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Interview with John Burton by Colin Stevens 1988 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory216
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of working for Cowan's Music Store as a teenager. He tells the story of a raid at the hotel bar next door.
Date Range
1928-1929
Length
0:10:16
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of working for Cowan's Music Store as a teenager. He tells the story of a raid at the hotel bar next door.
Date Range
1928-1929
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:10:16
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Stores
Buildings - Commercial - Hotels and Motels
Geographic Access
British Columbia - New Westminster
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
1988
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton conducted by Colin Stevens inside the Music Shop at Burnaby Village Museum, 1988. John Burton discusses his experiences working in music shops in New Westminster in the 1920s. Major themes discussed are: sales, displays, popular culture.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:30:14
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Interview Location
Burnaby Village Museum, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-3_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with John Burton by Colin Stevens

Images
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Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory217
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of the printing industry, both in Burnaby and in Orangeville, Ontario.
Date Range
1912-1931
Length
0:09:52
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of the printing industry, both in Burnaby and in Orangeville, Ontario.
Date Range
1912-1931
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:52
Subject
Printing Tools and Equipment
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
Less detail

Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory218
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of the printing industry. He discusses the manufacturing of printing products; of being assembled in Canada verses being made in Canada.
Date Range
1912-1932
Length
0:09:11
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of the printing industry. He discusses the manufacturing of printing products; of being assembled in Canada verses being made in Canada.
Date Range
1912-1932
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:11
Subject
Printing Tools and Equipment
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
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Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory219
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of a court case between the Sun and the Province newspapers.
Date Range
1920-1949
Length
0:09:21
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of a court case between the Sun and the Province newspapers.
Date Range
1920-1949
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:21
Subject
Documentary Artifacts - Newspapers
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
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Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory220
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of the radio phenomena and its impact on the newspaper business.
Date Range
1920-1939
Length
0:09:00
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of the radio phenomena and its impact on the newspaper business.
Date Range
1920-1939
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:00
Subject
Sound Communication Tools and Equipment
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
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Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory221
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of the Linotype machine, as well as the history of his grandfather, John Foley, founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper.
Date Range
1860-1932
Length
0:08:48
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of the Linotype machine, as well as the history of his grandfather, John Foley, founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper.
Date Range
1860-1932
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:08:48
Name
Foley, John
Subject
Printing Tools and Equipment
Documentary Artifacts - Newspapers
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
Less detail

Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory222
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's explanation of the connection between printers and unions throughout history. He also tells the story of the cylinder press being smashed by handpress workmen to protect their jobs at the London Times as well as his own experiences learning on…
Date Range
1485-1814
Length
0:09:45
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's explanation of the connection between printers and unions throughout history. He also tells the story of the cylinder press being smashed by handpress workmen to protect their jobs at the London Times as well as his own experiences learning on the Linotype.
Date Range
1485-1814
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:45
Subject
Printing Tools and Equipment
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
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Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory223
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of the unemployed riot in Vancouver.
Date Range
[1930 or 1932]
Length
0:02:53
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of the unemployed riot in Vancouver.
Date Range
[1930 or 1932]
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:02:53
Subject
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Vancouver
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
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Interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory224
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of first coming to Burnaby. He discusses his school years, his father's work and his own employment, including the two years he worked for his uncle at the Orangeville Sun in Ontario.
Date Range
1912-1933
Length
0:09:07
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of first coming to Burnaby. He discusses his school years, his father's work and his own employment, including the two years he worked for his uncle at the Orangeville Sun in Ontario.
Date Range
1912-1933
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:07
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 12th Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Edmonds Area
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton conducted by Jim Wolf on March 4, 1987 in New Westminster. Major themes include New Westminster businesses and his grandfather's newspaper.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:45:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-5_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf

Images
Less detail

Interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory225
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's employment at the sawmill. He discusses New Westminster and Burnaby during the 1930s, including the experience of living in Burnaby while under receivership.
Date Range
1933-1939
Length
0:09:35
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's employment at the sawmill. He discusses New Westminster and Burnaby during the 1930s, including the experience of living in Burnaby while under receivership.
Date Range
1933-1939
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:35
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton conducted by Jim Wolf on March 4, 1987 in New Westminster. Major themes include New Westminster businesses and his grandfather's newspaper.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:45:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-5_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf

