chinese or Japanese person from working for the Municipality of Burnaby. Burnaby Village Museum researcher Denise Fong provides information on Chinese immigrants in Burnaby, how many of them were farmers in the Big Bend area and how hard it was for them to own land due to racial discrimination. Denise also refers to an article in"Harrowsmith" magazine (c.1980s) where thirty five Chinese-Canadians operated farms in Burnaby. 06:22 - 09:24 This portion provides a description of Chinese market farms and vegetable peddling. Background information about the history of market farms, truck farms and vegetable peddling in Burnaby and the lower mainland provided by Denise Fong. 09:24 - 12:03 This portion talks about the policies put in place to create further barriers to Chinese farmers. Denise Fong provides information regarding the civic bylaws that were created to restrict produce sales, fines and fees that were imposed on peddlers, establishment of green grocers, the Chinese Marketing Act, the establishment of organizations to support Chinese farmers including the Chinese Growers Assocation. 12:04 - 15:00 This portion talks about how Chinese-Canadians played important roles in conventional "long" food networks. Denise Fong provides information in how Chinese Canadians participated in the larger food distribution network in British Columbia. Denise shares a story of Chinese-Canadian Cecil Lee and how he introduced the import of Chinese mandarin oranges into British Columbia. 15:01 - 16:29 Final summary regarding the contraditions in our local food system that continue to persist today and how despite the improved status of Chinese-Canadians in British Columbia, cheap, migrant labourers continue to be an overlooked part of our local food system. This portion includes a recorded excerpt from M.L.A. Mabel Elmore regarding Temporary Foreign Workers (presented before the NDP caucous in 2015). 16:29 - 17:22 Credits, thanks and acknowledgements. Special thanks to Duncan McCue and M.LA. Mabel Elmore. Music created by P. Ruderman
History/Biography
Podcast hosts, Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. Guest, Denise Fong is a historical researcher at Burnaby Village Museum. She has degrees in Anthropology (BA) and Archaeology (MA), and is completing her doctoral degree at UBC in Interdisciplinary Studies. Her primary research interests are in Chinese Canadian history and critical heritage studies. She is the co-curator of the Burnaby Village Museum “Across the Pacific” exhibition, and the Museum of Vancouver’s “A Seat at the Table – Chinese Immigration and British Columbia”.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Rose Wu
Wei Yan Yeong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture
Gardens - Market Gardens
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Fong, Denise
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Burnaby Village Museum
McCue, Duncan
Elmore, Mabel
Responsibility
Burnaby Village Museum & Univeristy of British Columbia
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Notes
Title based contents of sound recording
For associated video recording of research interview with Denise Fong - see BV020.28.2
Compilation of Research Resources used by authors Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong include:
Lim, S. (2015). Feeding the "Greenest City": Historicizing "Local," Labour, and the Postcolonial Politics of Eating. Canadian Journal of Urban Research, 24(1), 78-100. Retrieved October 22, 2020, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/26195279
Mable Elmore’s statement on the plight of temporary foreign workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LF4_js0R-Mo&ab_channel=BCNDPCaucus
Michael Pollen’s speech at UBC Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1n-kRJhPPQ&feature=emb_title&ab_channel=LFSLearningCentre
Gibb, Natalie & Wittman, Hannah. (2012). Parallel alternatives: Chinese-Canadian farmers and the Metro Vancouver local food movement. Local Environment. 18. 1-19. 10.1080/13549839.2012.714763.
Yu, J. (2014, March 31). The integration of the Chinese market gardens of southern British Columbia, 1885-1930 [R]. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0228676
Burnaby Village Museum, Interview with Denise Fong by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, 2020. BV020.28.2 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumvideo14276
Images
Audio Tracks
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Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14274
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:16:19 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part three in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts where the hosts Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, "Dig up the roots of the past to unearth the foundations of the Chinese Canadian experience in Burnaby." This episode three is titled "Chinese Herbalist Shops and …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:16:19 min)
Material Details
Podcasts hosts: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Persons from recorded extracts: Denise Fong; Josephine Chow; Julie Lee Guest: Dr. John Yang Podcast Date: October 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:16:19 min Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.5
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part three in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts where the hosts Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, "Dig up the roots of the past to unearth the foundations of the Chinese Canadian experience in Burnaby." This episode three is titled "Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM". The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia Faculty and while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. In this series the students connect their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. 00:00 - 01:34 Podcast opens with an introduction to this episode in the podcast series. 01:35 - 03:43 This portion of the podcast consists of segments of pre-recorded interviews between Denise Fong and Chinese-Canadians Julie Lee and Josephine Chow who grew up in Burnaby. Josephine and Jule recall visiting herbalist shops in Vancouver's Chinatown during the nineteen fifties and sixties. Due to the lack of herbalist shops in the Burnaby community during that time, it was common for a Chinese farming family to travel to Vancouver’s Chinatown in order to obtain herbal prescriptions or dried goods. Julie speaks briefly about what the type of Traditional Chinese medical care and advice her mother and family received. Josephine Chow tells of a female Chinese doctor from Vancouver, Madeline Chung who was responsible for delivering a lot of Chinese babies including Josephine and describes how her mother would take members of the family to the herbalist in Vancouver's Chinatown. 03:44 - 04:44 In this portion, the hosts tell of how aside from its medicinal purposes, herbalist shops also have a major socio-cultural significance to the Chinese community. The hosts describe the traditional layout of Chinese herblist shops, with a table set up for the game Ma Jong in the back and a seating area where customers could chat while waiting and be served tea. The hosts provide an example of the "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co." herbalist shop in Victoria that was open between 1905 and 1967 and of how the shop and contents are now part of a permanent exhibit at the Burnaby Village Museum. 04:45 - 09:21 In this portion, the hosts describe "Traditional Chinese Medicine" also known as "TCM". In order to better understand the importance of TCM in Chinese culture, and specifically to Chinese-Canadian immigrants, the hosts interview Dr John Yang, the chairperson and program director of Kwantlen Polytechnic University's TCM program. Holding a PHD in TCM before migrating with his family to Canada, Dr Yang came here 30 years ago and immediately started his journey as a TCM practitioner at his home basement in Burnaby. Dr. Yang tells of how he worked with the lobbying group, ATCMA (The British Columbia Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture Practitioners) to help legitimize TCM as a recognized form of medical health care. In 1996, the Canadian government finally approved the legitimization of TCM in Canada, where one is required to take a licensing exam before they’re allowed to start their practices in Canada. 09:22 - 15:17 In this portion of the podcast, Dr. Yang and hosts describe how Traditional Chinese Medicine and treatments differ from Western medicine, how TCM is a way of life and regularly incorporated into recipes and diets, the lack of social acceptance and the import of Chinese medicinal herbs and misconceptions. 15:18 - 16:19 Conclusion, credits and acknowledgements.
History/Biography
Podcast hosts, Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Rose Wu
Wei Yan Yeong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Public Services - Health Services
Names
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Lee, Julie Cho Chan
Chow, Josephine
Fong, Denise
Yang, Dr. John
