Skip header and navigation

692 records – page 1 of 14.

Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory222
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's explanation of the connection between printers and unions throughout history. He also tells the story of the cylinder press being smashed by handpress workmen to protect their jobs at the London Times as well as his own experiences learning on…
Date Range
1485-1814
Length
0:09:45
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's explanation of the connection between printers and unions throughout history. He also tells the story of the cylinder press being smashed by handpress workmen to protect their jobs at the London Times as well as his own experiences learning on the Linotype.
Date Range
1485-1814
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:45
Subject
Printing Tools and Equipment
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
Less detail

Open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner July / August 1973 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory82
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to William Pritchard's thoughts on Socialism and Revolution in their various incantations. He also discusses the political leanings of the arrested Winnipeg Strikers.
Date Range
1688-1919
Length
0:08:51
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to William Pritchard's thoughts on Socialism and Revolution in their various incantations. He also discusses the political leanings of the arrested Winnipeg Strikers.
Date Range
1688-1919
Photo Info
William A. Pritchard, Burnaby Reeve 1930-1932 and council member 1928-1930. Item no. 459-016
Length
0:08:51
Name
Woodsworth, James Shaver
Subject
Political Theories
Interview Date
July / August 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a open meeting with William Pritchard and writer Norman Penner. Norman Penner is the editor of the book "Winnipeg 1919" about the strike from the striker's perspective. William Pritchard wrote the speech that was included in the book. Audience members were invited to ask Pritchard questions. Major theme discussed is: The Winnipeg General Strike. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
William "Bill" Arthur Pritchard was born on April 3, 1888 in Salford, England, the son of a miner and factory worker. In May 1911, Bill moved to British Columbia and within a week of arriving became an active member of the Socialist Party of Canada. From 1914 to 1917, he served as editor of the Western Clarion – the SPC newspaper. He became such a well-known socialist figure that when he travelled to Winnipeg to participate in the General Strike in 1919, he was one of only seven people arrested and imprisoned for his participation in the event despite the fact that he was in no way directly involved in its planning nor development. In 1922, Bill and his family settled in North Burnaby in the Capitol Hill District. Almost immediately after his arrival, Bill began to advocate for change and a planned development scheme for the municipality. Pritchard ran successfully for the position of Reeve and held the post until the end of 1932. One of Reeve Pritchard’s highest priorities while in office was to attempt to provide work for as many unemployed as possible all the while trying to elicit more support from the provincial and federal governments. Bill was a strong advocate of the belief that relief work should be focused on projects that would see a comprehensive development scheme for Burnaby – including planned sewers, roads and water supply. Despite Bill's best efforts, however, Burnaby was forced into receivership and at the end of 1932, a Provincial Commission stepped in to take over the governance of the city. Reeve Pritchard, having done all he could as a champion of the unemployed, stepped down as Reeve but left behind an undeniable legacy of courage and determination. He was rewarded for his enormous contributions to the city in 1975 when he was chosen to be made a Freeman of Burnaby. William Pritchard died on October 23, 1981. Norman Penner was born in Winnipeg in 1921 to Rose and Jacob Penner and brother to Roland, Ruth and Walter. Their father Jacob was a leading member of the Communist Party and popular Winnipeg Alderman. Norman graduated from high school in 1937 but did not begin university until much later, preferring to begin his adult life from 1938 to 1941 as a full-time officer of the Winnipeg branch of the Communist Party of Canada. From 1941 to 1946 he served with the Canadian Army which included two-and-a-half years of overseas combat duty. On his return to Canada in 1947 he again returned to his duties as a full-time officer with the communist Labour-Progressive Party (formed in 1941 after the Canadian Communist Party was officially banned). After the abortive Hungarian revolution in 1956, Norman Penner resigned from the party and instead worked as a self-employed manufacturer’s sales representative until 1971. In 1964 he decided to go back to school part time and graduated with a BA from the University of Toronto in 1969. He took an MA in 1971 and a PhD in 1975 from the same institution. Penner was hired as a lecturer at York University's Glendon College in 1972 and soon became a professor, continuing to teach until 1995. He wrote extensively on the Canadian left. Penner edited and introduced "Winnipeg 1919: The Strikers' Own History of the Winnipeg General Strike" in 1973, published "The Canadian Left: A Critical Analysis" in 1977 and contributed three chapters to as well as editing "Keeping Canada Together Means Changing Our Thinking" in 1978. He published "Canadian Communism: The Stalin Years and Beyond" in 1988 and "From Protest to Power: Social Democracy in Canada 1900 to Present" in 1992 as well as numerous articles, reviews and book chapters. Norman Penner was married to Norma Lipes for sixty-seven years. The couple had four children: Steve (Mary Ellen Marus); Joyce (Herman Parsons); Gary (Marlene Kadar); and Bob (Shaena Lambert). Norman Penner died April 16, 2009 at the age of eighty-eight.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:03:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Pritchard, William A.
Penner, Norman
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-02-2_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory238
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the earlier the impact of the gold rush on British Columbia and the formation of Lytton, BC.
Date Range
1803-1884
Length
0:09:29
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the earlier the impact of the gold rush on British Columbia and the formation of Lytton, BC.
Date Range
1803-1884
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:29
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory237
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Doreen "Pixie" McGeachie's introduction of the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself, telling the story of Archdeacon Richard Small. She begins by reading the book's forward, as well as the beginnings of the first chapter.
Date Range
1849-1872
Length
0:09:04
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Doreen "Pixie" McGeachie's introduction of the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself, telling the story of Archdeacon Richard Small. She begins by reading the book's forward, as well as the beginnings of the first chapter.
Date Range
1849-1872
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:04
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Recording of John Burton - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory213
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to John Burton's description of the galley press and the proofing process. He also discusses job printing (now referred to as commercial printing).
Date Range
1850-1950
Length
0:09:14
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to John Burton's description of the galley press and the proofing process. He also discusses job printing (now referred to as commercial printing).
Date Range
1850-1950
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:14
Subject
Documentary Artifacts - Newspapers
Printing Tools and Equipment
Scope and Content
Recording is of John Burton discussing the history of the weekly newspaper and of the types of printing presses that have been used in Canada, as well as exactly how their parts function. John appears to be describing printing presses that are in the room with him.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:46:18
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-2_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of recording of John Burton

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory239
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes early missionary experiences in Lytton, including descriptions from the diary of Bishop Hill.
Date Range
1859-1867
Length
0:09:26
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes early missionary experiences in Lytton, including descriptions from the diary of Bishop Hill.
Date Range
1859-1867
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:26
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory221
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of the Linotype machine, as well as the history of his grandfather, John Foley, founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper.
Date Range
1860-1932
Length
0:08:48
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of the Linotype machine, as well as the history of his grandfather, John Foley, founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper.
Date Range
1860-1932
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:08:48
Name
Foley, John
Subject
Printing Tools and Equipment
Documentary Artifacts - Newspapers
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
Less detail

Interview with Tony Fabian by Kathy Bossort October 29, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory599
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Tony Fabian’s description of the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain, the creation of the Pavilion area in 1957, the history of proposals for how Burnaby Mountain could be used, the land transfer to SFU in 1963, and difficulty accessing the m…
Date Range
1860-1995
Length
0:15:57
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Tony Fabian’s description of the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain, the creation of the Pavilion area in 1957, the history of proposals for how Burnaby Mountain could be used, the land transfer to SFU in 1963, and difficulty accessing the mountain for recreation prior to 1965. He also talks about the dispute between SFU and the City of Burnaby over land ownership and control.
Date Range
1860-1995
Length
0:15:57
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 29, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Tony Fabian conducted by Kathy Bossort. Tony Fabian was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Tony Fabian’s part in park creation and protection of natural areas in Burnaby, particularly as a member of the Park and Recreation Commission in the 1970s; his childhood and how that contributed to his land ethic; and the history of the uses made of and setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Tony S. Fabian was born in 1934 in north Saskatchewan. At less than a year old Tony, along with his siblings, was removed from his family home and eventually placed with an immigrant farm family. As a child he worked on the farm and witnessed what he considered abusive treatment of the land and farm animals. When he was about 12 years old his adoptive family moved to the BC coast where he went on his own, working for a variety of farmers in Richmond and Delta. At 19 he contracted polio, quit farm work, and found work with the telephone company. In 1956 Tony married, and in 1957 he and his wife moved to a home on Hardwick Street in Burnaby where he still lives. Tony entered civic politics in the 1960s when he objected to development on Hardwick Park and became concerned about the destruction of Burnaby’s natural landscapes. He became a life long advocate for preserving natural areas and helped to create large parks in Burnaby on the foreshore of the Fraser River and on Burrard Inlet. He served as a member of the Parks and Recreation Commission 1970-1975, is a long time volunteer with the Burnaby Lake Park Association, and continues to stay current on local and regional environmental issues. In 2008 Tony was presented with the City of Burnaby Environment Award for Community Stewardship.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:43:22
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Fabian, Tony S.
Interview Location
Tony Fabian's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-007_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Tony Fabian

Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory251
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's essay entitled Stump Rangers, a listing of early settlers that includes addresses and short descriptions, essays on Confederation Park, land clearing and on Burnaby's first Council meeting.
Date Range
1865-1919
Length
0:10:18
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's essay entitled Stump Rangers, a listing of early settlers that includes addresses and short descriptions, essays on Confederation Park, land clearing and on Burnaby's first Council meeting.
Date Range
1865-1919
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:10:18
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Officials - Aldermen and Councillors
Land Clearing
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_1
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory240
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary at Lytton, British Columbia.
Date Range
1867-1868
Length
0:09:11
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary at Lytton, British Columbia.
Date Range
1867-1868
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:11
Name
Good, Reverend John Booth
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory241
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary in and around Lytton, British Columbia, including…
Date Range
1868-1872
Length
0:09:07
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary in and around Lytton, British Columbia, including the unhappy event of the death of his daughter.
Date Range
1868-1872
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:07
Name
Good, Reverend John Booth
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory242
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the mission at Lytton, British Columbia. An unidentified man speaks at the completion of the reading, giving som…
Date Range
1872-1874
Length
0:08:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the mission at Lytton, British Columbia. An unidentified man speaks at the completion of the reading, giving some details on various individuals discussed during the reading.
Date Range
1872-1874
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:08:15
Subject
Buildings - Religious
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with Marianne May Bateman February 22, 1978 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory190
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's father Edwin Bateman's history of first coming to Canada.
Date Range
1880-1920
Length
0:08:39
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's father Edwin Bateman's history of first coming to Canada.
Date Range
1880-1920
Photo Info
Photograph of Edwin Wettenhall Bateman with his four daughters; Marianne May is sitting on a chair beside her father, [1903}. Item no. BV992.29.1
Length
0:08:39
Name
Bateman, Edwin W.
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 22, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Marianne May "May" Bateman conducted by Colin Stevens, February 22, 1978. Major themes discussed are: Elworth.
Biographical Notes
May Bateman was born in 1894 in Portage LaPrairie, Manitoba to Edwin Wettenhall Bateman and Cassie (Dale) Bateman. May's father, Edwin Bateman was born in 1859 in Sandbach, Cheshire, to James and Caroline Mary Wettenhall Bateman (their home in Sandbach was called Elworth Cottage). When he was twenty-one, E.W. Bateman immigrated to Manitoba, Canada where he met Catherine “Cassie” Dale, daughter of George and Sarah Gillon Dale. They were married in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba on November 9, 1886. Edwin and Cassie had seven children, the eldest Edna Caroline Annie (Corner) born in 1889, George, Mamie (McWilliams) born in 1892, Marianne May “May” Bateman born in 1894, Jessie (Fox Kemp), Carey, and the youngest Warren Stafford born in 1901.Cassie (Dale) Bateman died in Portage La Prairie in 1909. Edwin was transferred to Vancouver by the Canadian Pacific Railway where he married Cassie’s younger sister Mary Dale, born 1865, and moved his six children to Vancouver. The Bateman family first lived at 7th and Balsam in a large new house. It wasn’t until 1920 that they decided to move to the quieter atmosphere of the Burnaby Lake- Deer Lake area. By this time Edwin Wettenhall Bateman was a retired CPR executive. He moved his wife and daughter May to Deer Lake and commissioned 'Elworth' house, designed by English-born and trained architect Enoch Evans. The house was completed by contractor William Dodson in 1922 and located at the site of what would become Burnaby Village Museum, 6501 Deer Lake Avenue. The Batemans lived here for seventeen years before moving back to Vancouver in May of 1935. Mary Bateman died July 5, 1935. Edwin Wettenhall Bateman died on November 25, 1957 at the age of ninety-seven. Marianne May Bateman died in 1990.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bateman, Marianne May
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-014-1_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with May Bateman

