100 records – page 1 of 5.

Actors performing in play "Maluka"

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumdescription19280
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1988]
Collection/Fonds
Dr. Sadhu Binning fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 10 x 15 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of actors from Vancouver Sath performing in the play "Maluka" at J. W. Sexsmith Elementary School in Vancouver. Three actors are identified as Billa Takhar (seated on chair), Paul Binning (standing in centre) and Manjit Lehl (standing on the right). The play is an adaptation based on the…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Dr. Sadhu Binning fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 10 x 15 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of actors from Vancouver Sath performing in the play "Maluka" at J. W. Sexsmith Elementary School in Vancouver. Three actors are identified as Billa Takhar (seated on chair), Paul Binning (standing in centre) and Manjit Lehl (standing on the right). The play is an adaptation based on the novel "Maluka" written by Sadhu Singh Dhami.
Subjects
Performances - Dramatic Performances
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Binning, Paul
Lehl, Manjit
Takhar, Billa
Vancouver Sath
Accession Code
BV023.7.17
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
[1988]
Media Type
Photograph
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
2023-03-30
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Images
Less detail

Actors performing in play "Maluka"

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumdescription19281
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1988]
Collection/Fonds
Dr. Sadhu Binning fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 15 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of actors from Vancouver Sath, Sukhwant Hundal (front centre) and Billa Takhar (behind to right) performing in the play "Maluka" at J. W. Sexsmith Elementary School in Vancouver. Both men are Sikh and are wearing turbins. The play is an adaptation based on the novel "Maluka" written by S…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Dr. Sadhu Binning fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 15 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of actors from Vancouver Sath, Sukhwant Hundal (front centre) and Billa Takhar (behind to right) performing in the play "Maluka" at J. W. Sexsmith Elementary School in Vancouver. Both men are Sikh and are wearing turbins. The play is an adaptation based on the novel "Maluka" written by Sadhu Singh Dhami.
Subjects
Performances - Dramatic Performances
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Hundal, Sukhwant
Takhar, Billa
Vancouver Sath
Accession Code
BV023.7.18
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
[1988]
Media Type
Photograph
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
2023-03-30
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Images
Less detail

Andy Johnson's "Glenedward"

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivedescription35046
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1912 (date of original), copied 1986
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w copy print ; 8.7 x 12.7 cm + copy negative
Scope and Content
Photograph of the exterior of Andrew M. Johnson's house "Glenedward," at 5152 Kingsway. Two men and two boys are outside the house, with the youngest boy is seated in a toy car. A low stone wall is surrounding the yard.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1912 (date of original), copied 1986
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society fonds
Series
Community Archives Collection series
Subseries
Photographs subseries
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w copy print ; 8.7 x 12.7 cm + copy negative
Description Level
Item
Record No.
181-001
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Accession Number
BHS1986-29
Scope and Content
Photograph of the exterior of Andrew M. Johnson's house "Glenedward," at 5152 Kingsway. Two men and two boys are outside the house, with the youngest boy is seated in a toy car. A low stone wall is surrounding the yard.
Subjects
Buildings - Residential - Houses
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Media Type
Photograph
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Geographic Access
Kingsway
Street Address
5152 Kingsway
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Marlborough Area
Images
Less detail

Barge at Kapoor Sawmills Ltd.

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumdescription15192
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1947] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a barge filled with sawdust docked outside of the Kapoor Sawmills Limited in the Burrard Inlet. A loading conveyor is visible in front of the barge. Sawdust chips were transported from the sawmill to pulp mills.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a barge filled with sawdust docked outside of the Kapoor Sawmills Limited in the Burrard Inlet. A loading conveyor is visible in front of the barge. Sawdust chips were transported from the sawmill to pulp mills.
History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Kaur Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sarjit Kaur Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Siddoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), Runjeet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Geographic Access
Burrard Inlet
Barnet Marine Park
Accession Code
BV019.32.13
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
[1947] (date of original), copied 2004
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
See page 62 in book "In the Shadow by the Sea - recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "The conveyor that loaded the sawdust chips on to a barge for transport to pulp mills, c. 1940s"
Images
Less detail

