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Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory251
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's essay entitled Stump Rangers, a listing of early settlers that includes addresses and short descriptions, essays on Confederation Park, land clearing and on Burnaby's first Council meeting.
Date Range
1865-1919
Length
0:10:18
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's essay entitled Stump Rangers, a listing of early settlers that includes addresses and short descriptions, essays on Confederation Park, land clearing and on Burnaby's first Council meeting.
Date Range
1865-1919
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:10:18
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Officials - Aldermen and Councillors
Land Clearing
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_1
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory252
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's memories of constructing a mill for Simpson & Giberson and of working on homes for himself, Angus McLean and Percy Little in the Lochdale area. He discusses the strike at Barnet mill and reads an essay written by Grace E. Carpenter. Land clear…
Date Range
1919-1955
Length
0:06:06
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's memories of constructing a mill for Simpson & Giberson and of working on homes for himself, Angus McLean and Percy Little in the Lochdale area. He discusses the strike at Barnet mill and reads an essay written by Grace E. Carpenter. Land clearing is described in detail. Alfred also relates a story from 1920 involving early settlers E. Powell and J. Amos.
Date Range
1919-1955
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:06:06
Subject
Land Clearing
Buildings - Industrial - Mills
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_2
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory253
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's descriptions of road construction in Burnaby, including the names of the settlers and logging companies involved in their construction. Alfred discusses the changes that took place during World War I, along with municipal Relief work that he t…
Date Range
1903-1940
Length
0:09:46
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's descriptions of road construction in Burnaby, including the names of the settlers and logging companies involved in their construction. Alfred discusses the changes that took place during World War I, along with municipal Relief work that he took part in at Burnaby Mountain. Alfred also discusses early schools and mentions his wife, Ada Bingham.
Date Range
1903-1940
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:46
Subject
Construction - Road Construction
Land Clearing
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_3
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory254
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's reading of an essay written by Captain Thomas S. Guns describing the Lozells district, as well as quoting single sentences of various other writers on the topic of Deer Lake and the Burnaby Lake District. Alfred mentions the first schools of B…
Date Range
1892-1955
Length
0:07:38
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's reading of an essay written by Captain Thomas S. Guns describing the Lozells district, as well as quoting single sentences of various other writers on the topic of Deer Lake and the Burnaby Lake District. Alfred mentions the first schools of Burnaby Lake and the "pleasure walk" along Douglas Road, from Vancouver to New Westminster.
Date Range
1892-1955
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:38
Historic Neighbourhood
Lozells (Historic Neighbourhood)
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_4
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory255
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's personal memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1919 and the work that the early settlers did for Burnaby, including a mention of woman's backbreaking labour. Alfred describes Burnaby as being organized around the two villages of Edmonds and V…
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:09:44
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's personal memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1919 and the work that the early settlers did for Burnaby, including a mention of woman's backbreaking labour. Alfred describes Burnaby as being organized around the two villages of Edmonds and Vancouver Heights. He discusses the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement of British Columbia.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:44
Subject
Protests and Demonstrations
Organizations
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_5
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory256
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's description of Commissioner Fraser taking power in Burnaby. Alfred mentions the Burnaby Housing Committee and the Willingdon Heights Subdivision before beginning reading his series of short stories. He reads "I ARRIVE IN BURNABY AND WE BUILD A…
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:09:06
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's description of Commissioner Fraser taking power in Burnaby. Alfred mentions the Burnaby Housing Committee and the Willingdon Heights Subdivision before beginning reading his series of short stories. He reads "I ARRIVE IN BURNABY AND WE BUILD A SHINGLE MILL/ 1919/ Burnaby Lake" as well as "WE BUILD A HOME AND DIG A WELL. 1920", both written in 1963.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:06
Subject
Organizations
Buildings - Industrial - Mills
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_6
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory257
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads "WHAT THE LOCHDALE DISTRICT LOOKED LIKE IN 1919-20-21-22" and "1st and SECOND SETTLERS IN THE LOCHDALE DISTRICT" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:09:44
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads "WHAT THE LOCHDALE DISTRICT LOOKED LIKE IN 1919-20-21-22" and "1st and SECOND SETTLERS IN THE LOCHDALE DISTRICT" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:44
Subject
Land Clearing
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_7
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory258
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "THE RUM RUNNERS AND BOOTLEG WHISKY IN BURNABY" and "BURNABY. NORTH. SOUTH. EAST? AND WEST 1892---1943" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1892-1963
Length
0:07:05
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "THE RUM RUNNERS AND BOOTLEG WHISKY IN BURNABY" and "BURNABY. NORTH. SOUTH. EAST? AND WEST 1892---1943" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1892-1963
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:05
Name
Hawthorn, Mary
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_8
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory259
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "The ICE AGE and other observations before Burnaby", "The Coming of the Great Trees in Burnaby", "AND THEN MODERN CIVILIZATION STRUCK BURNABY" each written in March of 1962.
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:07:31
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "The ICE AGE and other observations before Burnaby", "The Coming of the Great Trees in Burnaby", "AND THEN MODERN CIVILIZATION STRUCK BURNABY" each written in March of 1962.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:31
Subject
Plants - Trees
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_9
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track nine of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 10

