More like 'Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM'

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Interview with Dr. John Yang by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo14277
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
August 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (66 min., 57 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a Zoom interview with Dr, John Yang conducted by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, UBC students in the UBC Faculty of Land and Food Systems. The interview was conducted with Dr. Yang as part of the students' research for "Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM", part three i…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
August 2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (66 min., 57 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo
Material Details
Interviewers: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Interviewee: Dr. John Yang Interview Date: August 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 01:06:57 Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Accession Code
BV020.28.1
Access Restriction
Restricted access
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a Zoom interview with Dr, John Yang conducted by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, UBC students in the UBC Faculty of Land and Food Systems. The interview was conducted with Dr. Yang as part of the students' research for "Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM", part three in a series of "Back to the Roots" podcasts. The podcast series explores the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. In this series the students connected their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. The majority of the interview was conducted in english with occasional comments spoken in mandarin by Wei Yan Yeong and Dr. John Yang. 00:00 – 15:13 The video interview opens with Wei Yan Yeong providing a brief synopsis of the project that she is working on in partnership with Rose Wu. She explains to Dr. John Yang that the content from this interview will help inform podcast episode number three “Chinse Herbalist Shops and TCM”. Dr. Yang responds to questions asked by Wei Yan and Rose. Dr. Yang explains why he first came to Canada from China more than thirty years ago and provides information on his educational background. He describes how he first earned a degree in western medicine in China and became an assistant professor at a medical school before turning to study Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) by completing a PHD from Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine. When he immigrated to Canada with his wife more than thirty years ago, he decided to continue to practice TCM . 15:14 – 21:53 In this segment of the interview, Rose Wu asks if he joined an existing TCM business or whether he started his own practice. Dr. Yang explains that he practiced on his own and that TCM wasn’t licensed in Canada until 1996. He further explains how Western medicine was the only regulated medical practice used in Canada and it took a long time to lobby the government to recognize the benefits of TCM and why it should be a licensed profession. 21:58 – 25:00 In this segment of the interview Dr. Yang speaks about his experience as a doctor of TCM in Burnaby, his role as the president of the Federation of Traditional Chinese Medicine Colleges of Canada and how they lobbied the government for more recognition and his professional work as a dean and clinical director of the Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s Traditional Chinese Medicine program. 27:36 – 47:07 In this segment Dr. Yang explains how Traditional Chinese Medicine is ingrained in the Chinese culture and part of daily life which is why many Chinese immigrants rely on TCM to protect their immune system. He explains how TCM is based on four different energies (cold, hot, warm and cool) and different from traditional western medicine. He provides examples of different energies from certain foods. 47:08 – 52:13 In this segment, Dr. Yang speaks about his experience as a practitioner of TCM in the treatment of patients, how many of his patients are not Chinese and how he treats many of his patients with acupuncture. Dr. Yang provides an example of a patient being treated with acupuncture for a frozen shoulder. 52:14 – 56:43 In this segment, Dr. Yang is asked if he also uses Western medicine. Dr. Yang shares his positive experiences treating fever with acupuncture and how growing up in China that there was no access to western medicine – no antibiotics or penicillin until the last 50 years or so. He explains that this is why Chinese people have always relied on TCM. 56:44 - 1:06:57 Dr. Yang provides information on the education required to become a registered acupuncturist and a licensed TCM practitioner. He explains that herbs used in TCM can be purchased from herbalist shops in Chinatown or you can purchase concentrations of the herbs directly from your TCM doctor. He clarifies how animal products that are restricted (including shark fins) are no longer included for treatments in TCM, all TCM herbs are regulated in Canada by the FDA whereas herbs that you buy in Chinatown are treated as food and not drugs.
History/Biography
Interviewer biographies: Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. Interviewee biography: Dr. John Yang is a chairperson and program director of Kwantlen Polytechnic University's Traditional Chinese Medicine program. Dr. John Yang graduated from Hainan University Medical School, Haikou, China. He received his TCM training at Hainan Provincial Hospital of TCM, Haikou, China and a PhD from Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, China. For the past 11 years, John has been the Dean and Clinic Director at the PCU College of Holistic Medicine, Burnaby. As an expert in the field, John has given many national and international presentations and lectures on TCM. Dr. Yang is the current Vice-President at the Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture of British Columbia (ATCMA). He is also the Chair of the Academic/Educational Committee of ATCMA. Dr. Yang is the current President of the Federation of Traditional Chinese Medicine Colleges of Canada and a committee member on the Standards Council of Canada, Canadian Advisory Committees for International Organization for Standardization for TCM. John was elected as professional board member at the College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists of British Columbia (CTCMA). He was also a member of the Audit Team (Topic Specialist) for the Private Career Training Institution Agency of British Columbia (PCTIA), along with numerous past appointments to other TCM provincial, national and international committees.
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Public Services - Health Services
Regulations
Names
Yang, Dr. John
Yeong, Wei Yan
Wu, Rose
Notes
Title based on contents of video recording
For recording of podcast "Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM" - see BV020.28.5
Contact Burnaby Village Museum to view content
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Duncan & Margaret McGregor Estate 'Glen-Lyon' Mansion

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark518
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Description
Overlooking the rich farmland of the Fraser River floodplain, 'Glen-Lyon' is an Edwardian era rural estate, with a tall, two and one-half storey plus basement wood-frame mansion, set in a pastoral and formal landscape with an associated barn and early log pond, located near a ravine and forested ar…
Associated Dates
1902
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Associated Dates
1902
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 12183
Enactment Date
11/12/2006
Description
Overlooking the rich farmland of the Fraser River floodplain, 'Glen-Lyon' is an Edwardian era rural estate, with a tall, two and one-half storey plus basement wood-frame mansion, set in a pastoral and formal landscape with an associated barn and early log pond, located near a ravine and forested area adjacent to Marine Drive in South Burnaby.
Heritage Value
‘Glen-Lyon’ is valued as an excellent example of a privately-owned Edwardian era country estate built at the turn of the nineteenth century. The property retains significant heritage features including the Edwardian era mansion with rustic Arts and Crafts features, and elements of a working agricultural landscape. The property was originally the Royal City Mills logging camp, and in 1900 was purchased by Duncan Campbell McGregor (1853-1929) and Margaret Jane McGregor (1875-1960), who named their estate ‘Glen-Lyon’ after Duncan McGregor’s birthplace in Perthshire, Scotland. The McGregors were active in municipal affairs and social activities, and played a significant role in the early development of Burnaby. Duncan McGregor served as a city councillor from 1909 to 1912 and was elected reeve of Burnaby in 1913. Margaret McGregor was instrumental in the formation and fundraising activities of the Victoria Order of Nurses in Burnaby. Additionally, the site is historically significant for its association with early social welfare and correctional reform. The estate was sold in 1926 to an inter-denominational religious organization called the Home of the Friendless, which used it as their B.C. headquarters. The organization was charged with several cases of abuse and neglect in 1937, after which a Royal Commission was formed that led to new legislation to regulate and license all private welfare institutions. 'Glen-Lyon' was sold to the provincial government, and was dedicated in 1939 by the Lt.-Gov. E.W. Hamber for use as the New Haven Borstal Home for Boys and Youthful Offenders (later renamed the New Haven Correction Centre). The Borstal movement originated in England in the late nineteenth century, as an alternative to sending young offenders and runaways to prisons by providing reformatories that focused on discipline and vocational skill. This site’s role as the first North American institution devoted to the Borstal School philosophy was historic, and influenced corrections programs across Canada. The site retains significant features from its development in 1939 as the Borstal School, including a large gambrel-roofed barn designed by Chief Provincial Architect Henry Whittaker of the Department of Public Works that is the only remaining structure of its kind in Burnaby. Between 1941 and 1945 the mansion housed the Provincial School for the Deaf and Blind when the Borstal School was closed temporarily as a war measure during the Second World War.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of 'Glen-Lyon' Mansion include its: - location on a sloping site with expansive southern exposure, adjacent to Marine Drive - residential form, scale and massing of the house as exemplified by its two and one-half storey height, above-ground basement and rectangular plan - Arts and Crafts elements of the house such as its stone foundation, multi-gabled roof line with steep central hipped roof, symmetrical cross-gables, side shed dormers, bellcast upper walls sheathed in cedar shingles and lower walls sheathed in narrow clapboard - original exterior features of the house such as the full width front verandah with square columns, central staircase on the southern elevation, original doors and stained glass windows; and the irregular fenestration such as double-hung 1-over-1 wooden-sash windows, bay windows, and projecting windows in the gable ends - original interior features of the house such as the U-shaped main stair designed around two symmetrically placed Ionic columns, and interior trim on the main floor including boxed beams and fireplaces - gambrel-roofed barn with roof vent with finial, sliding hay loft and access doors, small multi-pane windows, and lapped wooden siding - associated landscape features such as the original garden plantings with some exotic and many native specimen trees; the original log pond and its concrete Marine Drive causeway and culvert; rockeries and a rose garden
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Organization
Home of the Friendless
Borstal School
New Haven Correction Centre
Architect
Henry Whittaker
Function
Primary Historic--Estate
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
003-004-661
Boundaries
'Glen-Lyon' is comprised of a single residential lot located at 4250 Marine Drive, Burnaby.
Area
230873.18
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Private
Name Access
McGregor, Duncan C. (1853-1929)
Whittaker, Henry
Home of the Friendless
Borstal School
New Haven Correction Centre
Subject Access
Buildings - Heritage
Buildings - Residential - Houses
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Buildings - Residential
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Duncan & Margaret McGregor Estate 'Glen-Lyon' New Haven Barn