Barnet school class

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumdescription15184
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[between 1941 and 1942] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of Barnet School elementary class, 1941-1942. The group of students are arranged outside in three rows with trees behind them. Students are identified from left to right as; front row: Kenny Marshall, unknown, Lakhbeer Siddoo, Gurdeb Siddoo, Bobby Karppinen, unknown, Hardev Siddoo; middl…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of Barnet School elementary class, 1941-1942. The group of students are arranged outside in three rows with trees behind them. Students are identified from left to right as; front row: Kenny Marshall, unknown, Lakhbeer Siddoo, Gurdeb Siddoo, Bobby Karppinen, unknown, Hardev Siddoo; middle row: Moyra Foort, Rose Johnston, Doreen Karppinen, Dierdre Davidson, Freda Hall, Joan Lynch, Sheila Carey, Catherine La Favor, Beatrice Woolsey and Goglin; back row: Bobby Goglin, Jackie Marshall, Ken Murray, Gurmeet Gurdell, Florence La Favor, Diljeet Teja, Colin Simmons, Ronny Johnson.
Subjects
Persons - Students
Persons - Children
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Buildings - Schools
Names
Barnet School
Marshall, Kenny
Siddoo, Hardev
Siddoo, Lakhbeer
Siddoo, Gurdeb
Karppinen, Robert "Bobby"
Foort, Moyra
Johnston, Rose
Karppinen, Doreen
Davidson, Dierdre
Hall, Freda
Lynch, Joan
Carey, Sheila
La Favor, Cathryn Bernice
McMillan, Beatrice Woolsey
Goglin, Robert "Bobby"
Marshall, Jack Darrel "Jackie"
Murray, Ken
Gurdell, Gurmeet
La Favor, Florence Alice
Teja, Diljeet
Simmons, Colin
Johnson, Ron "Ronny"
Accession Code
BV019.32.5
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
[between 1941 and 1942] (date of original), copied 2004
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
see page 235 in the book "In the Shadow by the Sea - recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "Barnet School / Class 1941-1942 / Back Row:..."
Images
Less detail

Besant Kaur Siddoo at her kitchen stove

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumdescription15181
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of Besant Kaur Siddoo (spouse of Kapoor Singh Siddoo) tending the sawdust burner at her kitchen stove. A large galvanized hopper which fed the sawdust to the fire box of the stove is to her left.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of Besant Kaur Siddoo (spouse of Kapoor Singh Siddoo) tending the sawdust burner at her kitchen stove. A large galvanized hopper which fed the sawdust to the fire box of the stove is to her left.
History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Kaur Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sarjit Kaur Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Siddoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), Runjeet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Siddoo, Besant Kaur
Accession Code
BV019.32.2
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
see page 63 in the book "In the Shadow by the Sea - recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "Mrs. Kapoor Siddoo tending the sawdust burner at her kitchen stove. Note the hopper which fed the sawdust to the fire box of the stove. c. 1940s"
Images
Less detail

Boom man with logs

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumdescription15195
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of an unidentified South Asian Sikh boom man standing on a log with a steel pointed pike pole directing logs within a log boom. The log boom was located in Burrard Inlet at the Kapoor Sawmills Limited.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of an unidentified South Asian Sikh boom man standing on a log with a steel pointed pike pole directing logs within a log boom. The log boom was located in Burrard Inlet at the Kapoor Sawmills Limited.
History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Kaur Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sarjit Kaur Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Siddoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), Runjeet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Occupations - Millworkers
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Geographic Access
Burrard Inlet
Barnet Marine Park
Accession Code
BV019.32.16
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
[194-] (date of original), copied 2004
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
See page 61 of book "In the Shadow by the Sea - Recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "A boom man needed to be nimble on his feet to select and move logs to the log slip where they could be haulde up into the mill."
Images
Less detail