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Burnaby Village Museum
Responsibility
Burnaby Village Museum & Univeristy of British Columbia
Notes
Title based contents of sound recording
See also Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020 - BV020.6.1; Interview with Julie Lee by Denise Fong February 6, 2020 - BV020.6.2
For associated video recording of research interview with Dr. John Yang - see BV020.28.1
Compilation of Research Resources used by authors Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong include:
B.C. to recognize doctors of Chinese medicine: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/b-c-to-recognize-doctors-of-chinese-medicine-1.396806
B.C. takes steps to legitimize traditional Chinese medicine: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/bc-takes-steps-to-legitimize-traditional-chinese-medicine/article18428851/
Traditional Chinese medicine moves into the mainstream https://www.straight.com/life/415386/traditional-chinese-medicine-moves-mainstream
Burnaby Village Museum - Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong Feb. 7, 2020. BV020.6.1 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording12337
Burnaby Village Museum, Interview with Julie Lee by Denise Fong Feb. 6, 2020. BV020.6.2 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording12338
Images
Audio Tracks
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Interview with Denise Fong by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14276
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:60:38 min.)
Scope and Content
Item consists of an audio recording of a Zoom interview with Denise Fong conducted by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at UBC. The interview was conducted with Denise Fong as part of the students' research for their podcast "Where is your food from?". This podcast…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:60:38 min.)
Material Details
Interviewers: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Interviewee: Denise Fong Interview Date: September 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:60:38 Recording device: Zoom video communication platform Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.2
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of an audio recording of a Zoom interview with Denise Fong conducted by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at UBC. The interview was conducted with Denise Fong as part of the students' research for their podcast "Where is your food from?". This podcast was part two in a series of three "Back to the Roots" podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. In this series the students connected their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. "Where is your food from?" explores contemporary versus historical alternative food movements and how early Chinese farmers in the lower mainland had to be creative in their business tactics in order to survive in a local food system that discriminated against their race. 00:00 - 4:51 Denise Fong introduces herself and provides a summary of the work that she has done while working as a researcher on the Chinese Canadian History Research project for the Burnaby Village Museum. Denise explains how much of her research has focused on the history of Chinese Canadian market gardeners and green grocers and their presence in Burnaby. Denise tells of how many Chinese immigrants found it hard to find work due to racial discrimination which led many Chinese men to work in agriculture and farming. Her research has shown that many of the Chinese farms were located in the Big Bend area of Burnaby. 04:52 – 08:24 In this segment, Denise elaborates on the “truck” or “market” farming industry for Chinese farmers in Burnaby. Denise explains how “truck” farming was a mode for distributing produce from Chinese farms and some of the challenges the Chinese farmers faced. 08:25 – 14:10 In this segment Denise talks about peddling as another mode to distribute farm produce and how this was often dominated by Chinese Canadians since they were restricted from accessing other jobs. Denise explains how the Chinese peddlers would have their own routes with customers who depended on them to bring the produce to them. Denise provides an example of racial discrimination whereby a Burnaby Bylaw prevented people of Chinese descent from working for the city. 14:11 – 22: 39 In this segment, Denise describes how in the 1950s and 1960s, produce distribution networks for Chinese Canadian farmers in Burnaby expanded to larger stores and wholesalers including Woodward’s, Safeway in Burnaby, MacDonald’s Consolidated and Kelly Douglas. Denise provides specific examples of Burnaby families and tells the story of Chinese Canadian Cecil Lee, a produce buyer for Kelly Douglas. In the mid 1970s Lee, was asked to oversee the import of Chinese mandarin oranges into Canada and was responsible for the design of a new cardboard box to replace the wooden crates that held the mandarin oranges. 22:40 – 33:28 In this segment, Denise provides information on Chinese farming methods and practices that she gathered through her research. Information gathered from interviews, research papers and an article in Harrowsmith magazine suggest that many of the Big Bend farms in Burnaby relied on crop rotation, companion planting and intercropping along with traditional organic fertilizers that were available. Denise also tells of how Chinese farmers often relied on traditional methods that they brought from Southern China including the creation of raised beds to avoid damage due to flooding. Wei Yan comments that many of these traditional methods are being reintroduced as a new sustainable way of farming. Research done by Wei Yan found that when chemical fertilizers were introduced informational brochures included Chinese translations. 33:29 – 38:30 In this segment Rose and Wei Yan speak to Denise about the cultural demographic of farmers in the Big Bend area of Burnaby and what types of crops were grown. Denise comments that to her knowledge there were mostly Chinese farmers in this area but there were some European farmers as well. Produce that was grown on the farms was mostly market driven by the local consumers and it wasn’t until the 1970s that there was a bigger demand to grow Chinese vegetables to supply the growing Chinese population. Denise shares personal experience of what she learned after a visit to a local farm and the different methods that the farmer used for growing crops. The three discuss the importance of innovation and adaptability in growing techniques that Chinese farmers have used. 38:31 – 46:23 In this segment, Rose and Wei Yan speak to Denise about the discrimination barriers that Chinese farmers had to face. Denise speaks about discriminatory bylaws and regulations that targeted Chinese farmers including the Peddling tax. She tells of how this tax, persecution to peddlers and restrictions resulted in the emergence of a new industry of Chinese green grocers. Denise names Chinese trade organizations that were formed in response to the social and economic segregation and marginalization that Chinese farmers and retailers faced. Denise references research done by Natalie Gibb and Hannah Wittman from their article “Parallel Alternatives: Chinese-Canadian farmers and the Metro Vancouver local food movement” as well as research by Harry Con and Edgar Wickberg. Denise also provides information that she has gathered from Chinese farmers in Burnaby including the Yip family who were able to purchase land after World War II through the Veterans Land Act and how prior to World War II it was very difficult for Chinese immigrants to purchase land. 46:24 – 1:00:38 In this segment the group discusses how Chinese farmers have adapted in the market garden farm distribution system and the introduction of retail spaces on their farms as part of the new local food movement. Denise, Rose and Wei Yan reflect on how their interview with Denise Fong and research resources will support their podcast series and exhibits at Burnaby Village Museum.
History/Biography
Interviewer biographies: Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. Interviewee biography: Denise Fong is a historical researcher at Burnaby Village Museum. She has degrees in Anthropology (BA) and Archaeology (MA), and is completing her doctoral degree at UBC in Interdisciplinary Studies. Her primary research interests are in Chinese Canadian history and critical heritage studies. She is the co-curator of the Burnaby Village Museum “Across the Pacific” exhibition, and the Museum of Vancouver’s “A Seat at the Table – Chinese Immigration and British Columbia”.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Agriculture
Agriculture - Crops
Agriculture - Farms
Gardens - Market Gardens
Foods
Names
Fong, Denise
Yeong, Wei Yan
Wu, Rose
Notes
Title based on contents of recording
Item was originally recorded as an mp4 video and converted to an mp3 sound recording for public access on Heritage Burnaby. To access the video recording, contact Burnaby Village Museum.
For recording of podcast "Where is your food from?" see BV020.28.4
Images
Audio Tracks