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/landmark852
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Description
Designed in a vernacular architectural style, the New Haven Barn is a large gambrel-roofed barn located on the Edwardian era McGregor Estate 'Glen-Lyon,' overlooking the rich farmland of the Fraser River floodplain and near a ravine and forested area adjacent to Marine Drive in South Burnaby.
Associated Dates
1939
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Home of the Friendless, New Haven Borstal Home for Boys and Youthful Offenders, New Haven Correction Centre
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Home of the Friendless, New Haven Borstal Home for Boys and Youthful Offenders, New Haven Correction Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 4250 Marine Drive
Associated Dates
1939
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 12183
Enactment Date
11/12/2006
Description
Designed in a vernacular architectural style, the New Haven Barn is a large gambrel-roofed barn located on the Edwardian era McGregor Estate 'Glen-Lyon,' overlooking the rich farmland of the Fraser River floodplain and near a ravine and forested area adjacent to Marine Drive in South Burnaby.
Heritage Value
The site is historically significant for its association with early social welfare and correctional reform. The estate was sold in 1926 to an inter-denominational religious organization called the Home of the Friendless, which used it as their B.C. headquarters. The organization was charged with several cases of abuse and neglect in 1937, after which a Royal Commission was formed that led to new legislation to regulate and license all private welfare institutions. 'Glen-Lyon' was sold to the provincial government, and was dedicated in 1939 by the Lt.-Gov. E.W. Hamber for use as the New Haven Borstal Home for Boys and Youthful Offenders (later renamed the New Haven Correction Centre). The Borstal movement originated in England in the late nineteenth century, as an alternative to sending young offenders and runaways to prisons by providing reformatories that focused on discipline and vocational skill. This site’s role as the first North American institution devoted to the Borstal School philosophy was historic, and influenced corrections programs across Canada. The New Haven Barn is a significant feature from its development in 1939 as the Borstal School, designed by Chief Provincial Architect Henry Whittaker of the Department of Public Works, and is the only remaining structure of its kind in Burnaby.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the New Haven Barn include its: - gambrel-roofed barn with roof vent with finial, sliding hay loft and access doors, small multi-pane windows, and lapped wooden siding
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Organization
Home of the Friendless
Borstal School
New Haven Correction Centre
Architect
Henry Whittaker
Function
Primary Historic--Estate
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
003-004-661
Boundaries
'Glen-Lyon' is comprised of a single residential lot located at 4250 Marine Drive, Burnaby.
Area
230873.18
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Private
Name Access
Whittaker, George
New Haven Borstal Home for Boys and Youthful Offenders
New Haven Correction Centre
Borstal School
Subject Access
Buildings - Heritage
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Buildings - Agricultural
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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A Family Farm

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14268
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:13:57 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part one in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part one is titled “A Family Farm”. The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land an…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:13:57 min)
Material Details
Podcasts hosts: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Persons from recorded extracts: Denise Fong; Josephine Chow Music: prod. riddiman Podcast Date: October 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:13:57 min Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.3
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part one in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part one is titled “A Family Farm”. The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia Faculty and while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. In this series the students connect their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. 00:00-02:21 The podcast opens with Wei Yan Yeong and Rose Wu introducing themselves and their topic- the Chinese Canadian experience in Burnaby and the people who have made important contributions to the city’s development. “A Family Farm” talks about Chinese-owned businesses which are family run. “The family-oriented nature of Chinese-owned businesses also extend to many of the early (and current) Chinese-owned farms in the Burnaby Big Bend area. When Chinese men first began farming in BC in the 1860s, a lot of them worked as labourers because they weren’t allowed to own land. After World War II many of these farmers were allowed to purchase lots, thanks to the Veterans Land Grant. These grants allowed returning veterans to purchase small parcels of land with government loans. Eventually, these men would start families on the farm, and many Chinese-owned farms became family-operated businesses where every member, male, female, child, and extended relatives were enlisted to work the grounds. And it was hard work, often from dawn to dusk, 6-7 days a week.” 02:23 – 07:50 This portion includes excerpts from Oral History interview with Josephine Chow (nee Hong) of Hop On Farms in the Burnaby Big Bend area. The interview was conducted by Burnaby Village Museum researcher Denise Fong. Josephine recalls growing up on the family farm with her six siblings. She tells of how the family pulled together money to purchase twelve acres along Marine Drive in 1951, her family’s background, daily life on the farm , responsibilities on the farm for her and her siblings and of how her mother had to balance working on the farm and providing for a family of ten to twelve people. 07:51 – 08:10 In this portion, hosts comment and reflect on their own experiences. “While it’s likely that a lot of this was done out of necessity and not being able to afford additional paid labourers, having grown up in Chinese households ourselves, we can definitely understand the rationale for these family-operated businesses and how it connects back to the Chinese understanding of family and kinship.” 08:11 – 09:06 In this portion, Rose and Wei provide information on the roots of the Chinese character for family “jia” in mandarin or “gah” in Cantonese. They explain that the term family is composed of two parts: the upper element is like a roof, symbolizing shelter, and the bottom part represents a pig which symbolizes food, whereby the Chinese character for family represents that of a farm. They provide a quote from the writings of Francois de Martin-Donos “In ancient China, the farm is an enterprise, a shelter that insures one food and work. The farm is a place to rely on, but in return, needs to be maintained, including a set of responsibilities. In other words, “family” is the insurance of a stable life.” 09:07 – 10:27 In this portion, the hosts speak about how traditional Chinese thought is heavily influenced by the teachings of Confucius and Confucius philosophy. They explain how Confucius emphasized five sets of human relationships that form the basis for society: ruler and minister, husband and wife, parents and child, sibling and sibling, friend and friend. Of these five, three are familial relationships also known as Filial piety – the respect and care for one’s familial superiors (such as parents, elders, and ancestors). They speak of how this is one of Confucianism’s main teachings and in this respect caring for family members is seen as a moral obligation. In China housing arrangements are in the form of siheyuan”s — a type of residence that featured a courtyard surrounded on all four sides with buildings. These traditionally housed one large extended family if they were wealthy enough. 10:28 – 13:08 In this portion, hosts provide further information on Josephine Chow’s family experience working and living on the “Hop On” family farm through the decades. An excerpt from the interview with Josephine Chow conducted by Denise Fong is included. In this excerpt, Josephine reflects on her past experiences on the farm and her present day experiences of her siblings running the farm. 13:09 -13:56 Final summary, credits and acknowledgements.
History/Biography
Podcast hosts, Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Rose Wu
Wei Yan Yeong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture
Gardens - Market Gardens
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Fong, Denise
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Responsibility
Burnaby Village Museum & Univeristy of British Columbia
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Notes
Title based contents of sound recording
See also Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong February 7, 2020 - BV020.6.1
Compilation of Research Resources used by authors Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong include:
Why is family important in China? https://medium.com/@francois_dmd/why-is-family-so-important-in-china-1617b13a67
Burnaby Village Museum - Interview with Josephine Chow by Denise Fong Feb. 7, 2020. BV020.6.1 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumsoundrecording12337
Covered Roots: The History of Vancouver's Chinese Farms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4WHS2Uf3JU
Burnaby Village Museum Shares Chinese-Canadian Farming History This Summer https://westcoastfood.ca/burnaby-village-museum-shares-chinese-canadian-farming-history-this-summer/
Chinese Market Gardeners in the City of Burnaby BC Continue to Practice Urban Agriculture https://cityfarmer.info/chinese-market-gardeners-in-the-city-of-burnaby-bc-continue-to-practice-urban-agriculture/
Chinese Market Gardening in BC https://www.bcfoodhistory.ca/chinese-market-gardening-bc/
Images
Audio Tracks
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A Pig's Tale

