504 records – page 1 of 26.

England House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark501
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Description
The Mary England Residence is a one and one-half storey, wood-frame, Period Revival cottage with a steeply pitched, cross-gabled roof. Situated on Griffiths Drive within the Edmonds neighbourhood of Burnaby, the Mary England Residence has an original attached garage.
Associated Dates
1930
Formal Recognition
Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Mary England Residence
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Mary England Residence
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Griffiths Drive
Associated Dates
1930
Formal Recognition
Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Council Resolution
Enactment Date
26/05/2003
Description
The Mary England Residence is a one and one-half storey, wood-frame, Period Revival cottage with a steeply pitched, cross-gabled roof. Situated on Griffiths Drive within the Edmonds neighbourhood of Burnaby, the Mary England Residence has an original attached garage.
Heritage Value
The Mary England Residence, built in 1930, is valued as a representation of the period revival styles that were popular in the era between the two World Wars. At this time, it was considered the height of fashion for a house to reflect historical styles, even when combined in an eclectic manner, that expressed a domestic ideal of cozy traditionalism. The Mary England Residence is an exuberant example of this trend. Half-timbering, multi-paned and leaded casement windows and a steeply pitched, cross-gabled roof impart a storybook cottage charm. Its first owner, Mary England, was employed for several years as stenographer at the old Burnaby Municipal Hall. An original attached garage is evidence of the growing presence of automobiles in domestic life of the 1930s. Additionally, the Mary England Residence is a testament to the continued suburban growth of the Edmonds neighbourhood. During the Edwardian era, the area experienced a housing boom. Its proximity to New Westminster, coupled with its regional transportation links, made it an attractive area for middle-class residences. Despite the economic recession of the 1930s, the Edmonds area continued to develop with modest but handsome housing.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the Mary England Residence: - location, in the Edmonds neighbourhood of East Burnaby - residential form, scale and massing as expressed by its one and one-half storey height with full basement, rectangular plan and steeply pitched cross-gabled roof - Period Revival elements such as rough-cast stucco, half-timbering, minimal eave overhangs, arched entry with glazed wooden front door, and arched-top feature window - mixture of windows including: double-hung, multi-paned wooden sash windows in double assembly; 6-over-1 double-hung wooden sash windows in multiple assembly; multi-paned casement windows; and straight-leaded feature windows - external parged chimney and two internal chimneys - attached front-gabled garage - associated landscape features including mature deciduous trees and fruit trees
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Stride Avenue Area
Function
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Primary Current--Single Dwelling
Community
Edmonds
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D.011-115-424
Boundaries
The Mary England Residence is comprised of a single residential lot located at 7276 Griffiths Drive, Burnaby.
Area
1404.26
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Public (local)
Documentation
City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, Heritage Site Files
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Bell's Drygoods Store