Interview with Denise Fong by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong

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Interview with Howe Lee, 2019

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording10266
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
February 20, 2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (01:18:41 min)
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Howe Lee conducted by BVM researcher Denise Fong. Mr. Lee describes growing up in Armstrong in the 1930s and 1940s, leaving to attend university, and becoming a teacher in Burnaby. He discusses his community involvement and the creation of the Chinese Canadian Militar…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum Oral Histories series
Subseries
Chinese Canadians in Burnaby subseries
Date
February 20, 2019
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (01:18:41 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Denise Fong Interviewee: Howe Lee Location of Interview: Burnaby Village Museum Interview Date: February 20, 2019 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all Tracks: 1:18:41
Accession Code
BV019.15.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Howe Lee conducted by BVM researcher Denise Fong. Mr. Lee describes growing up in Armstrong in the 1930s and 1940s, leaving to attend university, and becoming a teacher in Burnaby. He discusses his community involvement and the creation of the Chinese Canadian Military Museum Society. 00:00 – 20:39: Mr. Lee describes his family’s origins in China. Denise shows him a photograph of Armstrong and he uses it to show the location of his family’s property and other landmarks. He talks about his family’s life in Armstrong, their farm’s place in the Chinese produce supply system of the time, and the presence and life of Chinese people in British Columbia generally. Mr. Lee also relates how the Interior Vegetable Marketing Board’s policies affected the farm and his future prospects. 20:39 – 32:40: This portion of the recording pertains to Mr. Lee’s involvement with the Chinese Cultural Centre and how he developed an interest in commemorating and honouring Chinese pioneers and military veterans. He recalls his education in Armstrong and at U.B.C. and the community of Chinese students which first drew him to Vancouver’s Chinatown. 32:40 – 51:24: Mr. Lee describes his family and the Chinese community in Armstrong, using the photo to show the locations of the businesses. He recalls his involvement with youth groups, particularly the Cadets, and with local sports, noting that he faced very little discrimination there. Denise asks about the family’s farm and Mr. Lee identifies the family’s house in a drawing. 51:24 – 1:02:18: This portion of the recording pertains to Mr. Lee’s education and career. He describes his enjoyment of being a leader in various groups and activities, and his interest in the local Chinese community. He explains the structure and operation of the cadets and shares his perspective of its value in leadership training. 1:02:18 – 1:18:46: Mr. Lee recalls how he became involved with veterans and with the Chinese Cultural Centre in Vancouver. He talks about bringing his parents to Burnaby to live. Mr. Lee describes how he persuaded some veterans to reorganize their group under the Army, Navy & Air Force Veterans in Canada. He discusses the importance of documenting and passing on the legacy of the Chinese veterans’ contribution and tells how he convinced some of them to create The Chinese Canadian Military Museum Society. Mr. Lee relates how his involvement with the local society led to involvement with a national group.
History/Biography
Howe Lee has worked in education, business, military and within the community. He has taught Science and Mathematics in several Burnaby Secondary Schools and was head of the Science Department and Edmonds Secondary School. Lee was appointed Honorary Colonel in 2012. He has been active within the Chinese-Canadian community including working with the Chinese Canadian Military Museum, Vancouver Chinatown Memorial Square, Asian Heriage Month Society and the Chinatown Revitalization.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Persons - Veterans
Names
Lee, Howe
Fong, Denise
Chinese Canadian Military Museum Society
Audio Tracks
Less detail

