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Cecil and Julie Lee family portrait

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto4078
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[between 2000 and 2006]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : colour ; copy scan
Scope and Content
Photograph of Cecil and Julie Lee's extended family posing for studio portait; top row (L-R): Cecil (Chue Kan) Lee, Julie Cho Chan Lee; middle row (L-R): Rodney Lee holding Ethan and Tyler Lee, Darin Lee, Sandra Lee holding baby Aiden Lee; bottom row: Suey Ying Jung (Laura).
Administrative History
Photographs from the collection of Julie Lee, daughter of Suey Ying Jung (Laura) and Chan Puy Yuen (Henry). The couple were married at Fraser Mills in October, 1942. The family owned a farm on Douglas Road near Still Creek in the early 1900s. Their farm was located in front of the Douglas Road inte…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : colour ; copy scan
Scope and Content
Photograph of Cecil and Julie Lee's extended family posing for studio portait; top row (L-R): Cecil (Chue Kan) Lee, Julie Cho Chan Lee; middle row (L-R): Rodney Lee holding Ethan and Tyler Lee, Darin Lee, Sandra Lee holding baby Aiden Lee; bottom row: Suey Ying Jung (Laura).
Administrative History
Photographs from the collection of Julie Lee, daughter of Suey Ying Jung (Laura) and Chan Puy Yuen (Henry). The couple were married at Fraser Mills in October, 1942. The family owned a farm on Douglas Road near Still Creek in the early 1900s. Their farm was located in front of the Douglas Road interurban tram station.
Creator
[unknown]
Subjects
Agriculture - Farms
Names
Lee, Julie
Kan, Chue
Lee, Rodney
Lee, Ethan
Lee, Tyler
Lee, Darin
Lee, Sandra
Lee, Aiden
Jung, Ying
Geographic Access
British Columbia - Vancouver
Accession Code
BV017.24.31
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
[between 2000 and 2006]
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Scan Resolution
300
Scan Date
01-Oct-2017
Scale
96
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

90th birthday celebration

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto5173
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2003
Collection/Fonds
Waplington family fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 10 x 13.7 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of Frances L. Fleming at her 90th Birthday celebration. Frances passed away on July 8, 2004 just one month short of her 91st birthday.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Waplington family fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 10 x 13.7 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of Frances L. Fleming at her 90th Birthday celebration. Frances passed away on July 8, 2004 just one month short of her 91st birthday.
Subjects
Documentary Artifacts - Photographs
Names
Fleming, Frances "Fanny" Waplington
Accession Code
BV016.46.129
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
2003
Media Type
Photograph
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
13-Aug-2018
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph and notes in photograph album
Photograph is part of Photograph album BV016.46.52
Images
Less detail

Bee hives in the Wuzinski family backyard

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto9685
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2004
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Scope and Content
Bee hives in the Wuzinski family backyard at Cliff Avenue and Curtis Avenue.
Administrative History
John and Frances Wuzinski moved from Manitoba to Burnaby in 1944, where they purchased an acre of land on the corner of Hastings Street and Cliff Avenue. They had two daughters: Janice and Mary Louise. They grew berries, fruit and vegetables for home and for sale, and raised bees. People came from …
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Scope and Content
Bee hives in the Wuzinski family backyard at Cliff Avenue and Curtis Avenue.
Administrative History
John and Frances Wuzinski moved from Manitoba to Burnaby in 1944, where they purchased an acre of land on the corner of Hastings Street and Cliff Avenue. They had two daughters: Janice and Mary Louise. They grew berries, fruit and vegetables for home and for sale, and raised bees. People came from miles around to purchase strawberries, blueberries, tomatoes and honey. In 1962 the Wuzinski property was expropriated by the Municipality of Burnaby, and the family purchased another property nearby. They started a new garden, brought the bees, and transplanted several trees to the new property.
Other Title Information
title based on content
Names
Bobic, Janice
Wuzinski, John
Accession Code
BV018.39.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Date
2004
Media Type
Photograph
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
01-04-2015
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of signage outside of New Haven Correctional Centre. Signage reads, "4250 / NEW HAVEN / NEW HAVEN / CORRECTIONAL CENTRE / VISITORS PLEASE REPORT / TO GENERAL OFFICE / IN MAIN BUILDING".
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of signage outside of New Haven Correctional Centre. Signage reads, "4250 / NEW HAVEN / NEW HAVEN / CORRECTIONAL CENTRE / VISITORS PLEASE REPORT / TO GENERAL OFFICE / IN MAIN BUILDING".
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.869
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

Road and entrance to New Haven

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13526
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the entrance gate and road to New Haven Correctional Centre on Marine Drive.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the entrance gate and road to New Haven Correctional Centre on Marine Drive.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.870
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the main building and workshop building inside of New Haven Correctional Centre located on Marine Drive in Burnaby.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the main building and workshop building inside of New Haven Correctional Centre located on Marine Drive in Burnaby.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.871
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

New Haven building and parking lot

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13528
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the main building and parking lot of New Haven Correctional Centre located on Marine Drive in Burnaby.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the main building and parking lot of New Haven Correctional Centre located on Marine Drive in Burnaby.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.872
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

New Haven building and parking lot

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13529
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the main building and parking lot of New Haven Correctional Centre located on Marine Drive in Burnaby.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the main building and parking lot of New Haven Correctional Centre located on Marine Drive in Burnaby.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.873
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

New Haven building and parking lot

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13530
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the main building and cars in parking lot of New Haven Correctional Centre located on Marine Drive in Burnaby.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the main building and cars in parking lot of New Haven Correctional Centre located on Marine Drive in Burnaby.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.874
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

Pond and bridge at New Haven

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13531
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of pond and bridge at New Haven Correctional Centre located on Marine Drive in Burnaby.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of pond and bridge at New Haven Correctional Centre located on Marine Drive in Burnaby.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.875
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of roadway entrance to New Haven Correctional Centre with the intitals "NHCC" located in a garden along the bank of a pond. Farm buildings are visible behind the trees.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of roadway entrance to New Haven Correctional Centre with the intitals "NHCC" located in a garden along the bank of a pond. Farm buildings are visible behind the trees.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.876
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of three storey building at New Haven Correctional Centre.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of three storey building at New Haven Correctional Centre.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.877
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

Workshop buildings at New Haven

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13535
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of workshop buildings with five bay doors at New Haven Correctional Centre.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of workshop buildings with five bay doors at New Haven Correctional Centre.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.878
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