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark537
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Description
Bell’s Drygoods Store is a typical commercial false front, single storey, wood-frame building that has been relocated to the Burnaby Village Museum.
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Whitechurch Hardware Store
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Whitechurch Hardware Store
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - 4900 Deer Lake Avenue
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
Bell’s Drygoods Store is a typical commercial false front, single storey, wood-frame building that has been relocated to the Burnaby Village Museum.
Heritage Value
The value of the Bell’s Drygoods Store lies in its significance as one of the last remaining intact false front retail structures of its time to survive in Burnaby. Additionally, it remains as one of East Burnaby’s few surviving early commercial buildings and is representative of other typical commercial structures of the period. Originally located on Sixth Street in East Burnaby, in a small commercial district that served residents located along the streetcar line between New Westminster and Edmonds, its proximity to the streetcar served to draw customers into the store. This store also served as the location of the East Burnaby Post Office, one of a number of local post offices located throughout the municipality during the early twentieth century. Clifford Tuckey constructed the building in 1922, with a small lean-to structure on the back housing a kitchen and bedroom. The store was sold soon afterwards to William and Flora Bell, who then lived and worked here for a number of years. It represents a traditional relationship of the owner’s home to the store during this period, indicating the modest means of the owners and their commitment to running the business. The building was later sold to Maurice and Mildred Whitechurch, who ran it for many years as a hardware store. In 1974, the structure was relocated to its present site at the Museum. The heritage value for this structure also lies in its interpretive value within the Burnaby Village Museum. The site is an important cultural feature for the interpretation of Burnaby’s heritage to the public. Between 1993 and 1996 the building was restored to its 1925 appearance.
Defining Elements
The character defining features of Bell’s Drygoods Store include its: - rectangular form and simple massing - commercial false front parapet - front gable roof with cedar shingle cladding - horizontal lapped wooden siding - recessed main central entrance flanked by large storefront display windows - V-joint tongue-and-groove wood interior paneling - interior separation between commercial and residential space
Locality
Deer Lake Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Organization
Burnaby Village Museum
Function
Primary Current--Museum
Primary Historic--Shop
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 011-030-356 Legal Description: Parcel 1, District Lot 79 and District Lot 85, Group 1, New Westminster District, Reference Plan 77594
Boundaries
Burnaby Village Museum is comprised of a single municipally-owned property located at 6501 Deer Lake Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
38,488.63
Contributing Resource
Building
Landscape Feature
Structure
Ownership
Public (local)
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Name Access
Bell, William
Bell, Flora
Whitechurch, Maurice "Maury"
Burnaby Village Museum
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East Burnaby Neighbourhood

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark712
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Heritage Value
After a lull in construction during the World War I period, East Burnaby Neighbourhood's growth resumed during the 1920s when many homes and businesses were constructed. The post-World War Two period also saw rapid construction and the creation of new housing developments in response to a population boom. The neighbourhood remained a primarily single-family residential area.
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Stride Avenue Area
Images
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E.W. Bateman House 'Elworth'