Images
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Interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory226
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of the church events that took place during the depression (community effort). He discusses how the people of East Burnaby survived the depression and also discusses the water problem that occurred in New Westminster in 1921.
Date Range
1921-1939
Length
0:08:39
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of the church events that took place during the depression (community effort). He discusses how the people of East Burnaby survived the depression and also discusses the water problem that occurred in New Westminster in 1921.
Date Range
1921-1939
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:08:39
Subject
Buildings - Religious - Churches
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton conducted by Jim Wolf on March 4, 1987 in New Westminster. Major themes include New Westminster businesses and his grandfather's newspaper.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:45:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-5_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf

Images
Less detail

Interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory227
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of New Westminster in the 1930s, including various businesses and their locations.
Date Range
1933-1939
Length
0:08:40
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of New Westminster in the 1930s, including various businesses and their locations.
Date Range
1933-1939
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:08:40
Subject
Business
Geographic Access
British Columbia - New Westminster
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton conducted by Jim Wolf on March 4, 1987 in New Westminster. Major themes include New Westminster businesses and his grandfather's newspaper.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:45:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-5_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf

Images
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Interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory228
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's amusing story of a Gifford's Jewelry store robbery and of bootlegging in Burnaby.
Date Range
1935
Length
0:09:26
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's amusing story of a Gifford's Jewelry store robbery and of bootlegging in Burnaby.
Date Range
1935
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:26
Subject
Public Services - Policing
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton conducted by Jim Wolf on March 4, 1987 in New Westminster. Major themes include New Westminster businesses and his grandfather's newspaper.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:45:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-5_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf

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Interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine September 19, 1978 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory229
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of her former neighbour, Burnaby pioneer, Tom Irvine.
Date Range
1913-1958
Length
0:09:40
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of her former neighbour, Burnaby pioneer, Tom Irvine.
Date Range
1913-1958
Photo Info
Tom Irvine sitting with a young girl, 1919. Item no. HV975.33.3o
Length
0:09:40
Name
Irvine, Tom
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Laurel Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
September 19, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Jean Scott conducted by Colin Stevens on September 19, 1978. Major themes include: Tom Irvine and Laurel Street.
Biographical Notes
Jean Scott came from Scotland to Burnaby with her family in 1913 when she was five years old. The Scott family settled on Laurel Street, at the northwest end of Burnaby Lake.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:28:08
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Scott, Jean
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-005-2-1_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine September 19, 1978 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory230
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of Tom Irvine's house, next door to the Scott family's home on Laurel Street.
Date Range
1913-1958
Length
0:08:56
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of Tom Irvine's house, next door to the Scott family's home on Laurel Street.
Date Range
1913-1958
Photo Info
Tom Irvine sitting with a young girl, 1919. Item no. HV975.33.3o
Length
0:08:56
Name
Irvine, Tom
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Laurel Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
September 19, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Jean Scott conducted by Colin Stevens on September 19, 1978. Major themes include: Tom Irvine and Laurel Street.
Biographical Notes
Jean Scott came from Scotland to Burnaby with her family in 1913 when she was five years old. The Scott family settled on Laurel Street, at the northwest end of Burnaby Lake.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:28:08
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Scott, Jean
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-005-2-1_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine September 19, 1978 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory231
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of Tom Irvine as well as the layout of his house, next door to the Scott family's home on Laurel Street.
Date Range
1913-1958
Length
0:09:31
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of Tom Irvine as well as the layout of his house, next door to the Scott family's home on Laurel Street.
Date Range
1913-1958
Photo Info
Tom Irvine sitting with a young girl, 1919. Item no. HV975.33.3o
Length
0:09:31
Name
Irvine, Tom
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Laurel Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
September 19, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Jean Scott conducted by Colin Stevens on September 19, 1978. Major themes include: Tom Irvine and Laurel Street.
Biographical Notes
Jean Scott came from Scotland to Burnaby with her family in 1913 when she was five years old. The Scott family settled on Laurel Street, at the northwest end of Burnaby Lake.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:28:08
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Scott, Jean
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-005-2-1_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jean Scott September 19, 1978 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory232
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of her neighbourhood.
Date Range
1913-1958
Length
0:04:24
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of her neighbourhood.
Date Range
1913-1958
Photo Info
Tom Irvine sitting with a young girl, 1919. Item no. HV975.33.3o
Length
0:04:24
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Laurel Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
September 19, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Jean Scott conducted by Colin Stevens on September 19, 1978. Major themes include: Burnaby Lake and Laurel Street.
Biographical Notes
Jean Scott came from Scotland to Burnaby with her family in 1913 when she was five years old. The Scott family settled on Laurel Street, at the northwest end of Burnaby Lake.
Total Tracks
2
Total Length
0:09:38
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Scott, Jean
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-005-2-2_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jean Scott