Buildings at New Haven

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13536
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of workshop and main house at New Haven Correctional Centre. The workshop has two large double doors with a concrete driveway in front.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of workshop and main house at New Haven Correctional Centre. The workshop has two large double doors with a concrete driveway in front.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.879
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

Kitchen and dining addition

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13537
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of kitchen and dining addition to main building of New Haven Correctional Centre.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of kitchen and dining addition to main building of New Haven Correctional Centre.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.880
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

Grounds and green house at New Haven

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13538
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of a greenhouse and a section of the grounds of New Haven Correctional Centre. Grounds near the greenhouse include trees, vegetable and flower gardens, a wishing well and foot bridge.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of a greenhouse and a section of the grounds of New Haven Correctional Centre. Grounds near the greenhouse include trees, vegetable and flower gardens, a wishing well and foot bridge.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Gardens - Flower Gardens
Gardens - Vegetable Gardens
Buildings - Agriculture - Greenhouses
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.881
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of four of five cottages inside the New Haven Correctional Centre. The cottages were numbered one through five and were built in 1939.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of four of five cottages inside the New Haven Correctional Centre. The cottages were numbered one through five and were built in 1939.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Buildings - Residences
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.882
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

Main building at New Haven

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13540
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 10 x 5.3 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the main building of the New Haven Correctional Centre. A rock retaining wall and roadway are in front.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 10 x 5.3 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the main building of the New Haven Correctional Centre. A rock retaining wall and roadway are in front.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Buildings - Residences
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.883
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

Main building at New Haven

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13541
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 10 x 5.3 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the New Haven Correctional Centre's main building with dining-kitchen addition. A rock retaining wall with garden is in the foreground.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 10 x 5.3 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the New Haven Correctional Centre's main building with dining-kitchen addition. A rock retaining wall with garden is in the foreground.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.884
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

Building rooftops and grounds at New Haven

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13542
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of building rooftops and grounds at New Haven Correctional Centre.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of building rooftops and grounds at New Haven Correctional Centre.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.885
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

Sidewalk and grounds of New Haven

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumphoto13543
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Jan. 2001
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of sidewalk, buildings and grounds of New Haven Correctional Centre. Photograph is taken looking from the main building.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 5.3 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of sidewalk, buildings and grounds of New Haven Correctional Centre. Photograph is taken looking from the main building.
Administrative History
In 1937 New Haven Correctional Centre was established as the British Columbia Training School on the southeast side of Marine Drive in Burnaby (4250 Marine Drive). Sections of Sussex and Patterson Avenues bordered the estate. Originally, the facility housed nineteen inmates with two staff and was one of the first initiatives in Canada to segregate young adult inmates into a separate institution apart from adults. This was part of the Borstal system that started in England whereby young male offenders between the ages of sixteen and twenty one were trained to earn an honest living. Alterations and additions to the estate took place between December 1937 and October 1939 so that more inmates could be accomodated. Five new cottages were built that could hold up to forty people. Except for the plastering and lighting, all work on the new cottages was done by the inmates. On October 29, 1939, the Lieutenant-Governor Eric Hamber formally opened the New Haven Borstal School. World War II interrupted full development of the intstitution and it was closed in 1941 when the inmates were were conscripted into the army. Between 1941 and 1947 the Deaf and Blind Institute were housed at New Haven. In 1947, the New Haven Borstal School returned to the estate. New additions were added to old buildings and new additional buildings were erected on the site over the years including a warden's house on the east grounds and a barn and gymnasium. In the 1970s an equipment shed was added along with another dormitory and a variety of small sheds and storage buildings. The correctional centre officially closed in March 2001.
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Names
New Haven Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Accession Code
BV020.5.886
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Date
Jan. 2001
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Suncrest Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
25-Aug-2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph processing stamp on front of photograph reads: "'01_1_13"
Historical information based on notes from Mary Forsyth's research notes "New Haven" MSS185-018
Images
Less detail

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4370
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:12 min)
Scope and Content
Track 1: This portion of the recording pertains to Janet White’s school years and the activities and sports she participated in, formally and informally. She lived near 6th and Edmonds St., and then in the Cascades area, by Nithsdale St., and attended Schou Elementary. She attended many schools as …
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.1
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:12 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Janet White Total Number of Tracks: 8 Total length of all Tracks: 0:31:34
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 1: This portion of the recording pertains to Janet White’s school years and the activities and sports she participated in, formally and informally. She lived near 6th and Edmonds St., and then in the Cascades area, by Nithsdale St., and attended Schou Elementary. She attended many schools as soon as they were built, attending Gilmore Avenue, then Cascade Heights, Alpha Junior High, Moscrop Secondary, and finally Burnaby Central Secondary. Play was unstructured, with the Cascades bush and the tunnel parallel to and going under Smith Avenue being favourite places to play.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Janet White recording by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Names
Gooden, Tom
White, Janet
Schou Street School
Gilmore Avenue School
Cascade Heights Elementary School
Alpha Secondary School
Moscrop Secondary School
Burnaby Central Secondary School
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6th Street
Burnaby - Edmonds Street
Planning Study Area
Cascade-Schou Area
Audio Tracks

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 1

Less detail

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4468
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:04:14 min)
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to childhood responsibilities, chores, and early jobs, and the growth of Burnaby as experienced by a child. Janet describes her chores, and her first jobs at the PNE, Sears, and Super Value. She discusses how she used her allowance and employment inco…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.1
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:04:14 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Janet White Total Number of Tracks: 8 Total length of all Tracks: 0:31:34
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to childhood responsibilities, chores, and early jobs, and the growth of Burnaby as experienced by a child. Janet describes her chores, and her first jobs at the PNE, Sears, and Super Value. She discusses how she used her allowance and employment incomes.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Janet White recording by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Buildings - Commercial
Buildings - Commercial - Grocery Stores
Buildings - Commercial - Stores
Names
Gooden, Tom
White, Janet
Audio Tracks

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 2

Less detail

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4469
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:37 min)
Scope and Content
Track 3: This portion of the recording pertains to household living arrangements, toys and games, and organized youth activities. Janet describes attending a new United Church, involvement in Canadian Girls in Training, Job’s Daughters, and Girl Guides.
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.1
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:37 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Janet White Total Number of Tracks: 8 Total length of all Tracks: 0:31:34
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 3: This portion of the recording pertains to household living arrangements, toys and games, and organized youth activities. Janet describes attending a new United Church, involvement in Canadian Girls in Training, Job’s Daughters, and Girl Guides.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Janet White recording by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Organizations - Girls' Societies and Clubs
Names
Gooden, Tom
White, Janet
Audio Tracks