Booms and mill

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumdescription15187
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950] (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of log boom pond of the Kapoor Sawmills Limited in Burrard Inlet.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of log boom pond of the Kapoor Sawmills Limited in Burrard Inlet.
History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Kaur Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sarjit Kaur Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Siddoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), Runjeet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Industries - Logging/lumber
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Geographic Access
Burrard Inlet
Barnet Marine Park
Accession Code
BV019.32.8
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
[1950] (date of original), copied 2004
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
See page 66 in book "In the Shadow by the Sea - recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "The vast log boom pond of Kapoor Sawmill, c. 1950"
Images
Less detail

brochure

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact91728
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV023.13.3
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV023.13.3
Description
Komagata Maru - Brochure -- [1989?]. Three panel accordian folded sheet brochure prepared for Vancouver Sath by Sadhu Binning and Sukhwant Hundal for the exhibition of "Komagata Maru: A Story in Picture. The exhibit was to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Komagata Maru.
The brochure is printed in Punjabi and English on pink paper with black ink. The brochure is double sided with a front cover in English and a front cover in Punjabi.
Object History
These items are ephemera collected by the donor during the active years of the Vancouver Sath organization. Most of the meetings and rehearsals were held in Burnaby, and most of the performances were held in Vancouver. The group was passionate about tackling difficult issues within the community and giving a space for these issues to be raised. The hope was the conversations would begin and go somewhere within families and the community. They covered issues of gender inequality, martial violence, wage discrepancy in work, union support, and racism.
Vancouver Sath recognized that theatre was a more effective medium to reaching their audience than paper newsletters and publications was at the time. They were connected to the Canadian Farmworkers Union (CFU), and other location organzations for support, and due to many shared members. Often the CFU would apply for grants, and fund the cost of venue rental, set and prop procurement, and offering a modest honourarium to actors.
Reference
Transcript and translation available upon request.
Measurements
Height: 22 cm
Width: 12.5 cm
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail

Celebration

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivedescription98247
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[1999]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Scope and Content
Photograph of unidentified people, wearing colourful head coverings and clapping, who are participating in a celebration.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[1999]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Description Level
Item
Record No.
535-3314
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Accession Number
2018-12
Scope and Content
Photograph of unidentified people, wearing colourful head coverings and clapping, who are participating in a celebration.
Subjects
Events
Celebrations
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Media Type
Photograph
Notes
Title based on original file name
Collected by editorial for use in a September 1999 issue of the Burnaby NewsLeader
Images
Less detail

Chinese New Year envelope

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact89950
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV019.16.3
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV019.16.3
Description
Chinese New Year envelope; red paper with gummed, fold closure at top; text in Chinese and English in gold reading: "Jagmeet Singh / Leader of Canada's NDP / Burnaby South NDP Candidate / www.jagmeetsingh.ca / Paid for and authorized by official agent of the candidate."; contains a small, square orange-flavoured candy and a thin card; card has the candidate's name and photograph on one side, and the Chinese zodiac on the other.
Object History
Jagmeet Singh is a Canadian lawyer and politician serving as leader of the New Democratic Party since 2017. He was elected as the Member of Parliament (MP) for the riding of Burnaby South in a February 25, 2019 by-election.
Category
05.Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology
Classification
Merchandising T&E
Object Term
Envelope, Money
Subjects
Advertising Medium
Holidays - Chinese New Year
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Officials - Elected Officials
Celebrations
Names
Singh, Jagmeet
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail

David Ali

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivedescription96222
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2006]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Scope and Content
Photograph of David Ali standing inside the prayer hall of a mosque. Ali's shoes are visible in the foreground of the photograph, next to text on a floor tile that reads: "No Shoes Past the Line."
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2006]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Description Level
Item
Record No.
535-1914
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Accession Number
2018-12
Scope and Content
Photograph of David Ali standing inside the prayer hall of a mosque. Ali's shoes are visible in the foreground of the photograph, next to text on a floor tile that reads: "No Shoes Past the Line."
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Religions - Islam
Buildings - Religious - Mosques
Media Type
Photograph
Photographer
Bartel, Mario
Notes
Title based on caption
Collected by editorial for use in a February 2006 issue of the Burnaby NewsLeader
Caption from metadata: "Muslims, like David Ali, remove their shoes when entering the prayer hall to preserve the sanctity of the hall and keep it seperate from the outside world."
Images
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Dipen Thakrar