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jean Scott September 19, 1978 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory233
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of the houses in her neighbourhood. She also mentions participating in skating parties on Burnaby Lake.
Date Range
1913-1958
Length
0:05:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of the houses in her neighbourhood. She also mentions participating in skating parties on Burnaby Lake.
Date Range
1913-1958
Photo Info
Tom Irvine sitting with a young girl, 1919. Item no. HV975.33.3o
Length
0:05:15
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
September 19, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Jean Scott conducted by Colin Stevens on September 19, 1978. Major themes include: Burnaby Lake and Laurel Street.
Biographical Notes
Jean Scott came from Scotland to Burnaby with her family in 1913 when she was five years old. The Scott family settled on Laurel Street, at the northwest end of Burnaby Lake.
Total Tracks
2
Total Length
0:09:38
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Scott, Jean
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-005-2-2_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Jean Scott

Images
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Speech given by Jack Davy November 8, 1972 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory234
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to opening remarks given by Dr. Blythe Eagles for Jack Davy's speech. Jack begins his talk by telling anecdotes of early Burnaby school trustees and of early Burnaby teachers.
Date Range
1893-1957
Length
0:09:39
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to opening remarks given by Dr. Blythe Eagles for Jack Davy's speech. Jack begins his talk by telling anecdotes of early Burnaby school trustees and of early Burnaby teachers.
Date Range
1893-1957
Length
0:09:39
Name
Edmonds Street School
Subject
Education
Interview Date
November 8, 1972
Scope and Content
Recording is of a speech given by John "Jack" Davy on November 8, 1972 to the Burnaby Historical Society on the subject of Edmonds School. Jack Davy is introduced by Dr. Blythe Eagles.
Biographical Notes
John “Jack” Davy was raised in New Westminster and his family and the Eagles' family were close friends, with the grandparents and parents getting together regularly to play cards. As a child, Jack delivered the Columbian newspaper. Jack Davy worked for Burnaby schools for over fifty years; twenty-five of those years as principal at Edmonds Street School. During the depression, he worked as a principal of Kitchener Street School.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:29:41
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Davy, Jack
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-1_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of speech given by Jack Davy

Less detail

Speech given by Jack Davy November 8, 1972 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory235
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Jack Davy's description of the first Edmonds Street School principal, school activities of the time to the demolition of what he describes as the old grey building.
Date Range
1908-1957
Length
0:09:44
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Jack Davy's description of the first Edmonds Street School principal, school activities of the time to the demolition of what he describes as the old grey building.
Date Range
1908-1957
Length
0:09:44
Name
Edmonds Street School
Subject
Education
Interview Date
November 8, 1972
Scope and Content
Recording is of a speech given by John "Jack" Davy on November 8, 1972 to the Burnaby Historical Society on the subject of Edmonds School. Jack Davy is introduced by Dr. Blythe Eagles.
Biographical Notes
John “Jack” Davy was raised in New Westminster and his family and the Eagles' family were close friends, with the grandparents and parents getting together regularly to play cards. As a child, Jack delivered the Columbian newspaper. Jack Davy worked for Burnaby schools for over fifty years; twenty-five of those years as principal at Edmonds Street School. During the depression, he worked as a principal of Kitchener Street School.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:29:41
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Davy, Jack
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-1_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of speech given by Jack Davy

Less detail

Speech given by Jack Davy November 8, 1972 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory236
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Jack Davy's description of teachers of Edmonds School, including stories from the Second Street annex. He finishes his speech.
Date Range
1920-1966
Length
0:10:18
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Jack Davy's description of teachers of Edmonds School, including stories from the Second Street annex. He finishes his speech.
Date Range
1920-1966
Length
0:10:18
Name
Edmonds Street School
Subject
Occupations - Teachers
Interview Date
November 8, 1972
Scope and Content
Recording is of a speech given by John "Jack" Davy on November 8, 1972 to the Burnaby Historical Society on the subject of Edmonds School. Jack Davy is introduced by Dr. Blythe Eagles.
Biographical Notes
John “Jack” Davy was raised in New Westminster and his family and the Eagles' family were close friends, with the grandparents and parents getting together regularly to play cards. As a child, Jack delivered the Columbian newspaper. Jack Davy worked for Burnaby schools for over fifty years; twenty-five of those years as principal at Edmonds Street School. During the depression, he worked as a principal of Kitchener Street School.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:29:41
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Davy, Jack
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-1_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of recording of speech given by Jack Davy

Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory237
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Doreen "Pixie" McGeachie's introduction of the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself, telling the story of Archdeacon Richard Small. She begins by reading the book's forward, as well as the beginnings of the first chapter.
Date Range
1849-1872
Length
0:09:04
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Doreen "Pixie" McGeachie's introduction of the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself, telling the story of Archdeacon Richard Small. She begins by reading the book's forward, as well as the beginnings of the first chapter.
Date Range
1849-1872
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:04
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory238
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the earlier the impact of the gold rush on British Columbia and the formation of Lytton, BC.
Date Range
1803-1884
Length
0:09:29
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the earlier the impact of the gold rush on British Columbia and the formation of Lytton, BC.
Date Range
1803-1884
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:29
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory239
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes early missionary experiences in Lytton, including descriptions from the diary of Bishop Hill.
Date Range
1859-1867
Length
0:09:26
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes early missionary experiences in Lytton, including descriptions from the diary of Bishop Hill.
Date Range
1859-1867
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:26
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory240
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary at Lytton, British Columbia.
Date Range
1867-1868
Length
0:09:11
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary at Lytton, British Columbia.
Date Range
1867-1868
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:11
Name
Good, Reverend John Booth
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory241
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary in and around Lytton, British Columbia, including…
Date Range
1868-1872
Length
0:09:07
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes Reverend John Booth Good's first years serving as a missionary in and around Lytton, British Columbia, including the unhappy event of the death of his daughter.
Date Range
1868-1872
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:09:07
Name
Good, Reverend John Booth
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Book reading given by Pixie McGeachie January 10, 1973 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory242
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the mission at Lytton, British Columbia. An unidentified man speaks at the completion of the reading, giving som…
Date Range
1872-1874
Length
0:08:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Pixie McGeachie's continued reading of "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams and herself. This section of the reading describes the mission at Lytton, British Columbia. An unidentified man speaks at the completion of the reading, giving some details on various individuals discussed during the reading.
Date Range
1872-1874
Photo Info
Pixie McGeachie (left) and Florence Godwin, 1992. Item no. 330-003
Length
0:08:15
Subject
Buildings - Religious
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Lytton
Interview Date
January 10, 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie on January 10, 1973 to the Burnaby Historical Society from the book "Archdeacon on Horseback" by Canon Cyril E.H. Williams (then archivist in the Vancouver School of Theology, University of British Columbia) and Pixie McGeachie.
Biographical Notes
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:54:31
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, Pixie
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-2_ Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of recording of a book reading given by Pixie McGeachie

