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Sun Yat Sen : great man of the century

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumlibrary7598
[Guangdong, China]: China Post , 2011. (Book) 951.041 SUN
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection
Reference Collection
Type
Book
Call No.
951.041 SUN
Place of Publication
[Guangdong, China]
Publisher
China Post
Publication Date
2011
Physical Description
21 p. : ill (some col.) ; 26 x 33 cm
Subjects LoC
Biography
Postage stamps
Notes
Text in English and Chinese (Simplified)
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.679
Description
Yellow rectangular metal tin with lip on the bottom; ornate label is in blue & white This artifact is second from the right in the photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.679
Description
Yellow rectangular metal tin with lip on the bottom; ornate label is in blue & white This artifact is second from the right in the photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Medical & Psychological T&E
Marks/Labels
Printed Chinese characters are directly translated to; head, stab/sting, pain, effective, pill. Translation has been adjusted for English comprehension to: "Head pain pill". Brand name: Sushengrui Yongshoutang, made in Guangdong. Other characters translate to: "Nobody sees the alchemy/drug development, but god knows the heart/good intention." Medicine appears to treat headache.
Measurements
6 cm height x 5 cm width x 5 cm length
Country Made
China
Province Made
Guangdong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.549
Description
Box, green outside, pink inside; with lid, blue mottled design [part of the lid has become detached, but it is not numbered]
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.549
Description
Box, green outside, pink inside; with lid, blue mottled design [part of the lid has become detached, but it is not numbered]
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
07. Distribution & Transportation Artifacts
Classification
Container
Marks/Labels
White label with red lettering. English translation adjusted to Guangdong, Citrus reticulata Blanco. Guangdong (a province), is Huazhou (a city), Deshengtang (name of a shop), selected, correct or positive, typical, treasure, mountain, orange, red; medicine. This pill is made of many unidentified components. "White turbidity," refers to whitish and cloudy urine. "White turbidity" is a symptom of tiredness, deficiency in kidney qi, and alcohol abuse leading to spleen and stomach disorders. The pill is used to improved the kidneys and nourish the blood, as well as to treat back pain, weakness in the knees, the frequent need to urindate, rheumatism, bone pain, and neurasthenia.
Measurements
25 cm in height x 3 cm in width
Country Made
China
Province Made
Guangdong
Site/City Made
Huazhou
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.71
Description
English Name: Kellogg’s Seahorse Chinese Pinyin Name: Haima (HaiMa) Physical Description: dried white seahorse, curled tail, head tucked in to body Production Regions: Primarily produced along the coastline of Guangdong, Fujian and Taiwan. Functions: Warms kidney, invigorates yang, disperses binds,…
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.71
Description
English Name: Kellogg’s Seahorse Chinese Pinyin Name: Haima (HaiMa) Physical Description: dried white seahorse, curled tail, head tucked in to body Production Regions: Primarily produced along the coastline of Guangdong, Fujian and Taiwan. Functions: Warms kidney, invigorates yang, disperses binds, reduces swelling. Apply to impotence, enuresis, panting due to kidney deficiency, abdominal mass accumulation, traumatic injury, externally used to abscess, furuncle and sore.
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
Reference
Chinese Medicinal Material Images Database, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University. URL: http://libproject.hkbu.edu.hk/was40/detail?channelid=47953&lang=eng&searchword=pid=B00377
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.221
Description
Rectangular, unpainted tin box with top. Chinese characters on yellow coloured label attached to one side. Some water marks and discoloration on label. Box is first from left in photo.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company," Victoria, B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.221
Description
Rectangular, unpainted tin box with top. Chinese characters on yellow coloured label attached to one side. Some water marks and discoloration on label. Box is first from left in photo.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company," Victoria, B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Label contains three Chinese characters that are literally translated to: "sea" and "gold" and "sand." When adjusted to English comprehension, product is "Spora Lygodii / Japanese Climbing Fern Spore." The mature spore of the perennial climbing fern Lygodium japonicum (Thunb.) of Family Lygodiaceae, this can be found in Guangdong and Zhejiang provinces, etc.
Measurements
8 cm height x 10 cm width x 13 cm length
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1413
Description
Wooden box with rectangular orange label containing 3 black Chinese characters placed vertically.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store “Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.”, Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1413
Description
Wooden box with rectangular orange label containing 3 black Chinese characters placed vertically.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store “Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.”, Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Label contains 3 Chinese characters that are literally translated to: "gold"; "hairpin" followed by a character that was a former unit of measurement. When adjusted for English comprehension, product is either stem of Noble Dendrobium, White Dendrobium, Moniliform Dendrobiumtem, Doublelip Dendrobium or Hooked Dendrobium. It’s normally found on the mountains, mostly found in Taiwan, Hubei, Guangdong, Guangxi, Sichuan, Guizhou, and Yunnan. It’s a good support for stomach and treatment of fever. It helps to treat after injury and also good for vision.
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.32
Description
English Name: Villous Amomun Fruit Chinese Pinyin Name: Sharen (ShaRen / SuoShaMiRen) Physical Description: many small dried fruits, flattened ovals, ranging from pale tan to darker reddish brown colour; some have longitudinal ridges, others appear wrinkled, with stem protrusion one end or hole; at…
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.32
Description
English Name: Villous Amomun Fruit Chinese Pinyin Name: Sharen (ShaRen / SuoShaMiRen) Physical Description: many small dried fruits, flattened ovals, ranging from pale tan to darker reddish brown colour; some have longitudinal ridges, others appear wrinkled, with stem protrusion one end or hole; at least one is broken open Production Regions: Primarily produced in the Chinese provinces of Guangdong, Guangxi. Imported sha ren is produced in Vietnam, Thailand, Myanmar, and Indonesia. Functions: Transforms dampness, increases appetite, warms spleen, relieves diarrhea, regulates qi, calms fetus. Apply to retention of dampness in the middle, abdominal fullness and anorexia, deficiency and cold spleen and stomach, vomit and diarrhea, pernicious vomiting, restless fetal movements.
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
Reference
Chinese Medicinal Material Images Database, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University. URL: http://libproject.hkbu.edu.hk/was40/detail?channelid=47953&lang=eng&searchword=pid=B00254 ; Compendium of Materia Medica (Bencao Gangmu), 2003;
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.45
Description
English Name: Chinese Eaglewood / Tambac Chinese Pinyin Name: Chenxiang (ChenXiang) Physical Description: wood fragments, small, light to medium brown; thin shavings or splinters in varying sizes Production Regions: Primarily produced in the Chinese provinces of Guangdong, Hainan, Guangxi, Fujian, …
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.45
Description