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivedescription80903
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
March 22, 1998
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 14.5 x 21.5 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of Dipen Thakrar, a Burnaby South student, sitting near computer tables.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
March 22, 1998
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 14.5 x 21.5 cm
Description Level
Item
Record No.
535-1137
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Accession Number
2012-11
Scope and Content
Photograph of Dipen Thakrar, a Burnaby South student, sitting near computer tables.
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Thakrar, Dipen
Media Type
Photograph
Photographer
Langdeau, Brian
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Note in black ink on recto of photograph reads: "75% Bby pg. 4 / 592 A Bby Brian Bby - 4 -"
Trim marks and/or reproduction instructions on recto (scan is cropped)
Accompanying caption reads: "March 22, 1998 592A: / Dipen Thakrar is one of 20 Burnaby South secondary students who will demonstrate some of the high tech projects students have been working on when Prince Charles, and possibly his two sons, visit the school on Tuesday."
Images
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Duraisamy family

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivedescription97702
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2001]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
File
Physical Description
4 photographs (tiff) : col.
Scope and Content
File contains photographs of the Duraisamy family, who moved to Canada from Sri Lanka, displaying how they blend Christian Christmas and Hindu traditions in their home.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2001]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Physical Description
4 photographs (tiff) : col.
Description Level
File
Record No.
535-2977
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Accession Number
2018-12
Scope and Content
File contains photographs of the Duraisamy family, who moved to Canada from Sri Lanka, displaying how they blend Christian Christmas and Hindu traditions in their home.
Subjects
Holidays - Christmas
Religions - Christianity
Religions - Hinduism
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Media Type
Photograph
Photographer
Bartel, Mario
Notes
Title based on caption
Collected by editorial for use in a December 2001 issue of the Burnaby NewsLeader
Caption from metadata for 535-2977-1: "Siva and Kanges Duraisamy, originally from Sri Lanka, have been gradually melding their Hindu and Christian Christmas traditions."
Caption from metadata for 535-2977-2: "The Duraisamy family, originally from Sri Lanka, have been gradually melding Hindu and Christian Christmas traditions since moving to Canada in 1999."
Caption from metadata for 535-2977-3: "Niroo Duraisamy, 8, shows off the letter to Santa Claus he composed on his home computer. Since moving to Canada from Sri Lanka in 1999, his family has gradually incorporated western Christmas traditions into their holiday."
Caption from metadata for 535-2977-4: "Siva Duraisamy tries to figure out why the family's Frosty the Snowman decoration won't light up."
Images
Less detail

fan

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact91699
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV023.4.1
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV023.4.1
Description
Pakhi is a hand held fan. Tha fan has a pole like centre where a paddle is attached and swings freely around the pole. The bottom of the pole has a handle, and the top of the pole is painted fuchsia pink.
The paddle part of the fan is made of brown and green plasticized strips woven into a diamond pattern. The edge of the paddle is covered in a pleated white fabric trim.
Object History
These are items that belonged to the donors as household items in their home in Burnaby between 1976 and 2023.
Pakhi was made by donor before immigrating to Canada.
Category
03. Personal Artifacts
Classification
Personal Gear - - Personal Assistive Artifacts
Object Term
Fan, Hand
Subjects
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Personal Gear
Names
Pandher, Rajinder
Pandher, Raj
Record Type
Artifact
Images
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Farm workers

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivedescription66236
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[1908]
Collection/Fonds
Peers Family and Hill Family fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 5 x 8 cm (oval, sight) on sheet 15 x 22.5 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of four unidentified farm workers at the farm of Claude Hill.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[1908]
Collection/Fonds
Peers Family and Hill Family fonds
Series
Kitty Hill Peers family photograph series
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 5 x 8 cm (oval, sight) on sheet 15 x 22.5 cm
Description Level
Item
Record No.
477-949
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Accession Number
2007-12
Scope and Content
Photograph of four unidentified farm workers at the farm of Claude Hill.
Subjects
Occupations - Agricultural Labourers
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Media Type
Photograph
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Geographic Access
Buckingham Avenue
Street Address
5730 Buckingham Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Images
Less detail

Fire at Kapoor Sawmills Ltd.

