52 records – page 2 of 3.

Kapoor sawmill being rebuilt

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15186
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
6 Aug. 1939 (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of Kapoor Sawmill being rebuilt in August 1939. Two unidentified men are standing on the second floor of the building under a block and tackle that is suspended from the beam above.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
6 Aug. 1939 (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.7
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Kapoor Sawmill being rebuilt in August 1939. Two unidentified men are standing on the second floor of the building under a block and tackle that is suspended from the beam above.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sargeet Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Construction
Industries - Logging/lumber
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Kapoor Sawmills Limited and living quarters

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15189
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1945] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of the Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Company living quarters are visible on the ridge above.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[1945] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.10
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of the Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Company living quarters are visible on the ridge above.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sargeet Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Burnaby - Barnet Marine Park
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Kapoor Sawmills Limited, cabins and log booms

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15188
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[195-] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Panorama photograph of the Kapoor Sawmills Limited, cabins and log booms in Burrard Inlet. Cabins are located on the lower shore.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[195-] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.9
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Panorama photograph of the Kapoor Sawmills Limited, cabins and log booms in Burrard Inlet. Cabins are located on the lower shore.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sargeet Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Burnaby - Barnet Marine Park
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Kapoor Sawmills on fire

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15211
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
14 Jan. 1947 (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of the Kapoor sawmill on fire on January 14, 1947. Photograph is taken from the shore looking west up Burrard Inlet. There is snow covering the ground.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
14 Jan. 1947 (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.31
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of the Kapoor sawmill on fire on January 14, 1947. Photograph is taken from the shore looking west up Burrard Inlet. There is snow covering the ground.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sargeet Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Natural Phenomena - Fires
Natural Phenomena - Snow
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Burnaby - Barnet Marine Park
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Man at saw

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15200
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of an unidentified man standing next to a saw in operation at Kapoor Sawmills Limited. The large saw blade is in motion cutting through large logs.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.21
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of an unidentified man standing next to a saw in operation at Kapoor Sawmills Limited. The large saw blade is in motion cutting through large logs.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sargeet Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Occupations - Millworkers
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Burnaby - Barnet Marine Park
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Mayo Manhas and Kapoor Singh Siddoo in mill office

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15182
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of Mayo Manhas (right) and Kapoor Singh Siddoo (left) in a mill office looking over a map Vancouver Island with timber areas.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.3
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Mayo Manhas (right) and Kapoor Singh Siddoo (left) in a mill office looking over a map Vancouver Island with timber areas.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sargeet Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Siddoo, Kapoor Singh
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
see page 65 in the book "In the Shadow by the Sea - recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "Mr. Mayo Manhas and Mr. Kapoor Siddoo in the mill office looking over a map of timber areas. c. 1940s"
Images
Less detail

Men on green chain

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15201
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of two unidentified men working on the green chain at Kapoor Sawmills Limited. One of the men is Sikh.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.22
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of two unidentified men working on the green chain at Kapoor Sawmills Limited. One of the men is Sikh.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sargeet Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Occupations - Millworkers
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Burnaby - Barnet Marine Park
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
See page 64 of book "In the Shadow by the Sea - Recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "Men at work on the greeen chain, c. 1940s"
Images
Less detail

Millwright sharpens saw blade

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15199
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a millwright (identified as Mr. Hawkin's nephew) sharpening a large circular saw blade of a saw at Kapoor Sawmills Limited.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.20
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of a millwright (identified as Mr. Hawkin's nephew) sharpening a large circular saw blade of a saw at Kapoor Sawmills Limited.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sargeet Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Occupations - Millworkers
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Burnaby - Barnet Marine Park
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
See page 63 of book "In the Shadow by the Sea - Recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "A "millwright" sharpens the saw on the massive circular blade c. 1940s"
Images
Less detail

Mrs. Siddoo at her kitchen stove

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15181
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of Besant Siddoo (spouse of Kapoor Singh Siddoo) tending the sawdust burner at her kitchen stove. A large galvanized hopper which fed the sawdust to the fire box of the stove is to her left.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.2
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Besant Siddoo (spouse of Kapoor Singh Siddoo) tending the sawdust burner at her kitchen stove. A large galvanized hopper which fed the sawdust to the fire box of the stove is to her left.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sargeet Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Siddoo, Besant
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
see page 63 in the book "In the Shadow by the Sea - recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "Mrs. Kapoor Siddoo tending the sawdust burner at her kitchen stove. Note the hopper which fed the sawdust to the fire box of the stove. c. 1940s"
Images
Less detail