English Name: Chinese Eaglewood / Tambac Chinese Pinyin Name: Chenxiang (ChenXiang) Physical Description: wood fragments, small, light to medium brown; thin shavings or splinters in varying sizes Production Regions: Primarily produced in the Chinese provinces of Guangdong, Hainan, Guangxi, Fujian, Taiwan. Functions: Moves qi and relieves pain, warms the center and stops vomiting, promotes qi absorption and calms panting. Apply to chest and abdominal swelling pain, gastric cold and vomiting and hiccoughs, deficiency of kidney and inability to breathe due to adverse rising of qi.
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
Reference
Chinese Medicinal Material Images Database, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University. URL: http://libproject.hkbu.edu.hk/was40/detail?channelid=47953&lang=eng&searchword=pid=B00421 Compendium of Materia Medica (Bencao Gangmu), 2003; Taiwan Herbal Pharmacopeia, 2014.
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.52
Description
English Name: Clove Chinese Pinyin Name: Dingxiang (DingXiang) Physical Description: small dried flower buds, dark brown and twiglike with rounded heads held by 4 sepals; lower portions are slightly tapered and rough Production Regions: Primarily produced in Zanzibar Island of Tanzania, as well as …
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.52
Description
English Name: Clove Chinese Pinyin Name: Dingxiang (DingXiang) Physical Description: small dried flower buds, dark brown and twiglike with rounded heads held by 4 sepals; lower portions are slightly tapered and rough Production Regions: Primarily produced in Zanzibar Island of Tanzania, as well as Malaysia and Indonesia. In China, it has been introduced into cultivation in the provinces of Hainan and Guangdong. Functions: Warms stomach, warms kidney. Apply to cold stomach and swelling pain, hiccup, vomiting and diarrhea, impediment, colic, ozostomia, toothache.
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
Reference
Chinese Medicinal Material Images Database, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University. URL: http://libproject.hkbu.edu.hk/was40/detail?channelid=47953&lang=eng&searchword=pid=B00299 ; Compendium of Materia Medica (Bencao Gangmu), 2003;
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.55
Description
English Name: Lobed Kudzuvine Root Chinese Pinyin Name: Gegen (GeGen) Physical Description: roots, dried, flat, rough dark brown surfaces with longitudinal wrinkles; mostly rectangular but tapered in places Production Regions: Primarily produced in the Chinese provinces of Henan, Zhejiang, Guangdon…
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.55
Description
English Name: Lobed Kudzuvine Root Chinese Pinyin Name: Gegen (GeGen) Physical Description: roots, dried, flat, rough dark brown surfaces with longitudinal wrinkles; mostly rectangular but tapered in places Production Regions: Primarily produced in the Chinese provinces of Henan, Zhejiang, Guangdong, Hunan. Functions: Resolves exterior, abates heat, engenders fluid, outthrusts measles, raise yang, relieves diarrhea. Apply to fever and headache caused by exogenous pathogens, stiffness of the neck due to hypertension, hydrodipsia, diabetes, measles without adequate eruptions, dysentery of heat type, diarrhea.
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
Reference
Chinese Medicinal Material Images Database, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University. URL: http://libproject.hkbu.edu.hk/was40/detail?channelid=47953&lang=eng&searchword=pid=B00063 Compendium of Materia Medica (Bencao Gangmu), 2003; Taiwan Herbal Pharmacopeia, 2014.
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.70
Description
English Name: Tomentose Pummelo Peel Chinese Pinyin Name: Huajuhong (HuaJuHong / YouPi) Physical Description: large pieces of dried fruit peel, medium tan colour; intact peel is inside-out, has 4 points curving inwards; outer peel is finely pitted, inner peel is whitish with veins; 1 point broken o…
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.70
Description
English Name: Tomentose Pummelo Peel Chinese Pinyin Name: Huajuhong (HuaJuHong / YouPi) Physical Description: large pieces of dried fruit peel, medium tan colour; intact peel is inside-out, has 4 points curving inwards; outer peel is finely pitted, inner peel is whitish with veins; 1 point broken off halfway, another near tip Production Regions: Primarily produced in the Chinese area of Huazhou and Lianjiang of Guangdong. Functions: Disperses cold, dries dampness, promotes qi, eliminates phlegm. Apply to cough due to wind-cold, itching throat with phlegm, dyspepsia and chronic alcoholism, vomiting, nausea, painful abdominal mass.
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974.
Reference
Chinese Medicinal Material Images Database, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University. URL: http://libproject.hkbu.edu.hk/was40/detail?channelid=47953&lang=eng&searchword=pid=B00183 ; http://libproject.hkbu.edu.hk/was40/detail?channelid=1288&lang=en&record=1&searchword=herb_id=%27D00050%27%20OR%20herb_id=%27D00051%27 ; Compendium of Materia Medica (Bencao Gangmu), 2003;
Marks/Labels
See HV975.5.1165 for label that likely accompanied the pummelo peel.
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.668
Description
container; circular, flat, metal tin with lid; white label with red Chinese characters; partial label on side.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C. Watsons is a member of the A.S. Watson Group, which started as the Canton Dispensary and Soda Water Establishment, founded in 1828 as a small dispensary, with the mission to provide free medical serv…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.668
Description
container; circular, flat, metal tin with lid; white label with red Chinese characters; partial label on side.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C. Watsons is a member of the A.S. Watson Group, which started as the Canton Dispensary and Soda Water Establishment, founded in 1828 as a small dispensary, with the mission to provide free medical services to the poor people of the Southern Chinese province of Guangdong (also known as Canton). It moved to Hong Kong and re-emerged as the Hong Kong Dispensary from 1 January 1843. The company began trading under the name A.S. Watson & Company in 1871. Now, the A.S. Watson Group (or A.S. Watson or ASW) with headquarter located in Hong Kong, is the world's largest health and beauty retail group, with over 13,900 stores in 24 markets worldwide serving over 28 million customers per week, and over 3 billion customers and members throughout.
Marks/Labels
Label contains characters that are literally translated to: "Watsons", a brand name; "hurt" or "wound", "wind", "cold", "nose", "smoke", and "snuff". When adjusted for English comprehension, product is "Cold and Sinus snuff". This product will treat symptoms due to cold such as headaches, dizziness, nasal congestion, and others. Watsons is a member of the A.S. Watson Group, which started as the Canton Dispensary and Soda Water Establishment, founded in 1828 as a small dispensary, with the mission to provide free medical services to the poor people of the Southern Chinese province of Guangdong (also known as Canton). It moved to Hong Kong and re-emerged as the Hong Kong Dispensary from 1 January 1843. The company began trading under the name A.S. Watson & Company in 1871. Now, the A.S. Watson Group (or A.S. Watson or ASW) with headquarter located in Hong Kong, is the world's largest health and beauty retail group, with over 13,900 stores in 24 markets worldwide serving over 28 million customers per week, and over 3 billion customers and members throughout.
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1226
Description
Rectangular-shaped, silver-coloured bin. Rusty, Dented on the side. Small metal handle either side. Brown paper label featuring hand painted Chinese characters.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1226
Description
Rectangular-shaped, silver-coloured bin. Rusty, Dented on the side. Small metal handle either side. Brown paper label featuring hand painted Chinese characters.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Chinese characters translated word for word: born/raw; rock; to decide. This has been altered for English comprehension to mean: "Raw abalone shell" or "Concha Haliotidis". Product is variously coloured abalone. The Haliotis diversicolor, H. discus, H. ovina are from coast of Guangdong, FUjian and Hainan provinces in China. Slightly salty taste. For liver meridian. Calm the liver and subpress yang, clear liver heat and improve vision. To treat headache, dizziness, epileptic seizures, osteopyrexia and fever, blood-shot eyes, vision-disturbed ophthalmopathy, blurred vision.
