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Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1893-1970] (date of originals), copied 1988-1998, predominant 1988-2000
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
Approx. 84 cm of textual records + approx. 1,910 photographs + approx. 100 architectural drawings + 3 audio cassettes + 1 videocassette + 1 drawing
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records involved in the purchase, moving, restoration, research, conservation and exhibiting of the Love family farmhouse by Burnaby Village Museum. Records have been arranged into the following series: 1) Conservation work files 2) Restoration photographs 3) Curatorial files 4) …
Administrative History
Jesse Love was born in Swindon, England in 1847 and left England to work on a dairy farm in the Toronto area. While working on the farm in Toronto, he met Martha Leonard who he married in 1879. Martha was born on February 3, 1858 in Bedfordshire, England and had come to Canada with her parents Geor…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Fonds
File No.
51320-10
Physical Description
Approx. 84 cm of textual records + approx. 1,910 photographs + approx. 100 architectural drawings + 3 audio cassettes + 1 videocassette + 1 drawing
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records involved in the purchase, moving, restoration, research, conservation and exhibiting of the Love family farmhouse by Burnaby Village Museum. Records have been arranged into the following series: 1) Conservation work files 2) Restoration photographs 3) Curatorial files 4) Research files 5) Love family photographs 6) Love Farmhouse Oral History series
Administrative History
Jesse Love was born in Swindon, England in 1847 and left England to work on a dairy farm in the Toronto area. While working on the farm in Toronto, he met Martha Leonard who he married in 1879. Martha was born on February 3, 1858 in Bedfordshire, England and had come to Canada with her parents George and Ann Leonard. While living in Toronto, Jesse and Martha had two children, George born March 22, 1880 and Annie Elizabeth on August 24, 1881. About one year after Annie was born, the Love family moved to North Dakota to grow wheat. While living there, they had two more children, Henry who was born August 24, 1883 and Edith Minnie born October 9, 1885. The family decided to move further west after hearing about the fairer weather conditions from Martha’s father, George Leonard, who had settled in Vancouver in 1885. On May 23, 1887, Jesse, Martha and their four children arrived in Vancouver after travelling across Canada from Winnipeg on the first transcontinental train. The Loves made their home in Vancouver while Jesse helped clear land on Granville Street. Their fifth child, Thomas Robert was born on September 17, 1887 and soon after, the family moved to Lulu Island in Richmond where they lived growing vegetables and selling them to Vancouver hotels. While living and farming on Lulu island, the couple had two more girls, Martha (Dot or Dorothy) born on December 17, 1889 and Sarah Marie, born February 8, 1892. On October 6, 1893 an agreement was signed by Jesse Love to purchase 14.52 acres of land from Joseph C. Armstrong. The acreage covered the north east section of District Lot 25 within the newly incorporated District of the Municipality of Burnaby. It was here where the original Love house was built (between October 1893 and April 15, 1894) by Jesse Love with the help of local builder George Salt and father in law, George Leonard. The house consisted of an entrance hall, dining room, lean to kitchen, master bedroom and three bedrooms upstairs. A road was constructed and named Cumberland in 1905 and ran from District Lot 25 through to District Lot 11. The address for the Love home was 1390 Cumberland Road and in the early 1960’s the address was renumbered 7651 Cumberland Street. On the land surrounding the house, Jesse Love planted an orchard along with strawberries and raspberries which he sold at the Fraser Valley Market, T.S. Anandale’s Grocery Store in New Westminster and to hotels around Vancouver. Jesse Love served on the Burnaby School Board and also as a District Councillor in 1901 and from 1904-1907. While living in the house, Jesse and Martha had four more children, Phoebe Leonard, born April 15, 1894, Esther, born August 28, 1896, John Leonard, born June 7, 1899 and Hannah Victoria (also known as Girlie) who was born May 12, 1902. As the family grew to eleven children, additions along with some substantial remodelling in the craftsman style took place. In about 1898, a north wing addition was added to include a parlour with two windows, the construction of two more bedrooms and the relocation of the stair case to the North West wall. In 1903 the front door moved to the north elevation, a front porch was extended along the east wall and a summer lean to kitchen was added to the west elevation. Between 1905 and 1910, a tin embossed ceiling was installed along with an addition of the main kitchen which included a pantry, bathtub and a back porch. In about 1912, five craftsman style windows replaced the original pioneer tent style, the front verandah was enlarged to wrap around the south and east elevations, a back door was installed in the kitchen to access the verandah and wood shingle siding and brackets were added to the exterior. In 1918, at the age of 31 years, Robert Love fell ill due to an influenza epidemic and died on November 23, 1918. Following their son’s death, Martha Love became weak and on August 24, 1920, she passed away. By this time, Jesse had sold off a large percentage of his land and his youngest daughter, Girlie decided to stay on to live and care for him. Since the house was too large for just the two of them, Jesse invited any other children to return and share the residence. For a while his son, George and his wife joined them until 1925, followed by his daughter Sarah Parker (nee Love), her husband William and their three children, Albert, Bill and Elsie. The house remained pretty unchanged until 1928 after Jesse Love died of pneumonia (March 10, 1928) and the house was purchased by Sarah and her husband William Parker who continued to live there with their children. The master bedroom wall on the main floor opened up to the dining room, the kitchen pantry and bathtub converted to an alcove with a marble counter and enlarged window and sink while the bathroom was moved to the upstairs and the furnace and coolers were installed in the crawl space under the kitchen. A hot water tank was installed in the house in 1966. Sarah continued to live in the house until a little while after her husband William died in 1961. She sold the house to her daughter Elsie and husband John Hughes in 1966, who lived in the house along with their son Brent, until August 23, 1971. Mahbir Molchan Papan and his wife Geraldine Papan bought the house August 23, 1971 and by 1982, the house was sold to Nirmal Singh Singha and Narinder Singha. The Papans continued to rent the house from Nirmal Singh Singha and Narinder Singha until the late 1980s. In 1988, the house was scheduled for demolition with the remaining property to be subdivided. Fortunately, a neighbour, Mr. Harvey Elder recognized the farmhouse's historical significance and contacted the Burnaby Historical Society. Following this event, the owners agreed to donate the building to the Burnaby Village Museum (under the Century Park Museum Association) who financed the move of the house from Cumberland Street to the museum site. Heritage planner and architect, Robert Lemon provided guidance for the project. Prior to the move, the two porches were removed and demolished while the kitchen and roof were both separated from the main house. The kitchen and roof of the house were transported to Burnaby Village Museum on May 20, 1988 by Nickel Bros. House Moving company, while the main frame of the house completed its transportation to the museum near the end of May 1988 (due to low overhead wires). The house was moved down Cumberland Street to 10th Avenue, up Canada Way to Sperling and set on temporary footings near Hart House. Robert Lemon oversaw structural improvements such as, upgrading floor joists and creating new foundations to replace the original timber foundation of the farmhouse. The restoration went through several phases of work between 1988 until it opened in November 1998. Restoration began on both the interior and exterior features to be interpreted from the period of 1925. In 1993, the architecture firm of Brian G. Hart Associates was appointed for the design and construction supervision of the restoration project. Plans were created for a foundation on the museum site in 1989 and the farmhouse was eventually settled on a permanent foundation behind the Burnaby Village Museum administration building in 1993 along with the reattachment of the roof. The kitchen section was reattached to the main house in 1994 along with skirting around the foundation and the reshingling of the exterior. In 1996, the tin ceiling was removed to make way for the installation of the internal electrical system along with sprinklers, ceiling heating and fire break gyprock. The dining room ceiling joists were consolidated, a pantry and bathroom were added to the kitchen, the downstairs bedroom wall was opened and filled, the dining and kitchen doorways were widened. In 1997, a wheelchair ramp was installed along with a concrete sidewalk, stair rails, cement pads at the base of the stairs and a gravel sink for any excess water. Interior work included painting of the kitchen, restoration and furnishing of the kitchen pantry, insulation of the house floor to protect from rodents along with the reconstruction of the kitchen and house chimneys. The registrar worked together with the curator and conservator and was tasked with a large research project on the house including the family contacts and family history, property information, plans, photographs, artifacts, furnishings, stories etc. all organized in files for easy retrieval. A great deal of research and conservation was undertaken in order to make the interior of the house authentic to the time period as possible. One of the biggest projects was selecting and obtaining wall coverings since much of the original wallpaper was incomplete and poor condition. The conservator and registrar were lucky enough to locate a few samples of the original paper and engage the Bradbury and Bradbury Art Wallpaper Company of Benica, California to reproduce replica designs for free. The City of Burnaby now has its own series “Burnaby Village Papers” produced by this company which are titled “Burnaby Wall”; “Burnaby Border” and “Burnaby Ceiling”. All three of these wallpaper designs have been used in the Love farm house and are also commercially available through the Bradbury and Bradbury Art Wallpaper Company. After the completion of the kitchen, the Love farmhouse exhibit opened on November 29, 1998 with an open invitation to the public and extended members of the Love family. Officials including the Mayor, Doug Drummond and Love family members were all present to cut the ribbon for the special event.
Subjects
Buildings - Heritage
Buildings - Civic - Museums
Documentary Artifacts
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Cumberland Road Burnaby - Cumberland Street Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Accession Code
BV018.41; BV020.5
Access Restriction
Restricted access
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
[1893-1970] (date of originals), copied 1988-1998, predominant 1988-2000
Media Type
Textual Record
Architectural Drawing
Sound Recording
Moving Images
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
East Burnaby (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Cariboo-Armstrong Area
Arrangement
Other photographs documenting the move and restoration work were added later under BV020.5
Notes
Title based on content of fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse is described as an Artifact under BV988.33.1
Some records within this collection have restricted access and are subject to FIPPA
Accessions BV018.41 and BV020.5 form this fonds
Less detail

