684 records – page 4 of 35.

Interview with Annie Boulanger by Rod Fowler April 9, 1990 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory489
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1960-1990
Length
00:02:20
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s involvement in the Burnaby Writers’ Club, and its history and founding members Eileen Kernaghan and Chris Potter and other well known writers who were members of the club
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s involvement in the Burnaby Writers’ Club, and its history and founding members Eileen Kernaghan and Chris Potter and other well known writers who were members of the club
Date Range
1960-1990
Length
00:02:20
Person / Organization
Burnaby Writers' Club
Kernaghan, Eileen
Subject
Arts
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 9, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Annie Boulanger, conducted by Rod Fowler. Annie Boulanger was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Annie Boulanger’s volunteer community work in Burnaby, including initiating the teaching of french and gymnastics at Seaforth School where her children attended, doing historical research and oral histories for Burnaby Heritage Village and the SFU Archives, becoming a long term member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club, being a member and President of Burnaby Arts Council, and member of the Parks Board's Centre for the Performing Arts Committee (1987). The interview focuses attention on the Arts Council’s financial difficulties between 1985 and 1990, and the need for a comprehensive approach to supporting the arts through a municipal arts policy. Annie Boulanger also talks about her parents’ history, their home on Napier Street and her later home on Government Road, her education and teaching career, and her arts journalism. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Annie Urbanovits Boulanger’s parents emigrated from Hungary to Toronto, Louis in 1925 and Irene in 1930, where they married. Louis and Irene Boulanger moved to Vancouver where Louis worked in the Vancouver Shipyards during WWII and then for Nichols Chemical Company in Barnet for 15 years. While the Urbanovits family lived in Cloverdale, Louis commuted to Kask’s Camp in Barnet, until they moved to Burnaby in 1951 to an old farm purchased on Napier Street. Between 1951 and 1956 Annie completed her BA degree, majoring in chemistry and english with a minor in physical education, and obtained her teaching diploma at UBC. She taught for 4 years in various locations in BC before marrying and moving to Manitoba and Ottawa. She and her husband and five children (two more children to come later) returned to Burnaby in 1964 to a home on Government Street to be close to family. Annie Boulanger became involved in the community first through her children’s school, initiating and teaching french classes in Seaforth School in 1969, and supporting the development of gymnastics in school and as a municipal program. Her interest in Archives lead to doing oral histories for John Adams, curator of Heritage Village [Burnaby Heritage Village], and for SFU Archives. She became a long time member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club in the 1970s, taking a course in writing non-fiction from Chris Potter. In 1983 Annie Boulanger joined the Burnaby Arts Council, becoming President in 1985. She was involved in lobbying the municipality for better monetary support and facilities for the arts and for the creation of a Municipal Arts Policy. She has continued to promote the arts in Burnaby through her appointment to Burnaby’s Visual Arts Advisory Board in 1997, her arts journalism, writing regular book and theatre reviews for the local newspaper, and other activities. She was a member of the Burnaby Centennial Committee and was one of the editors of the book “Burnaby Centennial Anthology”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:41:53
Interviewee Name
Boulanger, Annie
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Annie Boulanger

Less detail

Interview with Annie Boulanger by Rod Fowler April 9, 1990 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory490
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1960-1990
Length
00:03:25
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s memories about the history of the Burnaby gymnastics clubs in Burnaby, including the Burnaby Unified Gymnastics Society (BUGS)
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s memories about the history of the Burnaby gymnastics clubs in Burnaby, including the Burnaby Unified Gymnastics Society (BUGS)
Date Range
1960-1990
Length
00:03:25
Subject
Sports - Gymnastics
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 9, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Annie Boulanger, conducted by Rod Fowler. Annie Boulanger was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Annie Boulanger’s volunteer community work in Burnaby, including initiating the teaching of french and gymnastics at Seaforth School where her children attended, doing historical research and oral histories for Burnaby Heritage Village and the SFU Archives, becoming a long term member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club, being a member and President of Burnaby Arts Council, and member of the Parks Board's Centre for the Performing Arts Committee (1987). The interview focuses attention on the Arts Council’s financial difficulties between 1985 and 1990, and the need for a comprehensive approach to supporting the arts through a municipal arts policy. Annie Boulanger also talks about her parents’ history, their home on Napier Street and her later home on Government Road, her education and teaching career, and her arts journalism. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Annie Urbanovits Boulanger’s parents emigrated from Hungary to Toronto, Louis in 1925 and Irene in 1930, where they married. Louis and Irene Boulanger moved to Vancouver where Louis worked in the Vancouver Shipyards during WWII and then for Nichols Chemical Company in Barnet for 15 years. While the Urbanovits family lived in Cloverdale, Louis commuted to Kask’s Camp in Barnet, until they moved to Burnaby in 1951 to an old farm purchased on Napier Street. Between 1951 and 1956 Annie completed her BA degree, majoring in chemistry and english with a minor in physical education, and obtained her teaching diploma at UBC. She taught for 4 years in various locations in BC before marrying and moving to Manitoba and Ottawa. She and her husband and five children (two more children to come later) returned to Burnaby in 1964 to a home on Government Street to be close to family. Annie Boulanger became involved in the community first through her children’s school, initiating and teaching french classes in Seaforth School in 1969, and supporting the development of gymnastics in school and as a municipal program. Her interest in Archives lead to doing oral histories for John Adams, curator of Heritage Village [Burnaby Heritage Village], and for SFU Archives. She became a long time member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club in the 1970s, taking a course in writing non-fiction from Chris Potter. In 1983 Annie Boulanger joined the Burnaby Arts Council, becoming President in 1985. She was involved in lobbying the municipality for better monetary support and facilities for the arts and for the creation of a Municipal Arts Policy. She has continued to promote the arts in Burnaby through her appointment to Burnaby’s Visual Arts Advisory Board in 1997, her arts journalism, writing regular book and theatre reviews for the local newspaper, and other activities. She was a member of the Burnaby Centennial Committee and was one of the editors of the book “Burnaby Centennial Anthology”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:41:53
Interviewee Name
Boulanger, Annie
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Annie Boulanger