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumdescription15202
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
14 Jan. 1947 (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a devasting fire that destroyed the Kapoor Sawmills Limited on January 14, 1947. The ground is covered with snow and smoke and flames are visible rising from the buildings.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a devasting fire that destroyed the Kapoor Sawmills Limited on January 14, 1947. The ground is covered with snow and smoke and flames are visible rising from the buildings.
History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Kaur Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sarjit Kaur Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Siddoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), Runjeet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Natural Phenomena - Fires
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Geographic Access
Burrard Inlet
Barnet Marine Park
Accession Code
BV019.32.23
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
14 Jan. 1947 (date of original), copied 2004
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Information from page 6 of The Province newspaper-Jan. 15, 1947 confirms that the fire occurred on Tuesday, January 14, 1947
See page 67 of book "In the Shadow by the Sea - Recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "The February, 1947 Kapoor Sawmill fire. Maintenance workers were trying to thaw out frozen bearings on a machine with a blowtorch and inadvertently started a fire in oily shavings. all the water pipes were frozen preventing the workers from dousing the intital small flames. Finally, but toolate to prevent the mill's destruction, water was pumped in from the inlet by the Burnaby Fire Department."
Images
Less detail

Fire at Kapoor Sawmills Ltd.

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumdescription15206
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
14 Jan. 1947 (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a fire at Kapoor Sawmills Limited in January 1947.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a fire at Kapoor Sawmills Limited in January 1947.
History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Kaur Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sarjit Kaur Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Siddoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), Runjeet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Natural Phenomena - Fires
Occupations - Fire Fighters
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Burnaby Fire Department
Geographic Access
Burrard Inlet
Barnet Marine Park
Accession Code
BV019.32.27
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
14 Jan. 1947 (date of original), copied 2004
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Information from page 6 of The Province newspaper-Jan. 15, 1947 confirms that the fire occurred on January 14, 1947
See page 67 of book "In the Shadow by the Sea - Recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "The February, 1947 Kapoor Sawmill fire. Maintenance workers were trying to thaw out frozen bearings on a machine with a blowtorch and inadvertently started a fire in oily shavings. all the water pipes were frozen preventing the workers from dousing the intital small flames. Finally, but too late to prevent the mill's destruction, water was pumped in from the inlet by the Burnaby Fire Department."
Images
Less detail

Fire at Kapoor Sawmills Ltd.

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumdescription15207
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
14 Jan.1947 (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a fire that destroyed the Kapoor Sawmills Limited in January 1947. A group of bystanders are looking on while firefighters from the Burnaby Fire Department fight the blaze.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a fire that destroyed the Kapoor Sawmills Limited in January 1947. A group of bystanders are looking on while firefighters from the Burnaby Fire Department fight the blaze.
History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Kaur Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sarjit Kaur Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Siddoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), Runjeet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Natural Phenomena - Fires
Occupations - Fire Fighters
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Burnaby Fire Department
Geographic Access
Burrard Inlet
Barnet Marine Park
Accession Code
BV019.32.28
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
14 Jan.1947 (date of original), copied 2004
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Information from page 6 of The Province newspaper-Jan. 15, 1947 confirms that the fire occurred on Tuesday January 14, 1947
See page 67 of book "In the Shadow by the Sea - Recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village". Caption with photograph reads: "The February, 1947 Kapoor Sawmill fire. Maintenance workers were trying to thaw out frozen bearings on a machine with a blowtorch and inadvertently started a fire in oily shavings. all the water pipes were frozen preventing the workers from dousing the intital small flames. Finally, but too late to prevent the mill's destruction, water was pumped in from the inlet by the Burnaby Fire Department."
Images
Less detail

Fire at Kapoor Sawmills Ltd.