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo14365
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
Oct. 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
3 video recordings (mp4) (5 min., 28 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo, subtitles
Scope and Content
Item consists of part two in a two part video series "A Taste of History" created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates from the Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies program (ACAM). Part two is titled "A Pig's Tale". The film highlights the history o…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
A Taste of History Video series - 2020 subseries
Date
Oct. 2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
3 video recordings (mp4) (5 min., 28 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo, subtitles
Material Details
Script: Debbie Liang; Joty Gill Narration: Joty Gill Editor: Debbie Liang Subtitles: English; Simplified Chinese; Traditional Chinese Video Appearances: Kathy Lee; Eleanor Lee Illustrations and Animations: Debbie Liang Photos, Images & B-roll: Piggery photo, image courtesy of Elwin Xie; Douglas Road: City of Burnaby Archives, 477-841; Canada Way, City of Burnaby Archives, 556-522, photo by Peg Campbell; Red pig by Debbie Liang; Piglets sleeping, image courtesy of RoyBuri from pixabay, free to use; Chinese Zodiac, image courtesy of RoofOfAllLight from wikimedia, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license; Pictograph for Home by Debbie Liang; Pigs lying down, image courtesy of Elwin Xie; Council minutes all from heritageburnaby.com; Cleanliness illustration set by Debbie Liang; "The Heathen Chinese in British Columbia" from Library and Archives Canada; Laundryman spitting from Daily News, Prince Rupert in 1911; Slicer on counter at Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co., Burnaby Village Museum BV017.7.290; Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co. Store front, Burnaby Village Museum BV017.7.191; Medical Practices Disagreement illustration by Debbie Liang; Butchering pig, image courtesy of Elwin Xie; Chinatown brolls, courtesy of Food2 group from UBC's 2019 ACAM 390 Class; Black Rotary telephone beside ball pen on white printed paper, image courtesy of Pixabay from pexels.com, free to use; Burnaby Lake on a cloudy day, image courtesy of Flying Pegunin from wikipedia; The Vancouver Sun May 4, 1921 from newspapers.com; Vancouver Daily May 3, 1921 from newspapers.com; Reduce number of pigs illustration by Debbie Liang; Black and white photo of piggery, image courtesy of Elwin Xie; 2019 Piggery illustration by Debbie Liang Music and Sound Effects: "Acoustic Mediation 2" from audionautix; Pig Grunting sounds from Kiddopedia Animasl, Creative Commons 0; "Piano moment" & "November" from bensound.com; "Ding sound effect" from freesoundlibrary; Wuxia2_Guzheng_Pipa by PeriTune http://peritune.com; Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com; Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Video adapted from 2019 BVM intern project by Debbie Liang and Marcela Gomez Special thanks to: UBC: Joanna Yang, Jenny Lu, Denise Fong, Henry Yu; BVM: Kate Petrusa, Amy Wilson Changes to music may have been made for the purposes of this video
Accession Code
BV020.28.7
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of part two in a two part video series "A Taste of History" created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates from the Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies program (ACAM). Part two is titled "A Pig's Tale". The film highlights the history of Chinese pig farms also known as "Piggeries" in Burnaby. The film tells the story of how many of these farms were established by Chinese immigrants along Douglas Road (now Canada Way) between the 1890s and 1920s; the importance of the pig in the Chinese Culture as well as a way for Chinese immigrants to make a living and the racism and discriminatory bylaws that the Chinese pig farmers suffered that finally led to the closure of many of these farms. Content references three documented piggery ranches along Douglas Road: Ah Sam; Young Chung and Hop Hin Yen. The films are supported with voice over in english, subtitles, animation along with historical photographs. One version of the film is supported with subtitles in English while two other versions of the film are supported with subtitles in Simplified Chinese and Traditional Chinese.
History/Biography
In 2020, due to the restrictions of COVID-19, University of British Columbia student interns with the Burnaby Village Museum Chinese Canadian History in Burnaby project were asked to create virtual experiences to reimagine Burnaby Village Museum's historical Chinese Canadian programming in remote online spaces. Debbie Liang and Joty Gill (UBC alumni and graduates of Dr. Henry Yu's 2019 summer ACAM 390A Global Seminar to Aisa) returned to work with Burnaby Village Museum to create two short films showcasing the history of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants and piggeries in Burnaby.
Creator
Joty Gill
Debbie Liang
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Regulations
Agriculture
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture - Ranches
Animals - Pigs
Names
Liang, Debbie
Gill, Joty
Burnaby Village Museum
University of British Columbia
Xie, Elwin
Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Company
Ah Sam
Young Chung
Hop Hin Yen
Responsibility
University of British Columbia
UBC Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadian Studies
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Burnaby - Canada Way
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Notes
Transcribed title
Video
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A Taste of History Video series - 2020 subseries

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo14272
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Subseries
Physical Description
6 video recordings (mp4)
Scope and Content
Subseries consists of a two part video series "A Taste of History". Part one is titled "A Taste of History - Scraps and Dragons" and part two is titled " A Taste of History - A Pig's Tale". The films were created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates fro…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
A Taste of History Video series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Subseries
Physical Description
6 video recordings (mp4)
Accession Code
BV020.28
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Subseries consists of a two part video series "A Taste of History". Part one is titled "A Taste of History - Scraps and Dragons" and part two is titled " A Taste of History - A Pig's Tale". The films were created by Debbie Liang and Joty Gill, University of British Columbia alumni and graduates from the Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies program (ACAM). "Scraps and Dragons" provides information on the origins of the Chinese-Canadian culinary dish "chop suey" and tells the story of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants, highlighting the history of the "Dragon Inn" chop suey restaurant owned by Larry Lee. "A Pig's Tale" shares informaton on the history of Chinese pig farms also known as "Piggeries" in Burnaby, highlighting the experiences of Chinese Pig farmers along Douglas Road. Films include versions with English, Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese subtitles.
History/Biography
In 2020, due to the restrictions of COVID-19, UBC interns were asked to create virtual experiences to reimagine Burnaby Village Museum's historical Chinese Canadian programming in remote online spaces. Debbie Liang and Joty Gill (UBC alumni and graduates of Dr. Henry Yu's 2019 summer ACAM 390A Global Seminar to Asia) returned to work with Burnaby Village Museum to create two short films showcasing the history of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants and piggeries in Burnaby
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Racism
Social Issues - Discrimination
Buildings - Commercial - Restaurants
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture - Ranches
Animals - Pigs
Regulations
Names
Liang, Debbie
Gill, Joty
Burnaby Village Museum
University of British Columbia
Notes
Title based on contents of subseries
Less detail