Images
Less detail

Interview with Minard Hill February 9, 1978 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory196
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's relatives in England, his father's early life as well as life on the strawberry farm in Burnaby.
Date Range
1880-1914
Length
0:10:09
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's relatives in England, his father's early life as well as life on the strawberry farm in Burnaby.
Date Range
1880-1914
Photo Info
Minard Gerald Hill in uniform, 1914. Item no. 477-926
Length
0:10:09
Name
Hill, Bernard R
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Burnaby - Canada Way
Burnaby - 4990 Canada Way
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 9, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill conducted by Colin Stevens, February 9, 1978. Major themes discussed are: the Burnaby Lake Neighbourhood, Gilley Brothers Logging Company and his father, Bernard Hill.
Biographical Notes
Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill was born in Burnaby on July 31, 1893 to Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard Richard Hill. He was the youngest child in the family with older siblings Frank, Claude and Winnie. Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Gerry attended Miss Harriet Woodward’s kindergarten class, and went on to Edmonds School with Miss Ellen Lister as his teacher. He later went to Central high school in New Westminster, often on horseback. Gerry served in World War I, signing his recruitment papers November 9, 1914. When he returned home, he worked felling trees, then as an apprentice surveyor and finally as a carpenter. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill married Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” Vidal on September 28, 1920 and single-handedly built a house for him and his wife about a thousand feet from his parents’ home. He also bought property at Yellow Point, Vancouver Island around this time. By the early 1930s Gerry had moved to Yellow Point permanently and begun work building the lodge. Elizabeth and Gerry’s child, Richard Grant McEwan Hill was born at Ladysmith hospital. Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” (Vidal) Hill died February 11, 1984 at the age of eighty-seven. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill died January 30, 1988 at the age of ninety-three.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:13:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Minard Gerald "Gerry"
Interview Location
Yellow Point, Vancouver Island
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-1_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Minard Hill

Images
Less detail

Recording of John Burton - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory212
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to John Burton's description of the Linotype machine and how it functions.
Date Range
1885-1959
Length
0:09:56
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to John Burton's description of the Linotype machine and how it functions.
Date Range
1885-1959
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:56
Subject
Printing Tools and Equipment
Scope and Content
Recording is of John Burton discussing the history of the weekly newspaper and of the types of printing presses that have been used in Canada, as well as exactly how their parts function. John appears to be describing printing presses that are in the room with him.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:46:18
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-2_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of John Burton

Images
Less detail

Open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner July / August 1973 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory78
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to William Pritchards' speech and his experiences at the trial for the Winnipeg General Strike as well as his stories of his early childhood and his father's socialist leanings.
Date Range
1890-1919
Length
0:09:30
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to William Pritchards' speech and his experiences at the trial for the Winnipeg General Strike as well as his stories of his early childhood and his father's socialist leanings.
Date Range
1890-1919
Photo Info
William A. Pritchard, Burnaby Reeve 1930-1932 and council member 1928-1930. Item no. 459-016
Length
0:09:30
Subject
Protests and Demonstrations - Strikes
Interview Date
July / August 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a open meeting with William Pritchard and writer Norman Penner. Norman Penner is the editor of the book "Winnipeg 1919" about the strike from the striker's perspective. William Pritchard wrote the speech that was included in the book. Audience members were invited to ask Pritchard questions. Major theme discussed is: The Winnipeg General Strike. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
William "Bill" Arthur Pritchard was born on April 3, 1888 in Salford, England, the son of a miner and factory worker. In May 1911, Bill moved to British Columbia and within a week of arriving became an active member of the Socialist Party of Canada. From 1914 to 1917, he served as editor of the Western Clarion – the SPC newspaper. He became such a well-known socialist figure that when he travelled to Winnipeg to participate in the General Strike in 1919, he was one of only seven people arrested and imprisoned for his participation in the event despite the fact that he was in no way directly involved in its planning nor development. In 1922, Bill and his family settled in North Burnaby in the Capitol Hill District. Almost immediately after his arrival, Bill began to advocate for change and a planned development scheme for the municipality. Pritchard ran successfully for the position of Reeve and held the post until the end of 1932. One of Reeve Pritchard’s highest priorities while in office was to attempt to provide work for as many unemployed as possible all the while trying to elicit more support from the provincial and federal governments. Bill was a strong advocate of the belief that relief work should be focused on projects that would see a comprehensive development scheme for Burnaby – including planned sewers, roads and water supply. Despite Bill's best efforts, however, Burnaby was forced into receivership and at the end of 1932, a Provincial Commission stepped in to take over the governance of the city. Reeve Pritchard, having done all he could as a champion of the unemployed, stepped down as Reeve but left behind an undeniable legacy of courage and determination. He was rewarded for his enormous contributions to the city in 1975 when he was chosen to be made a Freeman of Burnaby. William Pritchard died on October 23, 1981. Norman Penner was born in Winnipeg in 1921 to Rose and Jacob Penner and brother to Roland, Ruth and Walter. Their father Jacob was a leading member of the Communist Party and popular Winnipeg Alderman. Norman graduated from high school in 1937 but did not begin university until much later, preferring to begin his adult life from 1938 to 1941 as a full-time officer of the Winnipeg branch of the Communist Party of Canada. From 1941 to 1946 he served with the Canadian Army which included two-and-a-half years of overseas combat duty. On his return to Canada in 1947 he again returned to his duties as a full-time officer with the communist Labour-Progressive Party (formed in 1941 after the Canadian Communist Party was officially banned). After the abortive Hungarian revolution in 1956, Norman Penner resigned from the party and instead worked as a self-employed manufacturer’s sales representative until 1971. In 1964 he decided to go back to school part time and graduated with a BA from the University of Toronto in 1969. He took an MA in 1971 and a PhD in 1975 from the same institution. Penner was hired as a lecturer at York University's Glendon College in 1972 and soon became a professor, continuing to teach until 1995. He wrote extensively on the Canadian left. Penner edited and introduced "Winnipeg 1919: The Strikers' Own History of the Winnipeg General Strike" in 1973, published "The Canadian Left: A Critical Analysis" in 1977 and contributed three chapters to as well as editing "Keeping Canada Together Means Changing Our Thinking" in 1978. He published "Canadian Communism: The Stalin Years and Beyond" in 1988 and "From Protest to Power: Social Democracy in Canada 1900 to Present" in 1992 as well as numerous articles, reviews and book chapters. Norman Penner was married to Norma Lipes for sixty-seven years. The couple had four children: Steve (Mary Ellen Marus); Joyce (Herman Parsons); Gary (Marlene Kadar); and Bob (Shaena Lambert). Norman Penner died April 16, 2009 at the age of eighty-eight.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:03:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Pritchard, William A.
Penner, Norman
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-02-2_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner

Images
Less detail

Pioneer Days interviews September 22, 1971 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory266
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Lillian May (Davies) Jones's memories of her family life during the early days of Burnaby, mentioning her family home as well as the home of Reeve Shaw. Lillian is being interviewed in front of an audience at Heritage Village (now Burnaby Village Museum).
Date Range
1891-1955
Length
0:05:35
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Lillian May (Davies) Jones's memories of her family life during the early days of Burnaby, mentioning her family home as well as the home of Reeve Shaw. Lillian is being interviewed in front of an audience at Heritage Village (now Burnaby Village Museum).
Date Range
1891-1955
Length
0:05:35
Historic Neighbourhood
East Burnaby (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Second Street Area
Interview Date
September 22, 1971
Scope and Content
Recording is of interviews with Lillian May (Davies) Jones, Ada Evelyn (Lewis) Groves, Lillian Frederica (Lewis) Porter, and Elsie Wilson during the Pioneer Days celebration at Heritage Village (now Burnaby Village Museum) on September 22, 1971. Major themes discussed are: personal memories and occupations of interviewees family members.
Biographical Notes
Lillian May Davies was born June 28, 1891 to George and Rachel (Mills) Davies. She was one of four children. George Davies married Rachel Mills September 12, 1888 in Winnipeg and headed west to make their home. George’s brother Richard Davies had already bought property at the corner of 16th Street and 3rd Avenue (now 12th Avenue) when Rachel and George moved in and built a house next door. George Davies went to work for Gilley Bros. Logging Co. in Burnaby. Lillian May Davies married John Henry Jones on July 29, 1909 at the Methodist Church in Burnaby which had opened only a few weeks before (the Joneses were the first couple to be married there). Their reception was held in the Davies’ family garden. On June 3, 1910, Lillian and John’s first child, Arnold Jones was born. In 1919 they adopted their second child, John Sheldon Jones whose birth parents had died of influenza. John and Lillian built a home on the lot next to Lillian’s parents and lived there for forty-eight years. After her husband’s death in 1956, Lillian moved one lot over and remained living there for over twenty years. Lillian May (Davies) Jones died in Surrey on June 24, 1981 at the age of eighty-nine for over twenty years. Lillian May (Davies) Jones died in Surrey on June 24, 1981 at the age of eighty-nine. Ada Evelyn Lewis was born on September 11, 1899. She was one of nine Lewis children. Ada's father came to Victoria BC from San Francisco. He met his wife in Victoria and moved to New Westminster where he was a typesetter on the first edition of the Columbian newspaper. He continued to work for the Columbian until his retirement. Her family owned the East Burnaby Fruit Farm at 17th Avenue between 2nd and 4th Street where they harvested apples, plums and pears. Ada attended East Burnaby School in 1905 and remembers being a pupil of Miss Draper. Ada E. Lewis married and became Mrs. Ada Evelyn Groves. Lillian Frederica “Lillie” Lewis was born in 1896 to William Henry and Emma (Smith) Lewis at the family farm at 4th Street and 18th Avenue. The family grew to nine, eldest to youngest; Albert, Lizzie, Minnie, Walter, Ernest, Lillie and Evelyn. Lillie’s mother, Emma (Smith) had the distinction of being the first girl of European descent to be born at Fort Victoria. Lillie’s father, William Henry Lewis helped to print the very first edition of the Vancouver Province in 1898. Lillie attended Douglas Road School and remembers being a pupil of Ellen Lister. Lillian Frederica “Lillie” Lewis married Bertie Blaine Porter at Lulu Island on November 7, 1918. They lived in Vancouver for a short time before returning to Burnaby to raise their four children. For most of his working life Bert operated a steam roller for the municipality. Lillian Frederica (Lewis) Porter died May 18, 1988 at the age of ninety-two. Elsie Wilson was born August 16, 1898 to Annie and her second husband William Wilson. Annie’s first husband Samuel W Walmsley died December 20, 1895 at the age of thirty-five, leaving Annie a widow at twenty-seven with two young children Annie age four and Samuel age six. Annie Walmsley married her second husband William Wilson on April 17, 1897. Elsie attended West Burnaby public school (later Kingsway West elementary) and remembers picking raspberries at various Burnaby farms for seven seasons.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:24:19
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Jones, Lillian May Davies
Wilson, Elsie
Porter, Lillie Lewis
Groves, Ada Evelyn Lewis
Interview Location
Burnaby Village Museum, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-020_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of Pioneer Days interviews

Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory58
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his first years in the Lochdale district of Burnaby, including his first job building a sawmill on Burnaby Lake.
Date Range
1892-1919
Length
0:07:22
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his first years in the Lochdale district of Burnaby, including his first job building a sawmill on Burnaby Lake.
Date Range
1892-1919
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:22
Subject
Occupations - Lumberjacks
Buildings - Industrial - Sawmills
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill November 7, 1977 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory204
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of Christmas as a young boy, living in the Deer Lake area. He tells stories of the antics he got into with his brothers. Claude's wife, Marion Hill speaks encouraging words.
Date Range
1892-1905
Length
0:09:33
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of Christmas as a young boy, living in the Deer Lake area. He tells stories of the antics he got into with his brothers. Claude's wife, Marion Hill speaks encouraging words.
Date Range
1892-1905
Photo Info
Claude Hill, the son of Bernard and Marian Hill, [1888]. Item no. 477-933
Length
0:09:33
Subject
Holidays - Christmas
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Burnaby - Canada Way
Burnaby - 4990 Canada Way
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
November 7, 1977
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A. Claude Hill and his wife Marion Hill, conducted by Colin Stevens, November 7, 1977. Major themes discussed are: Christmas traditions and his Deer Lake neighbourhood.
Biographical Notes
Claude Hill was born in England about 1885, the eldest son of Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard R. Hill. His younger sibling were Frank, Winnie and Minard Gerald “Gerry.” Claude Hill was named after Bernard’s older brother, Louis Claude Hill. Claude's father, Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Uncle Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. His oldest child, Claude was seven years old at the time and his first years of school in Burnaby were at Douglas Road. Later, Claude rode a horse and buggy with his younger brother to travel to school in New Westminster. A.Claude Hill married Marion "Mamie" in his early twenties.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Claude
Hill, Marion, Mrs A Claude Hill
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-019-1_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill

Images
Less detail

Interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill November 7, 1977 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory205
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of Christmas as a young boy, living in the Deer Lake area. Claude and Marion HIll continue discussing Christmas traditions of the time.
Date Range
1892-1905
Length
0:08:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of Christmas as a young boy, living in the Deer Lake area. Claude and Marion HIll continue discussing Christmas traditions of the time.
Date Range
1892-1905
Photo Info
Claude Hill, the son of Bernard and Marian Hill, [1888]. Item no. 477-933
Length
0:08:15
Subject
Holidays - Christmas
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
November 7, 1977
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A. Claude Hill and his wife Marion Hill, conducted by Colin Stevens, November 7, 1977. Major themes discussed are: Christmas traditions and his Deer Lake neighbourhood.
Biographical Notes
Claude Hill was born in England about 1885, the eldest son of Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard R. Hill. His younger sibling were Frank, Winnie and Minard Gerald “Gerry.” Claude Hill was named after Bernard’s older brother, Louis Claude Hill. Claude's father, Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Uncle Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. His oldest child, Claude was seven years old at the time and his first years of school in Burnaby were at Douglas Road. Later, Claude rode a horse and buggy with his younger brother to travel to school in New Westminster. A.Claude Hill married Marion "Mamie" in his early twenties.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Claude
Hill, Marion, Mrs A Claude Hill
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-019-1_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill

Images
Less detail

Interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill November 7, 1977 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory206
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of crossing from England to Canada and of the land clearing process.
Date Range
1892
Length
0:07:14
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of crossing from England to Canada and of the land clearing process.
Date Range
1892
Photo Info
Claude Hill, the son of Bernard and Marian Hill, [1888]. Item no. 477-933
Length
0:07:14
Name
Hill, Bernard R
Subject
Land Clearing
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
November 7, 1977
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A. Claude Hill and his wife Marion Hill, conducted by Colin Stevens, November 7, 1977. Major themes discussed are: Christmas traditions and his Deer Lake neighbourhood.
Biographical Notes
Claude Hill was born in England about 1885, the eldest son of Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard R. Hill. His younger sibling were Frank, Winnie and Minard Gerald “Gerry.” Claude Hill was named after Bernard’s older brother, Louis Claude Hill. Claude's father, Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Uncle Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. His oldest child, Claude was seven years old at the time and his first years of school in Burnaby were at Douglas Road. Later, Claude rode a horse and buggy with his younger brother to travel to school in New Westminster. A.Claude Hill married Marion "Mamie" in his early twenties.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Claude
Hill, Marion, Mrs A Claude Hill
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-019-1_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Claude Hill and his wife

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory243
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of the work that he and his brother did on the roadways; Canada Way, Kingsway. He discusses helping out at the Hatt-Cook residence as a boy as well as the tram system of the time. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husb…
Date Range
1892-1911
Length
0:09:58
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of the work that he and his brother did on the roadways; Canada Way, Kingsway. He discusses helping out at the Hatt-Cook residence as a boy as well as the tram system of the time. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husband with these descriptions.
Date Range
1892-1911
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:09:58
Subject
Construction - Road Construction
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill November 7, 1977 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory250
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of how his father cleared land to build a house, including the equipment that was used.
Date Range
1892-1905
Length
0:04:58
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of how his father cleared land to build a house, including the equipment that was used.
Date Range
1892-1905
Photo Info
Claude Hill, the son of Bernard and Marian Hill, [1888]. Item no. 477-933
Length
0:04:58
Name
Hill, Bernard R
Subject
Land Clearing
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Burnaby - Canada Way
Burnaby - 4990 Canada Way
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
November 7, 1977
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A. Claude Hill and his wife Marion Hill, conducted by Colin Stevens, November 7, 1977. Major themes discussed are: Christmas traditions and his Deer Lake neighbourhood.
Biographical Notes
Claude Hill was born in England about 1885, the eldest son of Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard R. Hill. His younger sibling were Frank, Winnie and Minard Gerald “Gerry.” Claude Hill was named after Bernard’s older brother, Louis Claude Hill. Claude's father, Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Uncle Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. His oldest child, Claude was seven years old at the time and his first years of school in Burnaby were at Douglas Road. Later, Claude rode a horse and buggy with his younger brother to travel to school in New Westminster. A.Claude Hill married Marion "Mamie" in his early twenties.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Claude
Hill, Marion, Mrs A Claude Hill
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-019-1_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory254
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's reading of an essay written by Captain Thomas S. Guns describing the Lozells district, as well as quoting single sentences of various other writers on the topic of Deer Lake and the Burnaby Lake District. Alfred mentions the first schools of B…
Date Range
1892-1955
Length
0:07:38
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's reading of an essay written by Captain Thomas S. Guns describing the Lozells district, as well as quoting single sentences of various other writers on the topic of Deer Lake and the Burnaby Lake District. Alfred mentions the first schools of Burnaby Lake and the "pleasure walk" along Douglas Road, from Vancouver to New Westminster.
Date Range
1892-1955
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:38
Historic Neighbourhood
Lozells (Historic Neighbourhood)
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_4
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory258
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "THE RUM RUNNERS AND BOOTLEG WHISKY IN BURNABY" and "BURNABY. NORTH. SOUTH. EAST? AND WEST 1892---1943" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1892-1963
Length
0:07:05
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "THE RUM RUNNERS AND BOOTLEG WHISKY IN BURNABY" and "BURNABY. NORTH. SOUTH. EAST? AND WEST 1892---1943" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1892-1963
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:05
Name
Hawthorn, Mary
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_8
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1893-1970] (date of originals), copied 1988-1998, predominant 1988-2000
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
Approx. 84 cm of textual records + approx. 1,910 photographs + approx. 100 architectural drawings + 3 audio cassettes + 1 videocassette + 1 drawing
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records involved in the purchase, moving, restoration, research, conservation and exhibiting of the Love family farmhouse by Burnaby Village Museum. Records have been arranged into the following series: 1) Conservation work files 2) Restoration photographs 3) Curatorial files 4) …
Administrative History
Jesse Love was born in Swindon, England in 1847 and left England to work on a dairy farm in the Toronto area. While working on the farm in Toronto, he met Martha Leonard who he married in 1879. Martha was born on February 3, 1858 in Bedfordshire, England and had come to Canada with her parents Geor…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
Approx. 84 cm of textual records + approx. 1,910 photographs + approx. 100 architectural drawings + 3 audio cassettes + 1 videocassette + 1 drawing
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records involved in the purchase, moving, restoration, research, conservation and exhibiting of the Love family farmhouse by Burnaby Village Museum. Records have been arranged into the following series: 1) Conservation work files 2) Restoration photographs 3) Curatorial files 4) Research files 5) Love family photographs 6) Love Farmhouse Oral History series
Administrative History
Jesse Love was born in Swindon, England in 1847 and left England to work on a dairy farm in the Toronto area. While working on the farm in Toronto, he met Martha Leonard who he married in 1879. Martha was born on February 3, 1858 in Bedfordshire, England and had come to Canada with her parents George and Ann Leonard. While living in Toronto, Jesse and Martha had two children, George born March 22, 1880 and Annie Elizabeth on August 24, 1881. About one year after Annie was born, the Love family moved to North Dakota to grow wheat. While living there, they had two more children, Henry who was born August 24, 1883 and Edith Minnie born October 9, 1885. The family decided to move further west after hearing about the fairer weather conditions from Martha’s father, George Leonard, who had settled in Vancouver in 1885. On May 23, 1887, Jesse, Martha and their four children arrived in Vancouver after travelling across Canada from Winnipeg on the first transcontinental train. The Loves made their home in Vancouver while Jesse helped clear land on Granville Street. Their fifth child, Thomas Robert was born on September 17, 1887 and soon after, the family moved to Lulu Island in Richmond where they lived growing vegetables and selling them to Vancouver hotels. While living and farming on Lulu island, the couple had two more girls, Martha (Dot or Dorothy) born on December 17, 1889 and Sarah Marie, born February 8, 1892. On October 6, 1893 an agreement was signed by Jesse Love to purchase 14.52 acres of land from Joseph C. Armstrong. The acreage covered the north east section of District Lot 25 within the newly incorporated District of the Municipality of Burnaby. It was here where the original Love house was built (between October 1893 and April 15, 1894) by Jesse Love with the help of local builder George Salt and father in law, George Leonard. The house consisted of an entrance hall, dining room, lean to kitchen, master bedroom and three bedrooms upstairs. A road was constructed and named Cumberland in 1905 and ran from District Lot 25 through to District Lot 11. The address for the Love home was 1390 Cumberland Road and in the early 1960’s the address was renumbered 7651 Cumberland Street. On the land surrounding the house, Jesse Love planted an orchard along with strawberries and raspberries which he sold at the Fraser Valley Market, T.S. Anandale’s Grocery Store in New Westminster and to hotels around Vancouver. Jesse Love served on the Burnaby School Board and also as a District Councillor in 1901 and from 1904-1907. While living in the house, Jesse and Martha had four more children, Phoebe Leonard, born April 15, 1894, Esther, born August 28, 1896, John Leonard, born June 7, 1899 and Hannah Victoria (also known as Girlie) who was born May 12, 1902. As the family grew to eleven children, additions along with some substantial remodelling in the craftsman style took place. In about 1898, a north wing addition was added to include a parlour with two windows, the construction of two more bedrooms and the relocation of the stair case to the North West wall. In 1903 the front door moved to the north elevation, a front porch was extended along the east wall and a summer lean to kitchen was added to the west elevation. Between 1905 and 1910, a tin embossed ceiling was installed along with an addition of the main kitchen which included a pantry, bathtub and a back porch. In about 1912, five craftsman style windows replaced the original pioneer tent style, the front verandah was enlarged to wrap around the south and east elevations, a back door was installed in the kitchen to access the verandah and wood shingle siding and brackets were added to the exterior. In 1918, at the age of 31 years, Robert Love fell ill due to an influenza epidemic and died on November 23, 1918. Following their son’s death, Martha Love became weak and on August 24, 1920, she passed away. By this time, Jesse had sold off a large percentage of his land and his youngest daughter, Girlie decided to stay on to live and care for him. Since the house was too large for just the two of them, Jesse invited any other children to return and share the residence. For a while his son, George and his wife joined them until 1925, followed by his daughter Sarah Parker (nee Love), her husband William and their three children, Albert, Bill and Elsie. The house remained pretty unchanged until 1928 after Jesse Love died of pneumonia (March 10, 1928) and the house was purchased by Sarah and her husband William Parker who continued to live there with their children. The master bedroom wall on the main floor opened up to the dining room, the kitchen pantry and bathtub converted to an alcove with a marble counter and enlarged window and sink while the bathroom was moved to the upstairs and the furnace and coolers were installed in the crawl space under the kitchen. A hot water tank was installed in the house in 1966. Sarah continued to live in the house until a little while after her husband William died in 1961. She sold the house to her daughter Elsie and husband John Hughes in 1966, who lived in the house along with their son Brent, until August 23, 1971. Mahbir Molchan Papan and his wife Geraldine Papan bought the house August 23, 1971 and by 1982, the house was sold to Nirmal Singh Singha and Narinder Singha. The Papans continued to rent the house from Nirmal Singh Singha and Narinder Singha until the late 1980s. In 1988, the house was scheduled for demolition with the remaining property to be subdivided. Fortunately, a neighbour, Mr. Harvey Elder recognized the farmhouse's historical significance and contacted the Burnaby Historical Society. Following this event, the owners agreed to donate the building to the Burnaby Village Museum who financed the move of the house from Cumberland Street to the museum site. Heritage planner and architect, Robert Lemon provided guidance for the project. Prior to the move, the two porches were removed and demolished while the kitchen and roof were both separated from the main house. The kitchen and roof of the house were transported to Burnaby Village Museum on May 20, 1988 by Nickel Bros. House Moving company, while the main frame of the house completed its transportation to the museum near the end of May 1988 (due to low overhead wires). The house was moved down Cumberland Street to 10th Avenue, up Canada Way to Sperling and set on temporary footings near Hart House. Robert Lemon oversaw structural improvements such as, upgrading floor joists and creating new foundations to replace the original timber foundation of the farmhouse. The restoration went through several phases of work between 1988 until it opened in November 1998. Restoration began on both the interior and exterior features to be interpreted from the period of 1925. In 1993, the architecture firm of Brian G. Hart Associates was appointed for the design and construction supervision of the restoration project. Plans were created for a foundation on the museum site in 1989 and the farmhouse was eventually settled on a permanent foundation behind the Burnaby Village Museum administration building in 1993 along with the reattachment of the roof. The kitchen section was reattached to the main house in 1994 along with skirting around the foundation and the reshingling of the exterior. In 1996, the tin ceiling was removed to make way for the installation of the internal electrical system along with sprinklers, ceiling heating and fire break gyprock. The dining room ceiling joists were consolidated, a pantry and bathroom were added to the kitchen, the downstairs bedroom wall was opened and filled, the dining and kitchen doorways were widened. In 1997, a wheelchair ramp was installed along with a concrete sidewalk, stair rails, cement pads at the base of the stairs and a gravel sink for any excess water. Interior work included painting of the kitchen, restoration and furnishing of the kitchen pantry, insulation of the house floor to protect from rodents along with the reconstruction of the kitchen and house chimneys. The registrar worked together with the curator and conservator and was tasked with a large research project on the house including the family contacts and family history, property information, plans, photographs, artifacts, furnishings, stories etc. all organized in files for easy retrieval. A great deal of research and conservation was undertaken in order to make the interior of the house authentic to the time period as possible. One of the biggest projects was selecting and obtaining wall coverings since much of the original wallpaper was incomplete and poor condition. The conservator and registrar were lucky enough to locate a few samples of the original paper and engage the Bradbury and Bradbury Art Wallpaper Company of Benica, California to reproduce replica designs for free. The City of Burnaby now has its own series “Burnaby Village Papers” produced by this company which are titled “Burnaby Wall”; “Burnaby Border” and “Burnaby Ceiling”. All three of these wallpaper designs have been used in the Love farm house and are also commercially available through the Bradbury and Bradbury Art Wallpaper Company. After the completion of the kitchen, the Love farmhouse exhibit opened on November 29, 1998 with an open invitation to the public and extended members of the Love family. Officials including the Mayor, Doug Drummond and Love family members were all present to cut the ribbon for the special event.
Subjects
Buildings - Heritage
Buildings - Civic - Museums
Documentary Artifacts
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Cumberland Road Burnaby - Cumberland Street Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Accession Code
BV018.41; BV020.5
Access Restriction
Restricted access
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
[1893-1970] (date of originals), copied 1988-1998, predominant 1988-2000
Media Type
Textual Record
Architectural Drawing
Sound Recording
Moving Images
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
East Burnaby (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Cariboo-Armstrong Area
Arrangement
Other photographs documenting the move and restoration work were added later under BV020.5
Notes
Title based on content of fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse is described as an Artifact under BV988.33.1
Some records within this collection have restricted access and are subject to FIPPA
Less detail