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory243
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of the work that he and his brother did on the roadways; Canada Way, Kingsway. He discusses helping out at the Hatt-Cook residence as a boy as well as the tram system of the time. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husb…
Date Range
1892-1911
Length
0:09:58
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of the work that he and his brother did on the roadways; Canada Way, Kingsway. He discusses helping out at the Hatt-Cook residence as a boy as well as the tram system of the time. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husband with these descriptions.
Date Range
1892-1911
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:09:58
Subject
Construction - Road Construction
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory244
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of riding the tram as a young man and briefly, of working for Ed Brown. Murdock mentions Reeve Byrne and the development of first water system in Burnaby. He also discusses Gilley Brother's Logging Company practices near his fath…
Date Range
1906-1975
Length
0:09:00
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of riding the tram as a young man and briefly, of working for Ed Brown. Murdock mentions Reeve Byrne and the development of first water system in Burnaby. He also discusses Gilley Brother's Logging Company practices near his father's ranch of six acres, which grew mostly strawberries to sell in Vancouver.
Date Range
1906-1975
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:09:00
Subject
Agriculture - Fruit and Berries
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Windsor Street
Burnaby - Imperial Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Kingsway-Beresford Area
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory245
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's opinion of shopping at a store in the present day. He mentions George Green's book "History of Burnaby", the Royal Oak Hotel and the development of Alta Vista. As well, Murdock mentions his father Robert William McMurray. Lillian (Wray) M…
Date Range
1904-1975
Length
0:09:45
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's opinion of shopping at a store in the present day. He mentions George Green's book "History of Burnaby", the Royal Oak Hotel and the development of Alta Vista. As well, Murdock mentions his father Robert William McMurray. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husband with these descriptions.
Date Range
1904-1975
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:09:45
Name
McMurray, R.W.
Royal Oak Hotel
Subject
Buildings - Commercial
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory246
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock and Lillian McMurray's trip back to Murdock's mother's hometown in in Northern Scotland. The discussion starts up again on the topic of Lillian (Wray) McMurray's father, Edward Wray's business, the Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office, then again with…
Date Range
1916-1975
Length
0:09:05
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock and Lillian McMurray's trip back to Murdock's mother's hometown in in Northern Scotland. The discussion starts up again on the topic of Lillian (Wray) McMurray's father, Edward Wray's business, the Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office, then again with a description of the cordwood business Murdock had with Emerson Doran.
Date Range
1916-1975
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:09:05
Name
Wray, Edward
Subject
Buildings - Commercial
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory247
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of his first team of horses. Lillian (Wray) McMurray and her husband discuss their son Bob McMurray's volunteerism and professional activities.
Date Range
1904-1975
Length
0:09:26
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of his first team of horses. Lillian (Wray) McMurray and her husband discuss their son Bob McMurray's volunteerism and professional activities.
Date Range
1904-1975
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:09:26
Name
McMurray, Bob
Subject
Transportation - Sleighs
Animals - Horses
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory248
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's impressions of municipal politics. The McMurrays discuss the municipal hall. Murdock also mentions Constable Hatt-Cook. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husband with these descriptions.
Date Range
1919-1975
Length
0:08:24
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's impressions of municipal politics. The McMurrays discuss the municipal hall. Murdock also mentions Constable Hatt-Cook. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husband with these descriptions.
Date Range
1919-1975
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:08:24
Name
Hatt-Cook, H.
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory249
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock and Lillian McMurray's opinions on Burnaby in 1975. As well, they discuss Lillian's expertise in flower gardening.
Date Range
1975
Length
0:03:18
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock and Lillian McMurray's opinions on Burnaby in 1975. As well, they discuss Lillian's expertise in flower gardening.
Date Range
1975
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:03:18
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill November 7, 1977 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory250
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of how his father cleared land to build a house, including the equipment that was used.
Date Range
1892-1905
Length
0:04:58
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of how his father cleared land to build a house, including the equipment that was used.
Date Range
1892-1905
Photo Info
Claude Hill, the son of Bernard and Marian Hill, [1888]. Item no. 477-933
Length
0:04:58
Name
Hill, Bernard R
Subject
Land Clearing
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Burnaby - Canada Way
Burnaby - 4990 Canada Way
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
November 7, 1977
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A. Claude Hill and his wife Marion Hill, conducted by Colin Stevens, November 7, 1977. Major themes discussed are: Christmas traditions and his Deer Lake neighbourhood.
Biographical Notes
Claude Hill was born in England about 1885, the eldest son of Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard R. Hill. His younger sibling were Frank, Winnie and Minard Gerald “Gerry.” Claude Hill was named after Bernard’s older brother, Louis Claude Hill. Claude's father, Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Uncle Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. His oldest child, Claude was seven years old at the time and his first years of school in Burnaby were at Douglas Road. Later, Claude rode a horse and buggy with his younger brother to travel to school in New Westminster. A.Claude Hill married Marion "Mamie" in his early twenties.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Claude
Hill, Marion, Mrs A Claude Hill
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-019-1_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill

Images
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Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory251
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's essay entitled Stump Rangers, a listing of early settlers that includes addresses and short descriptions, essays on Confederation Park, land clearing and on Burnaby's first Council meeting.
Date Range
1865-1919
Length
0:10:18
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's essay entitled Stump Rangers, a listing of early settlers that includes addresses and short descriptions, essays on Confederation Park, land clearing and on Burnaby's first Council meeting.
Date Range
1865-1919
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:10:18
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Officials - Aldermen and Councillors
Land Clearing
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_1
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory252
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's memories of constructing a mill for Simpson & Giberson and of working on homes for himself, Angus McLean and Percy Little in the Lochdale area. He discusses the strike at Barnet mill and reads an essay written by Grace E. Carpenter. Land clear…
Date Range
1919-1955
Length
0:06:06
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's memories of constructing a mill for Simpson & Giberson and of working on homes for himself, Angus McLean and Percy Little in the Lochdale area. He discusses the strike at Barnet mill and reads an essay written by Grace E. Carpenter. Land clearing is described in detail. Alfred also relates a story from 1920 involving early settlers E. Powell and J. Amos.
Date Range
1919-1955
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:06:06
Subject
Land Clearing
Buildings - Industrial - Mills
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_2
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory253
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's descriptions of road construction in Burnaby, including the names of the settlers and logging companies involved in their construction. Alfred discusses the changes that took place during World War I, along with municipal Relief work that he t…
Date Range
1903-1940
Length
0:09:46
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's descriptions of road construction in Burnaby, including the names of the settlers and logging companies involved in their construction. Alfred discusses the changes that took place during World War I, along with municipal Relief work that he took part in at Burnaby Mountain. Alfred also discusses early schools and mentions his wife, Ada Bingham.
Date Range
1903-1940
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:46
Subject
Construction - Road Construction
Land Clearing
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_3
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory254
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's reading of an essay written by Captain Thomas S. Guns describing the Lozells district, as well as quoting single sentences of various other writers on the topic of Deer Lake and the Burnaby Lake District. Alfred mentions the first schools of B…
Date Range
1892-1955
Length
0:07:38
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's reading of an essay written by Captain Thomas S. Guns describing the Lozells district, as well as quoting single sentences of various other writers on the topic of Deer Lake and the Burnaby Lake District. Alfred mentions the first schools of Burnaby Lake and the "pleasure walk" along Douglas Road, from Vancouver to New Westminster.
Date Range
1892-1955
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:38
Historic Neighbourhood
Lozells (Historic Neighbourhood)
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_4
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory255
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's personal memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1919 and the work that the early settlers did for Burnaby, including a mention of woman's backbreaking labour. Alfred describes Burnaby as being organized around the two villages of Edmonds and V…
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:09:44
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's personal memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1919 and the work that the early settlers did for Burnaby, including a mention of woman's backbreaking labour. Alfred describes Burnaby as being organized around the two villages of Edmonds and Vancouver Heights. He discusses the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement of British Columbia.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:44
Subject
Protests and Demonstrations
Organizations
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_5
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory256
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's description of Commissioner Fraser taking power in Burnaby. Alfred mentions the Burnaby Housing Committee and the Willingdon Heights Subdivision before beginning reading his series of short stories. He reads "I ARRIVE IN BURNABY AND WE BUILD A…
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:09:06
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's description of Commissioner Fraser taking power in Burnaby. Alfred mentions the Burnaby Housing Committee and the Willingdon Heights Subdivision before beginning reading his series of short stories. He reads "I ARRIVE IN BURNABY AND WE BUILD A SHINGLE MILL/ 1919/ Burnaby Lake" as well as "WE BUILD A HOME AND DIG A WELL. 1920", both written in 1963.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:06
Subject
Organizations
Buildings - Industrial - Mills
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_6
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory257
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads "WHAT THE LOCHDALE DISTRICT LOOKED LIKE IN 1919-20-21-22" and "1st and SECOND SETTLERS IN THE LOCHDALE DISTRICT" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:09:44
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads "WHAT THE LOCHDALE DISTRICT LOOKED LIKE IN 1919-20-21-22" and "1st and SECOND SETTLERS IN THE LOCHDALE DISTRICT" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:44
Subject
Land Clearing
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_7
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory258
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "THE RUM RUNNERS AND BOOTLEG WHISKY IN BURNABY" and "BURNABY. NORTH. SOUTH. EAST? AND WEST 1892---1943" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1892-1963
Length
0:07:05
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "THE RUM RUNNERS AND BOOTLEG WHISKY IN BURNABY" and "BURNABY. NORTH. SOUTH. EAST? AND WEST 1892---1943" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1892-1963
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:05
Name
Hawthorn, Mary
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_8
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory259
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "The ICE AGE and other observations before Burnaby", "The Coming of the Great Trees in Burnaby", "AND THEN MODERN CIVILIZATION STRUCK BURNABY" each written in March of 1962.
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:07:31
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "The ICE AGE and other observations before Burnaby", "The Coming of the Great Trees in Burnaby", "AND THEN MODERN CIVILIZATION STRUCK BURNABY" each written in March of 1962.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:31
Subject
Plants - Trees
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_9
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track nine of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 10

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory260
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "OUR HOUSE BURNS DOWN. 1922. Sherlock and Kitchener." that he wrote in 1963. Alfred reads "The Story of the Burnaby Giants of long ago" written by Eloise Street, published in the I…
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:06:51
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "OUR HOUSE BURNS DOWN. 1922. Sherlock and Kitchener." that he wrote in 1963. Alfred reads "The Story of the Burnaby Giants of long ago" written by Eloise Street, published in the Indian Time Magazine March, 1954.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:06:51
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_10
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track ten of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 11

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory261
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's reading of the letter he wrote to the secretary of The Royal Arsenal Co-Operative Society in London England, November 1937, describing the Co-operative Movement in Vancouver.
Date Range
1937
Length
0:11:39
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's reading of the letter he wrote to the secretary of The Royal Arsenal Co-Operative Society in London England, November 1937, describing the Co-operative Movement in Vancouver.
Date Range
1937
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:11:39
Subject
Organizations
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_11
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eleven of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 12