Eating your way through Burnaby: A look at Chinese Canadian history through food

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo14762
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
27 Oct. 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (61 min., 56 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Kate Petrusa, Burnaby Village Museum assistant curator. The webinar is titled "Eating your way through Burnaby: A look at Chinese Canadian history through food" and is presented by Denise Fong, Planning Assistant for the City of Bu…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Fall 2020 subseries
Date
27 Oct. 2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (61 min., 56 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Presenter: Denise Fong
Host: Kate Petrusa
Date of Presentation: October 27 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks:61 min., 56 sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Accession Code
BV020.29.7
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Kate Petrusa, Burnaby Village Museum assistant curator. The webinar is titled "Eating your way through Burnaby: A look at Chinese Canadian history through food" and is presented by Denise Fong, Planning Assistant for the City of Burnaby. The zoom webinar is the seventh in a collection of seven "Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker series" webinars that were presented and made available to the public between September 29 and October 27, 2020. The live webinar and recording was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. In this webinar, Denise Fong talks about how Chinese Canadians have played a key role in supplying food to Burnaby’s community through their participation in the local market gardening, green grocer, and restaurant industries. The presentation is supported with historical maps, photographs, documents, census records and stories from recent research on the 1960s-1970s period in Burnaby’s Big Bend and Capitol Hill neighborhoods. In her presentation, Denise also talks about the history of Chinese Immigration in Canada including the political circumstances and legal barriers that Chinese migrants faced in the late nineteenth to early twentieth century. Denise highlights specific Chinese Canadian family farms in Burnaby including; the Jung family farm located on 5460 Douglas Road operated by Jung Chong and his wife Jung Gee Shee; "Hop On Farms" located on Marine Drive, operated by Chan Kow Hong, Sui Ha Hong and family; the Tong Yip Farm located on Byrne Road operated by D.T. "George" Yip and his wife, Yip Chow Won Tai. Denise also highlights her recent research regarding Chinese Canadian corner stores and green grocers in Burnaby including; The Lee Kee grocery store located at 3824 East Hastings Street, owned and operated by Yow Lee Ko and his wife Say Jan Chan; the Burnaby Market located at 3942 East Hastings Street, owned and operated by Chin Yin Wong; the Quon Bros. located at 3702 East Hastings Street.; Y. Hoy Produce Co. located at 4092 East Hastings Street operated by Hoy Yen; Louie's Food Basket located at 5886 South East Marine Drive operated by Hoy Bew Louie, his wife Poy Yee and later by thier son Bing Louie and Tommy's Market located in Burnaby's Edmonds neighbourhood, operated by Tommy Chu. Denise also provides a detailed history of Tommy Chu and family who owned and operated Tommy's Market. Denise tells of how in the early 1970s, Chinese grocers in the lower mainland came together and formed the Lower Mainland Independent Grocers Association and Lower Mainland Grocers Co-Op. The organization was formed to protect the rights and promote businesses of independent grocers. In closing, Denise explains how her research of Chinese Canadian history in Burnaby continues and by the end of the project, the information will be made accessible in the form of a publication.
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Discrimination
Agriculture - Farms
Social Issues - Racism
Buildings - Commercial - Grocery Stores
Names
Petrusa, Kate
Fong, Denise
Jung, Chung Chong
Tommy's Produce
Lee Kee Grocery
Louie's Food Basket
Louie, Hoy Bew
Jung, Gee Shee
Hong, Chan Kow
Hong, Sui Ha
Yip, D.T. "George"
Yip, Chow Won Tai
Ko, Yow Lee
Ko, Chan Say Jan
Burnaby Market
Wong, Chin Yin
Quon Bros.
Y. Hoy Produce Co.
Yen, Hoy
Louie, Poy Yee
Louie, Bing
Chu, Tommy
Chu, Sharon
Chu, Calvin
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 3824 Hastings Street
Burnaby - Hastings Street
Burnaby - 3942 Hastings Street
Burnaby - 3702 Hastings Street
Burnaby - 4092 Hastings Street
Burnaby - 5286 Marine Drive
Burnaby - 5460 Douglas Road
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Burnaby 5886 Marine Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Burnaby Heights Area
Notes
Title based on contents of video recording
Video recording was edited for publication on Heritage Burnaby. Original mp4 video recording (BV020.29.7.1) is 72 min., 14 sec.
Video

Eating your way through Burnaby: A look at Chinese Canadian history through food, 27 Oct. 2020

Eating your way through Burnaby: A look at Chinese Canadian history through food, 27 Oct. 2020

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/media/hpo/_Data/_BVM_Moving_Images/2020_0029_0007_002.mp4
Less detail

The Fecundity of Food and Family: A Natural Niche for Chinese Canadians in Burnaby

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo14760
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
20 Oct. 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (62 min., 01 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum's Kate Petrusa. The webinar is titled "The Fecundity of Food and Family: A Natural Niche for Chinese Canadians in Burnaby" and is presented by UBC students, Debbie Liang; Joty Gill; Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong.…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Fall 2020 subseries
Date
20 Oct. 2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (62 min., 01 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Presenters: Debbie Liang; Joty Gill; Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong
Host: Kate Petrusa
Date of Presentation: October 20 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks:62 min., 01 sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Accession Code
BV020.29.5
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum's Kate Petrusa. The webinar is titled "The Fecundity of Food and Family: A Natural Niche for Chinese Canadians in Burnaby" and is presented by UBC students, Debbie Liang; Joty Gill; Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong. The zoom webinar is the fifth in a collection of seven "Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker series" webinars that were presented and made available to the public between September 29 and October 27, 2020. The live webinar and recording was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. In this webinar, the four UBC students, present their research on Chinese Canadian involvement in food and farming in early Burnaby. The students were participants in a joint partnership between Burnaby Village Museum and the UBC iniative for student teaching and research in Chinese Canadian Studies (INSTRCC), the UBC Asian Canadian & Asian Migration Studies program (ACAM), the UBC Centre for Community Engaged Learning (CCEL), the UBC Faculty of Land and Food Systems, UBC Go Global and UBC St. John's College (SJC). In 2020, due to the restrictions of COVID-19, the interns were asked to create virtual experiences to reimagine Burnaby Village Museum's historical Chinese Canadian programming in remote online spaces. Debbie Liang and Joty Gill (UBC alumni and graduates of Dr. Henry Yu's 2019 summer ACAM 390A Global Seminar to Asia) returned to work with Burnaby Village Museum to create two short films showcasing the history of Chinese Canadian Chop Suey restaurants and Piggeries in Burnaby. Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong (students in the UBC Faculty of Land and Food Systems) created a three episode podcast series "Back to the Roots" which delved into the topics of family-operated farming businesses, Chinese contributions to early local and alternative food systems, and Traditional Chinese Medicine and herbalism. The webinar begins with Joty Gill and Debbie Liang talking about their project, “A Taste of History Film Series”. They describe their research and challenges in the development of their two films “Scraps and Dragons” and “A Pig's Tale”. Debbie and Joty support their presentation with slides including excerpts from their films. Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong talk about their project which consisted of a three episode podcast series titled "Back to the Roots" which delved into the topics of family-operated farming businesses, Chinese contributions to early local and alternative food systems, and Traditional Chinese Medicine and herbalism. They describe their research, challenges and highlights which resulted in the three podcasts “A Family Farm”; “Where is your food from?” and “Chinese Herbalist Shops and TCM”. Rose and Wei Yan support their presentation with slides including excerpts from their podcasts. At the close of their presentation the students reflect on the importance of sharing personal aspects of Chinese Canadian History and answer questions from webinar participants.
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture
Gardens - Market Gardens
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Buildings - Commercial - Restaurants
Names
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Petrusa, Kate
Fong, Denise
University of British Columbia
Burnaby Village Museum
Notes
Title based on contents of video recording
Video recording was edited for publication on Heritage Burnaby. Original mp4 video recording (BV020.29.5.1) is 72 min., 25 sec.
Video

The Fecundity of Food and Family: A Natural Niche for Chinese Canadians in Burnaby, 20 Oct. 2020

The Fecundity of Food and Family: A Natural Niche for Chinese Canadians in Burnaby, 20 Oct. 2020