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark538
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Description
The E.W. Bateman House is a one-and-one-half storey wood-frame residence set within in a garden landscape. The house and its adjacent garage are the only historic buildings standing on their original site within the Burnaby Village Museum property.
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Edwin & Mary Bateman Residence
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Edwin & Mary Bateman Residence
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - 4900 Deer Lake Avenue
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
The E.W. Bateman House is a one-and-one-half storey wood-frame residence set within in a garden landscape. The house and its adjacent garage are the only historic buildings standing on their original site within the Burnaby Village Museum property.
Heritage Value
The E.W. Bateman House was constructed in the Deer Lake Crescent subdivision, that was originally promoted in 1911 as an upper class suburban neighbourhood. It represents one of the first residential developments in the City of Burnaby that required buildings to be of a specific value, thus demonstrating the desire for exclusivity among the successful businessmen who chose to settle in the area. The house and grounds illustrate the reduced scale of upper-class residential construction at a time of modest returning prosperity that followed the end of the First World War, and the social, cultural, lifestyle and leisure sensibilities of the owners in the Deer Lake Crescent subdivision: such values as social aspiration, racial exclusivity, demonstration of architectural taste, and importance of a landscaped garden. The heritage value of the E.W. Bateman House is its comprehensive representation of an upper middle-class suburban residence of the early 1920s. It was built for retired CPR executive Edwin Wettenhall Bateman (1859-1957) and his wife, Mary (Dale) Bateman (1865-1935), by contractor William Dodson in 1922. The Bateman House was designed by English-born and trained architect Enoch Evans (1862-1939) of E. Evans and Son, and is an important surviving residential design by Evans, and a typical example of the eclectic Period Revival influences that were common to domestic architecture in the post-First World War era. The symmetry of the imposing front verandah, supported by exaggerated Ionic columns, gives the relatively-modest house an image of grandeur and formality. Named after Edwin Bateman’s birthplace in Cheshire, England, ‘Elworth’ also symbolizes allegiance to England and the patriotic tenor of the time. The heritage value for this house also lies in its interpretive value within the Burnaby Village Museum. The site is an important cultural feature for the interpretation of Burnaby’s heritage to the public. The E.W. Bateman House was purchased by Burnaby in 1970 and became the focal point for the development of the Museum. Both the interior and exterior of the house have been restored and interpreted to the date of original construction, including recreated room interiors and period furnishings.
Defining Elements
The elements that define the heritage character of the E.W. Bateman House include its: - rectangular form and massing with central entry on long side - side gable roof with front shed dormer with cedar shingle cladding - symmetry of front facade - full open front verandah inset under the roofline, supported with Ionic columns - cedar shingle siding - multi-paned double-hung wooden-sash windows, mixture of 6-over-1 and 8-over-1 - symmetrical disposition of fenestration, with double-assembly units on the ground floor - exterior shutters - two flanking brick chimneys on the side elevations - interior room layouts and original interior features such as quality millwork and original hardware - original garage at the rear of the house
Locality
Deer Lake Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Organization
Burnaby Village Museum
Architect
Enoch Evans
E. Evans and Son
Builder
William Dodson
Function
Primary Current--Museum
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 011-030-356 Legal Description: Parcel 1, District Lot 79 and District Lot 85, Group 1, New Westminster District, Reference Plan 77594
Boundaries
Burnaby Village Museum is comprised of a single municipally-owned property located at 6501 Deer Lake Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
38,488.63
Contributing Resource
Building
Landscape Feature
Structure
Ownership
Public (local)
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Name Access
Bateman, Edwin W.
Bateman, Mary Dale
Evans, Enoch
Dodson, William
Burnaby Village Museum
Subject Access
Buildings - Residential
Buildings - Residential - Houses
Buildings - Heritage
Buildings - Civic - Museums
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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George S. & Jessie Haddon House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark508
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Description
The George and Jessie Haddon House is a symmetrical two-storey Dutch Colonial-style house with a side-gambrel roof and shed dormers. It is situated in the Burnaby Lake neighborhood in East Burnaby.
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 5558 Buckingham Avenue
Burnaby - 5520 Buckingham Avenue
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 12064
Enactment Date
19/06/2006
Description
The George and Jessie Haddon House is a symmetrical two-storey Dutch Colonial-style house with a side-gambrel roof and shed dormers. It is situated in the Burnaby Lake neighborhood in East Burnaby.
Heritage Value
Built in 1923, the George and Jessie Haddon House is a significant example of the romantic period revival styles that were popular during the period between the two World Wars. These traditionally styled homes reflected ongoing pride in past traditions but also recognized the modern ideals of economy and good design. At the time, houses displayed traditional and readily-identifiable historical styles as a hallmark of good taste. The use of the various Colonial Revival styles had gained new popularity during the 1920s, and this design could have originated in a residential pattern book, which were in wide circulation and used to expedite residential projects. This house displays the typical features of the Dutch Colonial style, imported from the eastern United States and relatively rare on the West Coast. The house originally featured an unusual porte-cochere with tapered supports, that indicated the growing importance of automobiles at the time. The house was built for George Samuel Haddon (1886-1971) and his wife Jessie (née Reade) Haddon, whom he married in 1915. George Haddon, who was born in British Columbia, was a prominent Vancouver figure and served as Secretary of the Vancouver General Hospital. Following Jessie's death, George Haddon was remarried to Alice Margaret Currie (1890-1951). The George and Jessie Haddon House is further valued for its connection with the continued development of the Burnaby Lake neighbourhood in the 1920s. The area was highly desirable to wealthy Vancouver and New Westminster residents because of its scenery, and easy access was provided by the British Columbia Electric Railway 'Burnaby Lake' interurban line, which opened in June 1911. The Haddon House illustrates the evolving nature of regional transportation and the growing communities made possible by increasing options for transportation. The house originally stood on a larger lot, and was relocated in 2006 to allow for subdivision and legal protection. The current owners restored the porte-cochere in 2014.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the George and Jessie Haddon House include its: - location within the Burnaby Lake neighbourhood - residential form, scale and massing as expressed by its two-storey height and gambrel roof with shed dormers - rough-cast stucco cladding - Colonial Revival details such as the symmetrical façade and massing, and side-gambrel roof with shed dormers - additional exterior features such as an interior chimney, exposed purlins and window boxes supported on large projecting brackets - wooden front door with glazed insets - interior features including original staircase, and wooden door and window trim
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Builder
William Dodson
Function
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D.026-745-127
Boundaries
The George and Jessie Haddon House is comprised of a single residential lot located at 5558 Buckingham Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
1080
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Private
Documentation
City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, Heritage Site Files
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Rev. James Black Residence