Interview with Joe Sadowski, 2017

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording5115
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
June 16, 2017
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (01:46.06 min)
Scope and Content
00:00 – 3:05: Joe discusses his involvement with the Association from its early days in the late 1960s. He describes the formation of the group, its original intentions, and its changing focus. 3:05 - 5:54: Joe recalls how the group decided to further their purpose by involving the public, and the …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum Oral Histories series
Subseries
Museum research interviews subseries
Date
June 16, 2017
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (01:46.06 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Rebeca Salas Interviewee: Joe Sadowski Date of interview: June 16, 2017 Total Number of Tracks: 1 Total Length of all Tracks: 1:46:06
Accession Code
BV018.18.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Scope and Content
00:00 – 3:05: Joe discusses his involvement with the Association from its early days in the late 1960s. He describes the formation of the group, its original intentions, and its changing focus. 3:05 - 5:54: Joe recalls how the group decided to further their purpose by involving the public, and the rationale behind building a trail system. He explains how the Burnaby Outdoor Education Association was formed and describes its activities. 5:54 – 9:20: Joe relates how the Association was able to access federal funding for the trail. He shares his perspective about local businesses having changed their priorities since that time. 9:20 – 13:31: Joe discusses how the group expanded its base, and why it changed its name to the Burnaby Lake Advisory. He explains how the trail system came to be under the jurisdiction of Metro Parks, and why the name was changed to the Burnaby Lake Park Association. He describes the shift in the group’s composition and responsibilities. 13:31 – 17:06: Rebecca notes that the museum is interested in the reasons for the group coming together in the 1960s. Joe describes how the group’s plans regarding the lake informed their subsequent activities there. He talks about the changing attitude to pollution in the 1970s. 17:06 - 22:05: Joe describes what Burnaby Lake was like in the 1960s. He discusses its importance to migrating birds, and talks about the improvement to Still Creek. 22:05 – 29:48: Joe talks about the big Burnaby Lake Clean Up. He notes that the public’s changing attitudes have made further large clean-ups unnecessary. 29:48 – 32:00: Joe talks about the work of the Eagle Creek Streamkeepers, the Sapperton Fish and Game Club, The Semiahmoo Rod and Gun Club, and the Hyde Creek Watershed Society. He observes that game clubs have broader interests now than sport alone. 32:00 – 37:37: Joe discusses the return of salmon to the lake, the improvement in the quality of water, and the increased numbers of birds. He shares his perspective that the relationship of the public to the lake changed as visitors began to take ownership. 37:37 – 39:30: Joe talks about the importance of leadership in conservation efforts, discussing how Bob Gardner and Elmer Rudolph inspired people to become involved. He describes the positive results of volunteering. 39:30 – 41:48: Asked what he feels has made the biggest difference in improving the health of the lake, Joe describes the change in the attitude of the public and contrasts this new environmental awareness with that of people in other parts of the world. 41:48 – 47:46: Joe discusses the importance of the buffer zone, and of giving students the opportunity to be involved in efforts to remove invasive species and plant native ones. 47:46 – 56:10: Joe talks about the nesting box program. He notes that interacting with wildlife may influence people’s future behavior and describes the experience as cross-cultural. 56:10 – 58:17: Joe discusses the design of the trail around the lake. 58:17 – 1:02:32: Joe mentions the advisory role of Dr. Milton McLaren in the Association’s trail building work. He remarks on the importance to the project of people such as Tony Fabian and John Thomson. Joe also discusses the material used for the trail’s construction. 1:02:32 – 1:10:53: Joe describes the Association’s relationship with the Nature House and the Wildlife Rescue Centre. He recalls the acquisition of the Nature House building. 1:10:53 – 1:19:57: Asked about consultation, Joe describes the design and construction of the trail as the only subject in which the group’s expertise was deferred to. He discusses his concerns about dredging, and mentions the installation of squirrel nesting boxes as a successful enhancement project. 1:19:57 – 1:28:05: Joe talks about how the Burnaby Lake area has changed since he moved to Burnaby in 1964, and mentions some of the detrimental effects of development. He recalls the construction of the original observation tower by Aril Dalsvaag’s students at Burnaby Central Secondary School, talks about the current tower and discusses the success of the Association’s turtle nesting pad. 1:28:05 – 1:34:50: Joe discusses the introduced species in Burnaby Lake, and the efforts to eradicate them. He mentions the work of Bob Gunn, from B.C.I.T., a former student of Bob Gardner. 1:34:50 – 1:49:28: Asked about the substances used to control the mosquito population at Burnaby Lake, Joe voices his concerns about the effects of spraying, noting that the butterfly garden has been negatively affected by it in the past. He describes the origin of the garden. 1:40:28 – 1:46:06: Rebecca summarizes the interview and thanks Joe. Joe describes his hopes for the B.L.P.A. and the future of the lake. He reiterates the importance of preservation and accessibility and remarks on the number and diversity of the visitors.
History/Biography
Recording is an interview with Joe Sadowski conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Rebeca Salas, June 16, 2017. Major themes discussed: the history of the Burnaby Park Advisory Association and the Group of Ten, and the ongoing conservation of Burnaby Lake.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Rebeca Salas
Names
Sadowski, Joe
Audio Tracks
Less detail