Measurements
24 cm height x 16 cm length x 14 cm width
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1249
Description
Rectangular metal bin with two small D shaped handles welded on opposite sides of the rim. Appears to have some tarnish and rust. Orange rectangular paper label with black Chinese characters is attached lengthwise to narrower side of bin. Label is ripped on left side.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat kee & Company," Victoria, B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1249
Description
Rectangular metal bin with two small D shaped handles welded on opposite sides of the rim. Appears to have some tarnish and rust. Orange rectangular paper label with black Chinese characters is attached lengthwise to narrower side of bin. Label is ripped on left side.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat kee & Company," Victoria, B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
The label contains three Chinese characters that are literally translated to: "white", "pine, loose" and "incense, appetizing, fragrant." When adjusted for English comprehension, product is "galbanum." Galbanum is produced in Guangdong, Guangxi, Fujian, Jiangxi, Zhejiang, and Anhui in China. It is commonly prescribed as a treatment to relieve rheumatic pains and colds as well as a cure for hemoorrhoids, sprains, and itching.
Measurements
22 cm H x 17 cm W x 17 cm D
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.794
Description
Rectangular cardboard box; bottom of box has green exterior and pink interior; lid of box is covered in marbled blue and beige pattern; upper left corner of lid has rectangular white label containing red Chinese characters.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store “Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.”, Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.794
Description
Rectangular cardboard box; bottom of box has green exterior and pink interior; lid of box is covered in marbled blue and beige pattern; upper left corner of lid has rectangular white label containing red Chinese characters.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store “Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.”, Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Label contains characters that are literally translated to: "Guangdong", the town of Huazhou", the name of the manufacturer, "Deshengtang", "best selection", "authentic / local", a place name, "a type of dried pomelo fruit local to Huazhou". When adjusted for English comprehension, product is "dried pomelo". It is also known as Citrus grandis Tomentosa and Citrus grandis(L.) Osbeck. The fruit is shaped in irregular rectangular pieces and most of them are thin pieces. The surface is a cinnamon brown colour. After storing for a while, the colour will turn dark brown. The fruit is very fragile and the taste is bitter. It cures coughing, nausea and vomiting.
Measurements
4 cm height x 10 cm width x 20 cm length
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.256
Description
Round based metal canister with lid and hand-written paper label. Artifact is second on left in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.256
Description
Round based metal canister with lid and hand-written paper label. Artifact is second on left in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Label contains 3 Chinese characters that are literally translated to : "camphot/cinnamonum camphyara" and "wood" and "son/child". When adjusted for English comprehension, the product is Zhangmuzi. Zhangmuzi is a mature fruit of Cinnamomum Cinnamomum camphora. Plant camphor, located in Guangdong, Guangxi, Yunnan, Guizhou, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Anhui, Fujian, Taiwan, Jiangxi, Hubei, Hunan, Sichuan and other places, especially Taiwan has the most. Taste spicy, warm. Purpose is to expel wind and cold, warm stomach and, regulate qi and stop pain to cure abdomen cold pain, cold wet vomit, Qi stagnation, beriberi.
Measurements
12 cm height x 9 cm width x 9 cm length
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1409
Description
Crate, wooden with paper label on one side and black stamped manufacturer's marking on second side.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1409
Description
Crate, wooden with paper label on one side and black stamped manufacturer's marking on second side.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Manufacturer's markings read: "Kwong Sun Woo Superior China Nut Oil Hong Kong" in English. Paper label with Chinese characters; characters literally translate to: "male/public"; "flower/Britain". When adjusted for English comprehension, product is Dandelion. Dandelions are harvested between summer and autumn at the beginning of blossom. They enter teh liver, stomach, and lung meridians. Actions include clearing heat from liver, stomach and lung, removing toxicity and removing dampness. They are used for sores and abscesses due to heat toxicity, swollen and sore throat, swelling and gum pain, swelling and red eyes, and syndromes of damp-heat. The original container is produced in Guangdong, Hong Kong.
Measurements
25 cm height
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.47
Description
English Name: Cassia bark tree Twig Chinese Pinyin Name: Guizhi (GuiZhi) Physical Description: twigs, short, light brown, varying thicknesses, with some ridging and wrinkling along their lengths; some have short pieces branching off, some show a scar where a branching piece has broken off; some are…
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974. Cassia bark twig is also known as Chinese cinnamon and has been used in Chinese medicine for centuries. Most of the cinnamon sold in Canada’s supermarkets i…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.7.47
Description
English Name: Cassia bark tree Twig Chinese Pinyin Name: Guizhi (GuiZhi) Physical Description: twigs, short, light brown, varying thicknesses, with some ridging and wrinkling along their lengths; some have short pieces branching off, some show a scar where a branching piece has broken off; some are cut or broken to blunt ends, others have bark missing at end, some have protruding bark ends with no wood inside Production Regions: Primarily produced in the Chinese provinces of Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi. Functions: Promotes sweating, resolves the flesh, warms and frees the channels and vessels, assists yang in transforming qi, downbears qi. Apply to wind-cold type of common cold, abdominal cold pain, amenorrhea due to cold blood, joint impediment, phlegm and retained fluid, edema, palpitations, renal mass.
Object History
Collection of original raw contents of the Chinese Herbalist Shop, Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee, Victoria BC, as purchased from Rodney Pain in 1974. Cassia bark twig is also known as Chinese cinnamon and has been used in Chinese medicine for centuries. Most of the cinnamon sold in Canada’s supermarkets is Chinese cinnamon.
Reference
Chinese Medicinal Material Images Database, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University. URL: http://libproject.hkbu.edu.hk/was40/detail?channelid=47953&lang=eng&searchword=pid=B00138 Compendium of Materia Medica (Bencao Gangmu), 2003; Taiwan Herbal Pharmacopeia, 2014.
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1188
Description
Gold painted circular tin with lid. Hand-written paper label with black text. Red decoration painted around top and bottom of tin. Lid is not painted.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1188
Description
Gold painted circular tin with lid. Hand-written paper label with black text. Red decoration painted around top and bottom of tin. Lid is not painted.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Painted on label reads "Van Loo Cigars" in white and red. Chinese characters on label, which literally translate to "sea"; "gold"; "sand". When adjusted for comprehension, product is Spora Lygodii/Japanese Climbing Fern Spore." It is the mature spore of the perennial climbing fern Lygodium japonicum. It can be found in Guangdong and Zhejiang provinces in China. In traditional Chinese medicine, it is often used to induce diuresis to treat stranguria. Symptoms include stranguria.
Measurements
13 cm height x 10 cm width x 10 cm length
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail

Metal tin canister with lid.

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumartifact23901
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.255
Description
Metal tin canister with lid (approximately 2 cm deep); brown rectangular label with 3 characters on front of canister.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.255
Description
Metal tin canister with lid (approximately 2 cm deep); brown rectangular label with 3 characters on front of canister.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Chinese characters on label literally translate to: "present or submit"; "eggplant"; "child". When adjusted for comprehension, product is Litsea cubeba. Litsea cubeba, the aromatic litsea or may chang, is an evergreen tree or shrub. It can be found in Guangxi, Guangdong and Hunan provinces in China. The oil can also be extracted from the leaf. The timber is sometimes used for making furniture and crafts. Plant parts are also used in medicine. It is used for detoxification, to reduce swelling, to stop bleeding, treat snake bite, for injuries causing bleeding, swollen feet, and chronic bronchitis.
Measurements
13 cm height x 7 cm diameter
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail

Mandarin (Putonghua) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording14769
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:01 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Mandarin of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with…
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Series
Across the Pacific - Temporary exhibition 2019-2021 series
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.42.2
Storage Location
Digital collection
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:01 min)
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Mandarin of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Audio Tracks

Mandarin (Putonghua) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Images
Less detail

Poonyue (Panyu) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording14770
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:02 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Panyu dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors a…
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Series
Across the Pacific - Temporary exhibition 2019-2021 series
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.42.3
Storage Location
Digital collection
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:02 min)
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Panyu dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Audio Tracks

Poonyue (Panyu) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Images
Less detail

Sundak (Shunde) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording14771
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:02 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Shunde dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors …
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Series
Across the Pacific - Temporary exhibition 2019-2021 series
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.42.4
Storage Location
Digital collection
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:02 min)
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Shunde dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Audio Tracks

Sundak (Shunde) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Images
Less detail

Toisan (Taishan) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording14772
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:02 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Toisan Taishan of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors alon…
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Series
Across the Pacific - Temporary exhibition 2019-2021 series
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.42.5
Storage Location
Digital collection
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:02 min)
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Toisan Taishan of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Audio Tracks

Toisan (Taishan) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Images
Less detail

Cantonese (Guangdonghua) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording14774
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:04 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Cantonese of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along wit…
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Series
Across the Pacific - Temporary exhibition 2019-2021 series
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.42.7
Storage Location
Digital collection
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:04 min)
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Cantonese of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Audio Tracks

Cantonese (Guangdonghua) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Images
Less detail

Yinping (Enping) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording14775
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:03 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Enping dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors …
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Series
Across the Pacific - Temporary exhibition 2019-2021 series
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.42.8
Storage Location
Digital collection
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:03 min)
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Enping dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Audio Tracks

Yinping (Enping) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Images
Less detail

Hoiping (Kaiping) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording14776
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:02 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Kaiping dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors…
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Series
Across the Pacific - Temporary exhibition 2019-2021 series
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.42.9
Storage Location
Digital collection
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:02 min)
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Kaiping dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Audio Tracks

Hoiping (Kaiping) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Images
Less detail

Chungsan (Zhongshan) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording14773
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:02 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Zhongshan dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visito…
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Video collection
Series
Across the Pacific - Temporary exhibition 2019-2021 series
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.42.6
Storage Location
Digital collection
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:00:02 min)
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Zhongshan dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Audio Tracks

