67 records – page 2 of 4.

blade or projectile

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact44879
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV002.57.30
Description
Ground slate point
Object History
The donor inherited this artifact from his mother, Katherine Maude (Kitty) Peers, who inherited them from her father, Louis Claude Hill. The artifacts were found on his farm at Douglas Road and Sperling Avenue (now site of Burnaby Village Museum).
Culture Phase: Locarno Beach phase (3520-2200 Before Present)
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Archeological Specimen
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Geographic Access
Burnaby Village Museum
Brookfield Farm
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

blade or projectile point

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact44878
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV002.57.29
Description
Ground and faceted stone point
Object History
The donor inherited this artifact from his mother, Katherine Maude (Kitty) Peers, who inherited them from her father, Louis Claude Hill. The artifacts were found on his farm at Douglas Road and Sperling Avenue (now site of Burnaby Village Museum).
Culture Phase: Locarno Beach phase (3520-2200 Before Present)
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Archeological Specimen
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Geographic Access
Burnaby Village Museum
Brookfield Farm
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

chisel

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact38885
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV998.11.1
Description
Chisel shaped tool, wedge-shaped; mainly green with white and brown fissures throughout. One side has elevated edge, possibly for attaching to handle.
Object History
The stone chisel was found by Archie Card, ca 1930 in the yard of the Card family home at 329 Richmond Street (later renamed Elwell) in Burnaby.
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

comb basket

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact29797
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV973.69.4
Description
Rectangular shaped coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundations and triangular shaped posterior wall that is higher than the other three. There is a small opening at the top of this wall to allow the basket to be hung.
Designs are done in black dyed cherry bark. Beaded designs are made by laying decorative materials flat over the surface of the coils, and securing them in place with alternating stitches of the cedar root.
Coast Salish: Tsleil-Waututh?
Object History
A comb basket that was created for sale or trade. The chevron shaped designs are associated with flying geese, and are also used for knitting and weavings. The designs at the top of the basket, above the opening, are called cluster of flies. These designs are common amongst the Coast Salish. There are spaces where the foundation materials show, rows are not even width, the beaded designs are irregular. These are often traits associated with learning.
Measurements
Wth. 3 1/2 inches X Lth. 8 1/4 inches
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
School/Style
Coast Salish
Culture
Tsleil-Waututh
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

hand maul

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact15555
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV983.32.13
Description
Nipple topped stone maul. Nipple topped stone maul. It has a crack through the entire shaft and the two halves look of different colour and stone type. There is a large chip missing along the crack.
Object History
The donor was of European decent and was given this maul by an unidentified person. In general, hand mauls are used in woodworking todrive antler wedges or spreading sticks into logs and split planks. They were also used in combination with chisels for detail work. Their presence at an archeological site is viewed as evidence of long term habitations. They are associated with house building, canoe building, housepost and welcome figure carving. Nipple top hand mauls are identified as Marpole Culture (400 BC - 400 AD).
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
First Nations
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Woodworking Tools and Equipment - Maul
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

hand maul

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact34041
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV991.26.1
Description
Conical topped stone maul; damaged area on one side; broken area at bottom edge.
Object History
Maul was found in the late 1920s by Joseph Theodore Dorman on his property on Cliff Avenue, between Halifax and Broadway. In general, hand mauls are used in woodworking todrive antler wedges or spreading sticks into logs and split planks. They were also used in combination with chisels for detail work. Their presence at an archeological site is viewed as evidence of long term habitations. They are associated with house building, canoe building, housepost and welcome figure carving. Nipple top hand mauls are identified as Marpole Culture (400 BC - 400 AD).
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Woodworking Tools and Equipment - Maul
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

hand maul

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact34042
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV991.26.2
Description
Nipple topped stone maul. There is a damaged area on one side and the bottom edge is badly chipped. There are blackish oily stains on the side of the maul.
Object History
Was found in the late 1920s by Joseph Theodore Dorman on his property on Cliff Avenue, between Halifax and Broadway.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
First Nations
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Woodworking Tools and Equipment - Maul
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

hand maul

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact44533
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV002.37.6
Description
Hand maul, stone; fragment, no top.
Object History
Donor's father found the maul in 1946-1947 when excavating a lot at 4203 Norfolk Street. The lot was kitty corner to Schou Street School.
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Woodworking Tools and Equipment - Maul
Archeological Specimen
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Norfolk Street
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

hand maul

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact44853
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV002.57.1
Description
Nipple topped stone maul. It has a pointed tip and a slight indentation on side of base. There is adhesive residue on bottom of base.
Object History
The donor inherited this artifact from his mother, Katherine Maude (Kitty) Peers, who inherited them from her father, Louis Claude Hill. The artifacts were found on his farm at Douglas Road and Sperling Avenue (now site of Burnaby Village Museum). In general, hand mauls are used in woodworking todrive antler wedges or spreading sticks into logs and split planks. They were also used in combination with chisels for detail work. Their presence at an archeological site is viewed as evidence of long term habitations. They are associated with house building, canoe building, housepost and welcome figure carving. Nipple top hand mauls are identified as Marpole Culture (400 BC - 400 AD).
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Woodworking Tools and Equipment - Maul
Archeological Specimen
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Geographic Access
Burnaby Village Museum
Brookfield Farm
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

hand maul

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact44854
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV002.57.2
Description
Conical topped stone maul; damaged by a plow.
Object History
The donor inherited this artifact from his mother, Katherine Maude (Kitty) Peers, who inherited them from her father, Louis Claude Hill. The artifacts were found on his farm at Douglas Road and Sperling Avenue (now site of Burnaby Village Museum).
In general, hand mauls are used in woodworking todrive antler wedges or spreading sticks into logs and split planks. They were also used in combination with chisels for detail work. Their presence at an archeological site is viewed as evidence of long term habitations. They are associated with house building, canoe building, housepost and welcome figure carving. Flat and conical topped hand mauls are identified as Gulf of Georgia Culture (400 AD - 1800).
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Woodworking Tools and Equipment - Maul
Archeological Specimen
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Geographic Access
Burnaby Village Museum
Brookfield Farm
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