Less detail

Interview with A.W. Dow by Larry R. Jensen November 11, 1974 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory160
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1928-1930
Length
0:09:18
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's purchase of the Lochdale General Store and the community members that became his customers. He mentions the closure of the Barnet Mill.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's purchase of the Lochdale General Store and the community members that became his customers. He mentions the closure of the Barnet Mill.
Date Range
1928-1930
Photo Info
Dow General Store, [193-]. Item no. HV976.62.1
Length
0:09:18
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Stores
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Jensen, Larry R.
Interview Date
November 11, 1974
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A.W. Dow by history student Larry R. Jensen, November 11, 1974. This interview was created to gain information for a History 432 paper entitled: "The Lochdale Community: A Study of Depression Times (1929-1939)." Major themes discussed are: the Lochdale Community and the Depression.
Biographical Notes
A.W. Dow went to boarding school in Truro, Cornwall, United Kingdom. A.W. Dow came to the Lochdale Community in 1928. He learnt of the Lochdale store being up for sale through his bride-to-be’s brother, bought it, and became the postmaster and Lochdale General Store owner from 1928 until 1937, renaming it Dow's General Store. In 1937, he and his wife left the store at Hastings Street, bought property and built a combination house and store at 599 Sperling Avenue. A.W. served as Secretary and Treasurer of the Rate Payers' Association. As well, he and his wife were charter members of the Lochdale Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:39
Interviewee Name
Dow, A.W.
Interview Location
599 Sperling Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society fonds
Series
Community Archives Collection series
Subseries
Oral history subseries
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Images
Audio Tracks
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Interview with A.W. Dow by Larry R. Jensen November 11, 1974 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory161
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1930-1932
Length
0:07:38
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's memories of the controversial Shell Oil development at Lochdale.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's memories of the controversial Shell Oil development at Lochdale.
Date Range
1930-1932
Photo Info
Dow General Store, [193-]. Item no. HV976.62.1
Length
0:07:38
Person / Organization
Shell Oil Company
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Jensen, Larry R.
Interview Date
November 11, 1974
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A.W. Dow by history student Larry R. Jensen, November 11, 1974. This interview was created to gain information for a History 432 paper entitled: "The Lochdale Community: A Study of Depression Times (1929-1939)." Major themes discussed are: the Lochdale Community and the Depression.
Biographical Notes
A.W. Dow went to boarding school in Truro, Cornwall, United Kingdom. A.W. Dow came to the Lochdale Community in 1928. He learnt of the Lochdale store being up for sale through his bride-to-be’s brother, bought it, and became the postmaster and Lochdale General Store owner from 1928 until 1937, renaming it Dow's General Store. In 1937, he and his wife left the store at Hastings Street, bought property and built a combination house and store at 599 Sperling Avenue. A.W. served as Secretary and Treasurer of the Rate Payers' Association. As well, he and his wife were charter members of the Lochdale Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:39
Interviewee Name
Dow, A.W.
Interview Location
599 Sperling Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society fonds
Series
Community Archives Collection series
Subseries
Oral history subseries
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Images
Audio Tracks
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Interview with A.W. Dow by Larry R. Jensen November 11, 1974 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory162
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1929
Length
0:08:02
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's memories of fellow Lochdale residents, based on the reading of 1929 address listings.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's memories of fellow Lochdale residents, based on the reading of 1929 address listings.
Date Range
1929
Photo Info
Dow General Store, [193-]. Item no. HV976.62.1
Length
0:08:02
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Jensen, Larry R.
Interview Date
November 11, 1974
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A.W. Dow by history student Larry R. Jensen, November 11, 1974. This interview was created to gain information for a History 432 paper entitled: "The Lochdale Community: A Study of Depression Times (1929-1939)." Major themes discussed are: the Lochdale Community and the Depression.
Biographical Notes
A.W. Dow went to boarding school in Truro, Cornwall, United Kingdom. A.W. Dow came to the Lochdale Community in 1928. He learnt of the Lochdale store being up for sale through his bride-to-be’s brother, bought it, and became the postmaster and Lochdale General Store owner from 1928 until 1937, renaming it Dow's General Store. In 1937, he and his wife left the store at Hastings Street, bought property and built a combination house and store at 599 Sperling Avenue. A.W. served as Secretary and Treasurer of the Rate Payers' Association. As well, he and his wife were charter members of the Lochdale Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:39
Interviewee Name
Dow, A.W.
Interview Location
599 Sperling Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society fonds
Series
Community Archives Collection series
Subseries
Oral history subseries
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Images
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with A.W. Dow