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark632
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Description
Residential building.
Associated Dates
1925
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Sussex Avenue
Associated Dates
1925
Description
Residential building.
Heritage Value
This home was built as a retirement home for Baptist Missionary Reverend James Black and his family in 1925; the Black family resided in the home until the early 1970s. The Black Residence is a good example of the Period Revival movement that occurred between the two World Wars. At the time, it was considered good taste for a house to have an identifiable historical style. The Black Residence was likely designed by a local architect or built by a contractor using a pattern book plan, and the British Arts and Crafts influence was typical of many middle class homes of the period built in Burnaby. The house was originally located facing Sardis Street with a beautiful garden landscape that was lost when the house was relocated in 2005.
Locality
Central Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Marlborough Area
Area
639.00
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Private
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Agnes & Elizabeth Michie Residence

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark554
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Description
Residential building.
Associated Dates
c.1935
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Yale Street
Associated Dates
c.1935
Description
Residential building.
Heritage Value
This interwar bungalow is beautifully preserved and retains many original features. Symmetrical in design, with two steeply-pitched front gables that flank a central arched gable over the front entrance, it also retains its narrow arched windows and projecting purlins in the front gables. Narrow sidelights flank the front door. The matching front elevation windows are typical of the period, with double-hung sash flanking a plate glass “picture window” with a curved transom; the upper panes are cross-leaded. This house was built by Agnes Michie and Elizabeth D. Michie.
Locality
Vancouver Heights
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Heights Area
Ownership
Private
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Alpha Secondary School

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark678
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1950
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 4600 Parker Street
Associated Dates
1950
Heritage Value
The unexpected period of growth in Burnaby during the first few years of the 1950s resulted in many overcrowded schools. As a result, the School Board decided it required a Junior High to alleviate enrolment issues at Gilmore Avenue Elementary-Junior school. Alpha opened in 1950 with 423 students. The new school had 12 rooms but added more in 1953. There were fires at the school in 1956 and 1964, resulting in the rebuilding of seven classrooms, library and administrative offices. There were additions made in 1968 and 1969 and in 1976 a gymnasium was built.
Planning Study Area
Brentwood Area
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Alta Vista Neighbourhood

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark707
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Heritage Value
As with many areas of Burnaby during this period, the years after World War Two marked a rapid growth in residential development in the Alta-Vista Neighbourhood. Subdivisions like Sussex and Suncrest were built and new schools and amenities were constructed to meet the demands of increased population.
Historic Neighbourhood
Alta Vista (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Sussex-Nelson Area
Images
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Alta Vista Neighbourhood