Oral history interview with Esther Stanley May 5, 1988 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museummultipleformat9836
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1925 (interview content), interviewed May 5, 1988
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (0:08:21 min)
Scope and Content
Track 1: Esther talks about the house as she remembers it from her childhood, describing the additions. Jim asks her about the furnishings of the hallway, parlour and kitchen and the contents of the pantry, and they discuss the house’s bathrooms.
Administrative History
Jim Wolf talks about Love Farmhouse with Esther Stanley, daughter of Jesse and Martha Love. They discuss the property, and the furnishings, decoration and amenities of the house as she remembers them. Esther’s recollections were to be used as a resource for redecorating and refurnishing the house a…
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Item
Series
Love Farmhouse Oral History Project series
File No.
51320-20
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (0:08:21 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Jim Wolf Interviewee: Esther Stanley Location of Interview: not known Interview Date: May 5, 1988 Total Length of all Tracks: 36:21 Total Number of Tracks: 5
Scope and Content
Track 1: Esther talks about the house as she remembers it from her childhood, describing the additions. Jim asks her about the furnishings of the hallway, parlour and kitchen and the contents of the pantry, and they discuss the house’s bathrooms.
Administrative History
Jim Wolf talks about Love Farmhouse with Esther Stanley, daughter of Jesse and Martha Love. They discuss the property, and the furnishings, decoration and amenities of the house as she remembers them. Esther’s recollections were to be used as a resource for redecorating and refurnishing the house as it was in 1925 for its use as an exhibit at the Burnaby Village Museum. Esther’s daughters are also present at the interview.
Creator
Jim Wolf
Subjects
Buildings - Heritage
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Names
Stanley, Esther Love
Wolf, Jim
Love, Jesse (1849-1928)
Love, Martha
Accession Code
BV018.41.47
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
1925 (interview content), interviewed May 5, 1988
Media Type
Sound Recording
Textual Record
Related Material
Wedding Portrait of Frank Charles Stanley and Esther Love Stanley, 1921. Item: BV015.40.41
Notes
Title based on content of file
4 pages of interview notes accompanying oral history recording
Audio Tracks

Oral history interview with Esther Stanley May 5, 1988 - Track 1

Images
Less detail

Love Farmhouse Oral History Project series

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museummultipleformat10392
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1925-1930 (interview content), interviewed between 1988 and 1991
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Series
Physical Description
Textual records + 3 audio cassettes + 1 videocassette
Scope and Content
Series consists of records created and collected during research of the Love family and the Love family farmhouse and include oral history interviews in various formats. Interviews were conducted by Jim Wolf and Burnaby Village Museum curator Colin Stevens with members of the Love family including;…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Series
Series
Love Farmhouse Oral History Project series
File No.
51320-20
Physical Description
Textual records + 3 audio cassettes + 1 videocassette
Scope and Content
Series consists of records created and collected during research of the Love family and the Love family farmhouse and include oral history interviews in various formats. Interviews were conducted by Jim Wolf and Burnaby Village Museum curator Colin Stevens with members of the Love family including; Annie Chamberlain, William Parker, Esther Stanley, Albert Parker and Elsie Hughes. Interviews were focused on the subject of the interior and exterior of the farmhouse from a first person perspective. The goal was to obtain as much information as possible from family members in order to accurately restore, furnish and exhibit the farmhouse back to it's original 1920s era.
Subjects
Buildings - Heritage
Names
Love, Jesse (1849-1928)
Burnaby Village Museum
Hughes, Elsie
Parker, Albert "Bert"
Parker, William Charles
Chamberlain, Annie
Stanley, Esther Love
Accession Code
BV018.41
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
1925-1930 (interview content), interviewed between 1988 and 1991
Media Type
Textual Record
Sound Recording
Moving Images
Notes
Title based on content of series
Less detail

Oral history interview with Esther Stanley May 5, 1988 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museummultipleformat10400
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1925 (interview content), interviewed May 5, 1988
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (0:07:50 min) + 4 p. of textual records
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to the property, Esther’s schooling, and the other members of the household. Esther recalls the house’s water supply system and Jim asks her about the gardens. They talk about the outbuildings and livestock. Esther also talks about the schools she att…
Administrative History
Jim Wolf talks about Love Farmhouse with Esther Stanley, daughter of Jesse and Martha Love. They discuss the property, and the furnishings, decoration and amenities of the house as she remembers them. Esther’s recollections were to be used as a resource for redecorating and refurnishing the house a…
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Item
Series
Love Farmhouse Oral History Project series
File No.
51320-20
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (0:07:50 min) + 4 p. of textual records
Material Details
Interviewer: Jim Wolf Interviewee: Esther Stanley Location of Interview: not known Interview Date: May 5, 1988 Total Length of all Tracks: 36:21 Total Number of Tracks: 5
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to the property, Esther’s schooling, and the other members of the household. Esther recalls the house’s water supply system and Jim asks her about the gardens. They talk about the outbuildings and livestock. Esther also talks about the schools she attended. Jim asks about the family’s Christmas traditions, Esther’s siblings, the deaths of family members in the house, and Jesse Love’s work and means of transport.
Administrative History
Jim Wolf talks about Love Farmhouse with Esther Stanley, daughter of Jesse and Martha Love. They discuss the property, and the furnishings, decoration and amenities of the house as she remembers them. Esther’s recollections were to be used as a resource for redecorating and refurnishing the house as it was in 1925 for its use as an exhibit at the Burnaby Village Museum. Esther’s daughters are also present at the interview.
Creator
Jim Wolf
Subjects
Buildings - Heritage
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Names
Stanley, Esther Love
Wolf, Jim
Love, Jesse (1849-1928)
Love, Martha
Accession Code
BV018.41.47
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
1925 (interview content), interviewed May 5, 1988
Media Type
Sound Recording
Textual Record
Notes
Title based on content of file
4 pages of interview notes accompanying oral history recording
Audio Tracks