Interview with Jiro Kamiya, 2015

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording4476
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[2015]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (01:11:02 min)
Scope and Content
0:00 – 6:38: Frank Kamiya recalls the museum’s ofuro project, describing how his father became involved with it. He talks about the ofuro in Canada, speaking of their importance to Japanese Canadians but noting that they have been superseded by newer products. Frank also mentions that ofuros are no…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum Oral Histories series
Subseries
Museum research interviews subseries
Date
[2015]
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (01:11:02 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Lisa Codd Interviewee: Jiro Kamiya Location of Interview: Nikkei Home, Burnaby Interview Date: [2015] Total Number of Tracks: 1 Total Length of all Tracks: 1:11:02
Accession Code
BV019.13.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
0:00 – 6:38: Frank Kamiya recalls the museum’s ofuro project, describing how his father became involved with it. He talks about the ofuro in Canada, speaking of their importance to Japanese Canadians but noting that they have been superseded by newer products. Frank also mentions that ofuros are now subject to modern building regulations. 6:38 – 20:30: Jiro Kamiya describes the construction of the ofuro. He explains the technique of water-proofing and talks about the different sizes of baths, discussing the differences in Japanese and Canadian styles and in the way water was supplied. 20:30 – 28:27: This portion of the recording pertains to Jiro Kamiya’s background as a carpenter in Shizuoka, Japan, in the family’s business, and how he came to immigrate to Canada. Frank talks about his father’s innovations and skills. He discusses the differences between Japanese and Canadian tools. Lisa Codd asks about the tools Jiro donated to the museum. 28:27 – 36:00: Frank talks about his father’s involvement in the building of the Museum’s ofuro. He notes that he himself drew up the plans and submitted them to City Hall. He asks about the ofuro’s plaque and the building’s condition. Lisa explains how the classification of buildings as replica or heritage determines how conservation choices are made. 36:00 – 45:47: Frank describes the purpose and use of the ofuro and the kind of accessories which should be included in the Museum’s display. The exact meaning of ‘ofuro’ is discussed with Jiro, as is bathing protocol for the larger and smaller kinds. 45:47 – 59:13: Jiro recalls New Year and other traditions and Lisa and Frank remark on the differences between the established infrastructures of Japan and those of rural Canada. Frank describes his father’s work in Canada. Jiro talks of being unable to join the carpenters union, but advancing in his profession through his ability and experience with Japanese techniques. 59:13 – 1:11:02: Jiro talks about the work that he did during internment during World War II and his choice to go to Winnipeg with his family. Frank relates how his father adapted to shipyard work, and Jiro tells anecdotes about his working years.
History/Biography
Recording is an interview with Jiro Kamiya about the ofuro he built as an exhibit for display at Burnaby Village Museum, and his work in Canada generally. When he speaks in Japanese, his son Frank Kamiya does the English translation. Frank recalls how his father, a Japanese-trained carpenter, came to be involved in the project, which was donated to the Museum by the Japanese Canadian Citizens Association. An unidentified woman is also present and contributes to the discussion.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Lisa Codd
Names
Kamiya, Jiro
Notes
Audio is only available to listen at the Burnaby Village Museum
Audio Tracks
Less detail

Interview with Tony and Hazel Padula by Eric Damer November 27, 2012 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory378
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
2012
Length
0:04:59
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains mainly to Tony Padula and Hazel (Bongea) Padula's opinions on restaurants in the Burnaby Heights area.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains mainly to Tony Padula and Hazel (Bongea) Padula's opinions on restaurants in the Burnaby Heights area.
Date Range
2012
Photo Info
Hazel (Bongea) Padula standing on the steps of her home at High Lawn, [195-]. Item no. 549-052.
Length
0:04:59
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Restaurants
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
November 27, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Tony Padula and Hazel (Bongea) Padula conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, November 27, 2012. Major themes discussed are: neighbourhoods and family heritage.
Biographical Notes
Tony Padula’s family came to Vancouver from Italy in 1926, the year Tony was born. After graduating from school, Tony entered the shoe industry as a salesman. Hazel Bongea (later Padula) was born in 1931 in Saskatchewan and moved to Vancouver with her family when she was ten years old. After graduating from school, Hazel found work with Standard Oil in Vancouver. Tony Padula and Hazel (Bongea) Padula married in 1951. By 1953 they had bought property in the Brentwood neighbourhood of Burnaby where they built a home and began a family. The Padulas moved away in 1959 but returned five years later to a new home in central Burnaby, where they lived for twenty-two years before moving again, this time to North Vancouver. After six years in North Vancouver, Tony and Hazel retired to New Westminster.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:09:21
Interviewee Name
Padula, Hazel Bongea
Padula, Tony
Interview Location
Burnaby Village Museum
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Images
Audio Tracks