My Story

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo9673
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2016
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Film and Video collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (4 min., 21 sec.) : digital, 25 fps, col., sd., stereo
Scope and Content
This film chronicles that 2013 journey of Kehar Sing Aujla and his wife as they travelled to India on vacation. The visit included a trip to the town of Ledo in North-East India, where the Ledo Mine Rescue Centre is located. In the film, Aujla describes the trip and the work he oversaw at the Ledo …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Film and Video collection
Series
Elders Digital Storytelling project series
Date
2016
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (4 min., 21 sec.) : digital, 25 fps, col., sd., stereo
Accession Code
BV016.37.4
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Other Title Information
title supplied by film maker
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
This film chronicles that 2013 journey of Kehar Sing Aujla and his wife as they travelled to India on vacation. The visit included a trip to the town of Ledo in North-East India, where the Ledo Mine Rescue Centre is located. In the film, Aujla describes the trip and the work he oversaw at the Ledo Mine Rescue Centre when he was Superintendent of the Coal Mines Rescue Department in India. His visit with friends and trip to a local Sikh holy place is also included in the film.
History/Biography
Kehar Singh Aujla is originally from the Western part of India. He and his wife immigrated to Canada in 1996 to be closer to his son and his family in Burnaby. Aujla worked in the coal mining industry in India for 40 years starting in 1951. He passed his management exam in 1960, and spent 23 years working with a coal mine rescue organization. Since moving to Burnaby he has received recognition for his commitment to volunteer work, receiving eight awards between 2006 and 2016, including being selected as Burnaby's Citizen of the Year for 2011. His volunteering has included work with Volunteer Grandparents, Burnaby Citizen Support Services, Burnaby Village Museum, the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts, BMO Marathon, Breast Cancer Association, and at the Sukh Sagar Gurdwara. His awards include the Gerontology Award from SFU, 2011 Citizen of the year from the City of Burnaby, Top 25 Immigrant of 2012 by Canadian Immigrants and Royal Bank of Canada, The Life Time Sewa Award by Sukh Sagar Sikh Temple of New Westminster, Best Community Service Award by Vaisakhi Gala of Surrey, Best Community Service Award by Age Care and News Leader, Sovereign Medal by Governor General of Canada, Above and Beyond Award by Fraser Health, Early Bird Award by Volunteer Resources of Burnaby General Hospital.
Creator
Kehar Sing Aujla
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Aujla, Kehar Singh
Geographic Access
India
Notes
Transcribed title
Video
Less detail

Natverial Thakore

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivephoto80665
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
September 24, 1997
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 23 x 15 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of Burnaby philanthropist Natverial Thakore holding a photo of Mahatma Gandhi while sitting on the grass.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
September 24, 1997
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Record No.
535-0933
Accession Number
2012-11
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 23 x 15 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Burnaby philanthropist Natverial Thakore holding a photo of Mahatma Gandhi while sitting on the grass.
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Thakore, Natverial
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Note in black ink on recto of photograph reads: "Bby 5 53% / Bby Mario 91-512"
Trim marks and/or reproduction instructions on recto (scan is cropped)
Images
Less detail