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark766
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1905-1924
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1905-1924
Heritage Value
Alta Vista, named for its high views of the Fraser Valley, rapidly grew during the period 1910-1912, seeing its settlement jump from about a dozen buildings in 1910 to about four hundred by the end of 1912. Home-seekers were attracted to its location just a short walk from the B.C.E.R. line at Royal Oak and Highland Park and easily accessible to both New Westminster and Vancouver.
Historic Neighbourhood
Alta Vista (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Sussex-Nelson Area
Images
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Andy Johnson House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark515
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Description
The Andy Johnson House is a large, one and one-half storey plus above-ground basement wood-frame mansion on a rubble-stone granite foundation with a red terra cotta pantile roof and an octagonal corner turret. The building stands in a prominent location on a corner lot on Kingsway, one of Burnaby’s…
Associated Dates
1912
Formal Recognition
Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Andrew M. & Margaret Johnson House 'Glenedward'
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Andrew M. & Margaret Johnson House 'Glenedward'
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 5152 Kingsway
Associated Dates
1912
Formal Recognition
Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Council Resolution
Enactment Date
26/05/2003
Description
The Andy Johnson House is a large, one and one-half storey plus above-ground basement wood-frame mansion on a rubble-stone granite foundation with a red terra cotta pantile roof and an octagonal corner turret. The building stands in a prominent location on a corner lot on Kingsway, one of Burnaby’s main transportation and commercial corridors, and stands adjacent to the Burlington Square Development.
Heritage Value
The Andy Johnson House 'Glenedward' is a valued representation of a prominent upper middle-class family dwelling from the pre-First World War era. Andrew M. Johnson (1861-1934), an early Vancouver pioneer, and his wife Margaret built this house in 1912, in an imposing style favoured by the newly wealthy of the prewar boom period. Born in Norway, Andrew Johnson arrived in Vancouver just months after the Great Fire of 1886 and went into partnership with J. (Ollie) Atkins in a transportation company that became the Mainland Transfer Company, eventually the largest of its kind in Vancouver. Johnson also operated Burnaby's historic Royal Oak Hotel, once located on the opposite corner from his estate. Additionally, the Andy Johnson House is significant for the high-quality design and construction of both the house and its landscaped setting. Designed in the British Arts and Crafts style, the house exhibits a rare degree of opulence in building materials, including imported terra cotta roof tiles, oak and walnut interior millwork, and stained glass manufactured by the Royal City Glass Company. The rubble-stone foundations and perimeter walls were obtained from two massive granite glacial erratic boulders found on the property. The house has been relocated closer to the corner, but the encircling stone walls, the gate posts and gates manufactured by the Westminster Iron Works and some of the original plantings have been retained. A grouping of three giant Sequoias, other mature deciduous trees and massings of shrubbery indicate the type of landscape setting considered appropriate for an estate house in the early years of the twentieth century.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the Andy Johnson House include its: - corner location on Kingsway at Royal Oak Avenue - residential form, scale and massing as expressed by the one and one-half storey height, above-ground basement, octagonal corner turret and rectangular plan - British Arts and Crafts details such as the use of natural indigenous materials, half-timbering in the gables and dormers, picturesque roofline, cedar shingle siding, extended eaves, native granite rubble-stone foundation with red-coloured mortar, and granite piers and chimneys - additional exterior features such as the central front entrance, elaborate wrap-around verandah, porte-cochere and balcony at second storey lighted with original cast iron electric lanterns - red terra cotta pantile roof cladding - fenestration, such as double-hung 1-over-1 wooden-sash windows with stained glass and leaded lights in the upper sash - original interior features such as fireplaces, wainscoting finished with oak and walnut millwork, and three-quarter sawn oak flooring - associated landscape features including three giant Sequoias. granite walls, granite gate posts and wrought iron gates
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Marlborough Area
Builder
J.C. Allen
Function
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Primary Current--Eating or Drinking Establishment
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
003-004-538
Boundaries
The Andy Johnson House is comprised of a single residential lot located at 5152 Kingsway, Burnaby
Area
1424.21
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Private
Name Access
Johnson, Andrew Martin "Andy"
Westminster Iron Works Company
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Brantford Elementary School

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark809
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1965
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6512 Brantford Avenue
Associated Dates
1965
Heritage Value
As housing developments extended north from Kingsway, pupil enrolments grew at Windsor and at Morley Schools so Brantford was built equidistant from the two to help ease enrolment problems. Brantford Elementary school opened in 1965 and was similar in structure to other schools built in Burnaby during this period - no basements, no second stories and no high stairways. Classrooms were built in a line and could easily be added to as enrolments increased. Brantford had room additions in 1969.
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Kingsway-Beresford Area
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Buena Vista Neighbourhood

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark759
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1905-1924
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1905-1924
Heritage Value
The Buena Vista neighbourhood (so named for its wonderful views) grew out of its proximity to Edmonds and New Westminster and was developed in the period 1911-1912. By the 1950s, the area had been further subdivided and in 1986, Burnaby Municipal Council adopted the Cariboo Hills Development Plan for the neighbourhood to maintain its character as a residential area of the city.
Historic Neighbourhood
East Burnaby (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Cariboo-Armstrong Area
Images
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Burquitlam Neighbourhood