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory260
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "OUR HOUSE BURNS DOWN. 1922. Sherlock and Kitchener." that he wrote in 1963. Alfred reads "The Story of the Burnaby Giants of long ago" written by Eloise Street, published in the I…
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:06:51
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "OUR HOUSE BURNS DOWN. 1922. Sherlock and Kitchener." that he wrote in 1963. Alfred reads "The Story of the Burnaby Giants of long ago" written by Eloise Street, published in the Indian Time Magazine March, 1954.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:06:51
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_10
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track ten of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 11

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory261
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's reading of the letter he wrote to the secretary of The Royal Arsenal Co-Operative Society in London England, November 1937, describing the Co-operative Movement in Vancouver.
Date Range
1937
Length
0:11:39
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's reading of the letter he wrote to the secretary of The Royal Arsenal Co-Operative Society in London England, November 1937, describing the Co-operative Movement in Vancouver.
Date Range
1937
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:11:39
Subject
Organizations
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_11
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eleven of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 12

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory262
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's summary of the recording that he has created, his closing remarks.
Date Range
1971
Length
0:02:37
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's summary of the recording that he has created, his closing remarks.
Date Range
1971
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:02:37
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_12
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track twelve of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory237
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Doreen "Pixie" McGeachie's introduction of the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself, telling the story of Archdeacon Richard Small. She begins by reading the book's forward, as well as the beginnings of the first chapter.
Date Range
1849-1872
Length
0:09:04
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Doreen "Pixie" McGeachie's introduction of the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself, telling the story of Archdeacon Richard Small. She begins by reading the book's forward, as well as the beginnings of the first chapter.
Date Range
1849-1872
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:04
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory238
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the earlier the impact of the gold rush on British Columbia and the formation of Lytton, BC.
Date Range
1803-1884
Length
0:09:29
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the earlier the impact of the gold rush on British Columbia and the formation of Lytton, BC.
Date Range
1803-1884
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:29
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory239
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes early missionary experiences in Lytton, including descriptions from the diary of Bishop Hill.
Date Range
1859-1867
Length
0:09:26
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes early missionary experiences in Lytton, including descriptions from the diary of Bishop Hill.
Date Range
1859-1867
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:26
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory240
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary at Lytton, British Columbia.
Date Range
1867-1868
Length
0:09:11
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary at Lytton, British Columbia.
Date Range
1867-1868
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:11
Name
Good, Reverend John Booth
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory241
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary in and around Lytton, British Columbia, including…
Date Range
1868-1872
Length
0:09:07
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary in and around Lytton, British Columbia, including the unhappy event of the death of his daughter.
Date Range
1868-1872
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:07
Name
Good, Reverend John Booth
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory242
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the mission at Lytton, British Columbia. An unidentified man speaks at the completion of the reading, giving som…
Date Range
1872-1874
Length
0:08:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the mission at Lytton, British Columbia. An unidentified man speaks at the completion of the reading, giving some details on various individuals discussed during the reading.
Date Range
1872-1874
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:08:15
Subject
Buildings - Religious
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with Aili Topalian by Eric Damer October 11, 2012 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory419
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains mainly to Aili (Rintanen) Topalian's parents. Aili tells the story of her parents meeting, getting married and eventually setting in Crabtown with their two children. She explains what it was like to live in Crabtown during the depression years; the homes were…
Date Range
1920-1945
Length
0:10:12
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains mainly to Aili (Rintanen) Topalian's parents. Aili tells the story of her parents meeting, getting married and eventually setting in Crabtown with their two children. She explains what it was like to live in Crabtown during the depression years; the homes were built on decks which were on top of pilings, that were sunk deep into the sand.
Date Range
1920-1945
Photo Info
Aili Rintanen (later Topalian) holding cat, next to her sister who has a rooster in her arms, [1937]. Item no. 337-003.
Length
0:10:12
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
October 11, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Aili (Rintanen) Topalian conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, October 11, 2012. Major theme discussed: growing up in Crabtown.
Biographical Notes
Aili Rintanen (later Topalian) came to British Columbia in 1936 from a homestead near Burnt Lake, Alberta. After a few months in Vancouver and then a Burnaby apartment, the Rintanens moved to a house on the Burrard Inlet. The family lived over the water, in a house built on a deck, secured to the top of pilings that were sunk deep into the sand. Aili's mother Aune Rintanen found work at a fish and chip shop in downtown Vancouver and her father Gus Rintanen worked in a nearby mill. Aili and her sister Trudi (later Tuomi), attended school in Burnaby. For nine years the Rintanens created a home for themselves in an area now called Crabtown, although no one living there called it that.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:39:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Topalian, Aili Rintanen
Interview Location
Interviewee's residence
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-028_ Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of interview with Aili Topalian