Interview with Minard Hill February 9, 1978 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory194
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's early memories of the neighbourhood of Burnaby Lake, including the houses that his father built. Gerry discusses his early work as a surveyor.
Date Range
1893-1913
Length
0:10:01
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's early memories of the neighbourhood of Burnaby Lake, including the houses that his father built. Gerry discusses his early work as a surveyor.
Date Range
1893-1913
Photo Info
Minard Gerald Hill in uniform, 1914. Item no. 477-926
Length
0:10:01
Name
Hill, Bernard R
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 9, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill conducted by Colin Stevens, February 9, 1978. Major themes discussed are: the Burnaby Lake Neighbourhood, Gilley Brothers Logging Company and his father, Bernard Hill.
Biographical Notes
Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill was born in Burnaby on July 31, 1893 to Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard Richard Hill. He was the youngest child in the family with older siblings Frank, Claude and Winnie. Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Gerry attended Miss Harriet Woodward’s kindergarten class, and went on to Edmonds School with Miss Ellen Lister as his teacher. He later went to Central high school in New Westminster, often on horseback. Gerry served in World War I, signing his recruitment papers November 9, 1914. When he returned home, he worked felling trees, then as an apprentice surveyor and finally as a carpenter. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill married Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” Vidal on September 28, 1920 and single-handedly built a house for him and his wife about a thousand feet from his parents’ home. He also bought property at Yellow Point, Vancouver Island around this time. By the early 1930s Gerry had moved to Yellow Point permanently and begun work building the lodge. Elizabeth and Gerry’s child, Richard Grant McEwan Hill was born at Ladysmith hospital. Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” (Vidal) Hill died February 11, 1984 at the age of eighty-seven. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill died January 30, 1988 at the age of ninety-three.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:13:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Minard Gerald "Gerry"
Interview Location
Yellow Point, Vancouver Island
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-1_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Minard Hill

Images
Less detail

Speech given by Jack Davy November 8, 1972 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory234
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to opening remarks given by Dr. Blythe Eagles for Jack Davy's speech. Jack begins his talk by telling anecdotes of early Burnaby school trustees and of early Burnaby teachers.
Date Range
1893-1957
Length
0:09:39
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to opening remarks given by Dr. Blythe Eagles for Jack Davy's speech. Jack begins his talk by telling anecdotes of early Burnaby school trustees and of early Burnaby teachers.
Date Range
1893-1957
Length
0:09:39
Name
Edmonds Street School
Subject
Education
Interview Date
November 8, 1972
Scope and Content
Recording is of a speech given by John "Jack" Davy on November 8, 1972 to the Burnaby Historical Society on the subject of Edmonds School. Jack Davy is introduced by Dr. Blythe Eagles.
Biographical Notes
John “Jack” Davy was raised in New Westminster and his family and the Eagles' family were close friends, with the grandparents and parents getting together regularly to play cards. As a child, Jack delivered the Columbian newspaper. Jack Davy worked for Burnaby schools for over fifty years; twenty-five of those years as principal at Edmonds Street School. During the depression, he worked as a principal of Kitchener Street School.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:29:41
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Davy, Jack
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-1_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of speech given by Jack Davy

Less detail

Interview with William A. Lewarne by Rod Fowler March 14, 1990 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory442
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Lewarne’s parents’ history (Ethel Leer and Alfred Lewarne) and growing up in South Burnaby.
Date Range
1893-1944
Length
00:05:35
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Lewarne’s parents’ history (Ethel Leer and Alfred Lewarne) and growing up in South Burnaby.
Date Range
1893-1944
Photo Info
Burnaby Alderman, Bill (William) Lewarne, [1973]. Item no. 231-012
Length
00:05:35
Name
Lewarne, Ethel Leer
Subject
Recreational Activities
Persons - Children
Historic Neighbourhood
Alta-Vista (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Sussex-Nelson Area
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
March 14, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with former Mayor William “Bill” Lewarne, conducted by Rod Fowler. Bill Lewarne was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Bill Lewarne’s business and political careers, and memories of growing up in South Burnaby in the 1930s. Bill Lewarne talks about his parent’s origins, his family and community struggles during the Depression, the interurban, his education, war service, and joining his father's business. He describes the start, operation and expansion of the family ice cream business, and how business life compared to political life. The interview explores the role of politics in community affairs, his political activities, the history of the BVA, and his involvement in various community organizations. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track, expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
William Alfred “Bill” Lewarne was born in Burnaby in 1926 to Ethel Cecilia Leer (1899- ) and Alfred Lewarne (1893-1962). The family, Ethel, Alfred and their three children Patricia, Beverley and William, moved to a house on Nelson Avenue in Alta Vista in 1931. Ethel still lived in the family home in 1990. Bill Lewarne attended Nelson Avenue School and South Burnaby High School (1932-1944). His father Alfred worked at Colony Farms as a dairy inspector and then for the Port of Vancouver Dairy before being laid off early in the Depression. The family struggled until in 1936 Alfred started his own ice cream business. After graduation Bill was in the army for two years, taking a refrigeration course under the veteran’s training benefit, before joining his father’s business. Three generations of the family operated the successful company, expanding from wholesale, retail and distribution of ice cream products into refrigerated warehouses and the wholesale ice business, until the business was sold to its competitor Dairyland in 1989. Bill Lewarne entered politics in 1965, first with the Nonpartisan Association (NPA) and then as a founder of the Burnaby Citizens Association (BCA). He served as an alderman on Burnaby Council 1973-1975 and 1977-1981 and as Mayor 1981-1987. In 1979 he ran for provincial office for the Social Credit Party against Rosemary Brown but lost. Bill Lewarne married June Lawrence and they had three children Robert, Leslie and Janice. He was active in many organizations: Burnaby/Willingdon Liberal Association, Seton Villa, Irish Fusileers of Canada, Lions Club, Rotary Club, Burnaby Association for Community Inclusion, and the Burnaby Hospital Foundation, and continued to be active on the Board of the BCA. Bill Lewarne died in 1995.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:34:40
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lewarne, William A. "Bill"
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and business computerization in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-019_Track_2
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Bill Lewarne