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumdescription15209
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
14 Jan.1947 (date of original), copied 2004
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a fire at the Kapoor Sawmills Limited on January 14, 1947. Mill buildings are engulfed in flames. There is snow on the ground.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
In the Shadow by the Sea collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : 300 dpi
Scope and Content
Photograph of a fire at the Kapoor Sawmills Limited on January 14, 1947. Mill buildings are engulfed in flames. There is snow on the ground.
History
Kapoor Singh Siddoo was born in 1885 in the Punjab village of Kharaudi, India. Kapoor was one of the pioneer South Asian Canadian Sikhs who immigrated to America in 1906 and onto Canada in 1912. Kapoor first arrived in San Francisco in 1906, along with twenty uneducated men from the Province of Punjab, India. Kapoor was the only one among these men who was educated so acted as their interpreter, manager and accountant. They worked along the Southern Pacific Railway line near Marysville, California, toward Reno and Nevada. Kapoor heard about the beauty of British Columbia and decided to travel to the west coast but times were tough with discrimination against all South Asians in British Columbia. With this information, Kapoor traveled east to Northern Ontario where he tried homesteading for a year but the extreme winter conditions didn’t appeal to him. Kapoor returned to British Columbia after receiving word from South Asian Canadians that they were in need of an educated accountant/manager for a sawmill. In 1923, with the change in immigration laws, Kapoor arranged for his wife, Besant Kaur to emigrate from India. Besant came to Canada accompanied by Kapoor’s older brother. Kapoor and Besant had two daughters, both born in Duncan B.C. Jagdis Kaur Siddoo was born in 1925 and Sarjit Kaur Siddoo was born in 1926. Both of their daughters graduated as doctors from University of Toronto medical school. His career in B.C. began as a lumberman for a large lumber mill on Vancouver Island until 1935. Following this, Kapoor established the Kapoor Lumber Company Limited and operated a mill at Shawnigan Lake before eventually purchasing 45 acres in 1939 of the eastern section of the former Barnet Mill site in Burnaby. He purchased the site from the Municipality of Burnaby under the name of Modern Sawmills Limited since there was a restriction on selling this piece of a property to a non-white person. Eventually the name was changed to Kapoor Sawmills Limited. Kapoor’s company was a financial success but was tragically razed on January 14, 1947 due to a devastating fire. A smaller mill was rebuilt on the site and Kapoor maintained a successful financial operation until 1959. In 1959, Kapoor Siddoo was considered one of Vancouver’s most influential men in the South Asian Community. In this same year, the family set up the Kapoor Singh Siddoo Foundation and with help from his wife and daughters opened a hospital in the Punjab village of Aur. In 1964, Kapoor died in India at the age of 79 years. Kapoor’s younger brother, Tara Singh Siddoo came to Canada from India in 1906 but after suffering discrimination, he returned to India in 1912. Several years later Tara returned to Canada joining Kapoor at a logging mill on Vancouver Island. Lesser shares of the mill were held by Tara and other family members. Tara and his wife, Beant Siddoo lived at Barnet between 1943 and 1945, with their family of five sons, Lakhbeer, Gurdeb, Gurcharn, Baldev, Hardev and three daughters, Harjeet (Sangha), Runjeet (Basi) and Buckshish (Sarai). One of Tara’s responsibilities was to oversee the logging camp and ensure that the logs arrived regularly from Cowichan Bay near Duncan to the Barnet logging mill.
Subjects
Industries - Logging/lumber
Natural Phenomena - Fires
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Names
Kapoor Sawmills Limited
Burnaby Fire Department
Geographic Access
Burrard Inlet
Barnet Marine Park
Accession Code
BV019.32.29
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
14 Jan.1947 (date of original), copied 2004
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Information from page 6 of The Province newspaper-Jan. 15, 1947 confirms that the fire occurred on Tuesday January 14, 1947
Images
Less detail

100 records – page 1 of 5.