Images
Less detail

Interview with Aili Topalian by Eric Damer October 11, 2012 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory420
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Aili (Rintanen) Topalian's collection of photographs. Aili describes each photograph and tells stories of her childhood along the waterfront at Burrard Inlet; the homes of Crabtown were built on decks which were on top of pilings, that were sunk deep into t…
Date Range
1920-1945
Length
0:07:49
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Aili (Rintanen) Topalian's collection of photographs. Aili describes each photograph and tells stories of her childhood along the waterfront at Burrard Inlet; the homes of Crabtown were built on decks which were on top of pilings, that were sunk deep into the sand.
Date Range
1920-1945
Photo Info
Aili Rintanen (later Topalian) holding cat, next to her sister who has a rooster in her arms, [1937]. Item no. 337-003.
Length
0:07:49
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
October 11, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Aili (Rintanen) Topalian conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, October 11, 2012. Major theme discussed: growing up in Crabtown.
Biographical Notes
Aili Rintanen (later Topalian) came to British Columbia in 1936 from a homestead near Burnt Lake, Alberta. After a few months in Vancouver and then a Burnaby apartment, the Rintanens moved to a house on the Burrard Inlet. The family lived over the water, in a house built on a deck, secured to the top of pilings that were sunk deep into the sand. Aili's mother Aune Rintanen found work at a fish and chip shop in downtown Vancouver and her father Gus Rintanen worked in a nearby mill. Aili and her sister Trudi (later Tuomi), attended school in Burnaby. For nine years the Rintanens created a home for themselves in an area now called Crabtown, although no one living there called it that.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:39:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Topalian, Aili Rintanen
Interview Location
Interviewee's residence
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-028_ Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of interview with Aili Topalian

Images
Less detail

Interview with Aili Topalian by Eric Damer October 11, 2012 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory421
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Aili (Rintanen) Topalian's childhood along the waterfront at Burrard Inlet (the homes of Crabtown were built on decks which were on top of pilings, that were sunk deep into the sand). Aili describes her childhood neighbours, her family home, family friends,…
Date Range
1937-1949
Length
0:10:42
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Aili (Rintanen) Topalian's childhood along the waterfront at Burrard Inlet (the homes of Crabtown were built on decks which were on top of pilings, that were sunk deep into the sand). Aili describes her childhood neighbours, her family home, family friends, dance halls, and the Marine Building in Vancouver.
Date Range
1937-1949
Photo Info
Aili Rintanen (later Topalian) holding cat, next to her sister who has a rooster in her arms, [1937]. Item no. 337-003.
Length
0:10:42
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
October 11, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Aili (Rintanen) Topalian conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, October 11, 2012. Major theme discussed: growing up in Crabtown.
Biographical Notes
Aili Rintanen (later Topalian) came to British Columbia in 1936 from a homestead near Burnt Lake, Alberta. After a few months in Vancouver and then a Burnaby apartment, the Rintanens moved to a house on the Burrard Inlet. The family lived over the water, in a house built on a deck, secured to the top of pilings that were sunk deep into the sand. Aili's mother Aune Rintanen found work at a fish and chip shop in downtown Vancouver and her father Gus Rintanen worked in a nearby mill. Aili and her sister Trudi (later Tuomi), attended school in Burnaby. For nine years the Rintanens created a home for themselves in an area now called Crabtown, although no one living there called it that.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:39:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Topalian, Aili Rintanen
Interview Location
Interviewee's residence
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-028_ Track_3
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of recording of interview with Aili Topalian