Images
Less detail

Interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles 10-Jun-75 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory42
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles and Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles' thoughts on the Boom years, the houses and development at Deer Lake and the south slope of Vancouver and developments in transportation.
Date Range
1896-1912
Length
0:04:13
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles and Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles' thoughts on the Boom years, the houses and development at Deer Lake and the south slope of Vancouver and developments in transportation.
Date Range
1896-1912
Photo Info
Mrs. Dunbar, Dr. Blythe Eagles and Dr. Violet (Dunbar) Eagles, June 1967. Item no. 404-002
Length
0:04:13
Subject
Agriculture - Fruit and Berries
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
10-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and his wife Dr Violet Eagles by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury (and Ross S. McLeod) June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the War Years and Burnaby Lake District. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Blythe's paternal grandparents, Charles and Maude Eagles immigrated to New Westminster in 1887. Their son Jack married Amelia Jane Johnston, and Blythe Eagles was born in New Westminster in 1902. In 1918 Blythe enrolled at the University of British Columbia, and took a Physiology class with eight other top students - his future wife, Violet Dunbar was the lone woman in the class. Blythe graduated in 1922, winning the Governor General's Gold Medal as top student. He received his MA in 1924 and his PhD in 1926 from the University of Toronto. He then completed his post-doctoral study at the National Institute for Medical Research in London, England. In 1933 Dr. Eagles became head of the Department of Dairying (1936-1955), Chairman of the Division of Animal Science (1955-1967), and Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture (in 1949 until his retirement in 1967). In 1968 he received an Honourary Doctor of Science Award from UBC Blythe was also one of the first appointments to the Burnaby Town Planning Commission. Violet Evelyn Dunbar was born September 29, 1899 in Ontario, the eldest child of John and Mary (Tompson) Dunbar. Violet attained her BA in 1921 and MA in 1922 from the University of British Columbia. In 1922 she attended the Provincial Normal School and within six months had a teaching certificate and taught at Lord Hudson School in 1923. In September 1923 she was awarded a two-year scholarship to the University of Toronto, where she joined Blythe in the Bio-Chemistry Department. She received a second MA and a PhD in 1929. Her graduate studies entailed research in pure proteins and enzymes related to the commercial production of cheese. Through this work she was recognized as one of the leading enzyme chemists in the country, being a senior lab instructor of biochemistry. Violet was one of the founders of the Burnaby Council of Women and active member of the International Council of Women. Blythe and Violet Eagles purchased property at Deer Lake in 1929 and began construction of their home shortly before their marriage on June 25, 1930. The Drs. Blythe and Violet Eagles Estate is a unique expression of the talents and tastes of both the Eagles and Frank Ebenezer Buck (1875-1970) who was head of the Horticultural Department and the Campus Landscape Architect at U.B.C. and established the plan for the Eagles garden while Blythe selected many of the plantings. The Eagles themselves designed the house as a romantic cottage inspired by the British Arts and Crafts style. Violet was an enthusiastic amateur gardener, maintaining and continually developing the garden. The Eagles were active volunteers in the local community as well as at UBC. When Simon Fraser University opened in Burnaby, they became well-known for entertaining dignitaries and special guests of the university in their lavish garden. After Violet's death in 1993, the estate was sold to the City of Burnaby. The funds were used to establish a Chair in Agriculture at the University of British Columbia in their memory.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:24:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Eagles, Dr. Blythe
Eagles, Dr. Violet
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-08_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles

Images
Less detail

Interview with Kathleen Rose July 14, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory146
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's first memories of coming to North Burnaby as well as of her husband's employment. She discusses quilt-making among families experiencing economic hardship.
Date Range
1897-1934
Length
0:10:37
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's first memories of coming to North Burnaby as well as of her husband's employment. She discusses quilt-making among families experiencing economic hardship.
Date Range
1897-1934
Length
0:10:37
Subject
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Albert Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Capitol Hill Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 14, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Kathleen Rose by SFU (Simon Fraser University) student Bettina Bradbury, July 14, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
Kathleen Rose was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1897 and immigrated to Prince Albert, Saskatchewan in 1907 with her family. Kathleen lived on the Prairie for eighteen years before getting married in 1923 and moving to Burnaby to be with her husband. The couple moved to the 4600 block of Albert Street in North Burnaby, where Kathleen’s husband cleared all of the land by hand. The Roses had help putting in the foundation but otherwise built their house themselves. Kathleen’s husband was a longshoreman at that time. They had a son, born in 1925, who suffered from rheumatic fever during the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:35:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Rose, Kathleen
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-21_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Kathleen Rose

Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory10
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's early childhood including the reasons why her family first moved to Burnaby, other early residents of the Deer Lake district, farming practices, and why the Hart family chose to leave Burnaby in 1917.
Date Range
1898-1917
Length
0:06:11
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's early childhood including the reasons why her family first moved to Burnaby, other early residents of the Deer Lake district, farming practices, and why the Hart family chose to leave Burnaby in 1917.
Date Range
1898-1917
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:06:11
Name
Woodward, Harriet
Subject
Agriculture - Fruit and Berries
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Deer Lake
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Harry Royle June 20, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory111
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's early life beginning at Gibraltar, through the war years.
Date Range
1898-1919
Length
0:06:06
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's early life beginning at Gibraltar, through the war years.
Date Range
1898-1919
Photo Info
Harry Royle smiling, in a suit and tie, photographed by Chidwich Studio [193-]. Item no. BV005.20.20
Length
0:06:06
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Harry Royle by Ross S. McLeod (and Bettina Bradbury) June 20, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the running of a grocery store. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Harry Royle was born in Gibraltar in 1898 to a Spanish mother and an English father (all of the Royle children except for one were born in Gibraltar). Harry's father served in the army for twenty-one years and because of that, the family moved regularly. While Harry was still a young baby, the Royle family moved to Ireland for six years, where he began his first years of schooling at the age of four. His dad retired from the army in 1907 and was sent to Canada with the BC Electric Company (the London General Army Buses Company). The rest of his family followed two years afterward in 1909 and settled in South Vancouver. Harry and his three brothers joined the army and were sent overseas as part of the second division. Luckily, they all returned home to Vancouver in 1919. Harry worked at the Hudson's Bay Company "counter jumping" before opening his own store in 1924 at 5527 Hastings Street and Ellesmere Avenue, a confectionery and general hangout for neighbourhood children."Harry's" was only twenty-five foot square and carried groceries obtained mainly from Kelly Douglas wholesalers. Most of Harry's customers worked at the mill at Barnet. Those that worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway were the few that still held jobs during the Depression. The store continued to serve the people of Capitol Hill throughout the Depression and war years, until Harry closed shop in 1945.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:01:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Royle, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-12_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Harry Royle

Images
Less detail

Speech given by Florence Hart Godwin May 28, 1973 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory282
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's description of her family's stories of the New Westminster fire. She also mentions B.R. Hill and his three sons, Claude, Frank and Minard Hill.
Date Range
1898-1917
Length
0:05:22
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's description of her family's stories of the New Westminster fire. She also mentions B.R. Hill and his three sons, Claude, Frank and Minard Hill.
Date Range
1898-1917
Photo Info
Arthur Morrow, Kingsley Hart, Florence Hart (later Godwin), and Katherine Maude "Kitty" Hill (later Peers) in the woods at the south side of Deer Lake photographed by W.T. Cooksley [1908]. Item no. HV976.139.3
Length
0:05:22
Subject
Natural Phenomena - Fires
Geographic Access
British Columbia - New Westminster
Interviewer
Burnaby Arts Council
Interview Date
May 28, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a speech given by Florence Hart Godwin at a Burnaby Arts Council meeting held May 28, 1973. Major themes discussed are: pioneer families and early residences in the Burnaby Lake District.
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:33:50
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-005-1_Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of speech given by Florence Hart Godwin

Images
Less detail

Interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles 10-Jun-75 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory41
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles memories of growing up in New Westminster and visiting Burnaby with family. Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles mentions when and where she was born.
Date Range
1899-1919
Length
0:07:22
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles memories of growing up in New Westminster and visiting Burnaby with family. Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles mentions when and where she was born.
Date Range
1899-1919
Photo Info
Mrs. Dunbar, Dr. Blythe Eagles and Dr. Violet (Dunbar) Eagles, June 1967. Item no. 404-002
Length
0:07:22
Subject
Agriculture - Fruit and Berries
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
10-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and his wife Dr Violet Eagles by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury (and Ross S. McLeod) June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the War Years and Burnaby Lake District. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Blythe's paternal grandparents, Charles and Maude Eagles immigrated to New Westminster in 1887. Their son Jack married Amelia Jane Johnston, and Blythe Eagles was born in New Westminster in 1902. In 1918 Blythe enrolled at the University of British Columbia, and took a Physiology class with eight other top students - his future wife, Violet Dunbar was the lone woman in the class. Blythe graduated in 1922, winning the Governor General's Gold Medal as top student. He received his MA in 1924 and his PhD in 1926 from the University of Toronto. He then completed his post-doctoral study at the National Institute for Medical Research in London, England. In 1933 Dr. Eagles became head of the Department of Dairying (1936-1955), Chairman of the Division of Animal Science (1955-1967), and Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture (in 1949 until his retirement in 1967). In 1968 he received an Honourary Doctor of Science Award from UBC Blythe was also one of the first appointments to the Burnaby Town Planning Commission. Violet Evelyn Dunbar was born September 29, 1899 in Ontario, the eldest child of John and Mary (Tompson) Dunbar. Violet attained her BA in 1921 and MA in 1922 from the University of British Columbia. In 1922 she attended the Provincial Normal School and within six months had a teaching certificate and taught at Lord Hudson School in 1923. In September 1923 she was awarded a two-year scholarship to the University of Toronto, where she joined Blythe in the Bio-Chemistry Department. She received a second MA and a PhD in 1929. Her graduate studies entailed research in pure proteins and enzymes related to the commercial production of cheese. Through this work she was recognized as one of the leading enzyme chemists in the country, being a senior lab instructor of biochemistry. Violet was one of the founders of the Burnaby Council of Women and active member of the International Council of Women. Blythe and Violet Eagles purchased property at Deer Lake in 1929 and began construction of their home shortly before their marriage on June 25, 1930. The Drs. Blythe and Violet Eagles Estate is a unique expression of the talents and tastes of both the Eagles and Frank Ebenezer Buck (1875-1970) who was head of the Horticultural Department and the Campus Landscape Architect at U.B.C. and established the plan for the Eagles garden while Blythe selected many of the plantings. The Eagles themselves designed the house as a romantic cottage inspired by the British Arts and Crafts style. Violet was an enthusiastic amateur gardener, maintaining and continually developing the garden. The Eagles were active volunteers in the local community as well as at UBC. When Simon Fraser University opened in Burnaby, they became well-known for entertaining dignitaries and special guests of the university in their lavish garden. After Violet's death in 1993, the estate was sold to the City of Burnaby. The funds were used to establish a Chair in Agriculture at the University of British Columbia in their memory.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:24:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Eagles, Dr. Blythe
Eagles, Dr. Violet
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-08_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles

Images
Less detail

Interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell 24-Jun-75 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory50
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne's childhood years living in Burnaby, through her first years of marriage.
Date Range
1899-1923
Length
0:08:23
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne's childhood years living in Burnaby, through her first years of marriage.
Date Range
1899-1923
Photo Info
Leer family; Ethel Leer Lewarne is standing on the far right, 1911. Item no. 204-052
Length
0:08:23
Subject
Occupations - Grocers
Historic Neighbourhood
Alta Vista (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
24-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Ethel (Leer) Lewarne and Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 24, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Ethel Cecilia Leer was born in 1899 in London, England to George Frederick and Sarah Ann Leer. In 1908, the Leer family immigrated to Vancouver, Canada. George Frederick Leer began working for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Ethel’s younger brother George Leer was born about this time. A third child was born but unfortunately did not live past infancy. The Leers arrived in Burnaby in 1911 and bought two lots in Alta Vista at the corner of Portland and McGregor. George Frederick and Sarah Ann were active members of the All Saints Anglican Church on Royal Oak. Ethel went to Dundonald school from 1911 to 1913 with Miss Bowell as her teacher, then on to Britannia High School from 1913 to 1915. Ethel’s father, George Frederick Leer died March 23, 1919 at the age of forty-one. Ethel Cecilia Leer married Alfred Lewarne on December 26, 1921 in Burnaby. Alfred was born February 9, 1893 in Cornwall, England. Before marriage he worked for a creamery in Vancouver. After marriage, Alfred began his own ice cream business in Burnaby. The Lewarnes bought a lot along Nelson Avenue and built a house. Their first child Patricia "Tricia" (later McCleod) was born in 1923, their second was Beverley “Bev” (later Burrell). Their third child, William A. “Bill” Lewarne was born in 1926. Bill grew up to become one of the most popular Mayors in Burnaby’s history, serving from 1981 to 1987. He also served as a member of Council from 1973 to 1975 and 1977 to 1981. After Alfred Lewarne’s death on May 5, 1962 at the age of sixty-nine, Ethel continued living in the family home. Ethel’s mother, Sarah Ann Leer died May 11, 1963 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:00:59
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lewarne, Ethel Leer
Burrell, Beverley "Bev" Lewarne
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-13_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Strachan June 20, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory133
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's early years, her move to Burnaby and her husband's employment at the Barnet Mill.
Date Range
1899-1931
Length
0:09:59
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's early years, her move to Burnaby and her husband's employment at the Barnet Mill.
Date Range
1899-1931
Length
0:09:59
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Florence Strachan by Ross S. McLeod and Bettina Bradbury, June 20, 1975. Major theme discussed is: The Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Florence Strachan was born in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1899. She met and married her husband in Scotland before coming to Atlantic Canada by ship in 1922, then from Quebec to Vancouver by train. When Florence’s husband got a job at Barnet Mills in 1924, the couple moved to Burnaby and rented a house at 2551 East Hastings Street. In 1926, the Strachans bought a house at 290 Ellesmere Avenue and concentrated on paying it off as quickly as possible. By 1931 the Mill had shut down, leaving Florence’s husband out of work, and forced to go on Relief. By this time the couple had two children, one born in 1928, and the other in 1930. Florence and her husband marched and picketed with the unemployed throughout the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:28:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Strachan, Florence
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-09_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Florence Strachan