North Burnaby High School Graduates 1954

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto163
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1954
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 36.5 x 58.5 cm mounted on board 76 x 101.5 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of graduates of North Burnaby High School in 1954 with all names of graduates scripted on mounting board by E.Skrypec. Row 1: L. Fox, S. Johnson, R. Larson, B. Milaney, J. Watson, D. Spring, G. Calder, J. Forester, A. Nash, J. McGiveron, M. Meikle, T. Brooks, J. Meikle, S. Hill, B. Bil…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph collection
Date
1954
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 36.5 x 58.5 cm mounted on board 76 x 101.5 cm
Accession Code
BV985.30.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of graduates of North Burnaby High School in 1954 with all names of graduates scripted on mounting board by E.Skrypec. Row 1: L. Fox, S. Johnson, R. Larson, B. Milaney, J. Watson, D. Spring, G. Calder, J. Forester, A. Nash, J. McGiveron, M. Meikle, T. Brooks, J. Meikle, S. Hill, B. Bilson, F. Stewart, M. Slavin, H. Trayling, B. Bourne, M. Mothe, M. Bazylevich, S. Yorston, E. Underwood, S. Sandberg, A. Craig, A. Holzman, M. Cranston, W. Pendygrasse and L. Holland. Row 2: S. Willimas, S. Anderson, G. Burgess, I. Radill, J. Jopling, J. Wong, K. McNicol, D. Gallie, W. Brigden, I. Frank, J. Elliott, P. Wooldard, D. Drummond, E. Murray, K. Nelson, B. Smith, J. Purser, D. Lister, N. Husband, A. Ryder and G. Olafson. Row 3: B. Beaumont, W. Judyski, B. Chamberland, R. Dyck, H. Lunow, R. Morris, N. Trtan, S. Gill, K. Elliott, D. Demchuk, D. Wilson, H. Philbrook, D. Connorton, D. Panton, G. Monk, G. Kubicek, J. Christian, H. Pendygrasse, D. Norman and H. Peterson. Row 4: C. Allen, J. MacDonald, H. Siddoo, G. Boyd, G. Norgard, P. Iannucci, R. McDonnell, B. Mills, R. Ostby, K. Bennett, F. McAuley, G. Topham, G. Clapp, H. Rink, T. Scuffi, B. Dolman, L. Armstrong, W. Cross, E. Matiash and B. Miles. Row 5: V. Cinnamon, T. Saunders, E. Skrypec, S. Bonettemaker, G. Barr, W. Greba, B. Asleson, B. Launder, F. Punko, J. Maxwell, J. McTaggart, D. Allen, W. Plevy, J. Bailey and R. Zacharias.
Subjects
Persons - Students
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Events
Buildings - Schools
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Siddoo, Hardev
Wong, Jessie
Burnaby North High School
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 4375 Pandora Street
Burnaby - Pandora Street
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Heights Area
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Less detail

Not fit to stay : public heath panics and South Asian exclusion

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumlibrary7613
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Author
Wallace, Sarah Isabel
Publication Date
2017
Call Number
305.891 WAL
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection
Reference Collection
Material Type
Book
Call Number
305.891 WAL
Author
Wallace, Sarah Isabel
Place of Publication
Vancouver
Toronto
Publisher
UBC Press
Publication Date
2017
Physical Description
ix, 279 p. : ills. ; 24 cm
Subjects LoC
Racism--Pacific Coast (North America)--History--20th century
South Asians--British Columbia--History
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 199-253) and index.
Less detail

The Punjabis in British Columbia : location, labour, First Nations, and multiculturalism

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumlibrary7612
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Author
Nayar, Kamala E. (Kamala Elizabeth), 1966-
Publication Date
2012
Call Number
305.891 NAY
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection
Reference Collection
Material Type
Book
Call Number
305.891 NAY
Author
Nayar, Kamala E. (Kamala Elizabeth), 1966-
Place of Publication
Montreal
Publisher
McGill-Queen's University Press
Publication Date
2012
Series
McGill-Queen's studies in ethnic history. Series two ; 31
Physical Description
xxi, 361 p. : ills. ; 23 cm
Subjects LoC
British Columbia--Ethnic relations
British Columbia--Emigration and immigration--History
Panjabis (South Asian people)--British Columbia
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (p. [283]-354) and index.
Less detail

Rebuilding the Kapoor Sawmills Limited

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15191
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1947] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of the reconstruction of the Kapoor Sawmills Limited following the fire in January 1947. Sawmill owner, Mr. Kapoor Singh Siddoo is visible standing on the roof.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[1947] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.12
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of the reconstruction of the Kapoor Sawmills Limited following the fire in January 1947. Sawmill owner, Mr. Kapoor Singh Siddoo is visible standing on the roof.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sargeet Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Siddoo, Kapoor Singh
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Burnaby - Barnet Marine Park
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Reconstruction of Kapoor sawmills

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15185
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1947] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of (left to right) Jagdis, Sarjit and Besant Siddoo standing next to Harbans Koor Teja with baby and Kartar K. Sangha (company cook) on the site of Kapoor Sawmills Limited. The photograph was taken during the reconstruction of the Kapoor Sawmill Limited after the fire that occurred in Fe…
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[1947] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.6
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of (left to right) Jagdis, Sarjit and Besant Siddoo standing next to Harbans Koor Teja with baby and Kartar K. Sangha (company cook) on the site of Kapoor Sawmills Limited. The photograph was taken during the reconstruction of the Kapoor Sawmill Limited after the fire that occurred in February 1947.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sarjit Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Construction
Industries - Logging/lumber
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Siddoo, Besant
Siddoo, Jagdis
Siddoo, Sarjit
Teja, Harbans Koor
Sangha, Kartar K.
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
see page 73 in the book "In the Shadow by the Sea - recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "Reconstruction of the new mill after the fire of 1946."
Images
Less detail