Images
Less detail

Interview with Aili Topalian by Eric Damer October 11, 2012 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory422
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Aili (Rintanen) Topalian's memories of her early life in Burnaby. Aili discusses family friends, Maplewood flats in North Vancovuer, the waterfront at Burrard Inlet, owning Bantam Roosters and an Alsatian dog. She mentions some of the more challenging aspec…
Date Range
1937-1979
Length
0:10:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Aili (Rintanen) Topalian's memories of her early life in Burnaby. Aili discusses family friends, Maplewood flats in North Vancovuer, the waterfront at Burrard Inlet, owning Bantam Roosters and an Alsatian dog. She mentions some of the more challenging aspects of Crabtown.
Date Range
1937-1979
Photo Info
Aili Rintanen (later Topalian) holding cat, next to her sister who has a rooster in her arms, [1937]. Item no. 337-003.
Length
0:10:15
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
October 11, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Aili (Rintanen) Topalian conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, October 11, 2012. Major theme discussed: growing up in Crabtown.
Biographical Notes
Aili Rintanen (later Topalian) came to British Columbia in 1936 from a homestead near Burnt Lake, Alberta. After a few months in Vancouver and then a Burnaby apartment, the Rintanens moved to a house on the Burrard Inlet. The family lived over the water, in a house built on a deck, secured to the top of pilings that were sunk deep into the sand. Aili's mother Aune Rintanen found work at a fish and chip shop in downtown Vancouver and her father Gus Rintanen worked in a nearby mill. Aili and her sister Trudi (later Tuomi), attended school in Burnaby. For nine years the Rintanens created a home for themselves in an area now called Crabtown, although no one living there called it that.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:39:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Topalian, Aili Rintanen
Interview Location
Interviewee's residence
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-028_ Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of interview with Aili Topalian