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark703
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Heritage Value
By the 1950s, the Burquitlam Neighbourhood was becoming a residential and commercial centre for the northeast section of Burnaby. The Sullivan Heights area was developed as a single-family residential area with the Lyndhurst School opening in 1954. The completion of the Lougheed Highway in 1953 encouraged more commercial and retail development and fostered the growth of the neighbourhood throughout this period.
Historic Neighbourhood
Burquitlam (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lyndhurst Area
Images
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Central Park Neighbourhood

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark688
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Heritage Value
Although still largely a rural area during the 1920s, subdivisions began appearing in the Central Park neighbourhood at this time. Development was slowed by the Great Depression of the 1930s but the influx of commercial buildings and new housing initiatives in the post-war boom led to a period of rapid growth especially in the Garden Village subdivision which was undertaken in 1953 with the plan to build 500 modern homes in the 140-acre site. Despite the closure of the interurban line in 1953, the neighbourhood remained an active commercial and residential centre.
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Maywood Area
Images
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Coburn House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark510
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Description
The Coburn House is a two and one-half storey plus basement Foursquare farm house. Prominently situated on a rise of land along the east side of Boundary Road overlooking Kingsway, it stands among single-family houses later constructed on its subdivided farm land.
Associated Dates
1910
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Minerva Jane Coburn House
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Minerva Jane Coburn House
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 5170 Boundary Road
Associated Dates
1910
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9184
Enactment Date
08/05/1989
Description
The Coburn House is a two and one-half storey plus basement Foursquare farm house. Prominently situated on a rise of land along the east side of Boundary Road overlooking Kingsway, it stands among single-family houses later constructed on its subdivided farm land.
Heritage Value
The Coburn House is important as a surviving representation of Burnaby’s early settlement period, when the municipality was largely an agricultural and residential suburb. It was built in 1910 by carpenter William Kirkham for Minerva Jane Coburn (1868-1940), and three years later the builder and client were married. Together, they operated the Surprise Poultry Farm, and were frequent participants at the local Central Park Farmers' Institute Exhibitions. This house is valued as an excellent and well-preserved example of a substantial Edwardian era Foursquare farm house. Significant due to its generous size, dominant symmetry, the prominent verandah that wraps around the front and both sides, and the three roof dormers, this house retains a high degree of original material and integrity. The elevated siting of the house, its tall proportions and symmetrical appearance combined with its fine condition make this an excellent example of its type.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the Coburn House include its: - prominent location on Boundary Road, on an elevated site overlooking Vancouver - residential form, scale and massing as expressed by its cubic massing and tall, dominant roof form - Foursquare style as exemplified by its symmetry, square floor plan, pyramidal bellcast roof and three hipped dormers - Edwardian era construction details such as narrow bevelled wooden siding, broad horizontal eave band with scroll-cut eave brackets, and simple window surrounds - wraparound verandah encircling three main facades, with hipped roof, square columns and closed balustrades, connected to one storey extension at rear - projecting bay window on the main floor south facade - original double-hung 1-over-1 wooden-sash windows, some in double assembly on the ground floor - internal red brick chimney
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Garden Village Area
Function
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Primary Current--Single Dwelling
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
002-653-427
Boundaries
The Coburn House is comprised of a single residential lot located at 5170 Boundary Road, Burnaby
Area
541.91
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Private
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Confederation Park Elementary School

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark786
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1965
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 4715 Pandora Street
Associated Dates
1965
Heritage Value
Confederation Park school was built in 1965 to alleviate increased enrolments in Rosser Avenue and Capitol Hill schools. All elementary schools built in Burnaby in the post-war period share similar features and Confederation Park is no exception. Built low to the ground with no basement, no second stories and no high stairways, the structures could be easily added to as needed as the classrooms were built in a line.
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Capitol Hill Area
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Douglas-Gilpin Neighbourhood