Less detail

Interview with A.W. Dow by Larry R. Jensen November 11, 1974 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory163
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1929-1932
Length
0:09:08
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's memories of the development of the Lochdale Community Hall as well as continuing descriptions of residents from the 1929 address listings. He also begins discussing script as payment.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's memories of the development of the Lochdale Community Hall as well as continuing descriptions of residents from the 1929 address listings. He also begins discussing script as payment.
Date Range
1929-1932
Photo Info
Dow General Store, [193-]. Item no. HV976.62.1
Length
0:09:08
Person / Organization
Lochdale Community Hall
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Jensen, Larry R.
Interview Date
November 11, 1974
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A.W. Dow by history student Larry R. Jensen, November 11, 1974. This interview was created to gain information for a History 432 paper entitled: "The Lochdale Community: A Study of Depression Times (1929-1939)." Major themes discussed are: the Lochdale Community and the Depression.
Biographical Notes
A.W. Dow went to boarding school in Truro, Cornwall, United Kingdom. A.W. Dow came to the Lochdale Community in 1928. He learnt of the Lochdale store being up for sale through his bride-to-be’s brother, bought it, and became the postmaster and Lochdale General Store owner from 1928 until 1937, renaming it Dow's General Store. In 1937, he and his wife left the store at Hastings Street, bought property and built a combination house and store at 599 Sperling Avenue. A.W. served as Secretary and Treasurer of the Rate Payers' Association. As well, he and his wife were charter members of the Lochdale Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:39
Interviewee Name
Dow, A.W.
Interview Location
599 Sperling Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society fonds
Series
Community Archives Collection series
Subseries
Oral history subseries
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Images
Audio Tracks
Less detail

Interview with A.W. Dow by Larry R. Jensen November 11, 1974 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory164
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:09:01
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's wholesaler dealings during the Depression. He discusses how he received payment from the municipality.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's wholesaler dealings during the Depression. He discusses how he received payment from the municipality.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Dow General Store, [193-]. Item no. HV976.62.1
Length
0:09:01
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Stores
Interviewer
Jensen, Larry R.
Interview Date
November 11, 1974
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A.W. Dow by history student Larry R. Jensen, November 11, 1974. This interview was created to gain information for a History 432 paper entitled: "The Lochdale Community: A Study of Depression Times (1929-1939)." Major themes discussed are: the Lochdale Community and the Depression.
Biographical Notes
A.W. Dow went to boarding school in Truro, Cornwall, United Kingdom. A.W. Dow came to the Lochdale Community in 1928. He learnt of the Lochdale store being up for sale through his bride-to-be’s brother, bought it, and became the postmaster and Lochdale General Store owner from 1928 until 1937, renaming it Dow's General Store. In 1937, he and his wife left the store at Hastings Street, bought property and built a combination house and store at 599 Sperling Avenue. A.W. served as Secretary and Treasurer of the Rate Payers' Association. As well, he and his wife were charter members of the Lochdale Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:39
Interviewee Name
Dow, A.W.
Interview Location
599 Sperling Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society fonds
Series
Community Archives Collection series
Subseries
Oral history subseries
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Images
Audio Tracks
Less detail

Interview with A.W. Dow by Larry R. Jensen November 11, 1974 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory165
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1937-1939
Length
0:09:35
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's combination house and store site at Sperling Avenue as well as his grocer competition in the Lochdale area. He also discusses how dealing with rations affected business.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's combination house and store site at Sperling Avenue as well as his grocer competition in the Lochdale area. He also discusses how dealing with rations affected business.
Date Range
1937-1939
Photo Info
Dow General Store, [193-]. Item no. HV976.62.1
Length
0:09:35
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Stores
Interviewer
Jensen, Larry R.
Interview Date
November 11, 1974
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A.W. Dow by history student Larry R. Jensen, November 11, 1974. This interview was created to gain information for a History 432 paper entitled: "The Lochdale Community: A Study of Depression Times (1929-1939)." Major themes discussed are: the Lochdale Community and the Depression.
Biographical Notes
A.W. Dow went to boarding school in Truro, Cornwall, United Kingdom. A.W. Dow came to the Lochdale Community in 1928. He learnt of the Lochdale store being up for sale through his bride-to-be’s brother, bought it, and became the postmaster and Lochdale General Store owner from 1928 until 1937, renaming it Dow's General Store. In 1937, he and his wife left the store at Hastings Street, bought property and built a combination house and store at 599 Sperling Avenue. A.W. served as Secretary and Treasurer of the Rate Payers' Association. As well, he and his wife were charter members of the Lochdale Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:39
Interviewee Name
Dow, A.W.
Interview Location
599 Sperling Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society fonds
Series
Community Archives Collection series
Subseries
Oral history subseries
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Images
Audio Tracks
Less detail