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 3

Less detail

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4470
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:02:40 min)
Scope and Content
Track 4: This portion of the recording pertains to school activities and sports, and lunch hour recreation. Janet describes her group of friends, and the streaming of students into vocational or academic studies.
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.1
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:02:40 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Janet White Total Number of Tracks: 8 Total length of all Tracks: 0:31:34
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 4: This portion of the recording pertains to school activities and sports, and lunch hour recreation. Janet describes her group of friends, and the streaming of students into vocational or academic studies.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Janet White recording by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Education
Sports
Names
Gooden, Tom
White, Janet
Audio Tracks

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 4

Less detail

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4471
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:39 min)
Scope and Content
Track 5: This portion of the recording pertains to restrictions on children and youth of the time, and where children played. Janet describes her curfews, and the where she wasn’t supposed to play. She describes sneaking into the Cascades Drive-In with friends. As a teenager, she went to Hazel’s Ca…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.1
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:39 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Janet White Total Number of Tracks: 8 Total length of all Tracks: 0:31:34
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 5: This portion of the recording pertains to restrictions on children and youth of the time, and where children played. Janet describes her curfews, and the where she wasn’t supposed to play. She describes sneaking into the Cascades Drive-In with friends. As a teenager, she went to Hazel’s Café on Sunset where high school students and “drop-outs” mixed. Janet remarks on the lack of racial diversity in the part of Burnaby she lived in at that time.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Janet White recording by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Buildings - Commercial - Drive-in Theatres
Names
Gooden, Tom
White, Janet
Audio Tracks

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 5

Less detail

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4472
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:04:13 min)
Scope and Content
Track 6: This portion of the recording pertains to Janet’s best and worst memories of her youth. Janet’s best memory is of the freedom of children of the time. She describes sleepovers as a teenager, and the arrival of the first television on the block, noting that outdoor play declined when childr…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.1
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:04:13 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Janet White Total Number of Tracks: 8 Total length of all Tracks: 0:31:34
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 6: This portion of the recording pertains to Janet’s best and worst memories of her youth. Janet’s best memory is of the freedom of children of the time. She describes sleepovers as a teenager, and the arrival of the first television on the block, noting that outdoor play declined when children stayed in to watch television. Janet’s worst memory is of the murder of a classmate’s siblings by their parents.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Janet White recording by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Names
Gooden, Tom
White, Janet
Audio Tracks

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 6

Less detail

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4473
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1940-1959] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:25 min)
Scope and Content
Track 7: This portion of the recording pertains to changes in Burnaby since Janet’s childhood, and her continuing connection to the community and its values. She also describes her family’s shopping routines from the 1940s and 1950s, which centred on the Super Value at Canada Way and Smith St., and…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1940-1959] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.1
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:25 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Janet White Full Recording Time: 31:34 Number of Tracks: 8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 7: This portion of the recording pertains to changes in Burnaby since Janet’s childhood, and her continuing connection to the community and its values. She also describes her family’s shopping routines from the 1940s and 1950s, which centred on the Super Value at Canada Way and Smith St., and the Hudson’s Bay store downtown. When Woodward’s and Sears opened, the family also shopped there occasionally.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Janet White recording by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Buildings - Commercial - Stores
Buildings - Commercial - Grocery Stores
Names
Gooden, Tom
White, Janet
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Canada Way
Burnaby - Smith Avenue
Audio Tracks

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 7

Less detail

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4474
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:06:28 min)
Scope and Content
Track 8: This portion of the recording pertains to socializing in Janet’s later teen years. She talks about dances at Lochdale Community Hall and Capitol Hill Community Hall, and informal gatherings in homes. She describes the attitudes and practices related to drinking and smoking at that time. Ja…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1950s] (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.1
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:06:28 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Janet White Total Number of Tracks: 8 Total length of all Tracks: 0:31:34
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 8: This portion of the recording pertains to socializing in Janet’s later teen years. She talks about dances at Lochdale Community Hall and Capitol Hill Community Hall, and informal gatherings in homes. She describes the attitudes and practices related to drinking and smoking at that time. Janet also talks about the transportation options for young people, her parents’ occupations, and her memories of the Fraser River flood.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Janet White recording by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Natural Phenomena - Floods
Names
Gooden, Tom
White, Janet
Lochdale Community Hall
Capitol Hill Community Hall
Audio Tracks

Interview with Janet White May 10, 2005 - Track 8

Less detail

Interview with Ella Beatty, 2005

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4475
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:21:41 min)
Scope and Content
00:00-2:58: Ella describes the area around Kingsway and Edmonds as she remembers it from her childhood. She names the businesses on the four corners of the intersection, which included a small house which was turned into a business. 2:58-7:18: Ella mentions some of the organized activities of the …
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.2
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:21:41 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Ella Beatty Total Number of Tracks: 1 Total length of all Tracks: 21:41
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
00:00-2:58: Ella describes the area around Kingsway and Edmonds as she remembers it from her childhood. She names the businesses on the four corners of the intersection, which included a small house which was turned into a business. 2:58-7:18: Ella mentions some of the organized activities of the time, and discusses household responsibilities of girls. Ella describes jobs she had as a teenager, such as a brief time working at the B.C. Electric Café at Carrall St. She talks about her allowance, and describes how she spent the money as well as her earnings from her jobs. XXX 7:18–13:55: Although Ella doesn’t recall being involved in many organized activities, she does mention Sunday school and a girl’s group. She talks about having A.R.P. and First Aid training during the Second World War. Ella notes that children made their own fun, and discusses the games she played, parks she went to, and how she got there. She describes how parents kept an eye on children without strictly supervising them. Ella also talks about neighborhood and school friends, describes her recreation, which was mainly informal, and where she played. XXX 13:55–15:30: Ella can’t choose any one memory of her childhood as being the most joyful, but she recalls the announcement of the declaration of war (of World War II) as her worst childhood memory. XXX 15:30–16:31: Ella describes the families in the neighborhood and her schoolmates as having similar cultural backgrounds. The very few immigrant families she remembers came from Europe. XXX 16:31–18:13: Ella describes her household living arrangements and her toys. XXX 18:13–20:25: Ella comments on the changes which have occurred in Burnaby since her childhood as the city has become built up. She notes that much of it began after the war as veterans returned home. XXX 20:25-21:41: Ella explains why she is still a Burnaby resident and remarks on the self-reliance that children acquired in the earlier days of the city.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Ella Beatty, recorded by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Wars - World War, 1939-1945
Buildings
Names
Beatty, Ella
Gooden, Tom
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Kingsway
Burnaby - Edmonds Street
Audio Tracks