Ross carrier with load

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15194
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a Ross straddle carrier transporting umber in the mill yard of Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Stacks of lumber stand next to the carrier and company lodgings can be seen on higher ground in the distance.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.15
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of a Ross straddle carrier transporting umber in the mill yard of Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Stacks of lumber stand next to the carrier and company lodgings can be seen on higher ground in the distance.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sargeet Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Transportation - Trucks
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Burnaby - Barnet Marine Park
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
See page 62 of book "In the Shadow by the Sea - Recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "a Ross Carrier moving lumber in the mill yard. These carriers replaced the horse drawn wagons that were used by the earlier mills, c.1940s"
Images
Less detail

Sarjit and Jagdis Siddoo

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15180
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of Jagdis and Sarjit Siddoo standing next to a cow in a field at Barnet. The Kapoor Sawmills Ltd. is visible in the background behind them.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Jagdis and Sarjit Siddoo standing next to a cow in a field at Barnet. The Kapoor Sawmills Ltd. is visible in the background behind them.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sarjit Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Animals - Cows
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Siddoo, Jagdis
Siddoo, Sarjit
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph was originally obtained used in the publication: "In the Shadow by the Sea - Recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village"
Images
Less detail

Siddoo and Teja Families

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto15210
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of members of the Teja and Siddoo families at the Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Family members are identified from left to right, front row: Hardev Siddoo and Harjeet Teja; middle row: Diljeet Teja, Lakhbeer Siddoo, Gurdeb Siddoo, Baldev Siddoo and Gurmeet Teja; back row: Gurdial Teja, Tara S…
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Pun…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Accession Code
BV019.32.30
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of members of the Teja and Siddoo families at the Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Family members are identified from left to right, front row: Hardev Siddoo and Harjeet Teja; middle row: Diljeet Teja, Lakhbeer Siddoo, Gurdeb Siddoo, Baldev Siddoo and Gurmeet Teja; back row: Gurdial Teja, Tara Siddoo and Kashmir Siddoo.
Administrative History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Singh Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sarjit Singh Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Sidoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), RunJet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill. Gurdial Singh Teja (1909-1972) and Harbans Kour Teja (1912-1972) were born in India and emigrated to British Columbia in the early 1930s. Gurdial and Harbans had three daughters, Diljeet, Gurmeet and Harjeet and one son, Hardev. Gurdial worked in sawmills on Vancouver Island until he moved the family to Barnet in 1938 to work at the Kapoor Sawmills Limited. The family lived on the site of the mill and the children attended Barnet school. While living at the mill, the Teja children took lessons in the teachings of Punjabi from Besant Kaur Siddoo. Following the fire in 1947, the Teja family moved to North Vancouver.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Siddoo, Lakhbeer
Siddoo, Gurdeb
Siddoo, Baldev
Siddoo, Kashmir
Siddoo, Tara
Teja, Diljeet
Teja, Gurdial
Siddoo, Hardev
Teja, Harjeet
Teja, Gurmeet
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Burnaby - Barnet Marine Park
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
See page 70 of book "In the Shadow by the Sea - Recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "..Siddoo and Teja families at Kapoor sawmills, c. 1940s. Back: Gurdial Teja, Tara Siddoo, Kashmir Siddoo. Middle: Diljeet Teja, Lakhbeer Siddoo, Gurdev Siddoo, Baldev Siddoo, Gurmeet Teja. Front: Hardev Teja, Harjeet Teja.
Photograph was mistaken in identifiying "Hardev Siddoo" as "Hardev Teja" (proper identification provided by family member)
Images
Less detail

Sikh couple at wedding

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto4406
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[between 1950 and 1960]
Collection/Fonds
Rhoda Jeffers fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : colour ; 9 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
A photograph of an unidentified Sikh couple getting married. An unidentified man wearing a white turban and beard is standing to the left of the couple and a column decorated with flowers. The groom is dressed in a dark suit with a white flower on his jacket. The bride is dressed in a saree and is …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Rhoda Jeffers fonds
Series
Jeffers family photographs series
Date
[between 1950 and 1960]
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : colour ; 9 x 13 cm
Accession Code
BV007.20.29
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
A photograph of an unidentified Sikh couple getting married. An unidentified man wearing a white turban and beard is standing to the left of the couple and a column decorated with flowers. The groom is dressed in a dark suit with a white flower on his jacket. The bride is dressed in a saree and is holding a bouquet of flowers. People behind the couple, are seated on the floor and standing. The women are wearing sarees.
Subjects
Ceremonies - Weddings
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Media Type
Photograph
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
13/05/2018
Images
Less detail

52 records – page 2 of 3.