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/media/hpo/_Data/_BVM_Moving_Images/2020_0029_0005_002.mp4
Less detail

Interview with Denise Fong by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14276
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:60:38 min.)
Scope and Content
Item consists of an audio recording of a Zoom interview with Denise Fong conducted by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at UBC. The interview was conducted with Denise Fong as part of the students' research for their podcast "Where is your food from?". This podcast…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:60:38 min.)
Material Details
Interviewers: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Interviewee: Denise Fong Interview Date: September 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:60:38 Recording device: Zoom video communication platform Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.2
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of an audio recording of a Zoom interview with Denise Fong conducted by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at UBC. The interview was conducted with Denise Fong as part of the students' research for their podcast "Where is your food from?". This podcast was part two in a series of three "Back to the Roots" podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. In this series the students connected their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. "Where is your food from?" explores contemporary versus historical alternative food movements and how early Chinese farmers in the lower mainland had to be creative in their business tactics in order to survive in a local food system that discriminated against their race. 00:00 - 4:51 Denise Fong introduces herself and provides a summary of the work that she has done while working as a researcher on the Chinese Canadian History Research project for the Burnaby Village Museum. Denise explains how much of her research has focused on the history of Chinese Canadian market gardeners and green grocers and their presence in Burnaby. Denise tells of how many Chinese immigrants found it hard to find work due to racial discrimination which led many Chinese men to work in agriculture and farming. Her research has shown that many of the Chinese farms were located in the Big Bend area of Burnaby. 04:52 – 08:24 In this segment, Denise elaborates on the “truck” or “market” farming industry for Chinese farmers in Burnaby. Denise explains how “truck” farming was a mode for distributing produce from Chinese farms and some of the challenges the Chinese farmers faced. 08:25 – 14:10 In this segment Denise talks about peddling as another mode to distribute farm produce and how this was often dominated by Chinese Canadians since they were restricted from accessing other jobs. Denise explains how the Chinese peddlers would have their own routes with customers who depended on them to bring the produce to them. Denise provides an example of racial discrimination whereby a Burnaby Bylaw prevented people of Chinese descent from working for the city. 14:11 – 22: 39 In this segment, Denise describes how in the 1950s and 1960s, produce distribution networks for Chinese Canadian farmers in Burnaby expanded to larger stores and wholesalers including Woodward’s, Safeway in Burnaby, MacDonald’s Consolidated and Kelly Douglas. Denise provides specific examples of Burnaby families and tells the story of Chinese Canadian Cecil Lee, a produce buyer for Kelly Douglas. In the mid 1970s Lee, was asked to oversee the import of Chinese mandarin oranges into Canada and was responsible for the design of a new cardboard box to replace the wooden crates that held the mandarin oranges. 22:40 – 33:28 In this segment, Denise provides information on Chinese farming methods and practices that she gathered through her research. Information gathered from interviews, research papers and an article in Harrowsmith magazine suggest that many of the Big Bend farms in Burnaby relied on crop rotation, companion planting and intercropping along with traditional organic fertilizers that were available. Denise also tells of how Chinese farmers often relied on traditional methods that they brought from Southern China including the creation of raised beds to avoid damage due to flooding. Wei Yan comments that many of these traditional methods are being reintroduced as a new sustainable way of farming. Research done by Wei Yan found that when chemical fertilizers were introduced informational brochures included Chinese translations. 33:29 – 38:30 In this segment Rose and Wei Yan speak to Denise about the cultural demographic of farmers in the Big Bend area of Burnaby and what types of crops were grown. Denise comments that to her knowledge there were mostly Chinese farmers in this area but there were some European farmers as well. Produce that was grown on the farms was mostly market driven by the local consumers and it wasn’t until the 1970s that there was a bigger demand to grow Chinese vegetables to supply the growing Chinese population. Denise shares personal experience of what she learned after a visit to a local farm and the different methods that the farmer used for growing crops. The three discuss the importance of innovation and adaptability in growing techniques that Chinese farmers have used. 38:31 – 46:23 In this segment, Rose and Wei Yan speak to Denise about the discrimination barriers that Chinese farmers had to face. Denise speaks about discriminatory bylaws and regulations that targeted Chinese farmers including the Peddling tax. She tells of how this tax, persecution to peddlers and restrictions resulted in the emergence of a new industry of Chinese green grocers. Denise names Chinese trade organizations that were formed in response to the social and economic segregation and marginalization that Chinese farmers and retailers faced. Denise references research done by Natalie Gibb and Hannah Wittman from their article “Parallel Alternatives: Chinese-Canadian farmers and the Metro Vancouver local food movement” as well as research by Harry Con and Edgar Wickberg. Denise also provides information that she has gathered from Chinese farmers in Burnaby including the Yip family who were able to purchase land after World War II through the Veterans Land Act and how prior to World War II it was very difficult for Chinese immigrants to purchase land. 46:24 – 1:00:38 In this segment the group discusses how Chinese farmers have adapted in the market garden farm distribution system and the introduction of retail spaces on their farms as part of the new local food movement. Denise, Rose and Wei Yan reflect on how their interview with Denise Fong and research resources will support their podcast series and exhibits at Burnaby Village Museum.
History/Biography
Interviewer biographies: Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. Interviewee biography: Denise Fong is a historical researcher at Burnaby Village Museum. She has degrees in Anthropology (BA) and Archaeology (MA), and is completing her doctoral degree at UBC in Interdisciplinary Studies. Her primary research interests are in Chinese Canadian history and critical heritage studies. She is the co-curator of the Burnaby Village Museum “Across the Pacific” exhibition, and the Museum of Vancouver’s “A Seat at the Table – Chinese Immigration and British Columbia”.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Agriculture
Agriculture - Crops
Agriculture - Farms
Gardens - Market Gardens
Foods
Names
Fong, Denise
Yeong, Wei Yan
Wu, Rose
Notes
Title based on contents of recording
Item was originally recorded as an mp4 video and converted to an mp3 sound recording for public access on Heritage Burnaby. To access the video recording, contact Burnaby Village Museum.
For recording of podcast "Where is your food from?" see BV020.28.4
Images
Audio Tracks

Interview with Denise Fong by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong

Less detail

Where is your food from?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14270
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:17:10 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part two in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part two is titled “Where is your food from?" The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
UBC Partnership series
Subseries
Back to the Roots Podcast series - 2020 subseries
Date
2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (00:17:10 min)
Material Details
Podcasts hosts: Rose Wu; Wei Yan Yeong Guest: Denise Fong Music: prod. riddiman Podcast Date: October 2020 Total Number of tracks: 1 Total Length of all tracks: 00:17:10 min Photograph info: Store front of Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee & Co in Victoria, B.C., 1975. BV017.7.191
Accession Code
BV020.28.4
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a recording of part two in a series of three “Back to the Roots” podcasts about the history of Chinese-Canadian farming in Burnaby and the lower mainland. Part two is titled “Where is your food from?" The podcasts were created by students Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia Faculty and while student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. In this series the students connect their knowledge of food systems to their shared Chinese heritage in order to discover how Chinese Canadian history is rooted in their local food systems. "Where is your food from?" explores contemporary versus historical alternative food movements and how early Chinese farmers in the lower mainland had to be creative in their business tactics in order to survive in a local food system that discriminated against their race. 00:00-02:45 The podcast opens with an audio clip from Harvard University professor and world renowned food journalist and author of "The Ominvore's Dilemma", Michael Pollan. Wei Yan Yeong and Rose Wu introduce themselves and their topic "Where is your food from?" They comment on the global philosophy "Eat local, think global" and question whether this philosphy ignores the struggles faced by local farms operated by immigrant workers back in the day. They comment "Unlike how these alternative food movements are heralded as sustainable, healthy, and even sometimes trendy now in today’s standards, for Chinese farmers, these alternative food movements were necessary for survival against discriminatory practices entrenched in the food system they were servicing." 02:46 - 06:21 This portion provides background on Chinese immigrant farmers and the establishment of "market gardens" or "truck farms". Rose and Wei Yan tell of how up to the 1970s, Chinese farms produced mostly European staples such as potatoes, carrots, tomatoes, corn and cabbage because there was no market for Chinese crops. Many of the Chinese immigrants were forced into farming and other menial jobs due to discriminatory practices that excluded them from other types of employment. The hosts provide a synopsis of Burnaby Bylaw Number 4, created in 1892, "The Chinese and Japanese Exclusion Bylaw" which prohibited any Chinese or Japanese person from working for the Municipality of Burnaby. Burnaby Village Museum researcher Denise Fong provides information on Chinese immigrants in Burnaby, how many of them were farmers in the Big Bend area and how hard it was for them to own land due to racial discrimination. Denise also refers to an article in"Harrowsmith" magazine (c.1980s) where thirty five Chinese-Canadians operated farms in Burnaby. 06:22 - 09:24 This portion provides a description of Chinese market farms and vegetable peddling. Background information about the history of market farms, truck farms and vegetable peddling in Burnaby and the lower mainland provided by Denise Fong. 09:24 - 12:03 This portion talks about the policies put in place to create further barriers to Chinese farmers. Denise Fong provides information regarding the civic bylaws that were created to restrict produce sales, fines and fees that were imposed on peddlers, establishment of green grocers, the Chinese Marketing Act, the establishment of organizations to support Chinese farmers including the Chinese Growers Assocation. 12:04 - 15:00 This portion talks about how Chinese-Canadians played important roles in conventional "long" food networks. Denise Fong provides information in how Chinese Canadians participated in the larger food distribution network in British Columbia. Denise shares a story of Chinese-Canadian Cecil Lee and how he introduced the import of Chinese mandarin oranges into British Columbia. 15:01 - 16:29 Final summary regarding the contraditions in our local food system that continue to persist today and how despite the improved status of Chinese-Canadians in British Columbia, cheap, migrant labourers continue to be an overlooked part of our local food system. This portion includes a recorded excerpt from M.L.A. Mabel Elmore regarding Temporary Foreign Workers (presented before the NDP caucous in 2015). 16:29 - 17:22 Credits, thanks and acknowledgements. Special thanks to Duncan McCue and M.LA. Mabel Elmore. Music created by P. Ruderman
History/Biography
Podcast hosts, Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong are University of British Columbia students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and student interns at Burnaby Village Museum. Guest, Denise Fong is a historical researcher at Burnaby Village Museum. She has degrees in Anthropology (BA) and Archaeology (MA), and is completing her doctoral degree at UBC in Interdisciplinary Studies. Her primary research interests are in Chinese Canadian history and critical heritage studies. She is the co-curator of the Burnaby Village Museum “Across the Pacific” exhibition, and the Museum of Vancouver’s “A Seat at the Table – Chinese Immigration and British Columbia”.
Media Type
Sound Recording
Creator
Rose Wu
Wei Yan Yeong
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Agriculture - Farms
Agriculture
Gardens - Market Gardens
Social Issues - Discrimination
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Fong, Denise
Wu, Rose
Yeong, Wei Yan
Burnaby Village Museum
McCue, Duncan
Elmore, Mabel
Responsibility
Burnaby Village Museum & Univeristy of British Columbia
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Marine Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Notes
Title based contents of sound recording
For associated video recording of research interview with Denise Fong - see BV020.28.2
Compilation of Research Resources used by authors Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong include:
Lim, S. (2015). Feeding the "Greenest City": Historicizing "Local," Labour, and the Postcolonial Politics of Eating. Canadian Journal of Urban Research, 24(1), 78-100. Retrieved October 22, 2020, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/26195279
Mable Elmore’s statement on the plight of temporary foreign workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LF4_js0R-Mo&ab_channel=BCNDPCaucus
Michael Pollen’s speech at UBC Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1n-kRJhPPQ&feature=emb_title&ab_channel=LFSLearningCentre
Gibb, Natalie & Wittman, Hannah. (2012). Parallel alternatives: Chinese-Canadian farmers and the Metro Vancouver local food movement. Local Environment. 18. 1-19. 10.1080/13549839.2012.714763.
Yu, J. (2014, March 31). The integration of the Chinese market gardens of southern British Columbia, 1885-1930 [R]. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0228676
Burnaby Village Museum, Interview with Denise Fong by Rose Wu and Wei Yan Yeong, 2020. BV020.28.2 https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumvideo14276
Images
Audio Tracks
Less detail

Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo18877
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
22 Sep. 2022
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (91 min., 5 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Curator, Jane Lemke with presentations and discussions by Megan Innes, Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra and Denise Fong. The webinar is titled "Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Fall 2022 subseries
Date
22 Sep. 2022
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (91 min., 5 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Host: Jane Lemke
Presenters: Meagan Innes; Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra; Denise Fong
Date of Presentation: Tuesday, September 22, 2022. 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks: 91 min., 5 sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Original recording of 91 min., 5 sec.was edited to 79 min., 2 sec. for viewing on Heritage Burnaby
Accession Code
BV022.27.4
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Curator, Jane Lemke with presentations and discussions by Megan Innes, Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra and Denise Fong. The webinar is titled "Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum". The webinar is the fourth in a series of six webinars presented in partnership by Burnaby Village Museum and Burnaby Public Library. The live webinar was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. Community members were invited to participate by bringing questions during the interactive online sessions. In this webinar speakers and host discuss what it takes to bring more diverse stories into the Burnaby Village Museum and explore the history of discriminatory practices and museological trends at the Burnaby Village Museum and other museums. Speakers highlight recent projects taking place at Burnaby Village Museum to ensure that other diverse stories of communities are being represented and told. Speakers each provide a ten minute presentation followed by discussions. The first speaker in the webinar is Meagan Innes. When talking about place, Meagan talks about her ancestral ties to certain places including the site where Burnaby Village Museum now stands and what it means to her Indigenous ancestors. Meagan shares stories from her grandfather John Cordocedo of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation and how her grandfather, her great grandfather and ancestors have lived, hunted, gathered and traveled on this land. Meagan talks about the work that she’s been involved with at the Burnaby Village Museum including the development of the Indigenous Learning House, the Matriarch’s Garden, the Indigenous History in Burnaby Resource Guide and development of Indigenous educational programing and projects. Meagan reflects on the collaboration and relationships that have developed during this work with Indigenous artists and Indigenous knowledge keepers. The second speaker in the webinar is Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra “Sharn”. Sharn's presentation is titled “From Orientalism and Colonialism to hope and future possibility”. Sharn speaks of her personal experience visiting the Burnaby Village Museum’s Chinese herbalist exhibit with her son and his school in 2019. Sharn expresses the racist impressions that she witnessed from the young students who visited the exhibit and her reaction re-visiting the exhibit in 2021 after the exhibit was revitalized. Sharn describes the much more positive aspects of the revitalized exhibit which transformed it from “Nostalgic Colonialism” to a place of meaningful belonging for racialized communities that includes faces and personal stories. Sharn looks forward to being a part of Burnaby’s next venture which looks at the history of Burnaby’s South Asian Canadian Community and shares some of her research while working on this project. The third speaker in the webinar is Denise Fong. Denise’s presentation is titled “Chinese Canadian History in Burnaby”. Denise provides some background regarding her work as a researcher working for the City of Burnaby. Denise takes us on a journey of her research in compiling non white experiences in Burnaby as well as uncovering personal stories from Burnaby families living and working in Burnaby. Denise points out discriminatory practices within Burnaby including the Chinese and Japanese Exclusion Bylaw in 1892 and the history of Chinese immigration to Canada including the Chinese Head Tax. Denise reflects on her own work, the work of students from UBC and volunteers from the Chinese Canadian History Advisory committee in building relationships with Chinese Canadian families within Burnaby to obtain stories and family records. Denise points out the various projects that these relationships and research have contributed to including; Heritage interpretive plaques installed at the Riverway Golf Course and in the Big Bend area of Burnaby, an award winning exhibit at Burnaby Village Museum “Across the Pacific”, new Chinese Canadian resources available on “Heritage Burnaby”, the revitalization of the Chinese Herbalist shop exhibit “Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee and Co.” at Burnaby Village Museum, the Chinese Market Garden at Burnaby Village Museum, the creation of a "Burnaby Farm Tour" map highlighting Chinese farms in the Big Bend area and a publication titled "Chinese Canadian History in Burnaby Resource Guide". Following the presentations, host Jane Lemke enters a conversation with Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra and Denise Fong. Jane intiates the conversations with questions regarding further work that is necessary for Burnaby Village Museum and other museums to move forward in readdressing the narratives beyond white colonial settler perspectives to include stories of marginalized and racialized people who are under represented and often forgotten.
History/Biography
Jane Lemke has worked in various museums in the Lower Mainland and has been the Curator at Burnaby Village Museum since 2019. Her educational background includes a Master of Arts degree in History and a Master of Museum Studies degree. Her research focus has been on trauma and memory and its role in shaping Canadian identity. She loves sharing memories and stories of Burnaby with the public. Jane sits on the Council of the BC Museums Association and is the Chair of the BC Museums Association Professional Development and Education Committee.
Meagan Innes is from Xwmélts'tstn úxwumixw (Capilano Village). She is a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh First Nation Educator and a multidisciplinary Artist. Meagan completed her Masters of Education around examining connection to place, kinship and to spén´em (plant) s7ek_w’í7tel (siblings) pén´em (plant things). She is an emerging artist who is waking up her Ancestral skills and practicing the ways of her Ancestors. She is exploring reshaping pedagogy to embody traditional ways of knowing and being, more specifically Sḵwx̱wú7mesh traditional ways of learning, knowing and being. She had recently completed the First Nations Language Program at Simon Fraser University to become a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh langauge speaker which is the language of her Ancestors.
Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra (Sharn) is Coordinator of the South Asian Studies Institute at the University of the Fraser Valley, co-curator of exhibits at the Sikh Heritage Museum, located in the National Historic Site Gur Sikh Temple in Abbotsford, BC, and a sessional faculty in the Department of History at UFV. Sharn’s PhD looks at the affective experiences of racialized museum visitors through a critical race theory lens. She’s a passionate activist, building bridges between community and academia through museum work. She is a past member of the BC Museums Association, and currently a Director with the Pacific Canada Heritage Centre - Museum of Migration.
Denise Fong is a historical researcher with the City of Burnaby and Ph.D. candidate at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on Chinese Canadian identity and meaning making in heritage spaces. Since 2009, Denise has coordinated a number of historical research and public history projects, including SFU’s From C to C: Chinese Canadian Stories of Migration and UBC’s Chinese Canadian Stories: Uncommon Histories from a Common Past. She co-curated two award-winning Chinese Canadian exhibitions locally — Burnaby Village Museum’s Across the Pacific exhibition and the Chinese Canadian Museum of BC/Museum of Vancouver’s A Seat at the Table exhibition. She is a UBC Public Scholar and currently serves as the research director for UBC's Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadian Studies
Creator
Burnaby Village Museum
Subjects
Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Food
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - First contact with Europeans
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Social life and customs
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Art
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Languages
Indigenous peoples - Canada - , Treatment of
Plants
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Buildings - Civic - Museums
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Fong, Denise
Lemke, Jane
Innes, Meagan
Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation
Sandhra, Sharanjit Kaur "Sharn" Dr.
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Video

Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum, 22 Sep. 2022

Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum, 22 Sep. 2022

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/media/hpo/_Data/_BVM_Moving_Images/2022_0027_0004_002.mp4
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From Fuki to Ofuro: Japanese Canadians in Burnaby

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo17535
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
7 Oct. 2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (84 min., 20 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar on the Burnaby Village Museum Facebook page on October 7, 2021. The webinar was hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Community Engagement Coordinator, Christina Froschauer and presented by Raymond Nakamura. The webinar is titled "From Fuki to O…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Fall 2021 subseries
Date
7 Oct. 2021
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (84 min., 20 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Presenter: Raymond Nakamura
Host: Christina Froschauer
Date of Presentation: October 7, 2021
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks: 84 min., 20 sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication and Facebook platforms
Recording Note: Film was edited from it's original recorded version (97 min., 37 sec.) to edited version (84 min., 20 sec.) for public viewing on Heritage Burnaby.
Accession Code
BV021.31.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar on the Burnaby Village Museum Facebook page on October 7, 2021. The webinar was hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Community Engagement Coordinator, Christina Froschauer and presented by Raymond Nakamura. The webinar is titled "From Fuki to Ofuro: Japanese Canadians in Burnaby". In this webinar, Raymond Nakamura shares his own Japanese family history (Yamashita and Nakamura families) in British Columbia; provides insight into the Fuki plant (also known as butterbur) which was used by Japanese Canadians as a special culinary plant; describes the customs behind the ofuro (Japanese bathhouse) at Burnaby Village Museum and shares some of his research on Japanese Canadians who lived in Burnaby prior to the internment of Japanese Canadians in World War II. The title slide of Raymond's presentation reads "Japanese Canadians in Pre-War Burnaby". Raymond's presentation is supported with his own illustrations along with historical photographs from personal and public archival collections including the Nikkei National Museum, The City of Burnaby Archives and the Burnaby Village Museum. Japanese families highlighted in Raymond's talk include the Nakamuras; Yamashitas; Yasuis; Kokuryos; Kojimas; Shimotakaharas; Kariatsumaris; Ibatas; Marie Karamoto family and Dr. Taihei Kuzuhara. Many historical references regarding Burnaby residents come from Burnaby publications; "In the Shadow by the Sea : recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village" and "Pioneer Tales of Burnaby". During breaks in the presentation, Christina and Raymond take questions from webinar participants on zoom as well as viewers from the live recording on Burnaby Village Museum's Facebook page. Resource links shared during presentation include: Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre https://centre.nikkeiplace.org/res.../search-the-collection/ Landscapes of Injustic Archive https://loi.uvic.ca/archive/ Raymond's Brain https://www.raymondsbrain.com/ In the Shadow by the Sea : recollections of Burnaby's Barnet Village https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumlibrary5173
History/Biography
Raymond Nakamura was born and raised in Toronto, and has lived most of his adult life in Vancouver. Holding a PhD in Marine Sciences from University of Toronto, Raymond’s study specializing in the hydrodynamics of sand dollars. More recently, he has been recognized for his research work on Japanese Canadians, leading to fact and fiction writing, co-hosting podcasts and delivering creative presentations on the subject –one of which we are honoured to see today. Raymond has worked collaboratively with cultural centers across the Greater Vancouver Region, including Science World, the Vancouver Aquarium, the Nikkei National Museum, the Gulf of Georgia Cannery, to name a few.
Subjects
Persons - Japanese Canadians
Social Issues - Racism
Wars - World War, 1939-1945
Plants
Names
Shimotakahara, Hideko
Yasui, Harding
Yasui, Sukegoro
Kokuryo, Hideko
Karamoto, Marie
Nakamura, Raymond
Yamashita family
Kuzuhara, Dr. Taihei
Froschauer , Christina
Burnaby Village Museum
Kojima family
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Notes
Title based on contents of video recording
Video

From Fuki to Ofuro: Japanese Canadians in Burnaby, 7 Oct. 2021

From Fuki to Ofuro: Japanese Canadians in Burnaby, 7 Oct. 2021

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/media/hpo/_Data/_BVM_Moving_Images/2021_0031_0001_003.mp4
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Burnaby South anti-racism students

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivephoto97996
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2000]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Burnaby South Secondary School students Janet Chen and Tahilia Rebello posing next to a poster promoting the "International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination."
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2000]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Record No.
535-3100
Accession Number
2018-12
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Burnaby South Secondary School students Janet Chen and Tahilia Rebello posing next to a poster promoting the "International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination."
Photographer
Bartel, Mario
Subjects
Persons - Students
Buildings - Schools
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Burnaby South High School
Notes
Title based on caption
Collected by editorial for use in a February 2000 issue of the Burnaby NewsLeader
Caption from metadata: "Janet Chen, 18, and Tahilia Rebello, 17, are part of the Rebels Out Against Racism (ROAR) club at Burnaby South."
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 5455 Rumble Street
Burnaby - Rumble Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Alta Vista (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Clinton-Glenwood Area
Images
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T. Boyd Haskell at microphone