Interview with Ella Beatty, 2005

Less detail

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4477
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:06:11 min)
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to responsibilities, chores, and money. Cice recalls her chores, and how she spent her allowance. She describes her jobs in Mr. Pitman’s drygoods stores, on Kingsway and on Jubilee Ave., and in Anne Reid’s candy shop. Asked about church, Cice discuss…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.3
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:06:11 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Cice Brown Total Number of Tracks: 7 Total length of all Tracks: 0:40:19
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to responsibilities, chores, and money. Cice recalls her chores, and how she spent her allowance. She describes her jobs in Mr. Pitman’s drygoods stores, on Kingsway and on Jubilee Ave., and in Anne Reid’s candy shop. Asked about church, Cice discusses her involvement with the Henderson-Jubilee United church, and C.G.I.T..
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Cice Brown, interviewed by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Buildings - Commercial - General Stores
Buildings - Commercial - Grocery Stores
Buildings - Commercial - Stores
Names
Brown, Cice Chandler
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Kingsway
Burnaby - Jubilee Avenue
Audio Tracks

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 2

Less detail

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4478
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:53 min)
Scope and Content
Track 3: This portion of the recording pertains to friends and community. Cice talks of her mother’s wisdom and understanding, and of the happiness and freedom she experienced while she was growing up. She describes the neighborhood children playing together in the local ravines. Cice also recalls …
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.3
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:53 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Cice Brown Total Number of Tracks: 7 Total length of all Tracks: 0:40:19
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Scope and Content
Track 3: This portion of the recording pertains to friends and community. Cice talks of her mother’s wisdom and understanding, and of the happiness and freedom she experienced while she was growing up. She describes the neighborhood children playing together in the local ravines. Cice also recalls how getting a bicycle led eventually to the further freedom of cycling to White Rock, the airport, Deep Cove, and Horseshoe Bay.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Cice Brown, interviewed by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Sports - Cycling
Names
Brown, Cice Chandler
Audio Tracks

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 3

Less detail

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4479
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:06:35 min)
Scope and Content
Track 4: This portion of the recording pertains to friends, play, and recreation. Cice talks about Shirley, her best friend from grade school until Shirley’s death at 21. She describes the large, loose circle of friends she met in the Telford Avenue neighborhood or through school, and where they pl…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.3
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:06:35 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Cice Brown Total Number of Tracks: 7 Total length of all Tracks: 0:40:19
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 4: This portion of the recording pertains to friends, play, and recreation. Cice talks about Shirley, her best friend from grade school until Shirley’s death at 21. She describes the large, loose circle of friends she met in the Telford Avenue neighborhood or through school, and where they played. Cice recalls how she spent time with her high school friends, and discusses the games that she played with her family and friends.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Cice Brown, interviewed by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Recreational Activities
Persons - Children
Names
Brown, Cice Chandler
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Telford Avenue
Planning Study Area
Maywood Area
Audio Tracks

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 4

Less detail

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4480
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:07:55 min)
Scope and Content
Track 5: This portion of the recording continues with the topic of recreation. The next questions pertain to restrictions on children at the time, cultural diversity, living arrangements, and toys. Cice is asked to describe her best and worst memories. She mentions that there were few restrictions …
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.3
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:07:55 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Cice Brown Total Number of Tracks: 7 Total length of all Tracks: 0:40:19
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 5: This portion of the recording continues with the topic of recreation. The next questions pertain to restrictions on children at the time, cultural diversity, living arrangements, and toys. Cice is asked to describe her best and worst memories. She mentions that there were few restrictions on children, and discusses the nature of community at the time. She comments on the cultural and religious backgrounds of the people she knew. Cice describes her family’s home and living arrangements, and how they reflected her family’s situation. She recalls a favourite toy.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Cice Brown, interviewed by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Persons - Children
Names
Brown, Cice Chandler
Audio Tracks

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 5

Less detail

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4481
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:04:54 min)
Scope and Content
Track 6: This portion of the recording pertains to toys, continued from Track 5, living arrangements, and lifestyle choices. Cice continues to recall her favourite early childhood toy, and her bicycle, which she received as a teenager. She discusses how her parents made choices according to their f…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.3
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:04:54 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Cice Brown Total Number of Tracks: 7 Total length of all Tracks: 0:40:19
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 6: This portion of the recording pertains to toys, continued from Track 5, living arrangements, and lifestyle choices. Cice continues to recall her favourite early childhood toy, and her bicycle, which she received as a teenager. She discusses how her parents made choices according to their financial situation. Cice talks about her family installing a toilet, and she describes how the money saved for a bathtub was spent purchasing a piano instead.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Cice Brown, interviewed by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Toys
Sports - Cycling
Persons - Children
Names
Brown, Cice Chandler
Audio Tracks

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 6

Less detail

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4482
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:14 min)
Scope and Content
Track 7: This portion of the recording pertains to changes to Burnaby since Cice’s childhood. Cice discusses the rural nature of South Burnaby, and the sense of security of that time. She talks of the changes caused by the creation and growth of the Metrotown area. Cice describes how her husband’s …
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 10, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.3
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:03:14 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Cice Brown Total Number of Tracks: 7 Total length of all Tracks: 0:40:19
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 7: This portion of the recording pertains to changes to Burnaby since Cice’s childhood. Cice discusses the rural nature of South Burnaby, and the sense of security of that time. She talks of the changes caused by the creation and growth of the Metrotown area. Cice describes how her husband’s veteran status earned them a discount on a building lot from the City of Burnaby, allowing her to continue to live there.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Cice Brown, interviewed by Tom Gooden on May 10 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Persons - Veterans
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Persons - Children
Names
Brown, Cice Chandler
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Planning Study Area
Maywood Area
Audio Tracks