Images
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Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory577
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s overview of her education and her career with City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services beginning in 1986. She tells a delightful story about Prince Charles and Princess Diana at the opening ceremony of the Variety Playground in …
Date Range
1980-2015
Length
0:12:40
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s overview of her education and her career with City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services beginning in 1986. She tells a delightful story about Prince Charles and Princess Diana at the opening ceremony of the Variety Playground in Central Park.
Date Range
1980-2015
Length
0:12:40
Name
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services
Central Park
Subject
Education
Occupations
Events - Royal Visits
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory578
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s first years of employment with Parks, her sources of knowledge about Burnaby Mountain, and the department’s activities in Burnaby Mountain Park. She talks about the loop trail planned for Burnaby Mountain Park in 1958, the Trans Canada Trail p…
Date Range
1958-1992
Length
0:12:40
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s first years of employment with Parks, her sources of knowledge about Burnaby Mountain, and the department’s activities in Burnaby Mountain Park. She talks about the loop trail planned for Burnaby Mountain Park in 1958, the Trans Canada Trail project, events and issues at the Pavilion, and keeping track of trails on SFU lands.
Date Range
1958-1992
Length
0:12:40
Name
Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Department
Burnaby Mountain Park
Kamui Mintara
Trans Canada Trail
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Features - Trails
Planning
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory579
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s historical overview of early public recreation, and intentions to set aside parkland, on Burnaby Mountain; Acting-Commissioner Richard Bolton’s signing of By Law 1772 that created Barnet Mountain Park in 1942; and her explanation about the fun…
Date Range
1910-1960
Length
0:21:54
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s historical overview of early public recreation, and intentions to set aside parkland, on Burnaby Mountain; Acting-Commissioner Richard Bolton’s signing of By Law 1772 that created Barnet Mountain Park in 1942; and her explanation about the function and kinds of park dedications used in Burnaby.
Date Range
1910-1960
Length
0:21:54
Name
Bolton, Richard
Barnet Mountain Park
Burnaby Mountain Park
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory580
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s overview of the history of the Trans Mountain tank farm site on Burnaby Mountain, the delineation of the first conservation area on the mountain in 1974, and the reasons for inclusion of the tank farm in the conservation area. She also talks a…
Date Range
1942-2015
Length
0:13:21
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s overview of the history of the Trans Mountain tank farm site on Burnaby Mountain, the delineation of the first conservation area on the mountain in 1974, and the reasons for inclusion of the tank farm in the conservation area. She also talks about Suncor’s site and its inclusion in the conservation area.
Date Range
1942-2015
Length
0:13:21
Name
Trans Mountain Oil Pipeline Company
Suncor Energy Inc.
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Industries - Petroleum Industry
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory581
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s explanation about how lands transferred from SFU to the City of Burnaby are subject to a conservation covenant with the province, what uses are allowed, and how covenant conservation principals are applied to all of Burnaby Mountain Conservati…
Date Range
1974-2015
Length
0:16:29
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s explanation about how lands transferred from SFU to the City of Burnaby are subject to a conservation covenant with the province, what uses are allowed, and how covenant conservation principals are applied to all of Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area with the exception of the Pavilion (Centennial Park) area. Also discussed is the value of the traditional landmark character of Burnaby Mountain and the different meanings given to that phrase.
Date Range
1974-2015
Length
0:16:29
Name
Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Features - Forests
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory582
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s views on the pressures on the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area from the SFU community and utility corridors; managing the edges of the conservation area on Barnet Highway; the history of the Burnaby Mountain Parkway; and a further explanatio…
Date Range
1950-2015
Length
0:22:57
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s views on the pressures on the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area from the SFU community and utility corridors; managing the edges of the conservation area on Barnet Highway; the history of the Burnaby Mountain Parkway; and a further explanation about kinds of park dedications, the origin of the covenant , and the protection status each provides. Also explained are the terms of the 1995 Memorandum of Understanding between the City of Burnaby and SFU.
Date Range
1950-2015
Length
0:22:57
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby Mountain Parkway
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Parkway
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory583
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s views on the origin and subsequent development and resolution of the dispute between SFU and the City of Burnaby over land ownership and land use on Burnaby Mountain.
Date Range
1963-2015
Length
0:13:39
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s views on the origin and subsequent development and resolution of the dispute between SFU and the City of Burnaby over land ownership and land use on Burnaby Mountain.
Date Range
1963-2015
Length
0:13:39
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Government
Land
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory584
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s explanation of the City of Burnaby’s Official Community Planning process and its application to development of SFU’s UniverCity.
Date Range
1995-2015
Length
0:12:25
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s explanation of the City of Burnaby’s Official Community Planning process and its application to development of SFU’s UniverCity.
Date Range
1995-2015
Length
0:12:25
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Simon Fraser University
UniverCity
Burnaby Planning and Building Department
Subject
Public Services - Municipal Services
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory585
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s story about the naming, planning and development of Richard Bolton Park at SFU’s UniverCity.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:14:42
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s story about the naming, planning and development of Richard Bolton Park at SFU’s UniverCity.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:14:42
Name
Bolton, Richard
Simon Fraser University
UniverCity
Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Department
Subject
Public Services - Municipal Services
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Richard Bolton Park
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_9
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track nine of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory58
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his first years in the Lochdale district of Burnaby, including his first job building a sawmill on Burnaby Lake.
Date Range
1892-1919
Length
0:07:22
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his first years in the Lochdale district of Burnaby, including his first job building a sawmill on Burnaby Lake.
Date Range
1892-1919
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:22
Subject
Occupations - Lumberjacks
Buildings - Industrial - Sawmills
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory59
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of the fires in Burnaby during his first year of marriage to Ada.
Date Range
1919-1920
Length
0:08:28
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of the fires in Burnaby during his first year of marriage to Ada.
Date Range
1919-1920
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:08:28
Subject
Natural Phenomena - Fires
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Sprott Station
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory60
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of tree felling in Burnaby.
Date Range
1917-1935
Length
0:08:22
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of tree felling in Burnaby.
Date Range
1917-1935
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:08:22
Subject
Occupations - Lumberjacks
Plants - Trees
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory61
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's employment from 1912 to 1926, including his years at Balentine Pier.
Date Range
1912-1926
Length
0:07:17
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's employment from 1912 to 1926, including his years at Balentine Pier.
Date Range
1912-1926
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:17
Subject
Occupations - Labourers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory62
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's employment from 1926 to 1928, including his time working at a hunting lodge.
Date Range
1926-1928
Length
0:07:45
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's employment from 1926 to 1928, including his time working at a hunting lodge.
Date Range
1926-1928
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:45
Subject
Occupations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory63
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's employment just as the Depression hit. Alfred tells antecdotes, both amusing and disturbing, about working at a ranch out in Coquitlam.
Date Range
1928-1929
Length
0:09:46
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's employment just as the Depression hit. Alfred tells antecdotes, both amusing and disturbing, about working at a ranch out in Coquitlam.
Date Range
1928-1929
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:46
Subject
Occupations
Historic Neighbourhood
British Columbia - Coquitlam
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory64
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's entrepreneurial project undertaken during the Depression.
Date Range
1928-1929
Length
0:05:09
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's entrepreneurial project undertaken during the Depression.
Date Range
1928-1929
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:05:09
Subject
Occupations - Entrepreneurs
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory66
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement with the Army of the Common Good, including asserting influence on the Communist Party and the opening of the first Common Good store.
Date Range
1932
Length
0:09:43
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement with the Army of the Common Good, including asserting influence on the Communist Party and the opening of the first Common Good store.
Date Range
1932
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:43
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Organizations
Buildings - Commercial - Grocery Stores
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_9
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track nine of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 10

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory67
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of the Army of the Common Good, specifically how Labour Units (LU) worked.
Date Range
1932-1933
Length
0:09:36
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of the Army of the Common Good, specifically how Labour Units (LU) worked.
Date Range
1932-1933
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:36
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Grocery Stores
Persons - Volunteers
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_10
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track ten of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 11

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory68
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1936-1939
Length
0:08:52
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1936-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:08:52
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_11
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eleven of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 12

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory69
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1936-1939
Length
0:08:24
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1936-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:08:24
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_12
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track twelve of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 13

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory70
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of Unemployment organizations in Burnaby and his own participation in Relief work.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:07:34
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of Unemployment organizations in Burnaby and his own participation in Relief work.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:34
Subject
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_13
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track thirteen of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 14