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark799
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1955-2008
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1955-2008
Heritage Value
The Douglas-Gilpin Neighbourhood developed into a diverse area incorporating residential, business, educational and park districts in the period after 1955. The BCIT site was built in the early 1960s, shortly after the Burnaby Municipal Hall was located on Canada Way near Deer Lake in 1956. The construction of the Municipal Hall at this location fostered the creation of an administrative and business centre adjacent to the park, while the northern and central areas of the neighbourhood retained their primarily residential character.
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Images
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Edmonds Neighbourhood

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark704
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1925-1954
Heritage Value
The historic growth of Edmonds as a neighbourhood was based on its strategic location on the early interurban line between Vancouver and New Westminster. Even by 1980 when a survey of the residential neighbourhoods was conducted, a full 25% of homes in the area predated 1930. The 1950s was a period of strong housing development, with both single-family and multi-family units being constructed. Although Burnaby's City Hall was moved from Kingsway and Edmonds in the early 1950s, Edmonds remained an important centre in the community.
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Stride Avenue Area
Images
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Floden House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark524
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Description
The Floden House is a gambrel roofed, one and one-half storey plus basement wood-frame Dutch Colonial Revival residence, located at the head of the T-intersection of Fourth Street and Edmonds Street in a residential area of East Burnaby.
Associated Dates
1929
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Eric B. & Carrie Floden House
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Eric B. & Carrie Floden House
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 7244 4th Street
Associated Dates
1929
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 11358
Enactment Date
27/05/2002
Description
The Floden House is a gambrel roofed, one and one-half storey plus basement wood-frame Dutch Colonial Revival residence, located at the head of the T-intersection of Fourth Street and Edmonds Street in a residential area of East Burnaby.
Heritage Value
Built in 1929 for Swedish emigrant Eric Birger Floden (1896-1971) and his Norwegian wife, Carrie (1899-1943), the Floden House is a valued representation of local middle-class housing from the 1920s, at a time of increasing prosperity just prior to the onset of the Great Depression. Eric Birger Floden was the head sawyer at Shook Mills in New Westminster, and his family occupied the house until 1964. Additionally, the Floden House is significant as an example of a residential pattern book design from the 1920s. With a reviving economy after the First World War, pattern books were widely used to expedite residential design and construction. It was built by Floden's brother in-law, Nels Olund, a talented contractor of the Fraser Valley who was experienced in building gambrel roof barns. The Floden House is also valued as an example of the Dutch Colonial Revival style, and is typical of period revival houses built in the 1920s that reflected the modern ideals of economy and good design as well as an ongoing pride in past traditions. It was presumed at the time that a well-built house would display a traditional and readily-identifiable style as a hallmark of good taste. The use of the various Colonial Revival styles had gained new popularity during the late 1920s at the time of the American Sesquicentennial. A local landmark, the house originally stood at 7997 18th Avenue and was moved two blocks to its current location by the City of Burnaby when it purchased and rehabilitated the house to save it from demolition, indicating the City's commitment to heritage conservation.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the Floden House include its: - residential form, scale and massing as expressed by its one and one-half storey plus basement height, rectangular plan and distinctive roof form - Dutch Colonial Revival style details such as its side gambrel roof, front and rear shed dormers, attic fanlights, decorative shutters and regular fenestration - roof configuration, with overhanging eaves on the front facade with returns on the side facades, and clipped eaves on the side facades - asymmetrical front entry with small entry porch with lattice surrounds - front projecting bay window - wide lapped horizontal cedar siding - irregular fenestration, with original double-hung 6-over-1 wooden-sash windows - secondary side entry with balcony over - internal red brick chimney with concrete chimney caps
Historic Neighbourhood
East Burnaby (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Edmonds Area
Builder
Nels Olund
Function
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Primary Current--Single Dwelling
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
009-931-490
Boundaries
The Floden House is comprised of a single residential lot located at 7244 Fourth Street, Burnaby.
Area
804.13
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Private
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
Less detail

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