Interview with Cice Brown, 2005 - Track 7

Less detail

Interview with Gail Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4491
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:12:13 min)
Scope and Content
Track 1: This portion of the recording pertains to Gail’s school years, her activities, household living arrangements, responsibilities, jobs, toys and games, and friends. 00:00-2:46: Gail describes growing up in South Burnaby, on her parents’ farm on Marine Drive, which her father had purchased f…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.4
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:12:13 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Gail Yip Total Number of Tracks: 2 Total length of all Tracks: 0:22:16
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 1: This portion of the recording pertains to Gail’s school years, her activities, household living arrangements, responsibilities, jobs, toys and games, and friends. 00:00-2:46: Gail describes growing up in South Burnaby, on her parents’ farm on Marine Drive, which her father had purchased from the people he worked for. She talks about attending Riverway West Elementary School, then McPherson Junior High school, and Burnaby South High School. Gail describes the games and activities she participated in at school, both formal and informal. She discusses her first real job as a teenager, as a page at the Burnaby Public Library. 2:46-6:09: Gail recalls her responsibilities at home, and earning money. She talks about her family’s living arrangements. She describes her family, immediate and extended, and her family’s history on the farm. Gail discusses the economic difficulties of farming, and the job her father got when he leased the farm to a tenant. 6:09-10:15: Gail describes her playmates, with whom she played in the nearby bush, and recalls how the time of year and the weather affected their play. She mentions a roller skating rink on Edmonds Street, but notes that such amenities were uncommon then. Gail lists the organized youth activities she participated in: Brownies, C.G.I.T., and Explorers. She discusses the toys and games she played with at home with her sisters. Gail describes her family’s living arrangements, and how the large house included a big rumpus room with a television set. She talks about her family’s closeness with extended family. 10:15-12:13: Gail recalls that the distance between her home and school made it necessary to have lunch at school, and shares how this created a special group of friends. She relates how living near Marine Drive, which was then a highway, affected her. Gail recalls going to Sunday school with her neighbor’s children in her elementary school years, but describes her family as not being very connected to church. She talks about participating in Brownies and Explorers.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Gail Yip recording by Tom Gooden on May 9, 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s and 60s.
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Names
Yip, Gail
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Audio Tracks

Interview with Gail Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 1

Less detail

Interview with Gail Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4492
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:10:03 min)
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to Gail’s organized activities, her best and worst childhood memories, recreation, shopping, her feeling about living in Burnaby and the changes she has observed. 0:00-3:18: Gail continues to talk about Brownies. She relates her worst childhood memor…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.4
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:10:03 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Gail Yip Total Number of Tracks: 2 Total length of all Tracks: 0:22:16
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to Gail’s organized activities, her best and worst childhood memories, recreation, shopping, her feeling about living in Burnaby and the changes she has observed. 0:00-3:18: Gail continues to talk about Brownies. She relates her worst childhood memory, but can’t select a best. She describes how her activities were affected by living in the Marine Drive corridor, which was a difficult place to walk or cycle, or even cross the street. Gail mentions that her older sister encountered racial prejudice, but she can’t remember encountering any herself. 3:18-7:58: Gail discusses living in Burnaby, and the changes she has observed in the city. She describes the Kingsway corridor as busier and more congested now, but notes that there are improved opportunities for shopping . Gail recalls that her family did their grocery shopping at the Safeway at Royal Oak Avenue and Rumble St., and went to Woodward’s department store in New Westminster. She relates that although her family occasionally went to Chinatown in Vancouver, and that as a teenager she sometimes went to Vancouver to shop, she went to New Westminster more often, preferring the movie theatres there also. She notes that bus service on Marine Drive was infrequent, which affected her activities. Gail recalls that shopping days and hours were more restricted when she was a child. She describes how her family shopped by car, when her father was available to drive, until her mother began driving them later. 7:58-10:03: Gail shares her favourite things about living in Burnaby. She recalls being married at South Burnaby United Church, where she had gone to Sunday School, but not by a Chinese minister as she doesn’t speak Chinese.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Gail Yip recording by Tom Gooden on May 9, 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s and 60s.
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Names
Yip, Gail
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Audio Tracks

Interview with Gail Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 2

Less detail

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4493
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:04:56 min)
Scope and Content
Track 1: This portion of the recording pertains to Bob’s school activities, recreation, responsibilities, and his jobs. Bob grew up in the area of Central Burnaby known as Skunk Hollow, and talks of living near Norfolk and Douglas Road in his early childhood, and then on Government Road. He recalls…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.6
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:04:56 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Bob Lowe Total Number of Tracks: 6 Total length of all Tracks: 0:43:36
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 1: This portion of the recording pertains to Bob’s school activities, recreation, responsibilities, and his jobs. Bob grew up in the area of Central Burnaby known as Skunk Hollow, and talks of living near Norfolk and Douglas Road in his early childhood, and then on Government Road. He recalls attending Douglas Road School and Burnaby South High School. Bob describes his extracurricular activities in school, organized and informal. He mentions the games he played with his friends. Bob discusses his family chores, and his first job, which was a newspaper route for the Vancouver Province. He describes his later jobs, one at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, working for Mr. Arnold, and then for Mr. Robertson at Burnaby Lake Nurseries.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Robert "Bob" Lowe recording by Tom Gooden in 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Notes
Title based on content of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Persons - Children
Names
Lowe, Robert "Bob"
Douglas Road School
Burnaby South High School
Forest Lawn Memorial Park
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Norfolk Street
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Burnaby - Government Road
Audio Tracks

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 1

Less detail

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4494
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:11:02 min)
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to the earning and spending of money, household living arrangements, friends, and recreational activities. Bob describes his small businesses, and how he spent the money he earned. He shares his perspective that the self-sufficiency and practicality o…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.6
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:11:02 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Bob Lowe Total Number of Tracks: 6 Total length of all Tracks: 0:43:36
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to the earning and spending of money, household living arrangements, friends, and recreational activities. Bob describes his small businesses, and how he spent the money he earned. He shares his perspective that the self-sufficiency and practicality of the people he knew at the time had their origin in the community’s experiences of the First World War. Bob discusses his family’s living arrangements, and how they moved as circumstances required, although they always remained in the same area. Bob recalls his school sporting activities, and the Army Cadets organized in his high school during World War II. He talks of his friends and how they played in the bush, at the millponds, and on Still Creek, and how they could skate on the frozen creek to Burnaby Lake. He describes the hunting and fishing, and the field and water trials for retrievers in the marsh.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Bob Lowe recording by Tom Gooden in 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Recreational Activities
Organizations - Boys Societies and Clubs
Wars - World War, 1939-1945
Sports - Skating
Names
Lowe, Robert "Bob"
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Lake
Burnaby - Still Creek
Audio Tracks