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory71
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's thoughts on the outcomes of participating in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1932-1939
Length
0:07:47
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's thoughts on the outcomes of participating in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1932-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:47
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_14
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track fourteen of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Allan Nixon by Rod Fowler February 21, 1990 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory464
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about how Al Nixon began collecting and saving photographs, records and stories about the history of the Burnaby Fire Department in the mid 1980's. Finding the first scrapbook of photographs lead to other discoveries that placed the beginning of the Burnaby Fire Dep…
Date Range
1911-1990
Length
00:05:22
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about how Al Nixon began collecting and saving photographs, records and stories about the history of the Burnaby Fire Department in the mid 1980's. Finding the first scrapbook of photographs lead to other discoveries that placed the beginning of the Burnaby Fire Department in 1911.
Date Range
1911-1990
Length
00:05:22
Subject
Public Services - Fire Protection
Documentary Artifacts - Photographs
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 21, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Al Nixon, conducted by Rod Fowler. Al Nixon was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about the history and operations of the Burnaby Fire Department from its beginning in 1911 to 1990, and Al Nixon’s stories about the various ways photographs, records and artifacts about the department were collected and saved. The interview takes place while looking at photographs, but the information is clear nonetheless (His photographs have been deposited in the Burnaby Archives). Al Nixon also talks about his father's career as a firefighter, and about his Douglas grandparents and their home “The Gables” [Seven Gables] and neighbourhood in Burquitlam. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Al Nixon was born in New Westminster Feb. 8, 1936, the son of Provincial Fire Marshal Basil Nixon (1904-1975) and Agnes Douglas (1909-?). His mother’s family immigrated to Canada from Scotland in 1922 and lived in a large ca. 1900 home in Burquitlam at 9957 Sullivan Road called “Seven Gables” (recently demolished). His grandfather Thomas Douglas, a Coquitlam Councillor and Socialist, was murdered in 1934 in his North Road service station. Al Nixon began his career as a firefighter with the Burnaby Fire Department in 1957, eventually becoming Deputy Fire Chief Operations in 1987 and Fire Chief in 1991, before retiring in 1993. In the mid 1980's Al Nixon became interested in the department’s history after finding a photograph scrapbook at one of the firehalls. It was in very bad condition but he recognized its value and began a project to collect and save photographs, artifacts and stories about the Burnaby Fire Department, a 6 month project that turned into years. The photographs and information gathered by Al Nixon became part of Douglas Penn’s book “Follow that Fire: the history of the Burnaby Fire Department”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:43:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Nixon, Al
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-014_Track_1
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Al Nixon

Less detail

Interview with Allan Nixon by Rod Fowler February 21, 1990 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory465
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Al Nixon describing the location of the North Burnaby Fire Department fire hall and the location of the six fire halls subsequently built for the combined north and south department. He also talks about Fred Blake, Lewis Auvache and Henry Chapman, early member…
Date Range
1936-1990
Length
00:04:08
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Al Nixon describing the location of the North Burnaby Fire Department fire hall and the location of the six fire halls subsequently built for the combined north and south department. He also talks about Fred Blake, Lewis Auvache and Henry Chapman, early members of the department who were also interested in the department's history.
Date Range
1936-1990
Length
00:04:08
Name
Blake, Fred
Auvache, Lewis
Chapman, Henry H.
Subject
Public Services - Fire Protection
Buildings - Civic
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 21, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Al Nixon, conducted by Rod Fowler. Al Nixon was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about the history and operations of the Burnaby Fire Department from its beginning in 1911 to 1990, and Al Nixon’s stories about the various ways photographs, records and artifacts about the department were collected and saved. The interview takes place while looking at photographs, but the information is clear nonetheless (His photographs have been deposited in the Burnaby Archives). Al Nixon also talks about his father's career as a firefighter, and about his Douglas grandparents and their home “The Gables” [Seven Gables] and neighbourhood in Burquitlam. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Al Nixon was born in New Westminster Feb. 8, 1936, the son of Provincial Fire Marshal Basil Nixon (1904-1975) and Agnes Douglas (1909-?). His mother’s family immigrated to Canada from Scotland in 1922 and lived in a large ca. 1900 home in Burquitlam at 9957 Sullivan Road called “Seven Gables” (recently demolished). His grandfather Thomas Douglas, a Coquitlam Councillor and Socialist, was murdered in 1934 in his North Road service station. Al Nixon began his career as a firefighter with the Burnaby Fire Department in 1957, eventually becoming Deputy Fire Chief Operations in 1987 and Fire Chief in 1991, before retiring in 1993. In the mid 1980's Al Nixon became interested in the department’s history after finding a photograph scrapbook at one of the firehalls. It was in very bad condition but he recognized its value and began a project to collect and save photographs, artifacts and stories about the Burnaby Fire Department, a 6 month project that turned into years. The photographs and information gathered by Al Nixon became part of Douglas Penn’s book “Follow that Fire: the history of the Burnaby Fire Department”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:43:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Nixon, Al
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-014_Track_2
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Al Nixon