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto17372
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1954]
Collection/Fonds
Simpsons-Sears Limited Burnaby fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17.5 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of T. Boyd Haskell, Manager of Simpsons-Sears, Burnaby standing on a stage and speaking into a microphone at an unidentified event. A man dressed in black face is seated behind him.
Administrative History
The use of black face minstrel performances were not neutral forms of entertainment. Black face creates damaging stereotypes about black people and these same stereotypes underpin anti black racism that feeds injustice towards black people.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Simpsons-Sears Limited Burnaby fonds
Series
Simpsons-Sears scrapbook series
Date
[1954]
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17.5 x 13 cm
Accession Code
BV021.26.122
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of T. Boyd Haskell, Manager of Simpsons-Sears, Burnaby standing on a stage and speaking into a microphone at an unidentified event. A man dressed in black face is seated behind him.
Administrative History
The use of black face minstrel performances were not neutral forms of entertainment. Black face creates damaging stereotypes about black people and these same stereotypes underpin anti black racism that feeds injustice towards black people.
Subjects
Social Issues - Racism
Performances - Dramatic Performances
Names
Haskell, T. Boyd
Media Type
Photograph
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Photograph was removed from original scrapbook with newspaper clippings, photographs and ephemera
Images
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Dogwood Lodge closure

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivephoto97998
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2000]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Auriel Arner and Eira Koch visit with their mother, Ivy Hear, at the Dogwood Lodge, shortly before its closure.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2000]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Record No.
535-3102
Accession Number
2018-12
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Auriel Arner and Eira Koch visit with their mother, Ivy Hear, at the Dogwood Lodge, shortly before its closure.
Photographer
Bartel, Mario
Subjects
Persons - Seniors
Persons - Families
Public Services - Health Services
Buildings - Residential - Seniors Housing
Notes
Title based on caption
Collected by editorial for use in a February 2000 issue of the Burnaby NewsLeader
Caption from metadata: "Auriel Arner and Eira Koch visit with their mother, Ivy Hear, one of five remaining patients waiting to be moved out of the Dogwood Seniors' Home."
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Willingdon Avenue
Burnaby - 3755 Willingdon Avenue
Planning Study Area
Cascade-Schou Area
Images
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Thank you from City of Burnaby

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo15400
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
9 Apr. 2020
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum COVID-19 collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (58 sec.) : digital, 24 fps, col., sd., stereo
Scope and Content
Film clip of Burnaby Mayor Mike Hurley and Burnaby City staff showing their appreciation to frontline workers, first responders and healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Burnaby City Hall and other city facilities have decorated windows with colourful hearts and staff members are standin…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum COVID-19 collection
Date
9 Apr. 2020
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (58 sec.) : digital, 24 fps, col., sd., stereo
Accession Code
BV021.2.14
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Film clip of Burnaby Mayor Mike Hurley and Burnaby City staff showing their appreciation to frontline workers, first responders and healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Burnaby City Hall and other city facilities have decorated windows with colourful hearts and staff members are standing outside buildings holding hearts of appreciation. The film closes with people holding hearts and conveying words of thanks in multiple languages.
History/Biography
Video taken by the City of Burnaby Marketing Department in 2020. The original intent of the clip was to produce communications about the pandemic and changes throughout the City that residents needed to be aware of.
Creator
City of Burnaby
Subjects
Officials - Mayors and Reeves
Buildings - Civic - City Halls
Public Services - Health Services
Buildings - Civic - Community Centres
Public Services - Municipal Services
Pandemics - COVID-19
Names
Hurley, Mike
City of Burnaby
Burnaby City Hall
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 4949 Canada Way
Burnaby - Canada Way
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Notes
Title based on contents of film
Video

Thank you from City of Burnaby, 9 Apr. 2020

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Heart attack survivors

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivephoto97987
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2000]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
File
Physical Description
2 photographs (tiff) : col.
Scope and Content
File contains photographs of heart attack survivors Carol Martin, with her pet bird, and Don Elliot, in his photography studio.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2000]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
File
Record No.
535-3092
Accession Number
2018-12
Physical Description
2 photographs (tiff) : col.
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
File contains photographs of heart attack survivors Carol Martin, with her pet bird, and Don Elliot, in his photography studio.
Photographer
Bartel, Mario
Subjects
Persons
Public Services - Health Services
Notes
Title based on caption
Collected by editorial for use in a February 2000 issue of the Burnaby NewsLeader
Caption from metadata for 535-3092-1: "Carol Martin has her pet bird, Birdy, to keep her company after her heart attack."
Caption from metadata for 535-3092-2: "Don Elliot says eventhough he was physically able to return to his photography studio after his heart attack, it took him much longer to be ready mentally."
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Images
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Charmaine Stevens

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivephoto96936
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2001]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Charmaine Stevens, a staff member with the Canadian Mental Health Association, posing on a bench next to a bus stop, with SkyTrain tracks visible on the other side of the road.
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2001]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Record No.
535-2491
Accession Number
2018-12
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : col.
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Charmaine Stevens, a staff member with the Canadian Mental Health Association, posing on a bench next to a bus stop, with SkyTrain tracks visible on the other side of the road.
Photographer
Bartel, Mario
Subjects
Transportation - Public Transit
Public Services - Health Services
Notes
Title based on caption
Collected by editorial for use in a June 2001 issue of the Burnaby NewsLeader
Caption from metadata: "Charmaine Stevens, of the Canadian Mental Health Association, says the ongoing bus strike has been difficult on her clients, most of whom are low income earners."
Images
Less detail

Oakalla hospital

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto17072
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
[1985]
Collection/Fonds
Oakalla Prison collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. slide ; 35 mm
Scope and Content
Photograph of Oakalla Prison hospital (Lower Regional Correctional Centre).
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Oakalla Prison collection
Series
Oakalla correctional facility photographs series
Date
[1985]
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. slide ; 35 mm
Accession Code
BV991.45.540
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Oakalla Prison hospital (Lower Regional Correctional Centre).
Subjects
Buildings - Public - Detention Facilities
Public Services - Health Services
Names
Oakalla Prison Farm
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 5220 Oakmount Crescent
Burnaby - Oakmount Crescent
Media Type
Photograph
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Oakalla Area
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Note in black ink on slide frame reads "Oakalla hospital / 1985?"
Images
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Brentwood Park Elementary School fashion show

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/archivephoto96896
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2001]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
File
Physical Description
2 photographs (tiff) : col.
Scope and Content
File contains photographs of a fashion show organized by students at Brentwood Park Elementary School to benefit Oxfam and discuss the role of sweatshops in the fashion industry. Photographs show the students in the fashion show wearing brand-name clothing and other students assembled and seated on…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[2001]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
File
Record No.
535-2453
Accession Number
2018-12
Physical Description
2 photographs (tiff) : col.
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
File contains photographs of a fashion show organized by students at Brentwood Park Elementary School to benefit Oxfam and discuss the role of sweatshops in the fashion industry. Photographs show the students in the fashion show wearing brand-name clothing and other students assembled and seated on the floor of the school's gymnasium.
Photographer
Bartel, Mario
Subjects
Persons - Students
Events - Fundraising
Social Issues
Names
Brentwood Park School
Notes
Title based on caption
Collected by editorial for use in a May 2001 issue of the Burnaby NewsLeader
Caption from metadata: "Students at Brentwood Park Elementary School get an education about the role of sweatshops in the fashion industry, in a brand-name fashion show to benefit OXFAM. The show, which was organized and presented by grade six-seven students, discussed the kind of conditions faced by workers making clothes for such popular brands as Nike, Gap, Adidas and Tommy Hilfigger."
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 1455 Delta Avenue
Burnaby - Delta Avenue
Planning Study Area
Brentwood Area
Images
Less detail

100 records – page 1 of 5.