Interview with A.W. Dow by Larry R. Jensen November 11, 1974 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory166
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:05:58
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's memories of the outcome of the Depression as well as the politics of the time.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's memories of the outcome of the Depression as well as the politics of the time.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Dow General Store, [193-]. Item no. HV976.62.1
Length
0:05:58
Subject
Political Theories
Interviewer
Jensen, Larry R.
Interview Date
November 11, 1974
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A.W. Dow by history student Larry R. Jensen, November 11, 1974. This interview was created to gain information for a History 432 paper entitled: "The Lochdale Community: A Study of Depression Times (1929-1939)." Major themes discussed are: the Lochdale Community and the Depression.
Biographical Notes
A.W. Dow went to boarding school in Truro, Cornwall, United Kingdom. A.W. Dow came to the Lochdale Community in 1928. He learnt of the Lochdale store being up for sale through his bride-to-be’s brother, bought it, and became the postmaster and Lochdale General Store owner from 1928 until 1937, renaming it Dow's General Store. In 1937, he and his wife left the store at Hastings Street, bought property and built a combination house and store at 599 Sperling Avenue. A.W. served as Secretary and Treasurer of the Rate Payers' Association. As well, he and his wife were charter members of the Lochdale Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:39
Interviewee Name
Dow, A.W.
Interview Location
599 Sperling Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society fonds
Series
Community Archives Collection series
Subseries
Oral history subseries
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Images
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with A.W. Dow

Less detail

Interview with Barry Jones by Kathy Bossort December 9, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory664
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1944-1970
Length
0:07:55
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about his parent's move to Burnaby in 1944, growing up on Georgia Street, his education at UBC and how he became a teacher. He also talks about his experience attending SFU in 1965/66 as a charter student in the Education Dept.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about his parent's move to Burnaby in 1944, growing up on Georgia Street, his education at UBC and how he became a teacher. He also talks about his experience attending SFU in 1965/66 as a charter student in the Education Dept.
Date Range
1944-1970
Length
0:07:55
Person / Organization
Simon Fraser University
Moscrop Secondary School
Subject
Education
Occupations - Teachers
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
December 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Barry Jones conducted by Kathy Bossort. Barry Jones was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Barry Jones talking about his home and the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and about the negotiations that resulted in the agreement between Simon Fraser University and the City of Burnaby in 1995. He talks about the building of Burnaby Mountain Parkway and its link to the 1995 agreement, and about his experiences with Trans Mountain tank farm and pipeline. He also talks about his education and career as teacher, school board trustee and politician.
Biographical Notes
Barry Jones was born 1940 in Princeton, BC. His father moved the family to a home on Georgia Street in North Burnaby in 1944 where Barry grew up. He attended UBC majoring in mathematics and chemistry, and unable to find work in his field, taught two years in northern BC. He liked teaching and returned to school, enrolling in education at the newly opened Simon Fraser University in 1965. He taught one year at Moscrop Secondary School in Burnaby and finished his 25 year teaching career in Coquitlam. Barry served ten years as a Burnaby School board trustee, and then ten years as North Burnaby MLA (NDP) beginning in 1986, serving five years in Official Opposition and five years in government under then-premier Mike Harcourt. During his time in government, Barry Jones successfully lobbied for freedom of information legislation. He also played a role in resolving the dispute between SFU and Burnaby over control and ownership of land on Burnaby Mountain and in creating the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area in 1995. He continues to live on Burnaby Mountain in a home he bought in 1971.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:06:23
Interviewee Name
Jones, J. Barry
Interview Location
City of Burnaby City Hall law libary
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Barry Jones

Less detail

Interview with Barry Jones by Kathy Bossort December 9, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory665
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1970-2015
Length
0:08:17
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about buying his Centennial Way home on Burnaby Mountain in 1971, the 1972 proposal for developing the south slope of the mountain, and the 1974 public hearings that resulted in the designation of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about buying his Centennial Way home on Burnaby Mountain in 1971, the 1972 proposal for developing the south slope of the mountain, and the 1974 public hearings that resulted in the designation of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain. He also talks about what the conservation area means to him and how the area has changed little since 1971.
Date Range
1970-2015
Length
0:08:17
Person / Organization
Hastings Grove
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
December 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Barry Jones conducted by Kathy Bossort. Barry Jones was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Barry Jones talking about his home and the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and about the negotiations that resulted in the agreement between Simon Fraser University and the City of Burnaby in 1995. He talks about the building of Burnaby Mountain Parkway and its link to the 1995 agreement, and about his experiences with Trans Mountain tank farm and pipeline. He also talks about his education and career as teacher, school board trustee and politician.
Biographical Notes
Barry Jones was born 1940 in Princeton, BC. His father moved the family to a home on Georgia Street in North Burnaby in 1944 where Barry grew up. He attended UBC majoring in mathematics and chemistry, and unable to find work in his field, taught two years in northern BC. He liked teaching and returned to school, enrolling in education at the newly opened Simon Fraser University in 1965. He taught one year at Moscrop Secondary School in Burnaby and finished his 25 year teaching career in Coquitlam. Barry served ten years as a Burnaby School board trustee, and then ten years as North Burnaby MLA (NDP) beginning in 1986, serving five years in Official Opposition and five years in government under then-premier Mike Harcourt. During his time in government, Barry Jones successfully lobbied for freedom of information legislation. He also played a role in resolving the dispute between SFU and Burnaby over control and ownership of land on Burnaby Mountain and in creating the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area in 1995. He continues to live on Burnaby Mountain in a home he bought in 1971.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:06:23
Interviewee Name
Jones, J. Barry
Interview Location
City of Burnaby City Hall law libary
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Barry Jones