Less detail

Interview with Allan Nixon by Rod Fowler February 21, 1990 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory466
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about the equipment used by the fire department over the years, in particular about the pump and ladder trucks, and about Chief Waddell's wise choice of locations for the fire halls.
Date Range
1927-1990
Length
00:04:05
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about the equipment used by the fire department over the years, in particular about the pump and ladder trucks, and about Chief Waddell's wise choice of locations for the fire halls.
Date Range
1927-1990
Length
00:04:05
Name
Waddell, Gordon
Subject
Public Services - Fire Protection
Buildings - Civic
Transportation - Fire Trucks
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 21, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Al Nixon, conducted by Rod Fowler. Al Nixon was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about the history and operations of the Burnaby Fire Department from its beginning in 1911 to 1990, and Al Nixon’s stories about the various ways photographs, records and artifacts about the department were collected and saved. The interview takes place while looking at photographs, but the information is clear nonetheless (His photographs have been deposited in the Burnaby Archives). Al Nixon also talks about his father's career as a firefighter, and about his Douglas grandparents and their home “The Gables” [Seven Gables] and neighbourhood in Burquitlam. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Al Nixon was born in New Westminster Feb. 8, 1936, the son of Provincial Fire Marshal Basil Nixon (1904-1975) and Agnes Douglas (1909-?). His mother’s family immigrated to Canada from Scotland in 1922 and lived in a large ca. 1900 home in Burquitlam at 9957 Sullivan Road called “Seven Gables” (recently demolished). His grandfather Thomas Douglas, a Coquitlam Councillor and Socialist, was murdered in 1934 in his North Road service station. Al Nixon began his career as a firefighter with the Burnaby Fire Department in 1957, eventually becoming Deputy Fire Chief Operations in 1987 and Fire Chief in 1991, before retiring in 1993. In the mid 1980's Al Nixon became interested in the department’s history after finding a photograph scrapbook at one of the firehalls. It was in very bad condition but he recognized its value and began a project to collect and save photographs, artifacts and stories about the Burnaby Fire Department, a 6 month project that turned into years. The photographs and information gathered by Al Nixon became part of Douglas Penn’s book “Follow that Fire: the history of the Burnaby Fire Department”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:43:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Nixon, Al
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-014_Track_3
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Al Nixon

Less detail

Interview with Allan Nixon by Rod Fowler February 21, 1990 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory467
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about the inhalator equipment used by the department starting in 1945. Al Nixon describes 50% of the calls received by the department as "pre-hospital care", and that the department is an emergency service rather than just a fire department. He also describes the 19…
Date Range
1945-1990
Length
00:06:11
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about the inhalator equipment used by the department starting in 1945. Al Nixon describes 50% of the calls received by the department as "pre-hospital care", and that the department is an emergency service rather than just a fire department. He also describes the 1990 department staffing and equipment level.
Date Range
1945-1990
Length
00:06:11
Subject
Public Services - Fire Protection
Emergency Measures
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 21, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Al Nixon, conducted by Rod Fowler. Al Nixon was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about the history and operations of the Burnaby Fire Department from its beginning in 1911 to 1990, and Al Nixon’s stories about the various ways photographs, records and artifacts about the department were collected and saved. The interview takes place while looking at photographs, but the information is clear nonetheless (His photographs have been deposited in the Burnaby Archives). Al Nixon also talks about his father's career as a firefighter, and about his Douglas grandparents and their home “The Gables” [Seven Gables] and neighbourhood in Burquitlam. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Al Nixon was born in New Westminster Feb. 8, 1936, the son of Provincial Fire Marshal Basil Nixon (1904-1975) and Agnes Douglas (1909-?). His mother’s family immigrated to Canada from Scotland in 1922 and lived in a large ca. 1900 home in Burquitlam at 9957 Sullivan Road called “Seven Gables” (recently demolished). His grandfather Thomas Douglas, a Coquitlam Councillor and Socialist, was murdered in 1934 in his North Road service station. Al Nixon began his career as a firefighter with the Burnaby Fire Department in 1957, eventually becoming Deputy Fire Chief Operations in 1987 and Fire Chief in 1991, before retiring in 1993. In the mid 1980's Al Nixon became interested in the department’s history after finding a photograph scrapbook at one of the firehalls. It was in very bad condition but he recognized its value and began a project to collect and save photographs, artifacts and stories about the Burnaby Fire Department, a 6 month project that turned into years. The photographs and information gathered by Al Nixon became part of Douglas Penn’s book “Follow that Fire: the history of the Burnaby Fire Department”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:43:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Nixon, Al
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-014_Track_4
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Al Nixon