Oral history interview with Esther Stanley May 5, 1988 - Track 2

Images
Less detail

Oral history interview with Esther Stanley May 5, 1988 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museummultipleformat10401
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1925 (interview content), interviewed May 5, 1988
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (0:06:20 min) + 4 p. of textual records
Scope and Content
Track 3: Esther recalls learning to drive, and Jim asks about her father’s pipe collection and the heating arrangements of the house. They discuss the family’s music and entertainments, and the furnishings and decoration of ground floor rooms. Esther mentions her job picking fruit. Jim shows the wo…
Administrative History
Jim Wolf talks about Love Farmhouse with Esther Stanley, daughter of Jesse and Martha Love. They discuss the property, and the furnishings, decoration and amenities of the house as she remembers them. Esther’s recollections were to be used as a resource for redecorating and refurnishing the house a…
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Item
Series
Love Farmhouse Oral History Project series
File No.
51320-20
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (0:06:20 min) + 4 p. of textual records
Material Details
Interviewer: Jim Wolf Interviewee: Esther Stanley Location of Interview: not known Interview Date: May 5, 1988 Total Length of all Tracks: 36:21 Total Number of Tracks: 5
Scope and Content
Track 3: Esther recalls learning to drive, and Jim asks about her father’s pipe collection and the heating arrangements of the house. They discuss the family’s music and entertainments, and the furnishings and decoration of ground floor rooms. Esther mentions her job picking fruit. Jim shows the women photographs from the archives, and Esther identifies people. Jim asks about the dates of the photos and the additions to the house.
Administrative History
Jim Wolf talks about Love Farmhouse with Esther Stanley, daughter of Jesse and Martha Love. They discuss the property, and the furnishings, decoration and amenities of the house as she remembers them. Esther’s recollections were to be used as a resource for redecorating and refurnishing the house as it was in 1925 for its use as an exhibit at the Burnaby Village Museum. Esther’s daughters are also present at the interview.
Creator
Jim Wolf
Subjects
Buildings - Heritage
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Names
Stanley, Esther Love
Wolf, Jim
Love, Jesse (1849-1928)
Love, Martha
Accession Code
BV018.41.47
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
1925 (interview content), interviewed May 5, 1988
Media Type
Sound Recording
Textual Record
Notes
Title based on content of file
4 pages of interview notes accompanying oral history recording
Audio Tracks

Oral history interview with Esther Stanley May 5, 1988 - Track 3

Images
Less detail

Oral history interview with Esther Stanley May 5, 1988 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museummultipleformat10402
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1925 (interview content), interviewed May 5, 1988
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (0:06:28 min) + 4 p. of textual records
Scope and Content
Track 4: In this portion of the recording, Jim shows more photographs to Esther, including recent ones, and she identifies areas of the gardens and grounds, and outbuildings. They also look at interior photos and discuss materials and finishes. Esther notes that her brother George helped with the a…
Administrative History
Jim Wolf talks about Love Farmhouse with Esther Stanley, daughter of Jesse and Martha Love. They discuss the property, and the furnishings, decoration and amenities of the house as she remembers them. Esther’s recollections were to be used as a resource for redecorating and refurnishing the house a…
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Item
Series
Love Farmhouse Oral History Project series
File No.
51320-20
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (0:06:28 min) + 4 p. of textual records
Material Details
Interviewer: Jim Wolf Interviewee: Esther Stanley Location of Interview: not known Interview Date: May 5, 1988 Total Length of all Tracks: 36:21 Total Number of Tracks: 5
Scope and Content
Track 4: In this portion of the recording, Jim shows more photographs to Esther, including recent ones, and she identifies areas of the gardens and grounds, and outbuildings. They also look at interior photos and discuss materials and finishes. Esther notes that her brother George helped with the additions to the house and interiors.
Administrative History
Jim Wolf talks about Love Farmhouse with Esther Stanley, daughter of Jesse and Martha Love. They discuss the property, and the furnishings, decoration and amenities of the house as she remembers them. Esther’s recollections were to be used as a resource for redecorating and refurnishing the house as it was in 1925 for its use as an exhibit at the Burnaby Village Museum. Esther’s daughters are also present at the interview.
Creator
Jim Wolf
Subjects
Buildings - Heritage
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Names
Stanley, Esther Love
Wolf, Jim
Love, Jesse (1849-1928)
Love, Martha
Accession Code
BV018.41.47
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
1925 (interview content), interviewed May 5, 1988
Media Type
Sound Recording
Textual Record
Notes
Title based on content of file
4 pages of interview notes accompanying oral history recording
Audio Tracks

Oral history interview with Esther Stanley May 5, 1988 - Track 4

Images
Less detail

Oral history interview with Esther Stanley May 5, 1988 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museummultipleformat10403
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1925 (interview content), interviewed May 5, 1988
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (0:07:22 min) + 4 p. of textual records
Scope and Content
Track 5: Esther looks at more of the recent photographs, and talks about trees on the property and details of interiors and exteriors of the house. Jim asks about the cellar and the reservoir, and they discuss the porch and its furnishings.
Administrative History
Jim Wolf talks about Love Farmhouse with Esther Stanley, daughter of Jesse and Martha Love. They discuss the property, and the furnishings, decoration and amenities of the house as she remembers them. Esther’s recollections were to be used as a resource for redecorating and refurnishing the house a…
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Jesse Love farmhouse fonds
Description Level
Item
Series
Love Farmhouse Oral History Project series
File No.
51320-20
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (0:07:22 min) + 4 p. of textual records
Material Details
Interviewer: Jim Wolf Interviewee: Esther Stanley Location of Interview: not known Interview Date: May 5, 1988 Total Length of all Tracks: 36:21 Total Number of Tracks: 5
Scope and Content
Track 5: Esther looks at more of the recent photographs, and talks about trees on the property and details of interiors and exteriors of the house. Jim asks about the cellar and the reservoir, and they discuss the porch and its furnishings.
Administrative History
Jim Wolf talks about Love Farmhouse with Esther Stanley, daughter of Jesse and Martha Love. They discuss the property, and the furnishings, decoration and amenities of the house as she remembers them. Esther’s recollections were to be used as a resource for redecorating and refurnishing the house as it was in 1925 for its use as an exhibit at the Burnaby Village Museum. Esther’s daughters are also present at the interview.
Creator
Jim Wolf
Subjects
Buildings - Heritage
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Names
Stanley, Esther Love
Wolf, Jim
Love, Jesse (1849-1928)
Love, Martha
Accession Code
BV018.41.47
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
1925 (interview content), interviewed May 5, 1988
Media Type
Sound Recording
Textual Record
Notes
Title based on content of file
4 pages of interview notes accompanying oral history recording
Audio Tracks