Less detail

Interview with Barry Jones by Kathy Bossort December 9, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory666
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1967-2015
Length
0:09:36
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about the rhododendron garden planted in 1967 on Centennial Way for Canada’s Centennial and the gardens current neglect. He talks about management of the conservation area and the Pavilion area, the trails on the mountain, and the people w…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about the rhododendron garden planted in 1967 on Centennial Way for Canada’s Centennial and the gardens current neglect. He talks about management of the conservation area and the Pavilion area, the trails on the mountain, and the people who use the trails.
Date Range
1967-2015
Length
0:09:36
Person / Organization
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Burnaby Mountain Park
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Plants - Flowers
Celebrations - Centennial
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
December 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Barry Jones conducted by Kathy Bossort. Barry Jones was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Barry Jones talking about his home and the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and about the negotiations that resulted in the agreement between Simon Fraser University and the City of Burnaby in 1995. He talks about the building of Burnaby Mountain Parkway and its link to the 1995 agreement, and about his experiences with Trans Mountain tank farm and pipeline. He also talks about his education and career as teacher, school board trustee and politician.
Biographical Notes
Barry Jones was born 1940 in Princeton, BC. His father moved the family to a home on Georgia Street in North Burnaby in 1944 where Barry grew up. He attended UBC majoring in mathematics and chemistry, and unable to find work in his field, taught two years in northern BC. He liked teaching and returned to school, enrolling in education at the newly opened Simon Fraser University in 1965. He taught one year at Moscrop Secondary School in Burnaby and finished his 25 year teaching career in Coquitlam. Barry served ten years as a Burnaby School board trustee, and then ten years as North Burnaby MLA (NDP) beginning in 1986, serving five years in Official Opposition and five years in government under then-premier Mike Harcourt. During his time in government, Barry Jones successfully lobbied for freedom of information legislation. He also played a role in resolving the dispute between SFU and Burnaby over control and ownership of land on Burnaby Mountain and in creating the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area in 1995. He continues to live on Burnaby Mountain in a home he bought in 1971.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:06:23
Interviewee Name
Jones, J. Barry
Interview Location
City of Burnaby City Hall law libary
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Barry Jones

Less detail

Interview with Barry Jones by Kathy Bossort December 9, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory667
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1975-1996
Length
0:11:00
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking briefly about serving as a trustee on the Burnaby Board of Education from 1975 to 1985 and as NDP MLA from 1986 to 1996, before describing his limited role in the dispute between the City of Burnaby and SFU over control and ownership of la…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking briefly about serving as a trustee on the Burnaby Board of Education from 1975 to 1985 and as NDP MLA from 1986 to 1996, before describing his limited role in the dispute between the City of Burnaby and SFU over control and ownership of land on Burnaby Mountain. He talks about how the dispute was resolved and some of the terms in the agreement.
Date Range
1975-1996
Length
0:11:00
Person / Organization
Burnaby School Board
Simon Fraser University
Rankin, Lee A.
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Subject
Intergovernmental Relations
Land
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
December 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Barry Jones conducted by Kathy Bossort. Barry Jones was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Barry Jones talking about his home and the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and about the negotiations that resulted in the agreement between Simon Fraser University and the City of Burnaby in 1995. He talks about the building of Burnaby Mountain Parkway and its link to the 1995 agreement, and about his experiences with Trans Mountain tank farm and pipeline. He also talks about his education and career as teacher, school board trustee and politician.
Biographical Notes
Barry Jones was born 1940 in Princeton, BC. His father moved the family to a home on Georgia Street in North Burnaby in 1944 where Barry grew up. He attended UBC majoring in mathematics and chemistry, and unable to find work in his field, taught two years in northern BC. He liked teaching and returned to school, enrolling in education at the newly opened Simon Fraser University in 1965. He taught one year at Moscrop Secondary School in Burnaby and finished his 25 year teaching career in Coquitlam. Barry served ten years as a Burnaby School board trustee, and then ten years as North Burnaby MLA (NDP) beginning in 1986, serving five years in Official Opposition and five years in government under then-premier Mike Harcourt. During his time in government, Barry Jones successfully lobbied for freedom of information legislation. He also played a role in resolving the dispute between SFU and Burnaby over control and ownership of land on Burnaby Mountain and in creating the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area in 1995. He continues to live on Burnaby Mountain in a home he bought in 1971.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:06:23
Interviewee Name
Jones, J. Barry
Interview Location
City of Burnaby City Hall law libary
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Barry Jones