hunting bow

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact16840
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV980.2.132
Description
Small maple hunting bow. A leather thong is tied to one end of the bow. It is loose at the other end, although, there is a knot that could slip over the bow. There are traces of green paint on the wood. Interior Salish: Nlaka’pamux: Spuzzum First Nation
Object History
Homer Barnett writes about Coast Salish bows: “the main hunting bow did not differ from the one used in fighting. It was made of yellow cedar root when this wood could be obtained from the mountains. The trunk wood was also used. An alternative was yew. Inferior bows for ducks and other birds were made from hardhack. Bows were about three or four feet long/ The were rather flat and were about the breadth of three fingers at the widest parts on either side of the grip, which was constricted and slightly thicker. They tapered from the centre towards both ends. The ends were curved away from the holder for a better string purchase (1955:100)
Plant fibres were seldom made into bow strings. More common were two-ply cords of sinew or gut. Atypically, a skin thong was used (1955:101).
Marks/Labels
There is writing inscribed on the inside of the bow, which reads: “1925" "Made for me by Spuzzum chief.”
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Site/City Made
Spuzzum
School/Style
Coast Salish
Culture
Nlaka'pamux
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Armament
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

Mountain Goat Horn Spoon

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact30018
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV973.73.177
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV973.73.177
Description
Horn spoon with fine carving on the narrow handle. Material is very dark.
Object History
Along the Northwest Coast, in general, undecorated spoons of wood and horn were used in everyday life, while more elaborately carved versions were used on special occasions. Horn spoons were often passed down in families as heirlooms, such spoons are generally darker in colour than those of recent manufacture. The bowls of these spoons are too large to place in the mouth, so food is sipped from the sides or the end.
The bowl of the mountain goat horn spoon is made from the larger part of the horn, at the base. The handle is made from the tip. It is straightened out by steaming in a wooden mould and then scored out inside as part of the shaping process
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
School/Style
Coast Salish
Culture
Haida
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Food Service Tools and Equipment
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

mukluks

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact84434
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV008.54.2
Description
Pair of mukluks made out of a combination of muskrat, caribou, seal, and moose hide. The musktrat fur goes up the calf of the muklucks. There is bead work on the upper foot and toe area, using yellow, green, blue, red, pink and black beads to make a floral design.
Object History
Parka was purchased by donor's wife in either Altin BC or near Perry River, Yukon between 1936 and 1943.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Site/City Made
Atlin
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Clothing - Footwear
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Atlin
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

obsidian knife

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact44869
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV002.57.20
Description
Butchering knife, obsidian; sharpened edges.
Object History
The donor inherited this artifact from his mother, Katherine Maude (Kitty) Peers, who inherited them from her father, Louis Claude Hill. The artifacts were found on his farm at Douglas Road and Sperling Avenue (now site of Burnaby Village Museum).
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Archeological Specimen
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Geographic Access
Burnaby Village Museum
Brookfield Farm
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

paddle

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact16839
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV980.2.131
Description
Men’s paddle carved from cedar wood. The shaft is flattened with a "T" style grip mortised at top The blade is flat with one side of the tip missing. There are other cracks in the blade.
Object History
Style of blade indicates it is a man’s paddle, for everyday use (see Barnett 1955:116). Anthropologist Homer Barnett notes: “Paddles were made of yellow cedar, yew, and maple. Those of maple and cedar were painted, the man’s being black and the woman’s red. A smoky pitch fire and oil gave an impenetrable black (116). Men’s paddles had a crutch or crosspiece handle – either one piece or doweled on. There were different shapes of paddles for women, steering, sealing and night hunting.
Marks/Labels
"Yale" written on tag.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Site/City Made
Yale
School/Style
Coast Salish
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Transportation
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

parka

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact84433
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV008.54.1
Description
Possible caribou hide parka with fur trimmed hood and cuffs. There are tassels along the shoulders and bottom hem. There is a zipper closure at the front.
Object History
Parka was purchased by donor's wife in either Altin BC or near Perry River, Yukon between 1936 and 1943.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Site/City Made
Atlin
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Clothing - Outerwear
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Atlin
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

projectile point

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact19193
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV002.57.6
Description
Projectile point, stone; rounded end. Bifacially flaked – stone removed on both sides of the point; basalt and lead shaped
Object History
The donor inherited this artifact from his mother, Katherine Maude (Kitty) Peers, who inherited them from her father, Louis Claude Hill. The artifacts were found on his farm at Douglas Road and Sperling Avenue (now site of Burnaby Village Museum).
Culture Phase: Possibly Locarno Beach phase (3520 -2200 Before Present)
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Armament
Archeological Specimen
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Geographic Access
Burnaby Village Museum
Brookfield Farm
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

projectile point

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact19194
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV002.57.7
Description
Projectile point, stone; indented on one side. Triangular stemmed projectile point
Object History
The donor inherited this artifact from his mother, Katherine Maude (Kitty) Peers, who inherited them from her father, Louis Claude Hill. The artifacts were found on his farm at Douglas Road and Sperling Avenue (now site of Burnaby Village Museum).
Culture Phase: Possibly Locarno Beach phase (3520 -2200 Before Present)
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Armament
Archeological Specimen
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Peers, Robert Claude Kenrick "Bob"
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby Village Museum
Brookfield Farm
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Lake Area
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

67 records – page 2 of 4.