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 2

Less detail

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4495
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:08:17 min)
Scope and Content
Track 3: This portion of the recording pertains to recreation. Bob continues talking about fishing, and how he and his friends sold their catch. He describes in detail the many games he played with his friends, listing the complicated rules and scoring systems.
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.6
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:08:17 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Bob Lowe Total Number of Tracks: 6 Total length of all Tracks: 0:43:36
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 3: This portion of the recording pertains to recreation. Bob continues talking about fishing, and how he and his friends sold their catch. He describes in detail the many games he played with his friends, listing the complicated rules and scoring systems.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Bob Lowe recording by Tom Gooden in 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Notes
Title based on content of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Recreational Activities - Fishing
Names
Lowe, Robert "Bob"
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Audio Tracks

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 3

Less detail

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4496
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:07:21 min)
Scope and Content
Track 4: This portion of the recording pertains to Bob’s best and worst memories of his childhood, and cultural differences in his community. Bob recalls participation in favourite activities as his best memories, and notes that children of the time were not restricted in their play. He talks of ma…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.6
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:07:21 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Bob Lowe Total Number of Tracks: 6 Total length of all Tracks: 0:43:36
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 4: This portion of the recording pertains to Bob’s best and worst memories of his childhood, and cultural differences in his community. Bob recalls participation in favourite activities as his best memories, and notes that children of the time were not restricted in their play. He talks of making an enterprise of harvesting and selling cascara bark during WWII, when prices rose. Bob describes his worst memories, which are of fires, a flood, and bad fog, and how he was nearly killed as a passenger in a wagon whose horse bolted. He recalls that his family was a minority among the Ukrainian families in the neighborhood.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Bob Lowe recording by Tom Gooden in 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Wars - World War, 1939-1945
Natural Phenomena - Fires
Natural Phenomena - Floods
Names
Lowe, Robert "Bob"
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Audio Tracks

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 4

Less detail

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4497
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:06:11 min)
Scope and Content
Track 5: This portion of the recording pertains to changes to Burnaby since Bob’s childhood. The track begins in mid-sentence and the first comment may relate to a previous topic or one lost in editing, as Bob refers to bitterness and notes that there were jobs for everyone when the Second World Wa…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.6
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:06:11 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Bob Lowe Total Number of Tracks: 6 Total length of all Tracks: 0:43:36
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 5: This portion of the recording pertains to changes to Burnaby since Bob’s childhood. The track begins in mid-sentence and the first comment may relate to a previous topic or one lost in editing, as Bob refers to bitterness and notes that there were jobs for everyone when the Second World War started. He continues to describe his relationship with his Ukrainian neighbors, and how he felt about such discrimination as he experienced. He discusses the entrepreneurial opportunities which existed for children and youth, recalls that everyone had private enterprises to help pay for necessities of life, and notes that most of his classmates went to work full time after finishing elementary school. Bob contrasts the general affluence of the present day with the pervasive poverty of his childhood. He notes that discipline at the time was physical, and that authority was not questioned. He comments on physical changes to Burnaby.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Bob Lowe recording by Tom Gooden in 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Persons - Children
Wars - World War, 1939-1945
Names
Lowe, Robert "Bob"
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Audio Tracks

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 5

Less detail

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4498
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:05:45 min)
Scope and Content
Track 6: This portion of the recording pertains to Bob’s feelings about Burnaby as a place to live, and continues the subject of change. Bob talks of his property in Burnaby, which he purchased as acreage. He compares the Burnaby of his childhood to that of pioneers such as Tommy Irvine, describing…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1930-1949 (interview content), interviewed May 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.6
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:05:45 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Bob Lowe Total Number of Tracks: 6 Total length of all Tracks: 0:43:36
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 6: This portion of the recording pertains to Bob’s feelings about Burnaby as a place to live, and continues the subject of change. Bob talks of his property in Burnaby, which he purchased as acreage. He compares the Burnaby of his childhood to that of pioneers such as Tommy Irvine, describing himself as a relative newcomer. He speaks of the preservation of the Deer Lake and Burnaby Lake areas. Bob describes his disorientation in the more newly densified parts of Burnaby, and observes that traffic has increased on Burnaby streets. Bob recalls that he mostly travelled on foot or by bike. He notes that the Neville Transport Company operated the school bus he used as well as the only North-South bus route in Burnaby at that time. He mentions Pacific Stage Lines as a later operator through Burnaby.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Bob Lowe recording by Tom Gooden in 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1930s and 40s.
Notes
Tiltle based on cotents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Transportation - Buses
Transportation - Bicycles
Names
Lowe, Robert "Bob"
Irvine, Tom
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Lake
Burnaby - Deer Lake
Audio Tracks

Interview with Bob Lowe 2005 - Track 6

Less detail

Interview with Ken Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4531
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:13:37 min)
Scope and Content
Track 1: This portion of the recording pertains to Ken’s family responsibilities, school activities, and friends. Ken relates how his father received a veteran’s land grant after the Second World War, on Byrne Rd. in the Big Bend area of Burnaby, and how his family operated a market garden on the l…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.5
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:13:37 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Ken Yip Total Number of Tracks: 5 Total length of all Tracks: 0:62:00
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 1: This portion of the recording pertains to Ken’s family responsibilities, school activities, and friends. Ken relates how his father received a veteran’s land grant after the Second World War, on Byrne Rd. in the Big Bend area of Burnaby, and how his family operated a market garden on the land, selling their produce to Kelly Douglas, Woodward’s, and MacDonald’s Consolidated. Ken describes how he moved to North Burnaby in the early 1970s, near Sperling Ave. and Lougheed Hwy., and then to the Burnaby General Hospital area when he married a few years later. He speaks of attending Riverside Elementary School, McPherson Junior High School, and Burnaby South High School. Ken recalls having little free time as a child. He speaks of working on the farm after he finished his homework, and playing there with his brother. He describes his household chores, and the additional responsibilities he took on as he grew older and acquired more skills. Ken talks of being in the school band with his friends, their activities and travel and their trip to Montreal for Expo in 1967. He discusses his interests and his family’s expectations of him and his brother.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Ken Yip recording by Tom Gooden on May 9, 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s and 60s.
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Persons - Veterans
Names
Yip, Ken
McPherson Park School
Riverside Elementary School
Burnaby South High School
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Burnaby - North Burnaby
Audio Tracks