Oral history interview with Esther Stanley May 5, 1988 - Track 5

Images
Less detail

Burnaby Retired Teachers collection

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivemultipleformat21
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1949-1994
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Retired Teachers collection
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
2 boxes of textual records and other material
Scope and Content
Collection consists of two boxes of records created by the Burnaby Retired Teachers group in relation to their work in various Burnaby schools. Records in this collection include information booklets, photographs, statistics, and other research materials collected by the Burnaby Retired Teachers' A…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1949-1994
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Retired Teachers collection
Physical Description
2 boxes of textual records and other material
Description Level
Fonds
Accession Number
BHS2002-11
Scope and Content
Collection consists of two boxes of records created by the Burnaby Retired Teachers group in relation to their work in various Burnaby schools. Records in this collection include information booklets, photographs, statistics, and other research materials collected by the Burnaby Retired Teachers' Association.
History/Biography
Concerned that Burnaby might be losing its educational history, the Retired Teachers’ Association of Burnaby formed the History of Education Committee and housed their records at Schou Elementary School. The Committee made efforts to assemble types of information that could help in the preparation of school histories, and once this information was assembled, they completed the paper entitled, “Introductory Resource Materials on Burnaby Schools / 1894-1991” which gives a one page ‘introduction’ to each school in the Burnaby district, past and present.
Media Type
Textual Record
Photograph
Sound Recording
Notes
Title based on contents of collection
BHS434, MSS103
Less detail
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1910-1987
Collection/Fonds
Edmonds School fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
8 folders of textual records
5 audio cassettes
43 photographs
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of photographs depicting Edmonds School, including its students, staff, and surrounding area, as well as a collection of records related to a a students' research project, where students interviewed former Edmonds School students.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1910-1987
Collection/Fonds
Edmonds School fonds
Physical Description
8 folders of textual records
5 audio cassettes
43 photographs
Description Level
Fonds
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Accession Number
BHS988-7
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of photographs depicting Edmonds School, including its students, staff, and surrounding area, as well as a collection of records related to a a students' research project, where students interviewed former Edmonds School students.
History/Biography
Edmonds School can trace its history back to the opening of the first school in Burnaby in 1894. The "Burnaby school" was a typical one-room school house constructed on a small site on the opposite side of Canada Way (then named Douglas Road) and 18th Avenue. In 1896, when West Burnaby School, was built the school was renamed the "East Burnaby School." By 1908, the original small school house and its little playground became too small to contain the growing number of school-aged children living in the area. That year the Municipality of Burnaby and the Burnaby School Board funded a new four room school to house 75 students on the present site facing Edmonds Street. This building was known for many years as the old "gray school" because of its drab paint colour. In 1913, a four-room addition completed this school which was then renamed the "Edmonds Street School." In 1922, the school was was expanded with a new four-room "bungalow" building on the Douglas Road side of the property. By 1925, four more rooms were added to house the student population of this rapidly growing district, which peaked at 580 by 1930. After World War II, the old school was designated as a junior high school and in 1949, the present building was opened on an expanded site. By 1953 and 1955 the school received more additions to accommodate a student enrolment that had expanded to thirteen hundred students. The original gray building was demolished in 1956 and the bungalow building, which had served for many years as the elementary school, was destroyed by fire in 1989.
Media Type
Textual Record
Photograph
Sound Recording
Notes
Title based on contents of fonds
BHS207 and MSS036
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Audio recordings containing interviews

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivemultipleformat57960
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1979
Collection/Fonds
Edmonds School fonds
Description Level
File
Physical Description
5 audio cassettes
Item No.
MSS036-002
Storage Location
AV Storage
Scope and Content
Sound recordings produced by students of Ms. Martel's grade 10 class that contain interviews with former students and teachers of Edmonds school. The interviews were conducted by the students for a class research project.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1979
Collection/Fonds
Edmonds School fonds
Physical Description
5 audio cassettes
Description Level
File
Item No.
MSS036-002
Storage Location
AV Storage
Access Restriction
In Archives only
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Accession Number
BHS988-7
Scope and Content
Sound recordings produced by students of Ms. Martel's grade 10 class that contain interviews with former students and teachers of Edmonds school. The interviews were conducted by the students for a class research project.
Media Type
Textual Record
Sound Recording
Notes
Title based on contents of file
Less detail

Community Heritage Commission Special Project fonds

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivemultipleformat74546
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1994-2012
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
43 photographs : col. (tiffs) ; 600ppi + 2306 photographs : copied (tiffs) + 219 photographs : copied (jpegs) + 30 interviews (wav) : digital sound files + 79 photographs (jpegs) + 56 cm of textual records + 662 photographs : b&w + 1 sound recording (microcassette tape)
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of project records created by Burnaby's Community Heritage Commission as part of their initiative and mandate.The fonds is organized into the following project series: 1. Charting Change Project series 2. Burna-Boom Oral History Project series 3. Burnaby Centennial series 4. In t…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1994-2012
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Physical Description
43 photographs : col. (tiffs) ; 600ppi + 2306 photographs : copied (tiffs) + 219 photographs : copied (jpegs) + 30 interviews (wav) : digital sound files + 79 photographs (jpegs) + 56 cm of textual records + 662 photographs : b&w + 1 sound recording (microcassette tape)
Description Level
Fonds
Access Restriction
Open access
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of project records created by Burnaby's Community Heritage Commission as part of their initiative and mandate.The fonds is organized into the following project series: 1. Charting Change Project series 2. Burna-Boom Oral History Project series 3. Burnaby Centennial series 4. In the Shadow by the Sea series 5. Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series 6. Life with the Moores of Hart House series
History/Biography
The History and Heritage Committee was established in 1992 under Burnaby's Centennial Committee. When the Centennial Committee was disbanded on December 31, 1992 , the History and Heritage Committee was made a part of the Burnaby Heritage Advisory Committee and proceeded under it's authority until 1995 when it was renamed The Community Heritage Commission (CHC) as a municipal heritage advisory committee by the Burnaby City Council under section 15 of the Heritage Conservation Act.The commission endeavours to provide comprehensive community heritage and history projects and programs to bring together the 'personal history' of citizens and facilitate a wider understanding and appreciation of Burnaby's 'collective memory'. Projects undertaken by Burnaby's Community Heritage Commission include: Burnaby Centennial Anthology: Stories of Early Burnaby; In the Shadow by the Sea: Recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village, the Heritage Burnaby website (www.heritageburnaby.ca); Charting Change: An Interactive Atlas and various oral history projects. These projects fall under the Community Heritage Commission's mandate to provide the citizens of Burnaby and the wider public with access to information about the city and its unique history through publications and online finding aids.
Media Type
Photograph
Textual Record
Sound Recording
Notes
Title based on contents of fonds
Photo catalogue 512, photo catalogue 615, photo catalogue 503, MSS198, MSS171, MSS196, photo catalogue 549, photo catalogue 315
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Burna-Boom Oral History Project series

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivemultipleformat74548
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
2012
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Description Level
Series
Physical Description
30 interviews (wav) : digital sound files + 79 photographs (jpegs)
Scope and Content
Series consists of Oral History Project records which were created under the direction of the Community Heritage Commission. Series includes audio files as well as visual records collected to support the project. Interviews were completed, featuring current Burnaby residents and indexed recordings …
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
2012
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Physical Description
30 interviews (wav) : digital sound files + 79 photographs (jpegs)
Description Level
Series
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Series consists of Oral History Project records which were created under the direction of the Community Heritage Commission. Series includes audio files as well as visual records collected to support the project. Interviews were completed, featuring current Burnaby residents and indexed recordings of their memories of Burnaby in the 1940s and 1950s are available to listen to on Heritage Burnaby.
Media Type
Photograph
Sound Recording
Notes
Title based on contents of series
Less detail

SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivemultipleformat88249
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[191-?] (date of original) -2015
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
16 folders of textual records + 813 photographs + 10 audio cassettes + 5 videocassettes + 8 data cassettes + 1 computer disk + 2 optical discs
Scope and Content
Records consist of material created and collected by the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee in celebration of Burnaby's Centennial in 1992. The fonds is arranged into four series; 1) Burnaby Image Bank Photograph series, 2) SFU/Centennial Committee Manuscript series, 3) Centennial Oral History Projec…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[191-?] (date of original) -2015
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Physical Description
16 folders of textual records + 813 photographs + 10 audio cassettes + 5 videocassettes + 8 data cassettes + 1 computer disk + 2 optical discs
Description Level
Fonds
Access Restriction
Open Access
Scope and Content
Records consist of material created and collected by the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee in celebration of Burnaby's Centennial in 1992. The fonds is arranged into four series; 1) Burnaby Image Bank Photograph series, 2) SFU/Centennial Committee Manuscript series, 3) Centennial Oral History Project series and 4) Video Project series.
History/Biography
The SFU (Simon Fraser University)/Burnaby Centennial Committee was established in 1990 and obtained initial funding from the President of Simon Fraser University which was matched by a grant authorized by the Mayor and Council of the Municipality of Burnaby. Further funding came from the Burnaby (civic) Centennial Committee after the projects had been accepted as part of the recognition for Burnaby's Centennial celebrations in 1992. The suggestion for this committee originated with Professor Robert Anderson from the School of Communications and he was joined by Professors, Veronica Strong-Boag from the Department of History and Leonard J. Evenden from the Department of Geography. Primary responsibilities ended up falling jointly to Professor Leonard J. Evenden and Susan Jamieson-McLarnon. The Committee was made up of the following members who helped to carry out the projects to completion: Rodney Fowler (SFU Department of Geography), Terry Fowler (Adler School of Professional Psychology, Chicago), Edward Gibson (SFU Department of Geography and Director of the Simon Fraser Gallery), James Ross (SFU Archivist), Allen Seager (Department of History), Grant Strate (SFU Fine and Performing Arts), and Arthur Wirick (representing Burnaby Municipal Centennial Committee). Other members of the university community contributed their expertise in a variety of ways, including: Jack Corse (SFU Librarian), Stephen Duguid (Institute of Humanities), Christine Hearn (Continuing Studies), Ken Mennel (Media and Public Relations), Jane Parkinson (Historian and Researcher), Stanley Shapiro (Business Administration) and Jerry Zaslove (Institute for the Humanities). Rodney Fowler also filled the position of committee coordinator. The committee's first undertaking was to explore the extent and availability of historical resources in the community of Burnaby. Two graduate students were hired to help carry out this work in the summer of 1991 which took two forms: a document based study and an oral history project. The documents based history resulted in an inventory of ‘archival’ resources titled "Burnaby: A Cultural Inventory and Resource Guide" and the Oral History Project consisted of interviews with eleven Burnaby citizens. With the culmination of these two projects a day long workshop was held with both the SFU and the Burnaby municipal committees and other members of the Burnaby community who were pursuing various centennial projects of their own. Following the workshop, and several meetings, the committee proposed other projects in addition to the Cultural Inventory and Oral History Project. The other completed projects consisted of; "The Burnaby Image Bank" which included an exhibition titled, "Images of Burnaby", a finding aid video titled, "Burnaby's Photographic Family Album / Burnaby Image Bank Collection / Volume 1 / 1992", a video titled "Burnaby at 100: Images and Voices", a book of essays titled, "Suburb of Happy Homes: Burnaby Centennial Themes" and a dance festival sponsored by The Centre for the Arts. Suburb of happy Homes: Burnaby Centennial Themes", dedicated to the citizens and students of Burnaby, and to the students of Simon Fraser University, was published in 1995. For this project, Leonard Evenden received the City of Burnaby Heritage Award in 1997.A companion project to the book of essays consisted of a map project which illustrated the development of settlement within the city but it never came to fruition due to funding constraints.
Media Type
Textual Record
Photograph
Sound Recording
Moving Images
Notes
Title based on contents of fonds
Photo catalogue 370, photo catalogue 576, photo catalogue 577, photo catalogue 578, MSS088, MSS131, MSS187, moving image catalogue 579
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Centennial Oral History Project series

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivemultipleformat88274
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1990-1992
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Description Level
Series
Physical Description
2 cm of textual records + 10 audio cassettes
Scope and Content
Series consists of records from the SFU (Simon Fraser University)/Burnaby Centennial Committee Oral History project including transcripts and sound recordings of eleven interviews.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1990-1992
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Physical Description
2 cm of textual records + 10 audio cassettes
Description Level
Series
Series
Centennial Oral History Project series
Access Restriction
Open Access
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Series consists of records from the SFU (Simon Fraser University)/Burnaby Centennial Committee Oral History project including transcripts and sound recordings of eleven interviews.
Media Type
Textual Record
Sound Recording
Notes
Title based on contents of series
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory10
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's early childhood including the reasons why her family first moved to Burnaby, other early residents of the Deer Lake district, farming practices, and why the Hart family chose to leave Burnaby in 1917.
Date Range
1898-1917
Length
0:06:11
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's early childhood including the reasons why her family first moved to Burnaby, other early residents of the Deer Lake district, farming practices, and why the Hart family chose to leave Burnaby in 1917.
Date Range
1898-1917
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:06:11
Name
Woodward, Harriet
Subject
Agriculture - Fruit and Berries
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Deer Lake
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory11
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's time in Vancouver and her early married life in the Edmonds district, as well as her husband's work at Fraser Mills.
Date Range
1917-[1929]
Length
0:03:29
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's time in Vancouver and her early married life in the Edmonds district, as well as her husband's work at Fraser Mills.
Date Range
1917-[1929]
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:03:29
Name
Fraser Mills
Godwin, Harold
Subject
Industries - Pulp and Paper
Transportation - Buses
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory12
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's positive attitude towards fellow citizens during the Depression, her husband's work and pay cuts at Fraser Mills and the issues of unemployment in general.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:04:34
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's positive attitude towards fellow citizens during the Depression, her husband's work and pay cuts at Fraser Mills and the issues of unemployment in general.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:04:34
Name
Godwin, Harold
Subject
Industries - Pulp and Paper
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_3
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory13
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's volunteer work with the Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) with Nurse Woodward and the Well Baby Clinic.
Date Range
1922-1942
Length
0:09:04
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's volunteer work with the Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) with Nurse Woodward and the Well Baby Clinic.
Date Range
1922-1942
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:09:04
Name
Victorian Order of Nurses
Woodward, Maude
Subject
Organizations - Womens' Societies and Clubs
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Stride Avenue Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory14
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's thoughts on the impact of the Depression on the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON) as well as information on the first Health Officer of Burnaby, Dr. Watson. Florence mentions recieving the support of then municipal treasurer, Mr. Caf…
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:07:27
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's thoughts on the impact of the Depression on the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON) as well as information on the first Health Officer of Burnaby, Dr. Watson. Florence mentions recieving the support of then municipal treasurer, Mr. Cafferky.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:07:27
Name
Victorian Order of Nurses
Cafferky, Emmet J.
Subject
Organizations - Womens' Societies and Clubs
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Stride Avenue Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory15
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin and her husband Hal's involvement with the VON and how they managed to carry on during the Depression, partially with the support of then municipal treasurer, Mr. Bolton.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:06:16
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin and her husband Hal's involvement with the VON and how they managed to carry on during the Depression, partially with the support of then municipal treasurer, Mr. Bolton.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:06:16
Name
Godwin, Harold
Bolton, Richard
Victorian Order of Nurses
Subject
Organizations - Womens' Societies and Clubs
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Stride Avenue Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_6
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory16
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's thoughts on Municipal politics of the time.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:05:09
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's thoughts on Municipal politics of the time.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:05:09
Name
Pritchard, William A.
Subject
Elections
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_7
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory17
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's memories of entertainment on offer during the Depression as well as her overall experience of that time, where she mentions the birth of her daughter in 1929.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:05:54
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's memories of entertainment on offer during the Depression as well as her overall experience of that time, where she mentions the birth of her daughter in 1929.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:05:54
Name
Godwin, Elizabeth
Subject
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Richmond Street
Burnaby - Elwell Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_8
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory18
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's early childhood including the reasons why his family first moved to Burnaby, his first experiences of unemployment and what initially drew him to the Working Organization in Burnaby and their protest against evictions.
Date Range
1914-1932
Length
0:08:44
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's early childhood including the reasons why his family first moved to Burnaby, his first experiences of unemployment and what initially drew him to the Working Organization in Burnaby and their protest against evictions.
Date Range
1914-1932
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:08:44
Subject
Organizations
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Inman Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory19
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's decision to join the Army of the Common Good and its Cooperative (CG Co-op) as well as the South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed. Harry discusses his father's work as caretaker at Central Park and helping to deal with wood cutting per…
Date Range
1932-1936
Length
0:09:26
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's decision to join the Army of the Common Good and its Cooperative (CG Co-op) as well as the South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed. Harry discusses his father's work as caretaker at Central Park and helping to deal with wood cutting permits and land clearing by men who were on script.
Date Range
1932-1936
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:09:26
Name
Central Park
Subject
Organizations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Central Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory20
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on how the Union of the Unemployed was organized and what its main focus was. Harry discusses the Union of the Unemployed's dealings with the Commissioner.
Date Range
1935-1936
Length
0:08:41
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on how the Union of the Unemployed was organized and what its main focus was. Harry discusses the Union of the Unemployed's dealings with the Commissioner.
Date Range
1935-1936
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:08:41
Subject
Organizations
Protests and Demonstrations
Officials - Commissioners
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_3
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory21
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's memories on the reaction of the community to the Union of the Unemployed. Harry mentions other Unemployed organizations throughout Metro Vancouver as well as the Workers Unity League and the Vancouver Trades and Labour Council and the…
Date Range
1935-1938
Length
0:07:04
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's memories on the reaction of the community to the Union of the Unemployed. Harry mentions other Unemployed organizations throughout Metro Vancouver as well as the Workers Unity League and the Vancouver Trades and Labour Council and their purpose.
Date Range
1935-1938
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:07:04
Subject
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with W.H.