Less detail

Pioneer Days interviews September 22, 1971 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory267
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Ada Evelyn (Lewis) Groves memories of her family life during the early days of Burnaby. She mentions the East Burnaby Fruit Farm (her family's farm) and the George Leaf General Store. She also talks about her brothers and her father, the first typesetter for t…
Date Range
1899-1905
Length
0:06:43
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Ada Evelyn (Lewis) Groves memories of her family life during the early days of Burnaby. She mentions the East Burnaby Fruit Farm (her family's farm) and the George Leaf General Store. She also talks about her brothers and her father, the first typesetter for the Columbian newspaper. Ada is being interviewed in front of an audience at Heritage Village (now Burnaby Village Museum).
Date Range
1899-1905
Length
0:06:43
Name
George Leaf General Store
Columbian newspaper
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 12th Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
East Burnaby (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Edmonds Area
Interview Date
September 22, 1971
Scope and Content
Recording is of interviews with Lillian May (Davies) Jones, Ada Evelyn (Lewis) Groves, Lillian Frederica (Lewis) Porter, and Elsie Wilson during the Pioneer Days celebration at Heritage Village (now Burnaby Village Museum) on September 22, 1971. Major themes discussed are: personal memories and occupations of interviewees family members.
Biographical Notes
Lillian May Davies was born June 28, 1891 to George and Rachel (Mills) Davies. She was one of four children. George Davies married Rachel Mills September 12, 1888 in Winnipeg and headed west to make their home. George’s brother Richard Davies had already bought property at the corner of 16th Street and 3rd Avenue (now 12th Avenue) when Rachel and George moved in and built a house next door. George Davies went to work for Gilley Bros. Logging Co. in Burnaby. Lillian May Davies married John Henry Jones on July 29, 1909 at the Methodist Church in Burnaby which had opened only a few weeks before (the Joneses were the first couple to be married there). Their reception was held in the Davies’ family garden. On June 3, 1910, Lillian and John’s first child, Arnold Jones was born. In 1919 they adopted their second child, John Sheldon Jones whose birth parents had died of influenza. John and Lillian built a home on the lot next to Lillian’s parents and lived there for forty-eight years. After her husband’s death in 1956, Lillian moved one lot over and remained living there for over twenty years. Lillian May (Davies) Jones died in Surrey on June 24, 1981 at the age of eighty-nine for over twenty years. Lillian May (Davies) Jones died in Surrey on June 24, 1981 at the age of eighty-nine. Ada Evelyn Lewis was born on September 11, 1899. She was one of nine Lewis children. Ada's father came to Victoria BC from San Francisco. He met his wife in Victoria and moved to New Westminster where he was a typesetter on the first edition of the Columbian newspaper. He continued to work for the Columbian until his retirement. Her family owned the East Burnaby Fruit Farm at 17th Avenue between 2nd and 4th Street where they harvested apples, plums and pears. Ada attended East Burnaby School in 1905 and remembers being a pupil of Miss Draper. Ada E. Lewis married and became Mrs. Ada Evelyn Groves. Lillian Frederica “Lillie” Lewis was born in 1896 to William Henry and Emma (Smith) Lewis at the family farm at 4th Street and 18th Avenue. The family grew to nine, eldest to youngest; Albert, Lizzie, Minnie, Walter, Ernest, Lillie and Evelyn. Lillie’s mother, Emma (Smith) had the distinction of being the first girl of European descent to be born at Fort Victoria. Lillie’s father, William Henry Lewis helped to print the very first edition of the Vancouver Province in 1898. Lillie attended Douglas Road School and remembers being a pupil of Ellen Lister. Lillian Frederica “Lillie” Lewis married Bertie Blaine Porter at Lulu Island on November 7, 1918. They lived in Vancouver for a short time before returning to Burnaby to raise their four children. For most of his working life Bert operated a steam roller for the municipality. Lillian Frederica (Lewis) Porter died May 18, 1988 at the age of ninety-two. Elsie Wilson was born August 16, 1898 to Annie and her second husband William Wilson. Annie’s first husband Samuel W Walmsley died December 20, 1895 at the age of thirty-five, leaving Annie a widow at twenty-seven with two young children Annie age four and Samuel age six. Annie Walmsley married her second husband William Wilson on April 17, 1897. Elsie attended West Burnaby public school (later Kingsway West elementary) and remembers picking raspberries at various Burnaby farms for seven seasons.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:24:19
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Jones, Lillian May Davies
Wilson, Elsie
Porter, Lillie Lewis
Groves, Ada Evelyn Lewis
Interview Location
Burnaby Village Museum, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-020_Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of Pioneer Days interviews

Less detail

Pioneer Days interviews September 22, 1971 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory269
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Elise Wilson's memories of her family life during the early days of Burnaby, mentioning her mother Annie Walmsley Wilson. Elsie is being interviewed in front of an audience at Heritage Village (now Burnaby Village Museum). The audience briefly discusses Burnab…
Date Range
1899-1910
Length
0:03:26
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Elise Wilson's memories of her family life during the early days of Burnaby, mentioning her mother Annie Walmsley Wilson. Elsie is being interviewed in front of an audience at Heritage Village (now Burnaby Village Museum). The audience briefly discusses Burnaby's early water supply.
Date Range
1899-1910
Length
0:03:26
Name
Wilson, Annie Walmsley
Subject
Public Services - Utilities
Interview Date
September 22, 1971
Scope and Content
Recording is of interviews with Lillian May (Davies) Jones, Ada Evelyn (Lewis) Groves, Lillian Frederica (Lewis) Porter, and Elsie Wilson during the Pioneer Days celebration at Heritage Village (now Burnaby Village Museum) on September 22, 1971. Major themes discussed are: personal memories and occupations of interviewees family members.
Biographical Notes
Lillian May Davies was born June 28, 1891 to George and Rachel (Mills) Davies. She was one of four children. George Davies married Rachel Mills September 12, 1888 in Winnipeg and headed west to make their home. George’s brother Richard Davies had already bought property at the corner of 16th Street and 3rd Avenue (now 12th Avenue) when Rachel and George moved in and built a house next door. George Davies went to work for Gilley Bros. Logging Co. in Burnaby. Lillian May Davies married John Henry Jones on July 29, 1909 at the Methodist Church in Burnaby which had opened only a few weeks before (the Joneses were the first couple to be married there). Their reception was held in the Davies’ family garden. On June 3, 1910, Lillian and John’s first child, Arnold Jones was born. In 1919 they adopted their second child, John Sheldon Jones whose birth parents had died of influenza. John and Lillian built a home on the lot next to Lillian’s parents and lived there for forty-eight years. After her husband’s death in 1956, Lillian moved one lot over and remained living there for over twenty years. Lillian May (Davies) Jones died in Surrey on June 24, 1981 at the age of eighty-nine for over twenty years. Lillian May (Davies) Jones died in Surrey on June 24, 1981 at the age of eighty-nine. Ada Evelyn Lewis was born on September 11, 1899. She was one of nine Lewis children. Ada's father came to Victoria BC from San Francisco. He met his wife in Victoria and moved to New Westminster where he was a typesetter on the first edition of the Columbian newspaper. He continued to work for the Columbian until his retirement. Her family owned the East Burnaby Fruit Farm at 17th Avenue between 2nd and 4th Street where they harvested apples, plums and pears. Ada attended East Burnaby School in 1905 and remembers being a pupil of Miss Draper. Ada E. Lewis married and became Mrs. Ada Evelyn Groves. Lillian Frederica “Lillie” Lewis was born in 1896 to William Henry and Emma (Smith) Lewis at the family farm at 4th Street and 18th Avenue. The family grew to nine, eldest to youngest; Albert, Lizzie, Minnie, Walter, Ernest, Lillie and Evelyn. Lillie’s mother, Emma (Smith) had the distinction of being the first girl of European descent to be born at Fort Victoria. Lillie’s father, William Henry Lewis helped to print the very first edition of the Vancouver Province in 1898. Lillie attended Douglas Road School and remembers being a pupil of Ellen Lister. Lillian Frederica “Lillie” Lewis married Bertie Blaine Porter at Lulu Island on November 7, 1918. They lived in Vancouver for a short time before returning to Burnaby to raise their four children. For most of his working life Bert operated a steam roller for the municipality. Lillian Frederica (Lewis) Porter died May 18, 1988 at the age of ninety-two. Elsie Wilson was born August 16, 1898 to Annie and her second husband William Wilson. Annie’s first husband Samuel W Walmsley died December 20, 1895 at the age of thirty-five, leaving Annie a widow at twenty-seven with two young children Annie age four and Samuel age six. Annie Walmsley married her second husband William Wilson on April 17, 1897. Elsie attended West Burnaby public school (later Kingsway West elementary) and remembers picking raspberries at various Burnaby farms for seven seasons.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:24:19
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Jones, Lillian May Davies
Wilson, Elsie
Porter, Lillie Lewis
Groves, Ada Evelyn Lewis
Interview Location
Burnaby Village Museum, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-020_Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of Pioneer Days interviews