Track eight of recording of interview with Tony and Hazel Padula

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Interview with Mary Lumby by Kathy Bossort January 8, 2016 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory675
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
2007-2015
Length
0:17:35
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about her move to UniverCity in 2007, why she likes living there and some of the disadvantages. She talks about the challenges of creating a sense of community in UniverCity, comparing it to the active involvement of Forest Hills and Forest …
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about her move to UniverCity in 2007, why she likes living there and some of the disadvantages. She talks about the challenges of creating a sense of community in UniverCity, comparing it to the active involvement of Forest Hills and Forest Grove residents in civic affairs, and about problems of isolation on the mountain top, and separation between campus and the residential area.
Date Range
2007-2015
Length
0:17:35
Person / Organization
Simon Fraser University
UniverCity
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Public Services
Planning
Persons - Volunteers
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 8, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Mary Lumby conducted by Kathy Bossort. Mary Lumby was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Mary Lumby’s experience living in Forest Hills, raising her children there, and her involvement in community groups and advocating for improved community services in the Forest Hills and Forest Grove neighbourhoods, and her later move to UniverCity. She talks about the history of the Forest Hills subdivision and what she liked about living there, its links with Forest Grove, and challenges facing both communities as a result of their isolation. Her description of living in UniverCity provides an interesting comparison in how community is created. Mary Lumby also talks about her teaching career, her volunteer activities especially related to the environment, the relationship Trans Mountain tank farm had with adjacent neighbourhoods when she lived in Forest Hills, and what the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area means to her.
Biographical Notes
Mary Lumby was born in Vancouver B.C. She moved to Burnaby and the Parkcrest area in 1977, and then to the new Forest Hills subdivision. Later she moved into another developing community, UniverCity, at the top of Burnaby Mountain and adjacent to the Simon Fraser University campus. Mary has been an active community member, volunteer and community advocate. She has been particularly interested in environmental issues, as a teacher, volunteer coordinator for civic events, and citizen representative on Burnaby’s Environment Committee. She continues to be active in community affairs and enjoys living on Burnaby Mountain.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:31:47
Interviewee Name
Lumby, Mary M.
Interview Location
Mary Lumby's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Mary Lumby

Less detail

Interview with Cice Brown, May 13, 2005 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording4482
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:03:14 min)
Scope and Content
Track 7: This portion of the recording pertains to changes to Burnaby since Cice’s childhood. Cice discusses the rural nature of South Burnaby, and the sense of security of that time. She talks of the changes caused by the creation and growth of the Metrotown area. Cice describes how her husband’s …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum Oral Histories series
Subseries
Growing Up in Burnaby subseries
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:03:14 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Cice Brown Date of Interview: May 13, 2005 Total Number of Tracks: 7 Total length of all Tracks: 0:40:19
Accession Code
BV017.45.3
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 7: This portion of the recording pertains to changes to Burnaby since Cice’s childhood. Cice discusses the rural nature of South Burnaby, and the sense of security of that time. She talks of the changes caused by the creation and growth of the Metrotown area. Cice describes how her husband’s veteran status earned them a discount on a building lot from the City of Burnaby, allowing her to continue to live there.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Cice Brown, interviewed by Tom Gooden on May 13 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Persons - Veterans
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Persons - Children
Names
Brown, Cice Chandler
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Planning Study Area
Maywood Area
Audio Tracks

Interview with Cice Brown, May 13, 2005 - Track 7

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Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory575
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:05:09
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s volunteer activities with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and Dania Homes Society, which includes giving talks to seniors about Burnaby Mountain parks. She also talks about kinds of accessible activities that people can do on Burna…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s volunteer activities with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and Dania Homes Society, which includes giving talks to seniors about Burnaby Mountain parks. She also talks about kinds of accessible activities that people can do on Burnaby Mountain.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:05:09
Person / Organization
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Swedish Canadian Rest Home and Manor
Dania Home
Subject
Recreational Activities
Geographic Features - Parks
Persons - Volunteers
Persons - Seniors
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Maureen Olofson

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Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory585
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:14:42
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s story about the naming, planning and development of Richard Bolton Park at SFU’s UniverCity.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s story about the naming, planning and development of Richard Bolton Park at SFU’s UniverCity.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:14:42
Person / Organization
Bolton, Richard
Simon Fraser University
UniverCity
Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Department
Subject
Public Services - Municipal Services
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Richard Bolton Park
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track nine of interview with Alekxos Sarter

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Interview with Henry deJong by Kathy Bossort November 6, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory611
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:10:55
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Henry deJong’s description of the development of the Mountain Air bike skills facility and working with various stakeholder groups, including the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association, Stoney Creek Environment Committee and Simon Fraser University.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Henry deJong’s description of the development of the Mountain Air bike skills facility and working with various stakeholder groups, including the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association, Stoney Creek Environment Committee and Simon Fraser University.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:10:55
Person / Organization
Mountain Air Bike Park
Burnaby Mountain Biking Association
Stoney Creek Environment Committee
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Recreational Activities
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 6, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Henry deJong conducted by Kathy Bossort. Henry deJong was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Henry deJong’s work designing, developing and maintaining trails in the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area as Park Design Technician for the City of Burnaby’s Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. He provides a history of trail development after the transfer of SFU land to Burnaby and the creation of the 1999 Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area Plan. He also talks about monitoring and managing the forest environment, rehabilitating damaged areas, working with park users and stakeholders, and his favourite trails.
Biographical Notes
Henry G. deJong was born 1954 in Newmarket, Ontario, to Harmen and Griet deJong. He came west to enjoy outdoor recreation in BC and lived in Smithers for several years before marrying and moving to the Vancouver area, where he obtained a diploma in landscape design & horticulture from BCIT. Henry began working for the City of Burnaby in the Engineering Department in 1985, moving to Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1990, and currently has the position of Park Design Technician. His focus on trail design and construction on Burnaby Mountain began in 2000 after the development of the 1999 Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area Plan. Henry lived in Burnaby for about 8 years in the Capital Hill and Edmonds area between 1983 and 1995 before moving to Cloverdale in Surrey. He belongs to the BC Mountaineering Club, the Willoughby Community Church and is a Boys Club volunteer.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:22:41
Interviewee Name
deJong, Henry G.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Henry deJong