Images
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Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory22
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the practices and philosophies of Army of the Common Good.
Date Range
1932
Length
0:06:39
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the practices and philosophies of Army of the Common Good.
Date Range
1932
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:06:39
Subject
Organizations
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory23
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores and their beginnings. Harry mentions the Credit Union.
Date Range
1932-1938
Length
0:09:14
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores and their beginnings. Harry mentions the Credit Union.
Date Range
1932-1938
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:09:14
Subject
Organizations
Persons - Volunteers
Geographic Access
Burnaby - McKay Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_6
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory24
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the reasons for the closing of the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores. Harry mentions other Cooperative stores throughout Metro Vancouver.
Date Range
1938
Length
0:08:23
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the reasons for the closing of the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores. Harry mentions other Cooperative stores throughout Metro Vancouver.
Date Range
1938
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:08:23
Subject
Organizations
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_7
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory25
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the formation of the Army of the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union).
Date Range
[1932]-1936
Length
0:11:12
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the formation of the Army of the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union).
Date Range
[1932]-1936
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:11:12
Name
Darling, Gordon
Phillips, Turnie
Subject
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_8
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with W.H.

Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory26
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Cooperative Commonweath Federation (CCF) as well as his mother and father's involvement in politics.
Date Range
1933-1935
Length
0:08:46
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Cooperative Commonweath Federation (CCF) as well as his mother and father's involvement in politics.
Date Range
1933-1935
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:08:46
Name
Weaver, George
Subject
Elections
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_9
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory27
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's early days working at Burnaby's Municipal Hall, first as an office boy.
Date Range
1909-1938
Length
00:07:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's early days working at Burnaby's Municipal Hall, first as an office boy.
Date Range
1909-1938
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
00:07:15
Subject
Occupations - Civic Workers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory28
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's memories of municipal pay cuts endured during the Depression.
Date Range
1928-1938
Length
00:09:56
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's memories of municipal pay cuts endured during the Depression.
Date Range
1928-1938
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
00:09:56
Subject
Occupations - Civic Workers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory29
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's memories of working with Reeve William A. Pritchard.
Date Range
1930-1932
Length
0:08:14
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's memories of working with Reeve William A. Pritchard.
Date Range
1930-1932
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:08:14
Name
Pritchard, William A.
Subject
Officials - Mayors and Reeves
Occupations - City Clerks
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_3
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory30
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of Mr. Feedham and the action against the Council in the Courts and the resulting Commissionership.
Date Range
1931-1932
Length
0:06:40
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of Mr. Feedham and the action against the Council in the Courts and the resulting Commissionership.
Date Range
1931-1932
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:06:40
Subject
Government - Local Government
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory31
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of the Ward System in Burnaby as well as his experiences with the Unemployed Organization.
Date Range
1928-1938
Length
0:06:51
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of the Ward System in Burnaby as well as his experiences with the Unemployed Organization.
Date Range
1928-1938
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:06:51
Subject
Organizations
Protests and Demonstrations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory32
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's comparisons between working for a Council versus working for a Commissionership.
Date Range
1923-1938
Length
0:06:27
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's comparisons between working for a Council versus working for a Commissionership.
Date Range
1923-1938
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:06:27
Subject
Officials - Commissioners
Officials - Aldermen and Councillors
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_6
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory33
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of various Commissioners.
Date Range
1933-1942
Length
0:06:35
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's impressions of various Commissioners.
Date Range
1933-1942
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:06:35
Subject
Officials - Commissioners
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_7
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory34
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's experiences with tax sales and a description of how they functioned.
Date Range
1928-1945
Length
0:06:03
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's experiences with tax sales and a description of how they functioned.
Date Range
1928-1945
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
0:06:03
Subject
Government - Local Government
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_8
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory35
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's early childhood including the reasons why his family moved to Burnaby, the small pox house at the border of New Westminster and stories of the unfinished family home at Formby Street.
Date Range
1914-1922
Length
0:09:27
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's early childhood including the reasons why his family moved to Burnaby, the small pox house at the border of New Westminster and stories of the unfinished family home at Formby Street.
Date Range
1914-1922
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:09:27
Subject
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Formby Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
East Burnaby (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Richmond Park Area
Second Street Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory36
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's teen years including the early passing of his father.
Date Range
1927-1930
Length
0:08:22
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's teen years including the early passing of his father.
Date Range
1927-1930
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:08:22
Subject
Geographic Features - Gardens
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Formby Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Richmond Park Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory37
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's impressions of the neighbourhood he grew up in.
Date Range
1925
Length
0:07:37
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's impressions of the neighbourhood he grew up in.
Date Range
1925
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:07:37
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Transportation
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Richmond Park Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_3
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory38
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's memories of Burnaby during the Depression years including his sister's personal and work history.
Date Range
1929-1938
Length
0:09:54
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's memories of Burnaby during the Depression years including his sister's personal and work history.
Date Range
1929-1938
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:09:54
Name
McGeachie, Florence Mary
Subject
Occupations - Nurses
Recreational Activities - Dancing
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory39
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's positive opinion towards the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) (later the NDP) as well as his experience of the Relief Camp Workers' Union (RCWU) and their protest at Hudson's Bay Company Store in Vancouver.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:10:39
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's positive opinion towards the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) (later the NDP) as well as his experience of the Relief Camp Workers' Union (RCWU) and their protest at Hudson's Bay Company Store in Vancouver.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:10:39
Name
Winch, Ernest "Ernie"
Winch, Harold
Subject
Organizations
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Vancouver
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory40
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's political views, giving voice to the widely held antagonism people held towards the R.B. Bennett government and its attitude toward the unemployed. Jack also discusses the great snow storm of 1933, brush fires in Burnaby and…
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:05:19
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's political views, giving voice to the widely held antagonism people held towards the R.B. Bennett government and its attitude toward the unemployed. Jack also discusses the great snow storm of 1933, brush fires in Burnaby and the Richmond Street Fire.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:05:19
Subject
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_6
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles 10-Jun-75 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory41
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles memories of growing up in New Westminster and visiting Burnaby with family. Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles mentions when and where she was born.
Date Range
1899-1919
Length
0:07:22
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles memories of growing up in New Westminster and visiting Burnaby with family. Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles mentions when and where she was born.
Date Range
1899-1919
Photo Info
Mrs. Dunbar, Dr. Blythe Eagles and Dr. Violet (Dunbar) Eagles, June 1967. Item no. 404-002
Length
0:07:22
Subject
Agriculture - Fruit and Berries
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
10-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and his wife Dr Violet Eagles by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury (and Ross S. McLeod) June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the War Years and Burnaby Lake District. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Blythe's paternal grandparents, Charles and Maude Eagles immigrated to New Westminster in 1887. Their son Jack married Amelia Jane Johnston, and Blythe Eagles was born in New Westminster in 1902. In 1918 Blythe enrolled at the University of British Columbia, and took a Physiology class with eight other top students - his future wife, Violet Dunbar was the lone woman in the class. Blythe graduated in 1922, winning the Governor General's Gold Medal as top student. He received his MA in 1924 and his PhD in 1926 from the University of Toronto. He then completed his post-doctoral study at the National Institute for Medical Research in London, England. In 1933 Dr. Eagles became head of the Department of Dairying (1936-1955), Chairman of the Division of Animal Science (1955-1967), and Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture (in 1949 until his retirement in 1967). In 1968 he received an Honourary Doctor of Science Award from UBC Blythe was also one of the first appointments to the Burnaby Town Planning Commission. Violet Evelyn Dunbar was born September 29, 1899 in Ontario, the eldest child of John and Mary (Tompson) Dunbar. Violet attained her BA in 1921 and MA in 1922 from the University of British Columbia. In 1922 she attended the Provincial Normal School and within six months had a teaching certificate and taught at Lord Hudson School in 1923. In September 1923 she was awarded a two-year scholarship to the University of Toronto, where she joined Blythe in the Bio-Chemistry Department. She received a second MA and a PhD in 1929. Her graduate studies entailed research in pure proteins and enzymes related to the commercial production of cheese. Through this work she was recognized as one of the leading enzyme chemists in the country, being a senior lab instructor of biochemistry. Violet was one of the founders of the Burnaby Council of Women and active member of the International Council of Women. Blythe and Violet Eagles purchased property at Deer Lake in 1929 and began construction of their home shortly before their marriage on June 25, 1930. The Drs. Blythe and Violet Eagles Estate is a unique expression of the talents and tastes of both the Eagles and Frank Ebenezer Buck (1875-1970) who was head of the Horticultural Department and the Campus Landscape Architect at U.B.C. and established the plan for the Eagles garden while Blythe selected many of the plantings. The Eagles themselves designed the house as a romantic cottage inspired by the British Arts and Crafts style. Violet was an enthusiastic amateur gardener, maintaining and continually developing the garden. The Eagles were active volunteers in the local community as well as at UBC. When Simon Fraser University opened in Burnaby, they became well-known for entertaining dignitaries and special guests of the university in their lavish garden. After Violet's death in 1993, the estate was sold to the City of Burnaby. The funds were used to establish a Chair in Agriculture at the University of British Columbia in their memory.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:24:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Eagles, Dr. Blythe
Eagles, Dr. Violet
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-08_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles

Images
Less detail

Interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles 10-Jun-75 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory42
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles and Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles' thoughts on the Boom years, the houses and development at Deer Lake and the south slope of Vancouver and developments in transportation.
Date Range
1896-1912
Length
0:04:13
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles and Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles' thoughts on the Boom years, the houses and development at Deer Lake and the south slope of Vancouver and developments in transportation.
Date Range
1896-1912
Photo Info
Mrs. Dunbar, Dr. Blythe Eagles and Dr. Violet (Dunbar) Eagles, June 1967. Item no. 404-002
Length
0:04:13
Subject
Agriculture - Fruit and Berries
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
10-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and his wife Dr Violet Eagles by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury (and Ross S. McLeod) June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the War Years and Burnaby Lake District. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Blythe's paternal grandparents, Charles and Maude Eagles immigrated to New Westminster in 1887. Their son Jack married Amelia Jane Johnston, and Blythe Eagles was born in New Westminster in 1902. In 1918 Blythe enrolled at the University of British Columbia, and took a Physiology class with eight other top students - his future wife, Violet Dunbar was the lone woman in the class. Blythe graduated in 1922, winning the Governor General's Gold Medal as top student. He received his MA in 1924 and his PhD in 1926 from the University of Toronto. He then completed his post-doctoral study at the National Institute for Medical Research in London, England. In 1933 Dr. Eagles became head of the Department of Dairying (1936-1955), Chairman of the Division of Animal Science (1955-1967), and Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture (in 1949 until his retirement in 1967). In 1968 he received an Honourary Doctor of Science Award from UBC Blythe was also one of the first appointments to the Burnaby Town Planning Commission. Violet Evelyn Dunbar was born September 29, 1899 in Ontario, the eldest child of John and Mary (Tompson) Dunbar. Violet attained her BA in 1921 and MA in 1922 from the University of British Columbia. In 1922 she attended the Provincial Normal School and within six months had a teaching certificate and taught at Lord Hudson School in 1923. In September 1923 she was awarded a two-year scholarship to the University of Toronto, where she joined Blythe in the Bio-Chemistry Department. She received a second MA and a PhD in 1929. Her graduate studies entailed research in pure proteins and enzymes related to the commercial production of cheese. Through this work she was recognized as one of the leading enzyme chemists in the country, being a senior lab instructor of biochemistry. Violet was one of the founders of the Burnaby Council of Women and active member of the International Council of Women. Blythe and Violet Eagles purchased property at Deer Lake in 1929 and began construction of their home shortly before their marriage on June 25, 1930. The Drs. Blythe and Violet Eagles Estate is a unique expression of the talents and tastes of both the Eagles and Frank Ebenezer Buck (1875-1970) who was head of the Horticultural Department and the Campus Landscape Architect at U.B.C. and established the plan for the Eagles garden while Blythe selected many of the plantings. The Eagles themselves designed the house as a romantic cottage inspired by the British Arts and Crafts style. Violet was an enthusiastic amateur gardener, maintaining and continually developing the garden. The Eagles were active volunteers in the local community as well as at UBC. When Simon Fraser University opened in Burnaby, they became well-known for entertaining dignitaries and special guests of the university in their lavish garden. After Violet's death in 1993, the estate was sold to the City of Burnaby. The funds were used to establish a Chair in Agriculture at the University of British Columbia in their memory.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:24:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Eagles, Dr. Blythe
Eagles, Dr. Violet
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-08_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles

Images
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Interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles 10-Jun-75 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory43
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles and Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles' memories of how things were in their neighbourhood when they first came to Burnaby. Blythe mentions the people that worked on their home, namely Ernest and Harold Winch.
Date Range
1930
Length
0:08:34
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles and Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles' memories of how things were in their neighbourhood when they first came to Burnaby. Blythe mentions the people that worked on their home, namely Ernest and Harold Winch.
Date Range
1930
Photo Info
Mrs. Dunbar, Dr. Blythe Eagles and Dr. Violet (Dunbar) Eagles, June 1967. Item no. 404-002
Length
0:08:34
Subject
Transportation - Automobiles
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
10-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and his wife Dr Violet Eagles by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury (and Ross S. McLeod) June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the War Years and Burnaby Lake District. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Blythe's paternal grandparents, Charles and Maude Eagles immigrated to New Westminster in 1887. Their son Jack married Amelia Jane Johnston, and Blythe Eagles was born in New Westminster in 1902. In 1918 Blythe enrolled at the University of British Columbia, and took a Physiology class with eight other top students - his future wife, Violet Dunbar was the lone woman in the class. Blythe graduated in 1922, winning the Governor General's Gold Medal as top student. He received his MA in 1924 and his PhD in 1926 from the University of Toronto. He then completed his post-doctoral study at the National Institute for Medical Research in London, England. In 1933 Dr. Eagles became head of the Department of Dairying (1936-1955), Chairman of the Division of Animal Science (1955-1967), and Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture (in 1949 until his retirement in 1967). In 1968 he received an Honourary Doctor of Science Award from UBC Blythe was also one of the first appointments to the Burnaby Town Planning Commission. Violet Evelyn Dunbar was born September 29, 1899 in Ontario, the eldest child of John and Mary (Tompson) Dunbar. Violet attained her BA in 1921 and MA in 1922 from the University of British Columbia. In 1922 she attended the Provincial Normal School and within six months had a teaching certificate and taught at Lord Hudson School in 1923. In September 1923 she was awarded a two-year scholarship to the University of Toronto, where she joined Blythe in the Bio-Chemistry Department. She received a second MA and a PhD in 1929. Her graduate studies entailed research in pure proteins and enzymes related to the commercial production of cheese. Through this work she was recognized as one of the leading enzyme chemists in the country, being a senior lab instructor of biochemistry. Violet was one of the founders of the Burnaby Council of Women and active member of the International Council of Women. Blythe and Violet Eagles purchased property at Deer Lake in 1929 and began construction of their home shortly before their marriage on June 25, 1930. The Drs. Blythe and Violet Eagles Estate is a unique expression of the talents and tastes of both the Eagles and Frank Ebenezer Buck (1875-1970) who was head of the Horticultural Department and the Campus Landscape Architect at U.B.C. and established the plan for the Eagles garden while Blythe selected many of the plantings. The Eagles themselves designed the house as a romantic cottage inspired by the British Arts and Crafts style. Violet was an enthusiastic amateur gardener, maintaining and continually developing the garden. The Eagles were active volunteers in the local community as well as at UBC. When Simon Fraser University opened in Burnaby, they became well-known for entertaining dignitaries and special guests of the university in their lavish garden. After Violet's death in 1993, the estate was sold to the City of Burnaby. The funds were used to establish a Chair in Agriculture at the University of British Columbia in their memory.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:24:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Eagles, Dr. Blythe
Eagles, Dr. Violet
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-08_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles

Images
Less detail

Interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles 10-Jun-75 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory44
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles and Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles' memories of the people in their neighbourhood; Lubbock, McCaffey, Harrolds, Peers, Hill, Woodward. Blythe discusses the postal system of the time in some detail.
Date Range
1930
Length
0:10:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles and Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles' memories of the people in their neighbourhood; Lubbock, McCaffey, Harrolds, Peers, Hill, Woodward. Blythe discusses the postal system of the time in some detail.
Date Range
1930
Photo Info
Mrs. Dunbar, Dr. Blythe Eagles and Dr. Violet (Dunbar) Eagles, June 1967. Item no. 404-002
Length
0:10:15
Subject
Public Services - Postal Services
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
10-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and his wife Dr Violet Eagles by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury (and Ross S. McLeod) June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the War Years and Burnaby Lake District. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Blythe's paternal grandparents, Charles and Maude Eagles immigrated to New Westminster in 1887. Their son Jack married Amelia Jane Johnston, and Blythe Eagles was born in New Westminster in 1902. In 1918 Blythe enrolled at the University of British Columbia, and took a Physiology class with eight other top students - his future wife, Violet Dunbar was the lone woman in the class. Blythe graduated in 1922, winning the Governor General's Gold Medal as top student. He received his MA in 1924 and his PhD in 1926 from the University of Toronto. He then completed his post-doctoral study at the National Institute for Medical Research in London, England. In 1933 Dr. Eagles became head of the Department of Dairying (1936-1955), Chairman of the Division of Animal Science (1955-1967), and Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture (in 1949 until his retirement in 1967). In 1968 he received an Honourary Doctor of Science Award from UBC Blythe was also one of the first appointments to the Burnaby Town Planning Commission. Violet Evelyn Dunbar was born September 29, 1899 in Ontario, the eldest child of John and Mary (Tompson) Dunbar. Violet attained her BA in 1921 and MA in 1922 from the University of British Columbia. In 1922 she attended the Provincial Normal School and within six months had a teaching certificate and taught at Lord Hudson School in 1923. In September 1923 she was awarded a two-year scholarship to the University of Toronto, where she joined Blythe in the Bio-Chemistry Department. She received a second MA and a PhD in 1929. Her graduate studies entailed research in pure proteins and enzymes related to the commercial production of cheese. Through this work she was recognized as one of the leading enzyme chemists in the country, being a senior lab instructor of biochemistry. Violet was one of the founders of the Burnaby Council of Women and active member of the International Council of Women. Blythe and Violet Eagles purchased property at Deer Lake in 1929 and began construction of their home shortly before their marriage on June 25, 1930. The Drs. Blythe and Violet Eagles Estate is a unique expression of the talents and tastes of both the Eagles and Frank Ebenezer Buck (1875-1970) who was head of the Horticultural Department and the Campus Landscape Architect at U.B.C. and established the plan for the Eagles garden while Blythe selected many of the plantings. The Eagles themselves designed the house as a romantic cottage inspired by the British Arts and Crafts style. Violet was an enthusiastic amateur gardener, maintaining and continually developing the garden. The Eagles were active volunteers in the local community as well as at UBC. When Simon Fraser University opened in Burnaby, they became well-known for entertaining dignitaries and special guests of the university in their lavish garden. After Violet's death in 1993, the estate was sold to the City of Burnaby. The funds were used to establish a Chair in Agriculture at the University of British Columbia in their memory.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:24:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Eagles, Dr. Blythe
Eagles, Dr. Violet
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-08_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles

Images
Less detail

Interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles 10-Jun-75 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory45
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles and Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles' memories of people working together as a community.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:03:48
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Dr Blythe Alfred Eagles and Dr Violet Evelyn (Dunbar) Eagles' memories of people working together as a community.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Mrs. Dunbar, Dr. Blythe Eagles and Dr. Violet (Dunbar) Eagles, June 1967. Item no. 404-002
Length
0:03:48
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Deer Lake
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
10-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and his wife Dr Violet Eagles by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury (and Ross S. McLeod) June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the War Years and Burnaby Lake District. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Blythe's paternal grandparents, Charles and Maude Eagles immigrated to New Westminster in 1887. Their son Jack married Amelia Jane Johnston, and Blythe Eagles was born in New Westminster in 1902. In 1918 Blythe enrolled at the University of British Columbia, and took a Physiology class with eight other top students - his future wife, Violet Dunbar was the lone woman in the class. Blythe graduated in 1922, winning the Governor General's Gold Medal as top student. He received his MA in 1924 and his PhD in 1926 from the University of Toronto. He then completed his post-doctoral study at the National Institute for Medical Research in London, England. In 1933 Dr. Eagles became head of the Department of Dairying (1936-1955), Chairman of the Division of Animal Science (1955-1967), and Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture (in 1949 until his retirement in 1967). In 1968 he received an Honourary Doctor of Science Award from UBC Blythe was also one of the first appointments to the Burnaby Town Planning Commission. Violet Evelyn Dunbar was born September 29, 1899 in Ontario, the eldest child of John and Mary (Tompson) Dunbar. Violet attained her BA in 1921 and MA in 1922 from the University of British Columbia. In 1922 she attended the Provincial Normal School and within six months had a teaching certificate and taught at Lord Hudson School in 1923. In September 1923 she was awarded a two-year scholarship to the University of Toronto, where she joined Blythe in the Bio-Chemistry Department. She received a second MA and a PhD in 1929. Her graduate studies entailed research in pure proteins and enzymes related to the commercial production of cheese. Through this work she was recognized as one of the leading enzyme chemists in the country, being a senior lab instructor of biochemistry. Violet was one of the founders of the Burnaby Council of Women and active member of the International Council of Women. Blythe and Violet Eagles purchased property at Deer Lake in 1929 and began construction of their home shortly before their marriage on June 25, 1930. The Drs. Blythe and Violet Eagles Estate is a unique expression of the talents and tastes of both the Eagles and Frank Ebenezer Buck (1875-1970) who was head of the Horticultural Department and the Campus Landscape Architect at U.B.C. and established the plan for the Eagles garden while Blythe selected many of the plantings. The Eagles themselves designed the house as a romantic cottage inspired by the British Arts and Crafts style. Violet was an enthusiastic amateur gardener, maintaining and continually developing the garden. The Eagles were active volunteers in the local community as well as at UBC. When Simon Fraser University opened in Burnaby, they became well-known for entertaining dignitaries and special guests of the university in their lavish garden. After Violet's death in 1993, the estate was sold to the City of Burnaby. The funds were used to establish a Chair in Agriculture at the University of British Columbia in their memory.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:24:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Eagles, Dr. Blythe
Eagles, Dr. Violet
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-08_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Dr Blythe Eagles and Dr Violet Eagles

Images
Less detail

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