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory262
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's summary of the recording that he has created, his closing remarks.
Date Range
1971
Length
0:02:37
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's summary of the recording that he has created, his closing remarks.
Date Range
1971
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:02:37
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_12
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track twelve of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Maude Holmstrom interview April 1989 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory263
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes (Lucy) Maude (Goodridge) Holmstrom's memories of first coming to Burnaby with her family, especially her mother and father, and the establishment of the Goodridge's grocery store.
Date Range
1909-1914
Length
0:07:09
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes (Lucy) Maude (Goodridge) Holmstrom's memories of first coming to Burnaby with her family, especially her mother and father, and the establishment of the Goodridge's grocery store.
Date Range
1909-1914
Photo Info
Maude Goodridge Holmstrom (middle row, 4th from right) with her Howard Avenue class, photographed by J.W. Phillips, 1913. Item no. 487-004
Length
0:07:09
Name
Goodridge, John Charles Bertram
Goodridge, Lucy Elston
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Johnson, Lou
Interview Date
April 1989
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with (Lucy) Maude (Goodridge) Holmstrom, conducted by her grandniece, Lou Johnson, April 1989. Major themes discussed are: Capitol Hill, early pioneers in Burnaby, Howard Avenue School.
Biographical Notes
Lucy Maude "Maude" Goodrige was born on Aprril 13, 1902 at Stanley Place, London, England. She was the eldest child of John Charles Bertram and Lucy (Elston) Goodridge, with four siblings; Alice Victoria, Gwendoline Elston "Gwen", Beatrice Alexandra, and George Edward Goodridge. John and Lucy Goodridge moved their family from Victoria Drive to Burnaby into a one room house on Capitol Hill, built over one year by John himself. At first, the family had to walk to Rosser to get drinking water, wheeling wheelbarrows full of water back home. Later on, John would discover a Grotto of fresh water on their property. When surveyors started showing land, travelling on horseback from Boundary Road to Capitol Hill, Lucy (Elston) Goodridge would offer lemonade and oranges to the thirsty settlers. This gave her the idea to start the first grocery store in the area, at Alpha and Hastings. Kelly Douglas helped the Goodridges stock the store with larger food orders. For smaller quantities, they used Swift and Company downtown. Maude first went to Howard Avenue School with her younger siblings then to the four room school Gilmore Avenue when it opened. Before John Goodridge went off to war in 1914, he handled grocery delivery and restocking using a team of horses. No one else in the family could handle the team, so while he was overseas, Maude would travel down to Swift and Company by streetcar and be forced to wait for a ride home from someone passing by as the stock was too heavy to carry on foot. Later, Maude remembers a Ford dealer coming to teach her how to drive, in effort to get her mother to buy a Ford. It worked. Maude lived at Capitol Hill until 1920. At the time of the depression, she was in California with her first husband, John Joseph Lemire whom she married October 14, 1922 in Vancouver. Gwendoline Elston "Gwen" Goodridge married William Lister of Point Grey, June 27, 1928. Alice Victoria Goodridge married David Augustus Norman September 24, 1929. Lucy Maude "Maude" (Goodridge) later married George William Holmstrom. George William Holmstrom died in 1957. His wife, Lucy Maude "Maude" (Goodridge) Holmstrom died in 1994.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:23:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Holmstrom, Lucy Maude "Maude" Goodridge Lemire
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-007_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of interview with Maude Holmstrom