Less detail

Interview with Henry deJong by Kathy Bossort November 6, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory612
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:12:00
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Henry deJong’s description of construction of the Velodrome Trail, how trails are named, approaches to balancing user demands with what is best for park ecology, and how trail design provides recreational value and decreases visitor impact.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Henry deJong’s description of construction of the Velodrome Trail, how trails are named, approaches to balancing user demands with what is best for park ecology, and how trail design provides recreational value and decreases visitor impact.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:12:00
Person / Organization
Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Department
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Features - Trails
Recreational Activities
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 6, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Henry deJong conducted by Kathy Bossort. Henry deJong was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Henry deJong’s work designing, developing and maintaining trails in the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area as Park Design Technician for the City of Burnaby’s Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. He provides a history of trail development after the transfer of SFU land to Burnaby and the creation of the 1999 Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area Plan. He also talks about monitoring and managing the forest environment, rehabilitating damaged areas, working with park users and stakeholders, and his favourite trails.
Biographical Notes
Henry G. deJong was born 1954 in Newmarket, Ontario, to Harmen and Griet deJong. He came west to enjoy outdoor recreation in BC and lived in Smithers for several years before marrying and moving to the Vancouver area, where he obtained a diploma in landscape design & horticulture from BCIT. Henry began working for the City of Burnaby in the Engineering Department in 1985, moving to Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1990, and currently has the position of Park Design Technician. His focus on trail design and construction on Burnaby Mountain began in 2000 after the development of the 1999 Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area Plan. Henry lived in Burnaby for about 8 years in the Capital Hill and Edmonds area between 1983 and 1995 before moving to Cloverdale in Surrey. He belongs to the BC Mountaineering Club, the Willoughby Community Church and is a Boys Club volunteer.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:22:41
Interviewee Name
deJong, Henry G.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Henry deJong

Less detail

Interview with Henry deJong by Kathy Bossort November 6, 2015 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory613
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:13:35
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Henry deJong’s discussion of shifts in public attitudes and use of the natural areas on Burnaby Mountain. He talks about educating the public and Park’s interpretive sign program, the involvement of volunteers from the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association on so…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Henry deJong’s discussion of shifts in public attitudes and use of the natural areas on Burnaby Mountain. He talks about educating the public and Park’s interpretive sign program, the involvement of volunteers from the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association on some trail projects, and approaches to controlling harmful or unsafe behaviour in the park.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:13:35
Person / Organization
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Burnaby Mountain Biking Association
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Features - Forests
Education
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 6, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Henry deJong conducted by Kathy Bossort. Henry deJong was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Henry deJong’s work designing, developing and maintaining trails in the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area as Park Design Technician for the City of Burnaby’s Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. He provides a history of trail development after the transfer of SFU land to Burnaby and the creation of the 1999 Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area Plan. He also talks about monitoring and managing the forest environment, rehabilitating damaged areas, working with park users and stakeholders, and his favourite trails.
Biographical Notes
Henry G. deJong was born 1954 in Newmarket, Ontario, to Harmen and Griet deJong. He came west to enjoy outdoor recreation in BC and lived in Smithers for several years before marrying and moving to the Vancouver area, where he obtained a diploma in landscape design & horticulture from BCIT. Henry began working for the City of Burnaby in the Engineering Department in 1985, moving to Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1990, and currently has the position of Park Design Technician. His focus on trail design and construction on Burnaby Mountain began in 2000 after the development of the 1999 Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area Plan. Henry lived in Burnaby for about 8 years in the Capital Hill and Edmonds area between 1983 and 1995 before moving to Cloverdale in Surrey. He belongs to the BC Mountaineering Club, the Willoughby Community Church and is a Boys Club volunteer.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:22:41
Interviewee Name
deJong, Henry G.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Henry deJong

Less detail

Interview with Henry deJong by Kathy Bossort November 6, 2015 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory614
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:08:28
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Henry deJong’s description of his favourite trails in the conservation area, and stories about the illegal cutting of trees and the 2006 death of two people in the park.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Henry deJong’s description of his favourite trails in the conservation area, and stories about the illegal cutting of trees and the 2006 death of two people in the park.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:08:28
Person / Organization
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Features - Trails
Plants - Trees
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 6, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Henry deJong conducted by Kathy Bossort. Henry deJong was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Henry deJong’s work designing, developing and maintaining trails in the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area as Park Design Technician for the City of Burnaby’s Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. He provides a history of trail development after the transfer of SFU land to Burnaby and the creation of the 1999 Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area Plan. He also talks about monitoring and managing the forest environment, rehabilitating damaged areas, working with park users and stakeholders, and his favourite trails.
Biographical Notes
Henry G. deJong was born 1954 in Newmarket, Ontario, to Harmen and Griet deJong. He came west to enjoy outdoor recreation in BC and lived in Smithers for several years before marrying and moving to the Vancouver area, where he obtained a diploma in landscape design & horticulture from BCIT. Henry began working for the City of Burnaby in the Engineering Department in 1985, moving to Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1990, and currently has the position of Park Design Technician. His focus on trail design and construction on Burnaby Mountain began in 2000 after the development of the 1999 Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area Plan. Henry lived in Burnaby for about 8 years in the Capital Hill and Edmonds area between 1983 and 1995 before moving to Cloverdale in Surrey. He belongs to the BC Mountaineering Club, the Willoughby Community Church and is a Boys Club volunteer.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:22:41
Interviewee Name
deJong, Henry G.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Henry deJong