Less detail

Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording12337
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1900-2020] (interview content), interviewed Feb. 7, 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (00:43:19 min.)
Storage Location
Digital Only
Scope and Content
Recording consists of an interview with Josephine Chow (nee Hong) conducted by BVM researcher Denise Fong at the Burnaby Village Museum. Josephine describes her family history and recollects her childhood experiences in 1950s and 60s while growing with her family on their "Hop On" farm in Burnaby. …
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1900-2020] (interview content), interviewed Feb. 7, 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.6.1
Storage Location
Digital Only
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (00:43:19 min.)
Material Details
Interviewer: Denise Fong Interviewee: Josephine Chow Location of Interview: Burnaby Village Museum Interview Date: February 7, 2020 Total Number of Tracks: 1 Total Length of all Tracks: 00:43:19
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Recording consists of an interview with Josephine Chow (nee Hong) conducted by BVM researcher Denise Fong at the Burnaby Village Museum. Josephine describes her family history and recollects her childhood experiences in 1950s and 60s while growing with her family on their "Hop On" farm in Burnaby. The farm is situated in the Big Bend area along Marine Drive and is still in operation today. 0:00-08:45 Josephine Chow provides some historical background on the history of “Hop On Farm” and her family in British Columbia. She tells of how her grandfather Gay Tim Hong and three partners pooled money together to purchase twelve acres on Marine Drive in 1951. Prior to this, most of them farmed on the Musqueam First Nation Reserve for 20-30 years. It all began when her great grandfather Hong Sui Wing, first came to Canada from China and slowly brought over her grandfather, father and other members of the family. Her grandfather, Gay Tim Hong went back and forth between Canada and China at least four times since he and her grandmother had four children including her father, who was born in 1931. Her father came to Canada at 10 years of age to live with his father. Josephine’s great grandfather came to Vancouver from Zhongshan county in Canton Province (also known as Guangdong). 8:46- 14:20 Josephine provides the names of her siblings from the eldest to the youngest; Pauline, Josephine (herself), Catherine, Noreen, Gary, Darlene and Marlene. She describes what life was like on the farm with her parents working from sunrise to sunset. The family farmed vegetable produce taking orders from local stores in the lower mainland. Often the children helped their parents with the orders starting at eight or nine years of age. Other workers on the farm travelled by bus from Vancouver’s Chinatown. She also tells of how her father was an animal lover and raised chickens, pigeons, geese, koy, goldfish and dogs. 14: 21 – 16:56 Josephine describes what Burnaby was like during the time that she grew up in the late 1950s. She explains that Burnaby was very quiet with nothing being open on Sundays. On the farm, she and her siblings would entertain themselves by playing games like soccer, baseball and kick ball or also by catching frogs, snails, caterpillars and ladybugs. There were neighbours living on Marine Drive and almost every house had someone who we went to the same elementary school. The neighbourhood children would often come to play with them on their farm. 16:56- 26:47 Josephine describes how when they were young there were farms all around them and how on Sunday drives with her father, they would go to feed horses or look at the cows. Josephine shares that her elder sister Pauline was the only one born in China and how when she first arrived that she lived on the Musqueam First Nations Reserve with their parents before they moved to Burnaby. Josephine recollects that most of her friends were farmer’s kids from the neighbourhood but while in school, she had more Caucasian friends. Josephine and her siblings attended Glenwood Elementary on Marine Drive and later Junior Secondary at McPherson Park (grades 8-10) and Burnaby South Senior Secondary (grades 11-12. ). She shares some of her experiences while attending school. She said that there were about a dozen Asians in school with her, mostly from farming families in the “Flats”. 26:48- 30:45 Josephine describes what life was like for her and her siblings after school. They often helped on the farm when they got home, usually taking care of orders for green onions. Her mother made dinner and did all of the cooking for family and workers on the farm as well as working in the fields. Her father did all of the grocery shopping in Vancouver’s Chinatown two or three times per week where he purchased meat and fish. She says that her grandfather, often travelled by bus every Saturday or Sunday to meet up with friends in Chinatown. Extracurricular activities for her and her siblings included volley ball and soccer as long as it didn’t interfere with their work schedule on the farm. 30:46- 37:03 Josephine describes what occurred while living at home, the food they ate, shopping and attending Chinese school. Her mother cooked only Chinese food, she didn’t know how to cook “Western food”. For school lunches, the kids made their own sandwiches. She tells of a Chinese language school arranged by Mrs. Joe [sic] who lived on Gilley Road and was Canadian born Chinese. Mrs. Joe [sic] also arranged an English class for farmer’s wives on Tuesday nights in which her mother attended. Josephine recollects learning Mandarin from Mrs. Joe [sic] a few days a week after her regular school. Chinese school took place at Riverway School on Meadow Avenue in Burnaby. Mrs. Joe also taught them a lot about Chinese culture including Kung Fu, Chinese Dance and Chinese brush painting. 37:04- 39:39 Josephine describes Medical Care for her and her family in the 1950s and 1960s. She tells of a female Chinese doctor in Vancouver, Dr. Madeline Chung. Dr. Chung was responsible for delivering a lot of Chinese babies including Josephine. The family also visited herbalists in Vancouver Chinatown. They would often buy herbs for colds etc. Josephine also tells of how her parents stayed in touch with family in China by writing letters. Her mother’s family, including her parents and siblings were still in China while most of her father’s family were here in Canada. 39:40- 43:19 – In closing, Josephine shares how life is much busier now and of how she misses the quietness of her days growing up. She briefly describes her life on the family farm now and how different it is from when her parents worked the farm. She explains how farming methods have changed and how they don’t have to work as hard as her parents did.
History/Biography
Interviewee biography: Josephine Chow (nee Hong) is the second eldest child of Chan Kow Hong and Sui Ha Hong. In 1925, Josephine's grandfather, Gay Tim Hong immigrated to Canada from Zhongshan county in Canton Province (also known as Guangdong). In 1952, her father, Chan Kow Hong joined his father, Gay Tim Hong and by 1953, he established "Hop On Farms" in the Big Bend area of Burnaby near Marine Drive. Josephine grew up on the farm with her parents and six siblings; Pauline, Catherine, Norine, Gary, Darlene and Marlene. In 1969, Josephine's elder sister Pauline and her husband Jack Chan took over the family farm and in 1972 their father and grandfather moved to Kamloops to open a restaurant. As an adult, Josephine worked in several different areas including owning and running her own Aesthetics business. Josephine eventually retired and returned to the farm to assist her siblings. The farm is still in operation. Interviewer biography: Denise Fong is a historical researcher at Burnaby Village Museum. She has degrees in Anthropology (BA) and Archaeology (MA), and is completing her doctoral degree at UBC in Interdisciplinary Studies. Her primary research interests are in Chinese Canadian history and critical heritage studies. She is the co-curator of BVM’s “Across the Pacific” exhibition, and the Museum of Vancouver’s “A Seat at the Table – Chinese Immigration and British Columbia”.
Notes
Title based on contents of interview
Creator
Burnaby Village Museum
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Persons - Immigrants
Agriculture - Farms
Education
Buildings - Schools
First Nations reserves - British Columbia
Names
Fong, Denise
Chow, Josephine
Glenwood Elementary School
McPherson Park School
Musqueam
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Byrne Road
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Audio Tracks

Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020

Images
Less detail

Interview with John Ferguson July 3, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory180
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1931. He describes the neighbourhood of Vancouver Heights and the people that lived there. He also describes the types of goods he sold at his Vancouver Heights Hardware Store.
Date Range
1900-1939
Length
0:08:23
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1931. He describes the neighbourhood of Vancouver Heights and the people that lived there. He also describes the types of goods he sold at his Vancouver Heights Hardware Store.
Date Range
1900-1939
Length
0:08:23
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Hardware Stores
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 3, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Ferguson by history student Ross S. McLeod, July 3, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
John Ferguson was born in Glasgow in 1900. He came to Canada with his family in 1910, and settled on Vancouver Island. In 1931 John Ferguson purchased the hardware store on the 3900 block of Hastings Street.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:32:21
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Ferguson, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-07_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with John Ferguson

Less detail

Interview with Helen Sprott August 10, 1977 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory207
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Helen Fanny Sprott's memories of her family's first years of living in Burnaby. She mentions the Hazard House and Mayfield Farms.
Date Range
1900-1908
Length
0:05:47
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Helen Fanny Sprott's memories of her family's first years of living in Burnaby. She mentions the Hazard House and Mayfield Farms.
Date Range
1900-1908
Photo Info
Sprott sisters sitting together on a long tressle. Helen Sprott is seated on the right, wearing glasses [1906]. Item no. HV978.1.10
Length
0:05:47
Subject
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Canada Way
Burnaby - Burnaby Lake
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Interview Date
August 10, 1977
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Helen Sprott, August 10, 1977. Major themes discussed are: the Sprott home.
Biographical Notes
Helen Sprott was born in Burnaby on June 22, 1902. Her father, Louis Edgar Sprott and younger brother came out to Burnaby from England, following their older brother Charles F. Sprott. The two younger brothers were in the Merchant Marines together prior to arriving in to Burnaby and learning to farm. Louis Edgar Sprott and Helen Louise F. Nicholls were married June 30, 1900 and stayed at the Haszard House while their own house was being built. By 1902, "the Dovecote" was built and Helen was born. The house was added on to and later renamed "Mayfield Farms." Helen's grandmother and aunt on her mother's side came to live at Mayfield Farms in 1907 or 1908. Helen Sprott was living in Penticton at the time of her death, April 8, 1978 at the age of seventy-five.
Total Tracks
2
Total Length
0:08:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sprott, Helen
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-019-2_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Helen Sprott

Images
Less detail

Interview with Helen Sprott August 10, 1977 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory208
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Helen Fanny Sprott's memories of her family's first years of living in Burnaby.
Date Range
1900-1902
Length
0:03:10
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Helen Fanny Sprott's memories of her family's first years of living in Burnaby.
Date Range
1900-1902
Photo Info
Sprott sisters sitting together on a long tressle. Helen Sprott is seated on the right, wearing glasses [1906]. Item no. HV978.1.10
Length
0:03:10
Interview Date
August 10, 1977
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Helen Sprott, August 10, 1977. Major themes discussed are: the Sprott home.
Biographical Notes
Helen Sprott was born in Burnaby on June 22, 1902. Her father, Louis Edgar Sprott and younger brother came out to Burnaby from England, following their older brother Charles F. Sprott. The two younger brothers were in the Merchant Marines together prior to arriving in to Burnaby and learning to farm. Louis Edgar Sprott and Helen Louise F. Nicholls were married June 30, 1900 and stayed at the Haszard House while their own house was being built. By 1902, "the Dovecote" was built and Helen was born. The house was added on to and later renamed "Mayfield Farms." Helen's grandmother and aunt on her mother's side came to live at Mayfield Farms in 1907 or 1908. Helen Sprott was living in Penticton at the time of her death, April 8, 1978 at the age of seventy-five.
Total Tracks
2
Total Length
0:08:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sprott, Helen
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-019-2_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Images
Less detail

Interview with Toki Miyashita by Rod Fowler February 27, 1990 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory516
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, and her Oikawa grandparent’s immigration to BC and settlement on Lion and Don Islands at the mouth of the Fraser River. She describes how the family was moved to the internment camp “The Orchard” in New Denver,…
Date Range
1900-1946
Length
00:07:05
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, and her Oikawa grandparent’s immigration to BC and settlement on Lion and Don Islands at the mouth of the Fraser River. She describes how the family was moved to the internment camp “The Orchard” in New Denver, but managed to find a place to live outside the camp where her grandmother grew a large garden from seeds brought in the seams of her clothing. She notes that the Lion Islands were named Oikawa-shima by the Japanese settlers.
Date Range
1900-1946
Length
00:07:05
Subject
Wars - World War, 1939-1945
Persons - Japanese Canadians
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 27, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Toki Miyashita, conducted by Rod Fowler. Toki Miyashita was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, her awakening interest in Japanese culture after the war, her subsequent interest in teaching others about Japanese crafts and arts, and becoming a helpful intermediary between Burnaby and visitors from Japan. The interview explores her interest in the Ainu of Japan and their possible link to the aboriginals of BC, her impressions of the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko, and her involvement in the events surrounding the creation of the sculpture “Playground of the Gods” for Burnaby Mountain. The interview also contains interesting details about the art of Japanese flower-arranging. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Toki Miyashita was born in Richmond B.C., ca. 1935, at the Nelson Brothers “fishery”, a second generation Canadian descended from the Oikawa family who settled on Don and Lion Islands (Oikawa-shima). In 1942 the Japanese Canadians in BC were forcibly moved from the coast and their belongings confiscated. Toki Miyashita, her parents, two brothers, and grandparents were first taken to Hastings Park where her father was separated from the family to work in road camps, and the rest of the family were interned in New Denver. Her resourceful grandmother moved the family to land outside the internment camp, growing a large garden from seeds brought with her. In 1946 the family moved to Kamloops and in 1958, after finishing high school, Toki Miyashita moved to Montreal to be with relatives and a small Japanese community. At this time she became interested in Japanese culture and took a Japanese language course at age 22. She learned about Japanese flower-arranging (Ikebana), paper folding (Origami), silk doll making (from a Russian Jew), and how to wear a kimono. She began demonstrating these arts in schools and to other groups, which she continued doing when she, her husband and two young children moved to Burnaby in 1969. Toki Miyashita has been called an unpaid “ambassador” of Japanese culture to the Lower Mainland. She has acted as liaison between Burnaby and her sister city Kushiro in Japan, which involved her in the creation of the Ainu sculpture “Playground of the Gods” on Burnaby Mountain for Burnaby’s Centennial. Toki Miyashita is a recognized Master in Ikebana Sogetsu, a school of flower-arranging, and has served on the board of the Vancouver Ikebana Association. She also served on Burnaby’s Family Court in the 1980s.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
01:34:10
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Miyashita, Toki
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-017_Track_1
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Toki Miyashita