Images
Less detail

Maude Holmstrom interview April 1989 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory264
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes (Lucy) Maude (Goodridge) Holmstrom's memories of Howard Avenue School and of learning to drive at a very young age.
Date Range
1910-1914
Length
0:09:45
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes (Lucy) Maude (Goodridge) Holmstrom's memories of Howard Avenue School and of learning to drive at a very young age.
Date Range
1910-1914
Photo Info
Maude Goodridge Holmstrom (middle row, 4th from right) with her Howard Avenue class, photographed by J.W. Phillips, 1913. Item no. 487-004
Length
0:09:45
Name
Howard Avenue School
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Johnson, Lou
Interview Date
April 1989
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with (Lucy) Maude (Goodridge) Holmstrom, conducted by her grandniece, Lou Johnson, April 1989. Major themes discussed are: Capitol Hill, early pioneers in Burnaby, Howard Avenue School.
Biographical Notes
Lucy Maude "Maude" Goodrige was born on Aprril 13, 1902 at Stanley Place, London, England. She was the eldest child of John Charles Bertram and Lucy (Elston) Goodridge, with four siblings; Alice Victoria, Gwendoline Elston "Gwen", Beatrice Alexandra, and George Edward Goodridge. John and Lucy Goodridge moved their family from Victoria Drive to Burnaby into a one room house on Capitol Hill, built over one year by John himself. At first, the family had to walk to Rosser to get drinking water, wheeling wheelbarrows full of water back home. Later on, John would discover a Grotto of fresh water on their property. When surveyors started showing land, travelling on horseback from Boundary Road to Capitol Hill, Lucy (Elston) Goodridge would offer lemonade and oranges to the thirsty settlers. This gave her the idea to start the first grocery store in the area, at Alpha and Hastings. Kelly Douglas helped the Goodridges stock the store with larger food orders. For smaller quantities, they used Swift and Company downtown. Maude first went to Howard Avenue School with her younger siblings then to the four room school Gilmore Avenue when it opened. Before John Goodridge went off to war in 1914, he handled grocery delivery and restocking using a team of horses. No one else in the family could handle the team, so while he was overseas, Maude would travel down to Swift and Company by streetcar and be forced to wait for a ride home from someone passing by as the stock was too heavy to carry on foot. Later, Maude remembers a Ford dealer coming to teach her how to drive, in effort to get her mother to buy a Ford. It worked. Maude lived at Capitol Hill until 1920. At the time of the depression, she was in California with her first husband, John Joseph Lemire whom she married October 14, 1922 in Vancouver. Gwendoline Elston "Gwen" Goodridge married William Lister of Point Grey, June 27, 1928. Alice Victoria Goodridge married David Augustus Norman September 24, 1929. Lucy Maude "Maude" (Goodridge) later married George William Holmstrom. George William Holmstrom died in 1957. His wife, Lucy Maude "Maude" (Goodridge) Holmstrom died in 1994.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:23:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Holmstrom, Lucy Maude "Maude" Goodridge Lemire
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-007_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of interview with Maude Holmstrom

Images
Less detail

Maude Holmstrom interview April 1989 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory265
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes (Lucy) Maude (Goodridge) Holmstrom's memories of her family life during the early days of Burnaby.
Date Range
1909-1929
Length
0:06:51
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes (Lucy) Maude (Goodridge) Holmstrom's memories of her family life during the early days of Burnaby.
Date Range
1909-1929
Photo Info
Maude Goodridge Holmstrom (middle row, 4th from right) with her Howard Avenue class, photographed by J.W. Phillips, 1913. Item no. 487-004
Length
0:06:51
Name
Goodridge, John Charles Bertram
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Johnson, Lou
Interview Date
April 1989
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with (Lucy) Maude (Goodridge) Holmstrom, conducted by her grandniece, Lou Johnson, April 1989. Major themes discussed are: Capitol Hill, early pioneers in Burnaby, Howard Avenue School.
Biographical Notes
Lucy Maude "Maude" Goodrige was born on Aprril 13, 1902 at Stanley Place, London, England. She was the eldest child of John Charles Bertram and Lucy (Elston) Goodridge, with four siblings; Alice Victoria, Gwendoline Elston "Gwen", Beatrice Alexandra, and George Edward Goodridge. John and Lucy Goodridge moved their family from Victoria Drive to Burnaby into a one room house on Capitol Hill, built over one year by John himself. At first, the family had to walk to Rosser to get drinking water, wheeling wheelbarrows full of water back home. Later on, John would discover a Grotto of fresh water on their property. When surveyors started showing land, travelling on horseback from Boundary Road to Capitol Hill, Lucy (Elston) Goodridge would offer lemonade and oranges to the thirsty settlers. This gave her the idea to start the first grocery store in the area, at Alpha and Hastings. Kelly Douglas helped the Goodridges stock the store with larger food orders. For smaller quantities, they used Swift and Company downtown. Maude first went to Howard Avenue School with her younger siblings then to the four room school Gilmore Avenue when it opened. Before John Goodridge went off to war in 1914, he handled grocery delivery and restocking using a team of horses. No one else in the family could handle the team, so while he was overseas, Maude would travel down to Swift and Company by streetcar and be forced to wait for a ride home from someone passing by as the stock was too heavy to carry on foot. Later, Maude remembers a Ford dealer coming to teach her how to drive, in effort to get her mother to buy a Ford. It worked. Maude lived at Capitol Hill until 1920. At the time of the depression, she was in California with her first husband, John Joseph Lemire whom she married October 14, 1922 in Vancouver. Gwendoline Elston "Gwen" Goodridge married William Lister of Point Grey, June 27, 1928. Alice Victoria Goodridge married David Augustus Norman September 24, 1929. Lucy Maude "Maude" (Goodridge) later married George William Holmstrom. George William Holmstrom died in 1957. His wife, Lucy Maude "Maude" (Goodridge) Holmstrom died in 1994.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:23:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Holmstrom, Lucy Maude "Maude" Goodridge Lemire
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-007_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of recording of interview with Maude Holmstrom

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