Less detail

Interview with Barry Jones by Kathy Bossort December 9, 2015 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory668
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1980-2015
Length
0:13:13
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about the building of the Burnaby Mountain Parkway, and its link with the SFU/City agreement and development in the Philips/Curtis area. He talks about the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society and members Karen Morcke and Dean Lamont. He …
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about the building of the Burnaby Mountain Parkway, and its link with the SFU/City agreement and development in the Philips/Curtis area. He talks about the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society and members Karen Morcke and Dean Lamont. He also talks about some of the key people involved in the negotiations between City and SFU, the ceremony at which the agreement was signed, and the plaque in the Pavilion area that commemorates the agreement.
Date Range
1980-2015
Length
0:13:13
Person / Organization
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Burnaby Mountain Parkway
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Morcke, Karen
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Transportation
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
December 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Barry Jones conducted by Kathy Bossort. Barry Jones was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Barry Jones talking about his home and the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and about the negotiations that resulted in the agreement between Simon Fraser University and the City of Burnaby in 1995. He talks about the building of Burnaby Mountain Parkway and its link to the 1995 agreement, and about his experiences with Trans Mountain tank farm and pipeline. He also talks about his education and career as teacher, school board trustee and politician.
Biographical Notes
Barry Jones was born 1940 in Princeton, BC. His father moved the family to a home on Georgia Street in North Burnaby in 1944 where Barry grew up. He attended UBC majoring in mathematics and chemistry, and unable to find work in his field, taught two years in northern BC. He liked teaching and returned to school, enrolling in education at the newly opened Simon Fraser University in 1965. He taught one year at Moscrop Secondary School in Burnaby and finished his 25 year teaching career in Coquitlam. Barry served ten years as a Burnaby School board trustee, and then ten years as North Burnaby MLA (NDP) beginning in 1986, serving five years in Official Opposition and five years in government under then-premier Mike Harcourt. During his time in government, Barry Jones successfully lobbied for freedom of information legislation. He also played a role in resolving the dispute between SFU and Burnaby over control and ownership of land on Burnaby Mountain and in creating the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area in 1995. He continues to live on Burnaby Mountain in a home he bought in 1971.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:06:23
Interviewee Name
Jones, J. Barry
Interview Location
City of Burnaby City Hall law libary
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Barry Jones

Less detail

Interview with Barry Jones by Kathy Bossort December 9, 2015 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory669
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1985-2015
Length
0:08:16
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about the Trans Mountain tank farm. He also talks about how SFU has benefitted Burnaby and the improved relationship between the the City and the university.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about the Trans Mountain tank farm. He also talks about how SFU has benefitted Burnaby and the improved relationship between the the City and the university.
Date Range
1985-2015
Length
0:08:16
Person / Organization
Simon Fraser University
Trans Mountain Oil Pipeline Company
Subject
Industries - Petroleum Industry
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
December 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Barry Jones conducted by Kathy Bossort. Barry Jones was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Barry Jones talking about his home and the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and about the negotiations that resulted in the agreement between Simon Fraser University and the City of Burnaby in 1995. He talks about the building of Burnaby Mountain Parkway and its link to the 1995 agreement, and about his experiences with Trans Mountain tank farm and pipeline. He also talks about his education and career as teacher, school board trustee and politician.
Biographical Notes
Barry Jones was born 1940 in Princeton, BC. His father moved the family to a home on Georgia Street in North Burnaby in 1944 where Barry grew up. He attended UBC majoring in mathematics and chemistry, and unable to find work in his field, taught two years in northern BC. He liked teaching and returned to school, enrolling in education at the newly opened Simon Fraser University in 1965. He taught one year at Moscrop Secondary School in Burnaby and finished his 25 year teaching career in Coquitlam. Barry served ten years as a Burnaby School board trustee, and then ten years as North Burnaby MLA (NDP) beginning in 1986, serving five years in Official Opposition and five years in government under then-premier Mike Harcourt. During his time in government, Barry Jones successfully lobbied for freedom of information legislation. He also played a role in resolving the dispute between SFU and Burnaby over control and ownership of land on Burnaby Mountain and in creating the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area in 1995. He continues to live on Burnaby Mountain in a home he bought in 1971.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:06:23
Interviewee Name
Jones, J. Barry
Interview Location
City of Burnaby City Hall law libary
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Barry Jones

Less detail

Interview with Barry Jones by Kathy Bossort December 9, 2015 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory670
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1995-2015
Length
0:08:06
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about UniverCity, the future of the forest on Burnaby Mountain, and the positive uses people make of the parkland. He also talks about the need to improve the entrance to the Pavilion area on the mountain, and suggests that Canada’s 150th …
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about UniverCity, the future of the forest on Burnaby Mountain, and the positive uses people make of the parkland. He also talks about the need to improve the entrance to the Pavilion area on the mountain, and suggests that Canada’s 150th Centennial in 2017 would be a good opportunity for doing so.
Date Range
1995-2015
Length
0:08:06
Person / Organization
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Burnaby - Centennial Way
UniverCity
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
December 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Barry Jones conducted by Kathy Bossort. Barry Jones was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Barry Jones talking about his home and the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and about the negotiations that resulted in the agreement between Simon Fraser University and the City of Burnaby in 1995. He talks about the building of Burnaby Mountain Parkway and its link to the 1995 agreement, and about his experiences with Trans Mountain tank farm and pipeline. He also talks about his education and career as teacher, school board trustee and politician.
Biographical Notes
Barry Jones was born 1940 in Princeton, BC. His father moved the family to a home on Georgia Street in North Burnaby in 1944 where Barry grew up. He attended UBC majoring in mathematics and chemistry, and unable to find work in his field, taught two years in northern BC. He liked teaching and returned to school, enrolling in education at the newly opened Simon Fraser University in 1965. He taught one year at Moscrop Secondary School in Burnaby and finished his 25 year teaching career in Coquitlam. Barry served ten years as a Burnaby School board trustee, and then ten years as North Burnaby MLA (NDP) beginning in 1986, serving five years in Official Opposition and five years in government under then-premier Mike Harcourt. During his time in government, Barry Jones successfully lobbied for freedom of information legislation. He also played a role in resolving the dispute between SFU and Burnaby over control and ownership of land on Burnaby Mountain and in creating the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area in 1995. He continues to live on Burnaby Mountain in a home he bought in 1971.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:06:23
Interviewee Name
Jones, J. Barry
Interview Location
City of Burnaby City Hall law libary
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Barry Jones