Less detail

Interview with Rick Sporns by Kathy Bossort October 30, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory606
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Rick Sporn’s discussion of the value of natural areas to Burnaby, the city’s history of protecting green spaces, and the complementary role the Pavilion area plays in the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. He talks about how the rose garden and “Playground of…
Date Range
1900-2015
Length
0:17:11
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Rick Sporn’s discussion of the value of natural areas to Burnaby, the city’s history of protecting green spaces, and the complementary role the Pavilion area plays in the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. He talks about how the rose garden and “Playground of the Gods” sculptures (Kamui Mintara) help Pavilion area visitors more fully appreciate the mountain setting. He also talks about the history of the construction of the Kamui Mintara sculptures.
Date Range
1900-2015
Length
0:17:11
Name
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Rose Garden
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Kamui Mintara
Central Park
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 30, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Rick Sporns conducted by Kathy Bossort. Rick Sporns was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Rick Sporn’s description of the history and design of Burnaby Mountain Centennial Rose Garden and the significance of the Centennial Pavilion area in the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Rick Sporns also talks about his career with the City of Burnaby’s Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services, management of Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area, and the value of natural areas to Burnaby.
Biographical Notes
Richard Sporns was born in 1957 in Daly Municipality, Manitoba, to Ulrich and Charlotte Sporns. The family moved to the Burquitlam Area of Burnaby in about 1965. Rick Sporns obtained his BSc degree in biology at SFU and a degree in landscape architecture at UBC. In 1985 he began his career in the City of Burnaby’s Park, Recreation and Cultural Services department where he currently is Assistant Manager - Parks Design. Rick was responsible for designing Burnaby Mountain Centennial Rose Garden, a legacy project proposed by Mark Stockdale to commemorate Burnaby’s 1992 Centennial. The rose garden opened to the public July 18, 1992.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:01:40
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sporns, Richard "Rick"
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-008_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Rick Sporns

Less detail

Interview with Minard Hill February 9, 1978 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory199
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of Doran Mill's logging practices, Gilley Brother's logging practices and the dam system that they established.
Date Range
1902-1903
Length
0:09:34
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of Doran Mill's logging practices, Gilley Brother's logging practices and the dam system that they established.
Date Range
1902-1903
Photo Info
Minard Gerald Hill in uniform, 1914. Item no. 477-926
Length
0:09:34
Name
Gilley Brothers Logging Company
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 9, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill conducted by Colin Stevens, February 9, 1978. Major themes discussed are: the Burnaby Lake Neighbourhood, Gilley Brothers Logging Company and his father, Bernard Hill.
Biographical Notes
Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill was born in Burnaby on July 31, 1893 to Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard Richard Hill. He was the youngest child in the family with older siblings Frank, Claude and Winnie. Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Gerry attended Miss Harriet Woodward’s kindergarten class, and went on to Edmonds School with Miss Ellen Lister as his teacher. He later went to Central high school in New Westminster, often on horseback. Gerry served in World War I, signing his recruitment papers November 9, 1914. When he returned home, he worked felling trees, then as an apprentice surveyor and finally as a carpenter. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill married Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” Vidal on September 28, 1920 and single-handedly built a house for him and his wife about a thousand feet from his parents’ home. He also bought property at Yellow Point, Vancouver Island around this time. By the early 1930s Gerry had moved to Yellow Point permanently and begun work building the lodge. Elizabeth and Gerry’s child, Richard Grant McEwan Hill was born at Ladysmith hospital. Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” (Vidal) Hill died February 11, 1984 at the age of eighty-seven. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill died January 30, 1988 at the age of ninety-three.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:13:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Minard Gerald "Gerry"
Interview Location
Yellow Point, Vancouver Island
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-1_ Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Minard Hill

Images
Less detail

Interview with Minard Hill February 9, 1978 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory200
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of the Gilley Brother's logging practices and the dam system that they established. Minard tells a story of his hunting days.
Date Range
1902-1903
Length
0:09:09
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of the Gilley Brother's logging practices and the dam system that they established. Minard tells a story of his hunting days.
Date Range
1902-1903
Photo Info
Minard Gerald Hill in uniform, 1914. Item no. 477-926
Length
0:09:09
Name
Gilley Brothers Logging Company
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 9, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill conducted by Colin Stevens, February 9, 1978. Major themes discussed are: the Burnaby Lake Neighbourhood, Gilley Brothers Logging Company and his father, Bernard Hill.
Biographical Notes
Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill was born in Burnaby on July 31, 1893 to Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard Richard Hill. He was the youngest child in the family with older siblings Frank, Claude and Winnie. Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Gerry attended Miss Harriet Woodward’s kindergarten class, and went on to Edmonds School with Miss Ellen Lister as his teacher. He later went to Central high school in New Westminster, often on horseback. Gerry served in World War I, signing his recruitment papers November 9, 1914. When he returned home, he worked felling trees, then as an apprentice surveyor and finally as a carpenter. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill married Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” Vidal on September 28, 1920 and single-handedly built a house for him and his wife about a thousand feet from his parents’ home. He also bought property at Yellow Point, Vancouver Island around this time. By the early 1930s Gerry had moved to Yellow Point permanently and begun work building the lodge. Elizabeth and Gerry’s child, Richard Grant McEwan Hill was born at Ladysmith hospital. Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” (Vidal) Hill died February 11, 1984 at the age of eighty-seven. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill died January 30, 1988 at the age of ninety-three.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:13:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Minard Gerald "Gerry"
Interview Location
Yellow Point, Vancouver Island
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-1_ Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Minard Hill

Images
Less detail

Interview with Minard Hill February 9, 1978 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory201
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of the Royal Oak Hotel and his former neighbours at the south side of Deer Lake.
Date Range
1902-1920
Length
0:10:36
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of the Royal Oak Hotel and his former neighbours at the south side of Deer Lake.
Date Range
1902-1920
Photo Info
Minard Gerald Hill in uniform, 1914. Item no. 477-926
Length
0:10:36
Name
Royal Oak Hotel
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 9, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill conducted by Colin Stevens, February 9, 1978. Major themes discussed are: the Burnaby Lake Neighbourhood, Gilley Brothers Logging Company and his father, Bernard Hill.
Biographical Notes
Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill was born in Burnaby on July 31, 1893 to Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard Richard Hill. He was the youngest child in the family with older siblings Frank, Claude and Winnie. Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Gerry attended Miss Harriet Woodward’s kindergarten class, and went on to Edmonds School with Miss Ellen Lister as his teacher. He later went to Central high school in New Westminster, often on horseback. Gerry served in World War I, signing his recruitment papers November 9, 1914. When he returned home, he worked felling trees, then as an apprentice surveyor and finally as a carpenter. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill married Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” Vidal on September 28, 1920 and single-handedly built a house for him and his wife about a thousand feet from his parents’ home. He also bought property at Yellow Point, Vancouver Island around this time. By the early 1930s Gerry had moved to Yellow Point permanently and begun work building the lodge. Elizabeth and Gerry’s child, Richard Grant McEwan Hill was born at Ladysmith hospital. Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” (Vidal) Hill died February 11, 1984 at the age of eighty-seven. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill died January 30, 1988 at the age of ninety-three.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:13:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Minard Gerald "Gerry"
Interview Location
Yellow Point, Vancouver Island
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-1_ Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Minard Hill

Images
Less detail

Interview with John Mallory June 24, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory118
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Mallory's early life and his first years in Burnaby dealing with delinquency of mortgage payments on his home. He also begins to discuss his political involvement with the labour movement.
Date Range
1903-1929
Length
0:10:02
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Mallory's early life and his first years in Burnaby dealing with delinquency of mortgage payments on his home. He also begins to discuss his political involvement with the labour movement.
Date Range
1903-1929
Length
0:10:02
Subject
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 11th Avenue
Burnaby - 15th Street
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 24, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Mallory by Simon Fraser University (SFU) masters student Bettina Bradbury June 24, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the Unemployment movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Audrey Mallory was born in Carman, Manitoba on January 10, 1903 to John and Bertha Nina (Rodgers) Mallory. The Mallory family moved to Deep Creek, British Columbia for a time before arriving in New Westminster. John Audrey Mallory married Janet Ellis Morice on November 15, 1924. John Mallory helped to build a mill at Powell River where he played baseball before he moved to Burnaby in the late 1920s. He built a house at 11th Avenue and 13th Street. He later moved to 1851 4th Street, working a few months out of the year as a construction foreman. He also worked renovating various mills. Towards the end of the thirties, he had established his own heating and plumbing business. John Mallory was very active in the labour movement, beginning with the Independent Labour Party which was renamed the Independent Labour Party Socialists, then the Socialist Party of Canada. He joined the Workers' Unity League (WUL) and their affiliates the Unemployed Workers Association at this time as well. Together with fellow organizers, John fixed up the Edmonds Hall and held fundraising parties for the Unemployment movement. Seen by others as an agitator, John organized countless strike movements, protests and demonstrations in his capacity as an organizer for the Workers' Unity League. John left the Socialist Party of Canada due to what he saw as their intolerance with other parts of the working class movement to join the Communist Party of Canada. He was later expelled from the Communist Party for "Trotskist leanings." Bertha Nina (Rodgers) Mallory died May 20, 1964 at the age of eighty-two. Her husband John Mallory died April 1, 1966 at the age of ninety-four. John Audrey Mallory died July 7, 1981 at the age of seventy-eight.
Total Tracks
13
Total Length
1:56:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mallory, John
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-11_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with John Mallory

Less detail

Interview with Catherine Rees March 14, 1990 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory184
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Catherine Bertha "Cathy" Rees's schooling as well as memories of her first years of teaching.
Date Range
1903-1928
Length
0:08:29
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Catherine Bertha "Cathy" Rees's schooling as well as memories of her first years of teaching.
Date Range
1903-1928
Photo Info
Burnaby South High School, [1930]. Item no. 280-008
Length
0:08:29
Subject
Occupations - Teachers
Interviewer
Evans, Alf
Interview Date
March 14, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Catherine Bertha "Cathy" Rees by fellow Burnaby Retired Teacher's Association member Alf Evans, March 14, 1990. This interview was prepared for the Burnaby School History Committee of the Burnaby Retired Teacher's Association. Major themes discussed are: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
Catherine Bertha “Cathy” Rees was born in Greenwood, British Columbia on March 30, 1903. Her mother died when she was four years old and her younger brother Lloyd was only a few months old. Catherine’s family moved regularly because her dad was continually transferred. She attended a two room school in Greenwood until grade four, then to school in Kamloops until grade 8, graduating from Duke of Connaught High School in New Westminster in 1919. One of her brothers won a lacrosse championship while at Nelson Avenue School. Catherine started at the University of British Columbia in 1919 and went to Normal School in 1923 (she belonged to the first teacher-training class). Upon graduating, Catherine was offered a position at Revelstoke High School for Physics, French and Latin which she took for a brief period of time. She then taught for one year in Victoria, traveling from one school to the other in a one ton truck to teach languages. For the next two years, she worked at Cloverdale High School. By 1929 Catherine began working in Burnaby where her father and two brothers were living. She taught at Burnaby South for her entire career in Burnaby, from 1929 to 1964. Catherine taught French and Latin as well as physical education to the girls (in the basement with two other teachers) and lived at the corner of Nelson and Victory (she still lives there at the time of this interview).
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:37:02
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Rees, Catherine "Cathy"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Retired Teachers collection
Item No.
MSS103-026_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Catherine Rees

Images
Less detail

692 records – page 1 of 14.

Narrow By

Back to top
Back to Top