Chungsan (Zhongshan) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.402
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Second from right in photograp…
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.402
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Second from right in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Label contains characters that are literally translated to: a brand name; "nourish"; "hygiene"; "medicine"; "wine"; and "tincture" (medical alcohol/wine). When adjusted for English comprehension, product is "Health tincture". The tincture includes a mixture of Chinese medicinal herbs with the addition of caterpillar fungus and turtle shell to replenish energy. It has the function of replenishing qi and invigorating qi, replenishing blood, nourshing the kidney,increasing male libido, treating the lack of appetite, refreshing the mind, getting rid of wind in the body, and improving circulation. Circular sticker translates to: "The sale of all secret formulae non-pharmaceutical medicinal preparations in Canada is regulated by The proprietary or patent Medicine Act. This law legalizes the sale of such remedies only upon condition that the quantities of the potent drugs used in their manufacture are within the limitations set by an Advisory Board, and that these quantities are printed on the labels and wrappers used in connection with the medicine and, further, that no false, misleading or exaggerated claims or representations of a cure for any disease are made on the labels and wrappers, or in any other manner respecting this article."
Measurements
30 cm height x 9cm width
Maker
ZiBao Tang
Country Made
China
Province Made
Guangdong
Site/City Made
Guangzhou Xiguan
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.417
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Third from right in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.417
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Third from right in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Label contains characters that are literally translated to: a brand name; "nourish"; "hygiene"; "medicine"; "wine"; and "tincture" (medical alcohol/wine). When adjusted for English comprehension, product is "Health tincture". The tincture includes a mixture of Chinese medicinal herbs with the addition of caterpillar fungus and turtle shell to replenish energy. It has the function of replenishing qi and invigorating qi, replenishing blood, nourshing the kidney,increasing male libido, treating the lack of appetite, refreshing the mind, getting rid of wind in the body, and improving circulation. The sale of all secret formulae non-pharmaceutical medicinal preparations in Canada is regulated by The proprietary or patent Medicine Act. This law legalizes the sale of such remedies only upon condition that the quantities of the potent drugs used in their manufacture are within the limitations set by an Advisory Board, and that these quantities are printed on the labels and wrappers used in connection with the medicine and, further, that no false, misleading or exaggerated claims or representations of a cure for any disease are made on the labels and wrappers, or in any other manner respecting this article.
Measurements
32 cm height x 9cm width
Maker
ZiBao Tang
Country Made
China
Province Made
Guangdong
Site/City Made
Guangzhou Xiguan
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.418
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Far left in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.418
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Far left in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Label contains characters that are literally translated to: a brand name; "nourish"; "hygiene"; "medicine"; "wine"; and "tincture" (medical alcohol/wine). When adjusted for English comprehension, product is "Health tincture". The tincture includes a mixture of Chinese medicinal herbs with the addition of caterpillar fungus and turtle shell to replenish energy. It has the function of replenishing qi and invigorating qi, replenishing blood, nourshing the kidney,increasing male libido, treating the lack of appetite, refreshing the mind, getting rid of wind in the body, and improving circulation. The sale of all secret formulae non-pharmaceutical medicinal preparations in Canada is regulated by The proprietary or patent Medicine Act. This law legalizes the sale of such remedies only upon condition that the quantities of the potent drugs used in their manufacture are within the limitations set by an Advisory Board, and that these quantities are printed on the labels and wrappers used in connection with the medicine and, further, that no false, misleading or exaggerated claims or representations of a cure for any disease are made on the labels and wrappers, or in any other manner respecting this article.
Measurements
32 cm height x 9cm width
Maker
ZiBao Tang
Country Made
China
Province Made
Guangdong
Site/City Made
Guangzhou Xiguan
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.419
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Bottle has discolouration on th…
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.419
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Bottle has discolouration on the label on the bottom. Third from left in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Label contains characters that are literally translated to: a brand name; "nourish"; "hygiene"; "medicine"; "wine"; and "tincture" (medical alcohol/wine). When adjusted for English comprehension, product is "Health tincture". The tincture includes a mixture of Chinese medicinal herbs with the addition of caterpillar fungus and turtle shell to replenish energy. It has the function of replenishing qi and invigorating qi, replenishing blood, nourshing the kidney,increasing male libido, treating the lack of appetite, refreshing the mind, getting rid of wind in the body, and improving circulation. The sale of all secret formulae non-pharmaceutical medicinal preparations in Canada is regulated by The proprietary or patent Medicine Act. This law legalizes the sale of such remedies only upon condition that the quantities of the potent drugs used in their manufacture are within the limitations set by an Advisory Board, and that these quantities are printed on the labels and wrappers used in connection with the medicine and, further, that no false, misleading or exaggerated claims or representations of a cure for any disease are made on the labels and wrappers, or in any other manner respecting this article.
Measurements
32 cm height x 9cm width
Maker
ZiBao Tang
Country Made
China
Province Made
Guangdong
Site/City Made
Guangzhou Xiguan
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.420
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Bottle has discolouration on th…
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.420
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Bottle has discolouration on the label on the bottom. Far right in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Label contains characters that are literally translated to: a brand name; "nourish"; "hygiene"; "medicine"; "wine"; and "tincture" (medical alcohol/wine). When adjusted for English comprehension, product is "Health tincture". The tincture includes a mixture of Chinese medicinal herbs with the addition of caterpillar fungus and turtle shell to replenish energy. It has the function of replenishing qi and invigorating qi, replenishing blood, nourshing the kidney,increasing male libido, treating the lack of appetite, refreshing the mind, getting rid of wind in the body, and improving circulation. The sale of all secret formulae non-pharmaceutical medicinal preparations in Canada is regulated by The proprietary or patent Medicine Act. This law legalizes the sale of such remedies only upon condition that the quantities of the potent drugs used in their manufacture are within the limitations set by an Advisory Board, and that these quantities are printed on the labels and wrappers used in connection with the medicine and, further, that no false, misleading or exaggerated claims or representations of a cure for any disease are made on the labels and wrappers, or in any other manner respecting this article.
Measurements
32 cm height x 9cm width
Maker
ZiBao Tang
Country Made
China
Province Made
Guangdong
Site/City Made
Guangzhou Xiguan
Title
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.421
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Bottle has discolouration on th…
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.421
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Bottle has discolouration on the label on the bottom. Bottle is center in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Label contains characters that are literally translated to: a brand name; "nourish"; "hygiene"; "medicine"; "wine"; and "tincture" (medical alcohol/wine). When adjusted for English comprehension, product is "Health tincture". The tincture includes a mixture of Chinese medicinal herbs with the addition of caterpillar fungus and turtle shell to replenish energy. It has the function of replenishing qi and invigorating qi, replenishing blood, nourshing the kidney,increasing male libido, treating the lack of appetite, refreshing the mind, getting rid of wind in the body, and improving circulation. The sale of all secret formulae non-pharmaceutical medicinal preparations in Canada is regulated by The proprietary or patent Medicine Act. This law legalizes the sale of such remedies only upon condition that the quantities of the potent drugs used in their manufacture are within the limitations set by an Advisory Board, and that these quantities are printed on the labels and wrappers used in connection with the medicine and, further, that no false, misleading or exaggerated claims or representations of a cure for any disease are made on the labels and wrappers, or in any other manner respecting this article.
Measurements
32 cm height x 9cm width
Maker
ZiBao Tang
Country Made
China
Province Made
Guangdong
Site/City Made
Guangzhou Xiguan
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.422
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Bottle has discolouration on th…
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.422
Description
Medicinal wine bottle; transparent green glass, sealed lid wrapped in metallic foil. Around the upper portion of neck an off-white label with light teal Chinese characters. On the main body of the bottle is an orange rectangular label with printed Chinese characters. Bottle has discolouration on the label on the bottom. Bottle is second from left in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Label contains characters that are literally translated to: a brand name; "nourish"; "hygiene"; "medicine"; "wine"; and "tincture" (medical alcohol/wine). When adjusted for English comprehension, product is "Health tincture". The tincture includes a mixture of Chinese medicinal herbs with the addition of caterpillar fungus and turtle shell to replenish energy. It has the function of replenishing qi and invigorating qi, replenishing blood, nourshing the kidney,increasing male libido, treating the lack of appetite, refreshing the mind, getting rid of wind in the body, and improving circulation. The sale of all secret formulae non-pharmaceutical medicinal preparations in Canada is regulated by The proprietary or patent Medicine Act. This law legalizes the sale of such remedies only upon condition that the quantities of the potent drugs used in their manufacture are within the limitations set by an Advisory Board, and that these quantities are printed on the labels and wrappers used in connection with the medicine and, further, that no false, misleading or exaggerated claims or representations of a cure for any disease are made on the labels and wrappers, or in any other manner respecting this article.