Less detail

Interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse by Kathy Bossort November 24, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory627
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1965-2015
Length
0:09:54
Summary
This portion of the interview is about introducing the two interviewees Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse. They talk about their education, how they became interested in their career paths as urban planners and what kept them interested in their work, how they were hired by the City of Burnaby, and th…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about introducing the two interviewees Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse. They talk about their education, how they became interested in their career paths as urban planners and what kept them interested in their work, how they were hired by the City of Burnaby, and their working relationship in the Planning Department.
Date Range
1965-2015
Length
0:09:54
Person / Organization
Burnaby Planning and Building Department
Parr, Anthony L.
Subject
Education
Occupations - Civic Workers
Public Services - Municipal Services
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 24, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse conducted by Kathy Bossort. Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland by dedication on Burnaby Mountain, the 1974/76 delineation of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and the dispute between Burnaby and Simon Fraser University over land ownership and control on Burnaby Mountain, as discussed by two retired participants in these events from the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department, Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse. They also talk about their interaction with the public in developing policies, particularly for the 1974 report “The Public Meetings - Phase One”, and the importance of a strong policy base for long range planning and the patience needed to assemble land for large parks. They talk as well about their careers, their close working relationship in the department, and the cooperation between City and SFU staff in the development of UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Basil Luksun was born and educated in South Africa, immigrating to Canada and Burnaby in 1972 to escape the harmful effects of apartheid. He holds a BSc degree from the University of Cape Town and a Post-Graduate Diploma in Town Planning from the University of Witwatersrand. He joined the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department in 1973, working his way up through the organization to Director of the department before retiring after 39 years in 2012. When he started work in the 1970s, the City of Burnaby was focusing on green space planning projects and he takes great pride in these projects as well as the city’s focus on long-term planning. Basil lived in the Capital Hill area from 1972 to 1990. He currently resides in Vancouver and has two sons, Warren and Derek. Jack Belhouse was born in 1946 in Vancouver and attended UBC, York University and SFU (1965-1972), majoring in urban geography. He began working in Burnaby’s planning department as a summer student in 1968, and was offered a full-time position when he graduated from university. He became Director of the Planning and Building Department before retiring after 38 years with the city in 2006. He and Basil Luksun worked closely together in long range planning in the department. Jack lives in Coquitlam with his wife Linda and has two children, Brad and Lori.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:58:23
Interviewee Name
Luksun, Basil
Belhouse, Jack
Interview Location
Basil Luksun's home in Vancouver
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse

Less detail

Interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse by Kathy Bossort November 24, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory628
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1913-2015
Length
0:19:24
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse talking about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain beginning in 1942 with By-Law 1772; the kinds of park dedications used by the City and shift in nature of dedications to accommodate long range park planning…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse talking about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain beginning in 1942 with By-Law 1772; the kinds of park dedications used by the City and shift in nature of dedications to accommodate long range park planning; and looking at the big picture policy and programs for land assembly for major open spaces and linkages.
Date Range
1913-2015
Length
0:19:24
Person / Organization
Burnaby Planning and Building Department
Barnet Mountain Park
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 24, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse conducted by Kathy Bossort. Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland by dedication on Burnaby Mountain, the 1974/76 delineation of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and the dispute between Burnaby and Simon Fraser University over land ownership and control on Burnaby Mountain, as discussed by two retired participants in these events from the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department, Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse. They also talk about their interaction with the public in developing policies, particularly for the 1974 report “The Public Meetings - Phase One”, and the importance of a strong policy base for long range planning and the patience needed to assemble land for large parks. They talk as well about their careers, their close working relationship in the department, and the cooperation between City and SFU staff in the development of UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Basil Luksun was born and educated in South Africa, immigrating to Canada and Burnaby in 1972 to escape the harmful effects of apartheid. He holds a BSc degree from the University of Cape Town and a Post-Graduate Diploma in Town Planning from the University of Witwatersrand. He joined the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department in 1973, working his way up through the organization to Director of the department before retiring after 39 years in 2012. When he started work in the 1970s, the City of Burnaby was focusing on green space planning projects and he takes great pride in these projects as well as the city’s focus on long-term planning. Basil lived in the Capital Hill area from 1972 to 1990. He currently resides in Vancouver and has two sons, Warren and Derek. Jack Belhouse was born in 1946 in Vancouver and attended UBC, York University and SFU (1965-1972), majoring in urban geography. He began working in Burnaby’s planning department as a summer student in 1968, and was offered a full-time position when he graduated from university. He became Director of the Planning and Building Department before retiring after 38 years with the city in 2006. He and Basil Luksun worked closely together in long range planning in the department. Jack lives in Coquitlam with his wife Linda and has two children, Brad and Lori.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:58:23
Interviewee Name
Luksun, Basil
Belhouse, Jack
Interview Location
Basil Luksun's home in Vancouver
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse

Less detail

Interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse by Kathy Bossort November 24, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory629
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1970-1990
Length
0:15:10
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse talking about the background to the creation of their 1974 report “The Public Meetings - Phase One” which made recommendations for long range planning policies for the City of Burnaby, including the creation of the conservation a…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse talking about the background to the creation of their 1974 report “The Public Meetings - Phase One” which made recommendations for long range planning policies for the City of Burnaby, including the creation of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain. They talk about meeting with the public as a strategy for refreshing policy, the shift in public attitudes for saving green spaces, and the City’s strong policy base for making decisions.
Date Range
1970-1990
Length
0:15:10
Person / Organization
Burnaby Planning and Building Department
Lawson, Doreen A.
Atchison, Jennifer
Gunn, Brian M.
Subject
Public Services - Municipal Services
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 24, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse conducted by Kathy Bossort. Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland by dedication on Burnaby Mountain, the 1974/76 delineation of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and the dispute between Burnaby and Simon Fraser University over land ownership and control on Burnaby Mountain, as discussed by two retired participants in these events from the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department, Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse. They also talk about their interaction with the public in developing policies, particularly for the 1974 report “The Public Meetings - Phase One”, and the importance of a strong policy base for long range planning and the patience needed to assemble land for large parks. They talk as well about their careers, their close working relationship in the department, and the cooperation between City and SFU staff in the development of UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Basil Luksun was born and educated in South Africa, immigrating to Canada and Burnaby in 1972 to escape the harmful effects of apartheid. He holds a BSc degree from the University of Cape Town and a Post-Graduate Diploma in Town Planning from the University of Witwatersrand. He joined the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department in 1973, working his way up through the organization to Director of the department before retiring after 39 years in 2012. When he started work in the 1970s, the City of Burnaby was focusing on green space planning projects and he takes great pride in these projects as well as the city’s focus on long-term planning. Basil lived in the Capital Hill area from 1972 to 1990. He currently resides in Vancouver and has two sons, Warren and Derek. Jack Belhouse was born in 1946 in Vancouver and attended UBC, York University and SFU (1965-1972), majoring in urban geography. He began working in Burnaby’s planning department as a summer student in 1968, and was offered a full-time position when he graduated from university. He became Director of the Planning and Building Department before retiring after 38 years with the city in 2006. He and Basil Luksun worked closely together in long range planning in the department. Jack lives in Coquitlam with his wife Linda and has two children, Brad and Lori.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:58:23
Interviewee Name
Luksun, Basil
Belhouse, Jack
Interview Location
Basil Luksun's home in Vancouver
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse

Less detail

Interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse by Kathy Bossort November 24, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/oralhistory630
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date Range
1974-2015
Length
0:18:26
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse talking about the establishment of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain 1974-1976; the definition of conservation vs preservation; issues around delineating the conservation area boundary; and steps to zoning the area. They …
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse talking about the establishment of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain 1974-1976; the definition of conservation vs preservation; issues around delineating the conservation area boundary; and steps to zoning the area. They tell about how they used an air photomosaic with mylar overlays to show delineation. They also explore the meaning of “traditional landmark character” of the mountain and its value for guiding park management and development adjacent to the park
Date Range
1974-2015
Length
0:18:26
Person / Organization
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 24, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse conducted by Kathy Bossort. Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland by dedication on Burnaby Mountain, the 1974/76 delineation of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and the dispute between Burnaby and Simon Fraser University over land ownership and control on Burnaby Mountain, as discussed by two retired participants in these events from the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department, Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse. They also talk about their interaction with the public in developing policies, particularly for the 1974 report “The Public Meetings - Phase One”, and the importance of a strong policy base for long range planning and the patience needed to assemble land for large parks. They talk as well about their careers, their close working relationship in the department, and the cooperation between City and SFU staff in the development of UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Basil Luksun was born and educated in South Africa, immigrating to Canada and Burnaby in 1972 to escape the harmful effects of apartheid. He holds a BSc degree from the University of Cape Town and a Post-Graduate Diploma in Town Planning from the University of Witwatersrand. He joined the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department in 1973, working his way up through the organization to Director of the department before retiring after 39 years in 2012. When he started work in the 1970s, the City of Burnaby was focusing on green space planning projects and he takes great pride in these projects as well as the city’s focus on long-term planning. Basil lived in the Capital Hill area from 1972 to 1990. He currently resides in Vancouver and has two sons, Warren and Derek. Jack Belhouse was born in 1946 in Vancouver and attended UBC, York University and SFU (1965-1972), majoring in urban geography. He began working in Burnaby’s planning department as a summer student in 1968, and was offered a full-time position when he graduated from university. He became Director of the Planning and Building Department before retiring after 38 years with the city in 2006. He and Basil Luksun worked closely together in long range planning in the department. Jack lives in Coquitlam with his wife Linda and has two children, Brad and Lori.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:58:23
Interviewee Name
Luksun, Basil
Belhouse, Jack
Interview Location
Basil Luksun's home in Vancouver
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse

Less detail

684 records – page 4 of 35.