Interview with Ken Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 1

Less detail

Interview with Ken Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4532
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:11:13 min)
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to Ken’s university education and jobs, his activities as a youth with friends and in school, his parents’ backgrounds, and the family’s religious practices. Ken relates how his friends came to him, knowing how busy he was on the farm, and how he spen…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.5
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:11:13 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Ken Yip Total Number of Tracks: 5 Total length of all Tracks: 0:62:00
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 2: This portion of the recording pertains to Ken’s university education and jobs, his activities as a youth with friends and in school, his parents’ backgrounds, and the family’s religious practices. Ken relates how his friends came to him, knowing how busy he was on the farm, and how he spent the spare time he had. He describes going as far as Washington State and Mission to watch car racing with friends when he was older. Ken speaks of his family as nominally Buddhist through his mother, who was from China. He recalls that, despite this, he and his brother were bused to Sunday school at a church near Joffre Ave. He talks of the activities and trips the church had for the children, whom, because of the distance, he didn’t see otherwise. He describes travelling with the school band, their fundraising, and their billeting arrangements.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Ken Yip recording by Tom Gooden on May 9, 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s and 60s.
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Yip, Ken
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Audio Tracks

Interview with Ken Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 2

Less detail

Interview with Ken Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4533
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:06:07 min)
Scope and Content
Track 3: This portion of the recording continues with Ken’s band activities, and then pertains to the games Ken played with his brother and friends. Ken discusses how the school band’s repertoire and performances were designed to complement the school’s events throughout the year. He describes the …
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.5
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:06:07 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Ken Yip Total Number of Tracks: 5 Total length of all Tracks: 0:62:00
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 3: This portion of the recording continues with Ken’s band activities, and then pertains to the games Ken played with his brother and friends. Ken discusses how the school band’s repertoire and performances were designed to complement the school’s events throughout the year. He describes the concert the band was invited to play on the lawn of Ceperley House on their return from Expo 67. Ken recalls the games he and his brother played, and the two neighbor boys they played with. He describes playing on the North American Peat property adjacent to theirs, in the peat trenches and in the bush. He talks of roaming as far as New Westminster and the Fraser River.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Ken Yip recording by Tom Gooden on May 9, 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s and 60s.
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Persons - Children
Education
Organizations - Bands
Names
Yip, Ken
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Audio Tracks

Interview with Ken Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 3

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Interview with Ken Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4534
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:14:41 min)
Scope and Content
Track 4: This portion of the recording pertains to Ken’s recreational activities, his most joyful and most unpleasant memories of his youth, his family’s history, and the Chinese associations his family was involved with. Ken recalls fishing off the access bridges across the tidal ditches on Byrne …
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.5
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:14:41 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Ken Yip Total Number of Tracks: 5 Total length of all Tracks: 0:62:00
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 4: This portion of the recording pertains to Ken’s recreational activities, his most joyful and most unpleasant memories of his youth, his family’s history, and the Chinese associations his family was involved with. Ken recalls fishing off the access bridges across the tidal ditches on Byrne Rd., and watching sturgeon in them. He mentions spending time at the Luxury Freeze near Burnaby South High School, and at a church near Royal Oak Ave. north of Rumble St. which hosted a basement coffee house a few nights a week for the young people. Ken recalls going to Oilcan Harry’s club in downtown Vancouver when he was older. Ken describes his family’s closeness as his best memory of his youth, sharing his perspective that this closeness came from having a family business. Ken’s worst memory is of losing his grandmother, who had lived with his family. He discusses his extended family and relates how his father was born in Cranbrook because his grandfather, who had come to Canada in the 1880s, was gold mining there at the time. Ken describes the kinds of Chinese associations he remembers in Vancouver, and the services they offered. He recalls the New Year and Spring festivals they hosted. He mentions his family belonging to the Chow association, ‘Chow’ being his mother’s family’s name.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Ken Yip recording by Tom Gooden on May 9, 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s and 60s.
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Yip, Ken
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Audio Tracks

Interview with Ken Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 4

Less detail

Interview with Ken Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording4535
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:16:19 min)
Scope and Content
Track 5: This portion of the recording pertains to differences between Ken’s family life and that of others in the community, and changes to Burnaby since he was young. Ken observes that the only difference he noticed was that he had Sundays free of commitments where some others might have church a…
  1 Audio  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1950s & 1960s (interview content), interviewed May 9, 2005
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Series
Growing Up in Burnaby
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV017.45.5
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (0:16:19 min)
Material Details
Interviewer: Tom Gooden Interviewee: Ken Yip Total Number of Tracks: 5 Total length of all Tracks: 0:62:00
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Track 5: This portion of the recording pertains to differences between Ken’s family life and that of others in the community, and changes to Burnaby since he was young. Ken observes that the only difference he noticed was that he had Sundays free of commitments where some others might have church activities. He describes the main change to Burnaby as being its increased urbanization, remembering how he would contrast the quiet, slow-paced Burnaby of his youth to the bustle of Chinatown, where his father did his shopping. He mentions the increased density, the changes to the Metrotown area, and the much larger number of shops. He notes that warehouses were built across from his family’s property, which is still farmland. Ken recalls that he and his wife only looked in Burnaby for a house when they married, thinking Vancouver too busy and commercialized then. He finishes by relating an incident from elementary school, when he saw a UFO hovering over the edge of the school’s property.
History/Biography
Recording of an interview with Ken Yip recording by Tom Gooden on May 9, 2005. This recording was completed for an exhibit, Growing Up in Burnaby, for the Burnaby Village Museum. Major themes discussed are growing up in Burnaby in the 1950s and 60s.
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Creator
Tom Gooden
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Yip, Ken
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Audio Tracks