Less detail

Interview with Allan Nixon by Rod Fowler February 21, 1990 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory468
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about the purchase and location of the first fire hydrants in Burnaby by the Waterworks Department, and about disputes about the areas covered by adjacent fire departments, in particular who covered District Lot 172 between Burnaby and New Westminster.
Date Range
1980-1990
Length
00:05:26
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about the purchase and location of the first fire hydrants in Burnaby by the Waterworks Department, and about disputes about the areas covered by adjacent fire departments, in particular who covered District Lot 172 between Burnaby and New Westminster.
Date Range
1980-1990
Length
00:05:26
Subject
Public Services - Fire Protection
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 21, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Al Nixon, conducted by Rod Fowler. Al Nixon was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about the history and operations of the Burnaby Fire Department from its beginning in 1911 to 1990, and Al Nixon’s stories about the various ways photographs, records and artifacts about the department were collected and saved. The interview takes place while looking at photographs, but the information is clear nonetheless (His photographs have been deposited in the Burnaby Archives). Al Nixon also talks about his father's career as a firefighter, and about his Douglas grandparents and their home “The Gables” [Seven Gables] and neighbourhood in Burquitlam. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Al Nixon was born in New Westminster Feb. 8, 1936, the son of Provincial Fire Marshal Basil Nixon (1904-1975) and Agnes Douglas (1909-?). His mother’s family immigrated to Canada from Scotland in 1922 and lived in a large ca. 1900 home in Burquitlam at 9957 Sullivan Road called “Seven Gables” (recently demolished). His grandfather Thomas Douglas, a Coquitlam Councillor and Socialist, was murdered in 1934 in his North Road service station. Al Nixon began his career as a firefighter with the Burnaby Fire Department in 1957, eventually becoming Deputy Fire Chief Operations in 1987 and Fire Chief in 1991, before retiring in 1993. In the mid 1980's Al Nixon became interested in the department’s history after finding a photograph scrapbook at one of the firehalls. It was in very bad condition but he recognized its value and began a project to collect and save photographs, artifacts and stories about the Burnaby Fire Department, a 6 month project that turned into years. The photographs and information gathered by Al Nixon became part of Douglas Penn’s book “Follow that Fire: the history of the Burnaby Fire Department”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:43:35
Other Tracks
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Interviewee Name
Nixon, Al
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-014_Track_5
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Al Nixon

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Interview with Allan Nixon by Rod Fowler February 21, 1990 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory469
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Al Nixon describing his work as Deputy Fire Chief and some of the challenges facing the department: the need for more and better equipment and halls to address fires in new kinds of structures (e.g. Metrotown parkade) and growing areas
Date Range
1980-1990
Length
00:05:58
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Al Nixon describing his work as Deputy Fire Chief and some of the challenges facing the department: the need for more and better equipment and halls to address fires in new kinds of structures (e.g. Metrotown parkade) and growing areas
Date Range
1980-1990
Length
00:05:58
Subject
Public Services - Fire Protection
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 21, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Al Nixon, conducted by Rod Fowler. Al Nixon was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about the history and operations of the Burnaby Fire Department from its beginning in 1911 to 1990, and Al Nixon’s stories about the various ways photographs, records and artifacts about the department were collected and saved. The interview takes place while looking at photographs, but the information is clear nonetheless (His photographs have been deposited in the Burnaby Archives). Al Nixon also talks about his father's career as a firefighter, and about his Douglas grandparents and their home “The Gables” [Seven Gables] and neighbourhood in Burquitlam. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Al Nixon was born in New Westminster Feb. 8, 1936, the son of Provincial Fire Marshal Basil Nixon (1904-1975) and Agnes Douglas (1909-?). His mother’s family immigrated to Canada from Scotland in 1922 and lived in a large ca. 1900 home in Burquitlam at 9957 Sullivan Road called “Seven Gables” (recently demolished). His grandfather Thomas Douglas, a Coquitlam Councillor and Socialist, was murdered in 1934 in his North Road service station. Al Nixon began his career as a firefighter with the Burnaby Fire Department in 1957, eventually becoming Deputy Fire Chief Operations in 1987 and Fire Chief in 1991, before retiring in 1993. In the mid 1980's Al Nixon became interested in the department’s history after finding a photograph scrapbook at one of the firehalls. It was in very bad condition but he recognized its value and began a project to collect and save photographs, artifacts and stories about the Burnaby Fire Department, a 6 month project that turned into years. The photographs and information gathered by Al Nixon became part of Douglas Penn’s book “Follow that Fire: the history of the Burnaby Fire Department”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:43:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Nixon, Al
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-014_Track_6
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Al Nixon

Less detail

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