Less detail

Interview with Ron Burton by Kathy Bossort November 16, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory617
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:11:04
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ron Burton’s description of how volunteers participate in maintaining trails on Burnaby Mountain in cooperation with City staff, which are organized as four Trail Days per year. He talks about the relationship between Burnaby Mountain Biking Association and th…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ron Burton’s description of how volunteers participate in maintaining trails on Burnaby Mountain in cooperation with City staff, which are organized as four Trail Days per year. He talks about the relationship between Burnaby Mountain Biking Association and the Parks department, the role the BMBA plays in educating its members, and the challenge biking’s “extreme” image has presented.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:11:04
Person / Organization
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Burnaby Mountain Biking Association
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Features - Trails
Sports - Cycling
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Ron Burton conducted by Kathy Bossort. Ron Burton was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the founding, goals, and activities of the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association as told by one of the founders and President of the club, Ron Burton, and about the development of mountain biking and trail construction on Burnaby Mountain, both prior to and after the creation of the conservation area in 1995/96. Ron Burton also talks about his childhood, his work as a Burnaby school trustee, and the sports and recreational activities he has enjoyed on the mountain.
Biographical Notes
Ron Burton was born in Burnaby in 1954 to Fred and Shirley Burton. He grew up in East Vancouver and attended Hastings Elementary and Gladstone Secondary schools. He worked on the waterfront for Viterra, became a member of the Grain Workers Union and joined the NDP in 1972. He and his wife moved to Burnaby’s Vancouver Heights in 1982 and Forest Grove in 1988. He has served as a Board of Education Trustee in the Burnaby School District since first being elected in 1987, currently serving as Board Chair. Ron is founder and President of the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association and an active rider on Burnaby Mountain since 1988. The Association was founded in 2000, registering as a society in 2005, with the goals to build sustainable trails on Burnaby Mountain, to provide education about trail riding, and to advocate for and improve the image of mountain biking. Under Ron’s leadership the Association has successfully recruited members and formed a cooperative relationship with Burnaby’s Parks staff and with other park trail users.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:01:32
Interviewee Name
Burton, Ronald C. "Ron"
Interview Location
Meeting room at the Burnaby School District office
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Ron Burton

Less detail

Interview with Ron Burton by Kathy Bossort November 16, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory618
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:08:23
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ron Burton’s description of mountain bikers’ care of the mountain environment and how the various park stakeholders work together and communicate concerns.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ron Burton’s description of mountain bikers’ care of the mountain environment and how the various park stakeholders work together and communicate concerns.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:08:23
Person / Organization
Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Department
Burnaby Mountain Biking Association
Stoney Creek Environment Committee
Stoney Creek Environmental Working Group
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Ron Burton conducted by Kathy Bossort. Ron Burton was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the founding, goals, and activities of the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association as told by one of the founders and President of the club, Ron Burton, and about the development of mountain biking and trail construction on Burnaby Mountain, both prior to and after the creation of the conservation area in 1995/96. Ron Burton also talks about his childhood, his work as a Burnaby school trustee, and the sports and recreational activities he has enjoyed on the mountain.
Biographical Notes
Ron Burton was born in Burnaby in 1954 to Fred and Shirley Burton. He grew up in East Vancouver and attended Hastings Elementary and Gladstone Secondary schools. He worked on the waterfront for Viterra, became a member of the Grain Workers Union and joined the NDP in 1972. He and his wife moved to Burnaby’s Vancouver Heights in 1982 and Forest Grove in 1988. He has served as a Board of Education Trustee in the Burnaby School District since first being elected in 1987, currently serving as Board Chair. Ron is founder and President of the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association and an active rider on Burnaby Mountain since 1988. The Association was founded in 2000, registering as a society in 2005, with the goals to build sustainable trails on Burnaby Mountain, to provide education about trail riding, and to advocate for and improve the image of mountain biking. Under Ron’s leadership the Association has successfully recruited members and formed a cooperative relationship with Burnaby’s Parks staff and with other park trail users.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:01:32
Interviewee Name
Burton, Ronald C. "Ron"
Interview Location
Meeting room at the Burnaby School District office
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Ron Burton

Less detail

Interview with Ron Burton by Kathy Bossort November 16, 2015 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory620
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:13:32
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ron Burton’s description of some of the trails on Burnaby Mountain, SFU campus trails, change in amount of use of trails, and the urban forest as an accessible oasis in the city.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ron Burton’s description of some of the trails on Burnaby Mountain, SFU campus trails, change in amount of use of trails, and the urban forest as an accessible oasis in the city.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:13:32
Person / Organization
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Ron Burton conducted by Kathy Bossort. Ron Burton was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the founding, goals, and activities of the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association as told by one of the founders and President of the club, Ron Burton, and about the development of mountain biking and trail construction on Burnaby Mountain, both prior to and after the creation of the conservation area in 1995/96. Ron Burton also talks about his childhood, his work as a Burnaby school trustee, and the sports and recreational activities he has enjoyed on the mountain.
Biographical Notes
Ron Burton was born in Burnaby in 1954 to Fred and Shirley Burton. He grew up in East Vancouver and attended Hastings Elementary and Gladstone Secondary schools. He worked on the waterfront for Viterra, became a member of the Grain Workers Union and joined the NDP in 1972. He and his wife moved to Burnaby’s Vancouver Heights in 1982 and Forest Grove in 1988. He has served as a Board of Education Trustee in the Burnaby School District since first being elected in 1987, currently serving as Board Chair. Ron is founder and President of the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association and an active rider on Burnaby Mountain since 1988. The Association was founded in 2000, registering as a society in 2005, with the goals to build sustainable trails on Burnaby Mountain, to provide education about trail riding, and to advocate for and improve the image of mountain biking. Under Ron’s leadership the Association has successfully recruited members and formed a cooperative relationship with Burnaby’s Parks staff and with other park trail users.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:01:32
Interviewee Name
Burton, Ronald C. "Ron"
Interview Location
Meeting room at the Burnaby School District office
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks
Less detail

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