Measurements
32 cm height x 9cm width
Maker
ZiBao Tang
Country Made
China
Province Made
Guangdong
Site/City Made
Guangzhou Xiguan
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1422
Description
Crate, wooden, covered with paper and varnish. All four sides have paper labels with Chinese characters.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  4 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.1422
Description
Crate, wooden, covered with paper and varnish. All four sides have paper labels with Chinese characters.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Side one: Chinese characters literally translate to: "sky/heaven/day/god";"immortal/celestial being/a surname";"son/seed/viscount/you". When adjusted for English comprehension, label is for semen hyoscyami. It’s normally found in Hebei, Henan, Zhejiang, Jiangxi, Shanxi, Gansu, Qinghai, Xinjiang, and Ningxia. Its tastes bitter and has light smell. It helps with asthma and soothing the nerves. It’s a good treatment for epilepsy, stomach cramps, diarrhea and also helps with toothache. Side 2: Chinese characters literally translate to: "nine/many";"greens";"son/seed/viscount/you". When adjusted for English comprehension, label is Chinese leek seed. The seed is in the shape of semi-circular or oval. The length is 3-4mm, the width is about 2mm. The color is in dark black. It has the unique smell and tastes a little bit spicy. It’s treatment of impotence dream, urinary frequency, and diarrhea. Side 3: Chinese characters literally translate to: "hundred/numerous/centum";"son/seed/viscount/you";"benevolence/kernel/humanity/sensitive". When adjusted for English comprehension, label is for arborvitae seed. It’s collected during Fall and Winter season. It’s found in Guangdong, Guangxi, Shanxi, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou. It helps to soothe the nerves. It’s treatment of convulsions, insomnia, night sweats and constipation. Side 4: Chinese characters literally transate to: "gold/golden/metals/money;"retreat/withdraw/quit/recede/fade". Not possible to translate.
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.125
Description
clear glass round-based bottle with cork and printed paper label. Artifact is fifth from left in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.125
Description
clear glass round-based bottle with cork and printed paper label. Artifact is fifth from left in photograph.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store "Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.", Victoria B.C.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Chemical T&E
Marks/Labels
Yellow label with black text. Label contains Chinese characters that are literally translated to: "Watson's" and "home" and "made" and "top" and "up" and "Quinine" and "powder". When adjusted for English comprehension, product is " Watson's Quinine powder". Quinine is a treatment for malaria. It is also used to treat lupus and arthritis. Quinine was also frequently prescribed as an off-label treatment for leg cramps at night, but this has become less common due to a Food and Drug Administration warning that this practice is associated with life-threatening side effects. Brand name "Watsons" is for A.S. Watson Group, which started as the Canton Dispensary and Soda Water Establishment in 1828 as a small dispensary, with the mission to provide free medical services to the poor people of the Southern Chinese province of Guangdong (also known as Canton). It moved to Hong Kong and re-emerged as the Hong Kong Dispensary in 1843. The company began trading under the name A.S. Watson & Company in 1871. Now, the A.S. Watson Group (or A.S. Watson or ASW) with headquarters located in Hong Kong, is the world's largest health and beauty retail group, with over 13,900 stores in 24 markets worldwide serving over 28 million customers per week, and over 3 billion customers and members throughout.
Measurements
10 cm height x 2 cm legth x 2 cm width
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.627
Description
Ten, brown-paper-wrapped bottles from "A.S. Watson & Co." Each has commercially made brown-paper label with Chinese characters. Yellow label sealing one end of package has company name and company logo of dragon and horse. Individual bottles were originally packaged together in brown paper and tied…
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store “Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.”, Victoria B.C. Watsons is a member of the A.S. Watson Group, which started as the Canton Dispensary and Soda Water Establishment, founded in 1828 as a small dispensary, with the mission to provide free medical serv…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV975.5.627
Description
Ten, brown-paper-wrapped bottles from "A.S. Watson & Co." Each has commercially made brown-paper label with Chinese characters. Yellow label sealing one end of package has company name and company logo of dragon and horse. Individual bottles were originally packaged together in brown paper and tied with string.
Object History
This item originates from the Chinese Herbalist Store “Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co.”, Victoria B.C. Watsons is a member of the A.S. Watson Group, which started as the Canton Dispensary and Soda Water Establishment, founded in 1828 as a small dispensary, with the mission to provide free medical services to the poor people of the Southern Chinese province of Guangdong (also known as Canton). It moved to Hong Kong and re-emerged as the Hong Kong Dispensary from 1 January 1843. The company began trading under the name A.S. Watson & Company in 1871. Now, the A.S. Watson Group (or A.S. Watson or ASW) with headquarter located in Hong Kong, is the world's largest health and beauty retail group, with over 13,900 stores in 24 markets worldwide serving over 28 million customers per week, and over 3 billion customers and members throughout.
Category
07. Distribution & Transportation Artifacts
Classification
Container
Marks/Labels
Label contains characters that are literally translated to: "small", "intestine", "air/gas", "medicine", "water", "inguinal (small intestine) or hernia", "is due to the dropping of qi" "resulting in difficulty to walk", "to cure the symptoms", "countries in the western world", "all use", "a common type of hernia treatment used in the western world in the 1950's", "to hold up the qi", "so that the organ does not drop", "can slowly recover", "as for using medication to treat symptoms", "to help it succeed", "those with mild illness/symptoms, the medical solution is sufficient for cure", "for those with more serious symptoms", "combine with external application of the medicine", "in order to apply, soak cotton in the solution", "apply 3-4 times a day without missing a dose", "for the price of a gas clip", "for details please see prescription", "when shopping", "make sure to look for the dragon and pagoda trademark", "you won't be mistaken", "suggested by Watson Pharmaceutical, Hong Kong". When adjusted for English comprehension, product is "Inguinal hernia medicine". This product is a medicinal solution that is used to treat inguinal hernia of the small intestine.
Measurements
14 cm length x 2.5 cm diameter
Country Made
China
Subjects
Science & Technology Tools & Equipment
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Name Access
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Victoria
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1921-1988 (date of originals), copied 2021
Collection/Fonds
Quon Lip Lee fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
8 photograph (tiffs)
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of photographs pertaining to personal records of Quon Lip Lee including his immigration and citizenship documents, his family, business and involvement as a member with Lee's Benevolent Associaton of Canada.
Administrative History
Quon Lip Lee immigrated to Canada in 1921 from Sun Woy county, Guangdong at the age of 12 and found work as a housekeeper. In his adult years, Lee travelled back to China several times and fathered two sons and two daughters in China, including Tim Lee who was born in 1949. Quon Lip Lee purchased t…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Quon Lip Lee fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
8 photograph (tiffs)
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of photographs pertaining to personal records of Quon Lip Lee including his immigration and citizenship documents, his family, business and involvement as a member with Lee's Benevolent Associaton of Canada.
Administrative History
Quon Lip Lee immigrated to Canada in 1921 from Sun Woy county, Guangdong at the age of 12 and found work as a housekeeper. In his adult years, Lee travelled back to China several times and fathered two sons and two daughters in China, including Tim Lee who was born in 1949. Quon Lip Lee purchased two acres of farmland in Richmond and operated a poultry farm in the No.3 Road and Williams Road area. He brought his wife and most of his children from China to Canada in 1952, with the exception of one daughter who was already married. When the poultry industry began to decline, Lee purchased a grocery store business in Burnaby and the Lee family moved to Burnaby in 1962. The shop was named C&L Grocery, which stood for Cheng (his son-in-law’s surname) and Lee. The property was located at 6912 Kingsway on the corner of Kingsway and Griffiths and had three store fronts and a house in the back where the family lived. The family grocery store sold groceries and canned goods and was in operation for approximately fifteen years. Quon Lip Lee was a member of Lee's Benevolent Association of Canada. In 1988, Quon Lip, received a service award for his many contributions as an advisory board member and board secretary of Lee's Benevolent Association magazine. As a child, Tim Lee attended Stride Avenue School, Edmonds School and Burnaby South Secondary School. Tim co-owned an architectural mill work company named New Image Millwork Ltd. in Surrey for 30 years before his retirement. The company renovated locations including the Burnaby Village Museum, Burnaby’s Winners store, and other businesses. Tim sold the business and retired in 2019.
Accession Code
BV021.18
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
1921-1988 (date of originals), copied 2021
Media Type
Textual Record
Photograph
Storage Location
Digital collection
Notes
Title based on contents of fonds
Less detail