Interview with Ken Yip May 9, 2005 - Track 5

Less detail

Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording12337
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1900-2020] (interview content), interviewed Feb. 7, 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (00:43:19 min.)
Storage Location
Digital Only
Scope and Content
Recording consists of an interview with Josephine Chow (nee Hong) conducted by BVM researcher Denise Fong at the Burnaby Village Museum. Josephine describes her family history and recollects her childhood experiences in 1950s and 60s while growing with her family on their "Hop On" farm in Burnaby. …
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1900-2020] (interview content), interviewed Feb. 7, 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum Oral History Collection
Description Level
Item
Accession Code
BV020.6.1
Storage Location
Digital Only
Physical Description
1 mp3 recording (00:43:19 min.)
Material Details
Interviewer: Denise Fong Interviewee: Josephine Chow Location of Interview: Burnaby Village Museum Interview Date: February 7, 2020 Total Number of Tracks: 1 Total Length of all Tracks: 00:43:19
Media Type
Sound Recording
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Recording consists of an interview with Josephine Chow (nee Hong) conducted by BVM researcher Denise Fong at the Burnaby Village Museum. Josephine describes her family history and recollects her childhood experiences in 1950s and 60s while growing with her family on their "Hop On" farm in Burnaby. The farm is situated in the Big Bend area along Marine Drive and is still in operation today. 0:00-08:45 Josephine Chow provides some historical background on the history of “Hop On Farm” and her family in British Columbia. She tells of how her grandfather Gay Tim Hong and three partners pooled money together to purchase twelve acres on Marine Drive in 1951. Prior to this, most of them farmed on the Musqueam First Nation Reserve for 20-30 years. It all began when her great grandfather Hong Sui Wing, first came to Canada from China and slowly brought over her grandfather, father and other members of the family. Her grandfather, Gay Tim Hong went back and forth between Canada and China at least four times since he and her grandmother had four children including her father, who was born in 1931. Her father came to Canada at 10 years of age to live with his father. Josephine’s great grandfather came to Vancouver from Zhongshan county in Canton Province (also known as Guangdong). 8:46- 14:20 Josephine provides the names of her siblings from the eldest to the youngest; Pauline, Josephine (herself), Catherine, Noreen, Gary, Darlene and Marlene. She describes what life was like on the farm with her parents working from sunrise to sunset. The family farmed vegetable produce taking orders from local stores in the lower mainland. Often the children helped their parents with the orders starting at eight or nine years of age. Other workers on the farm travelled by bus from Vancouver’s Chinatown. She also tells of how her father was an animal lover and raised chickens, pigeons, geese, koy, goldfish and dogs. 14: 21 – 16:56 Josephine describes what Burnaby was like during the time that she grew up in the late 1950s. She explains that Burnaby was very quiet with nothing being open on Sundays. On the farm, she and her siblings would entertain themselves by playing games like soccer, baseball and kick ball or also by catching frogs, snails, caterpillars and ladybugs. There were neighbours living on Marine Drive and almost every house had someone who we went to the same elementary school. The neighbourhood children would often come to play with them on their farm. 16:56- 26:47 Josephine describes how when they were young there were farms all around them and how on Sunday drives with her father, they would go to feed horses or look at the cows. Josephine shares that her elder sister Pauline was the only one born in China and how when she first arrived that she lived on the Musqueam First Nations Reserve with their parents before they moved to Burnaby. Josephine recollects that most of her friends were farmer’s kids from the neighbourhood but while in school, she had more Caucasian friends. Josephine and her siblings attended Glenwood Elementary on Marine Drive and later Junior Secondary at McPherson Park (grades 8-10) and Burnaby South Senior Secondary (grades 11-12. ). She shares some of her experiences while attending school. She said that there were about a dozen Asians in school with her, mostly from farming families in the “Flats”. 26:48- 30:45 Josephine describes what life was like for her and her siblings after school. They often helped on the farm when they got home, usually taking care of orders for green onions. Her mother made dinner and did all of the cooking for family and workers on the farm as well as working in the fields. Her father did all of the grocery shopping in Vancouver’s Chinatown two or three times per week where he purchased meat and fish. She says that her grandfather, often travelled by bus every Saturday or Sunday to meet up with friends in Chinatown. Extracurricular activities for her and her siblings included volley ball and soccer as long as it didn’t interfere with their work schedule on the farm. 30:46- 37:03 Josephine describes what occurred while living at home, the food they ate, shopping and attending Chinese school. Her mother cooked only Chinese food, she didn’t know how to cook “Western food”. For school lunches, the kids made their own sandwiches. She tells of a Chinese language school arranged by Mrs. Joe [sic] who lived on Gilley Road and was Canadian born Chinese. Mrs. Joe [sic] also arranged an English class for farmer’s wives on Tuesday nights in which her mother attended. Josephine recollects learning Mandarin from Mrs. Joe [sic] a few days a week after her regular school. Chinese school took place at Riverway School on Meadow Avenue in Burnaby. Mrs. Joe also taught them a lot about Chinese culture including Kung Fu, Chinese Dance and Chinese brush painting. 37:04- 39:39 Josephine describes Medical Care for her and her family in the 1950s and 1960s. She tells of a female Chinese doctor in Vancouver, Dr. Madeline Chung. Dr. Chung was responsible for delivering a lot of Chinese babies including Josephine. The family also visited herbalists in Vancouver Chinatown. They would often buy herbs for colds etc. Josephine also tells of how her parents stayed in touch with family in China by writing letters. Her mother’s family, including her parents and siblings were still in China while most of her father’s family were here in Canada. 39:40- 43:19 – In closing, Josephine shares how life is much busier now and of how she misses the quietness of her days growing up. She briefly describes her life on the family farm now and how different it is from when her parents worked the farm. She explains how farming methods have changed and how they don’t have to work as hard as her parents did.
History/Biography
Interviewee biography: Josephine Chow (nee Hong) is the second eldest child of Chan Kow Hong and Sui Ha Hong. In 1925, Josephine's grandfather, Gay Tim Hong immigrated to Canada from Zhongshan county in Canton Province (also known as Guangdong). In 1952, her father, Chan Kow Hong joined his father, Gay Tim Hong and by 1953, he established "Hop On Farms" in the Big Bend area of Burnaby near Marine Drive. Josephine grew up on the farm with her parents and six siblings; Pauline, Catherine, Norine, Gary, Darlene and Marlene. In 1969, Josephine's elder sister Pauline and her husband Jack Chan took over the family farm and in 1972 their father and grandfather moved to Kamloops to open a restaurant. As an adult, Josephine worked in several different areas including owning and running her own Aesthetics business. Josephine eventually retired and returned to the farm to assist her siblings. The farm is still in operation. Interviewer biography: Denise Fong is a historical researcher at Burnaby Village Museum. She has degrees in Anthropology (BA) and Archaeology (MA), and is completing her doctoral degree at UBC in Interdisciplinary Studies. Her primary research interests are in Chinese Canadian history and critical heritage studies. She is the co-curator of BVM’s “Across the Pacific” exhibition, and the Museum of Vancouver’s “A Seat at the Table – Chinese Immigration and British Columbia”.
Notes
Title based on contents of interview
Creator
Burnaby Village Museum
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Persons - Immigrants
Agriculture - Farms
Education
Buildings - Schools
First Nations reserves - British Columbia
Names
Fong, Denise
Chow, Josephine
Glenwood Elementary School
McPherson Park School
Musqueam
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Byrne Road
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Audio Tracks

Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020

Images
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