Head tax certificate issued to Dung Way How

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museummultipleformat15546
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1922-1934 (date of original), copied 2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Document collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 certificate (tiff) : col. ; 600 dpi
Scope and Content
Item consists of a head tax certificate issued by the Dominion of Canada - Immigration Branch - Department of the Interior to Dung Way How (Dong Howe). The certificate was first issued on March 18, 1922 and includes certification stamps on the front along with a photograph of Dung Way How. Certifi…
Administrative History
Dung Way How (Dong Howe) arrived from Bak Chun (North Village), Guangdong in 1922 as a paper son. He had two sons during his first marriage, but the sons remained in China and one died at a young age. He married his second wife Chow Goon Pang through an arranged marriage. She was married twice prev…
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Document collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 certificate (tiff) : col. ; 600 dpi
Scope and Content
Item consists of a head tax certificate issued by the Dominion of Canada - Immigration Branch - Department of the Interior to Dung Way How (Dong Howe). The certificate was first issued on March 18, 1922 and includes certification stamps on the front along with a photograph of Dung Way How. Certification stamps on the verso of the certificate were issued by Chinese Immigration authorities between 1922 and 1934. Information on the front of the certificate reads "...This Certifies That / Dung Way How whose photograph is attached / hereto arrived or landed at Vancouver B.C. / on the 23rd day of January 1922 / ex "Empress of Asia" / and upon representations made has been / admitted as exempt from head tax under the / provisions of the Chinese Immigration Act. / The above mentioned party claims / to be a native of Bark Choon Jong in the District of Pon Yue of the age of 20 years. The declaration in this case is C.I.4. No. 3715 Date at Vancouver on March 18, 1922" signed by "Controller of Chinese Immigration". Printed text on verso of certificate reads "IMPORTANT / IT IS NECESSARY THAT THIS / CERTIFICATE BE CAREFULLY / PRESERVED AS IT IS OF VALUE / AS A MEANS OF IDENTIFICATION".
Administrative History
Dung Way How (Dong Howe) arrived from Bak Chun (North Village), Guangdong in 1922 as a paper son. He had two sons during his first marriage, but the sons remained in China and one died at a young age. He married his second wife Chow Goon Pang through an arranged marriage. She was married twice previously and had a son from each marriage, but neither of them survived. Chow was from Nam Chun (South Village) and arrived in Canada as a paper daughter around the late 1930s or early 1940s. Both Dong and Chow spoke a Poon Yue dialect. The couple raised one daughter Vivian Dong (Dong Jing Yu) in Canada. The Dong family leased and operated the New Fountain hotel in Vancouver located at Abbott Street and Cordova Street. The family later went on to purchase farmland in Burnaby in 1957. The Dong family moved to Burnaby and operated a three acre market garden located at 6220 14th Avenue until 1972. They grew European staples including celery, radishes, green onions, beets, lettuces, endives, as well as Chinese vegetables such as gai lan (Chinese broccoli). There were two Chinese families in the area, including the Wong family who operated the Wong Chew market gardens 6325 14th Avenue. Dong Howe passed away in 1978. Chow Goon Pang passed away in 2000. Their daughter Vivian grew up in Burnaby and attended Riverside Elementary, McPherson Junior High School and Burnaby South Secondary School.
Creator
Dominion of Canada Immigration Branch
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Documentary Artifacts - Certificates
Migration
Names
Howe, Dong
Accession Code
BV021.13.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
1922-1934 (date of original), copied 2021
Media Type
Textual Record
Photograph
Storage Location
Digital collection
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording12337
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1900-2020] (interview content), interviewed Feb. 7, 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (00:43:19 min.)
Scope and Content
Recording consists of an interview with Josephine Chow (nee Hong) conducted by BVM researcher Denise Fong at the Burnaby Village Museum. Josephine describes her family history and recollects her childhood experiences in 1950s and 60s while growing with her family on their "Hop On" farm in Burnaby. …
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1900-2020] (interview content), interviewed Feb. 7, 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.6.1
Storage Location
Digital Only
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (00:43:19 min.)
Material Details
Interviewer: Denise Fong Interviewee: Josephine Chow Location of Interview: Burnaby Village Museum Interview Date: February 7, 2020 Total Number of Tracks: 1 Total Length of all Tracks: 00:43:19
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Recording consists of an interview with Josephine Chow (nee Hong) conducted by BVM researcher Denise Fong at the Burnaby Village Museum. Josephine describes her family history and recollects her childhood experiences in 1950s and 60s while growing with her family on their "Hop On" farm in Burnaby. The farm is situated in the Big Bend area along Marine Drive and is still in operation today. 0:00-08:45 Josephine Chow provides some historical background on the history of “Hop On Farm” and her family in British Columbia. She tells of how her grandfather Gay Tim Hong and three partners pooled money together to purchase twelve acres on Marine Drive in 1951. Prior to this, most of them farmed on the Musqueam First Nation Reserve for 20-30 years. It all began when her great grandfather Sui Wing Hong, first came to Canada from China and slowly brought over her grandfather, father and other members of the family. Her grandfather, Gay Tim Hong went back and forth between Canada and China at least four times since he and her grandmother had four children including her father, who was born in 1931. Her father came to Canada at 10 years of age to live with his father. Josephine’s great grandfather came to Vancouver from Zhongshan county in Canton Province (also known as Guangdong). 8:46- 14:20 Josephine provides the names of her siblings from the eldest to the youngest; Pauline, Josephine (herself), Catherine, Noreen, Gary, Darlene and Marlene. She describes what life was like on the farm with her parents working from sunrise to sunset. The family farmed vegetable produce taking orders from local stores in the lower mainland. Often the children helped their parents with the orders starting at eight or nine years of age. Other workers on the farm travelled by bus from Vancouver’s Chinatown. She also tells of how her father was an animal lover and raised chickens, pigeons, geese, koy, goldfish and dogs. 14: 21 – 16:56 Josephine describes what Burnaby was like during the time that she grew up in the late 1950s. She explains that Burnaby was very quiet with nothing being open on Sundays. On the farm, she and her siblings would entertain themselves by playing games like soccer, baseball and kick ball or also by catching frogs, snails, caterpillars and ladybugs. There were neighbours living on Marine Drive and almost every house had someone who we went to the same elementary school. The neighbourhood children would often come to play with them on their farm. 16:56- 26:47 Josephine describes how when they were young there were farms all around them and how on Sunday drives with her father, they would go to feed horses or look at the cows. Josephine shares that her elder sister Pauline was the only one born in China and how when she first arrived that she lived on the Musqueam First Nations Reserve with their parents before they moved to Burnaby. Josephine recollects that most of her friends were farmer’s kids from the neighbourhood but while in school, she had more Caucasian friends. Josephine and her siblings attended Glenwood Elementary on Marine Drive and later Junior Secondary at McPherson Park (grades 8-10) and Burnaby South Senior Secondary (grades 11-12. ). She shares some of her experiences while attending school. She said that there were about a dozen Asians in school with her, mostly from farming families in the “Flats”. 26:48- 30:45 Josephine describes what life was like for her and her siblings after school. They often helped on the farm when they got home, usually taking care of orders for green onions. Her mother made dinner and did all of the cooking for family and workers on the farm as well as working in the fields. Her father did all of the grocery shopping in Vancouver’s Chinatown two or three times per week where he purchased meat and fish. She says that her grandfather, often travelled by bus every Saturday or Sunday to meet up with friends in Chinatown. Extracurricular activities for her and her siblings included volley ball and soccer as long as it didn’t interfere with their work schedule on the farm. 30:46- 37:03 Josephine describes what occurred while living at home, the food they ate, shopping and attending Chinese school. Her mother cooked only Chinese food, she didn’t know how to cook “Western food”. For school lunches, the kids made their own sandwiches. She tells of a Chinese language school arranged by Mrs. Joe [sic] who lived on Gilley Road and was Canadian born Chinese. Mrs. Joe [sic] also arranged an English class for farmer’s wives on Tuesday nights in which her mother attended. Josephine recollects learning Mandarin from Mrs. Joe [sic] a few days a week after her regular school. Chinese school took place at Riverway School on Meadow Avenue in Burnaby. Mrs. Joe also taught them a lot about Chinese culture including Kung Fu, Chinese Dance and Chinese brush painting. 37:04- 39:39 Josephine describes Medical Care for her and her family in the 1950s and 1960s. She tells of a female Chinese doctor in Vancouver, Dr. Madeline Chung. Dr. Chung was responsible for delivering a lot of Chinese babies including Josephine. The family also visited herbalists in Vancouver Chinatown. They would often buy herbs for colds etc. Josephine also tells of how her parents stayed in touch with family in China by writing letters. Her mother’s family, including her parents and siblings were still in China while most of her father’s family were here in Canada. 39:40- 43:19 – In closing, Josephine shares how life is much busier now and of how she misses the quietness of her days growing up. She briefly describes her life on the family farm now and how different it is from when her parents worked the farm. She explains how farming methods have changed and how they don’t have to work as hard as her parents did.
History/Biography
Interviewee biography: Josephine Chow (nee Hong) is the second eldest child of Chan Kow Hong and Sui Ha Hong. In 1925, Josephine's grandfather, Gay Tim Hong immigrated to Canada from Zhongshan county in Canton Province (also known as Guangdong). In 1952, her father, Chan Kow Hong joined his father, Gay Tim Hong and by 1953, he established "Hop On Farms" in the Big Bend area of Burnaby near Marine Drive. Josephine grew up on the farm with her parents and six siblings; Pauline, Catherine, Norine, Gary, Darlene and Marlene. In 1969, Josephine's elder sister Pauline and her husband Jack Chan took over the family farm and in 1972 their father and grandfather moved to Kamloops to open a restaurant. As an adult, Josephine worked in several different areas including owning and running her own Aesthetics business. Josephine eventually retired and returned to the farm to assist her siblings. The farm is still in operation. Interviewer biography: Denise Fong is a historical researcher at Burnaby Village Museum. She has degrees in Anthropology (BA) and Archaeology (MA), and is completing her doctoral degree at UBC in Interdisciplinary Studies. Her primary research interests are in Chinese Canadian history and critical heritage studies. She is the co-curator of BVM’s “Across the Pacific” exhibition, and the Museum of Vancouver’s “A Seat at the Table – Chinese Immigration and British Columbia”.
Notes
Title based on contents of interview
Creator
Burnaby Village Museum
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Agriculture - Farms
Education
Buildings - Schools
First Nations reserves - British Columbia
Names
Fong, Denise
Chow, Josephine
Glenwood Elementary School
McPherson Park Junior Secondary School
Musqueam
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Byrne Road
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Audio Tracks

Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020

Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Oct. 2020
Collection/Fonds
UBC Partnership fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
3 mp4 videos (11 min., 19 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo, subtitles
Scope and Content
Item consists of part one in a two part video series "A Taste of History" created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates from the Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies program (ACAM). Part one is titled "Scraps and Dragons". The film provides backgroun…
  3 Videos  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Oct. 2020
Collection/Fonds
UBC Partnership fonds
Series
A Taste of History Video series - 2020 series
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.28.6
Storage Location
Digital collection
Physical Description
3 mp4 videos (11 min., 19 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo, subtitles
Material Details
Script: Debbie Liang; Joty Gill Narration: Debbie Liang Editor: Debbie Liang Subtitles: English; Simplified Chinese; Traditional Chinese Video Appearances: Kathy Lee; Eleanor Lee Interviews filmed by: Eleanor Lee Interview questions: Eleanor Lee; Debbie Liang Illustrations and Animations: Debbie Liang Photos, Images & B-roll: Vegetable letters from Shutterstock; Green onion and carrot footage from Debbie Liang; Chop Suey image courtesy of pulaw from Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC By 2.0); Chop Suey from Shutterstock; Menus by Amy Wilson; Gold Dragon booklet cover and menu image- courtesy of UBC RBSC Chung Collection (RBSC-ARC-1679-CCTX-309-122); Chop Suey Nation book cover, image courtesy of Douglas & MacIntyre; Dragon Inn: City of Burnaby Archives, 556-239 photo by John McCarron; Larry Lee, image courtesy of Eleanor Lee; VanTech, image courtesy of Mike from Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0); Bamboo Terrace, image courtesy of Rob from Flickr, public domain; Map image courtesy of Sentinel 2 from wikimedia Creative Commons; Salad bar inside of Dragon Inn Restaurant, Burnaby Village Museum, BV017.37.3; John Lee: City of Burnaby Archives, 535-0415, photo by Brian Langdeau; Photograph - Bar Inside the Dragon Inn Restaurant - Burnaby Village Museum, BV017.37.2; Chopping Mushrooms, footage courtesy of Pressmaster from pexels.com; Chopping Parsley, footage courtesy of Pressmaster from pexels.com; Kwan Luck from Debbie Liang; Crystall Mall as taken from the north side of Kingsway in Burnaby, image courtesy of w:en: Colin Keigher from wikimedia, Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license; Lok's Produce at Crystal mall (Burnaby) in the Underground Chinese Produce Market image courtesy of William Chen from wikimedia, Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 4.0 International license; Crystal Mall foodcourt, image courtesy of Jay Friedman, Gastrolust; Restaurant and Dragon Innn art by Debbie Liang Music and Sound Effects: "Alison", "Acoustic Mediation 2" from audionautix; "Slow Motion", "Creative Minds" & "Cute" from bensound.com; "Kitchen sounds" & "Pop" from Debbie Liang; "Ding sound effect" from freesoundlibrary Video adapted from 2019 BVM intern project by Debbie Liang and Marcela Gomez Special thanks to: UBC: Joanna Yang, Jenny Lu, Denise Fong, Henry Yu; BVM: Kate Petrusa, Amy Wilson Changes to music may have been made for the purposes of this video
Media Type
Moving Images
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of part one in a two part video series "A Taste of History" created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates from the Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies program (ACAM). Part one is titled "Scraps and Dragons". The film provides background information on the origins of the Chinese-Canadian culinary dish "chop suey" and tells the story of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants, highlighting the history of the "Dragon Inn" chop suey restaurant owned by Larry Lee. The film is supported with voice over in english, subtitles, animation, historical and family photographs and interviews with family members, Kathy Lee and Eleanor Lee. One version of the film is supported with subtitles in English while two other versions of the film are supported with subtitles in Simplified Chinese and Traditional Chinese.
History/Biography
In 2020, due to the restrictions of COVID-19, University of British Columbia student interns with the Burnaby Village Museum Chinese Canadian History in Burnaby project were asked to create virtual experiences to reimagine Burnaby Village Museum's historical Chinese Canadian programming in remote online spaces. Debbie Liang and Joty Gill (UBC alumni and graduates of Dr. Henry Yu's 2019 summer ACAM 390A Global Seminar to Aisa) returned to work with Burnaby Village Museum to create two short films showcasing the history of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants and piggeries in Burnaby. Larry Lee was born in Kaiping, Guangdong, China and immigrated to Canada in 1949 at the age of sixteen to reunite with his father, Lee Soon. Larry Lee's father had been in Canada for years before his son immigrated to join him. Larry attended Vancouver Technical Secondary School and learned English and carpentry. After he graduated, he was hired by Mr. Wong. Larry and Mr. Wong operated an IGA grocery store at Lonsdale in North Vancouver. Following this, Larry worked as a cashier for his father at "Bamboo Terrace" Chinese restaurant in Vancouver's Chinatown. In 1958, he married his wife Kathy and one year later, in 1959 he started a new business of his own. Larry opened the "Dragon Inn" chop suey restaurant at 2516 Kingsway (at Slocan) in Vancouver. Once the restaurant was doing well, Larry opened the "Park Inn" at Kingsway and 25th Avenue. The "Park Inn" was the first Chinese food restaurant with a smorgasboard in Vancouver. With the success of these restaurants and subsequent restaurants Larry Lee opened three other "Dragon Inn" chop suey restaurants located at; 4510 Kingsway and Willingdon in Burnaby (1964); 250 Columbia Street in New Westminster (1971) and Hastings and Willingdon (1990s). In the 1990s Larry retained ownership of the Dragon Inn at 4510 Kingsway and Willingdon and sold the other restaurants. In 1996, Larry sold the property of the Dragon Inn and surrounding lots located at Kingsway and Willingdon to make way for the construction of Crystal Mall. Larry and Kathy Lee had eight children who all worked in the family run restaurants until they were sold.
Notes
Transcribed title
Creator
Joty Gill
Debbie Liang
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Buildings - Commercial - Restaurants
Names
Lee, Larrry
Lee, Kathy
Lee, Eleanor
Liang, Debbie
Gill, Joty
Burnaby Village Museum
University of British Columbia
Responsibility
University of British Columbia
UBC Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadian Studies
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 4510 Kingsway
British Columbia - Vancouver
British Columbia - New Westminster
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Marlborough Area
Video Tracks
Less detail

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