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Weaving and Learning through Art

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo15668
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
11 May 2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (76 min., 47 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Assistant Curator, Kate Petrusa. The webinar is titled "Weaving and Learning through Art" and is presented by Nicole Preissl, Explorative Designer of Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Stó:lō decent. The Zoom webinar is the f…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Spring 2021 subseries
Date
11 May 2021
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (76 min., 47 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Presenter: Nicole Preissl
Host: Kate Petrusa
Date of Presentation: Tuesday, May 11, 7:00 pm - 8:15 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks: min., sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Recording Note: Film was edited from it's original recorded version (90 min., 05 sec.) to edited version (76 min., 47 sec.) for public viewing on Heritage Burnaby.
Accession Code
BV021.17.5
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Assistant Curator, Kate Petrusa. The webinar is titled "Weaving and Learning through Art" and is presented by Nicole Preissl, Explorative Designer of Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Stó:lō decent. The Zoom webinar is the fifth in a series of six "Neighbourhood Speaker series" webinars exploring a range of topics shared by Indigenous speakers and knowledge keepers that were presented and made available to the public between April 27 and May 12, 2021. The live webinar was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. Community members were invited to participate by bringing questions during the interactive online session. Nicole supports her presentation with slides and provides a hands on demonstration on weaving. Prior to the webinar, participants were offered materials that were prepared and made available from Burnaby Village Museum. In this interactive webinar, Nicole Preissl, explores the importance of plants within Coast Salish culture and demonstrates the traditional technique of rope-making. In the first part of her presentation, Nicole provides examples of indigenous plants and trees that grow in British Columbia and shares information on thier historical and cultural significance, medicinal and edible properties and how to identify them. Nicole also shares her own experiences and appreciation for natural materials and provides examples of her artwork. In the second half of Nicole's presentation participants are invited to join her demonstration in learning basic weaving techniques. Nicole provides two hands-on demonstrations to follow, one with yarn and one with iris leaves. During and follwing the presentation, Nicole Preissl takes questions from the audience that are moderated by the host, Kate Petrusa.
History/Biography
Nicole Preissl is an explorative designer who uses natural materials to influence her work. From both Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Stó:lō decent, she began introducing traditional artistic customs into her practice as a means of connecting to her culture. In her art practice she uses natural fibres and materials to create textile based designs. Her areas of interest are natural plant dyes, weaving Coast Salish style garments and using raw hide to create thought provoking design pieces.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Social life and customs
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Art
Plants
Plants - Flowers
Plants - Trees
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Baskets
Indigenous peoples - Implements
Indigenous peoples - Clothing
Names
Preissl, Nicole
Tsleil-Waututh Nation
Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation
Petrusa, Kate
Burnaby Village Museum
Notes
Title based on content of video recording
Video

Weaving and Learning through Art, 11 May 2021

Less detail

Since Time-Immemorial: A Look at the Rich Culture of Coast Salish Peoples and its Role at the Museum

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo18876
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
20 Sep. 2022
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (97 min., 15 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Indigenous Education Programmer, Nicole Preissl. The webinar is titled "Since Time-Immemorial: A Look at the Rich Culture of Coast Salish Peoples and its Role at the Museum". The webinar is the third in a ser…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Fall 2022 subseries
Date
20 Sep. 2022
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (97 min., 15 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Host: Nicole Preissl
Presenters: Carleen Thomas
Date of Presentation: Tuesday, September 20, 2022. 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks: 97 min., 15 sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Original recording of 97 min., 15 sec. was edited to 88 min., 50 sec. for viewing on Heritage Burnaby
Accession Code
BV022.27.3
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Indigenous Education Programmer, Nicole Preissl. The webinar is titled "Since Time-Immemorial: A Look at the Rich Culture of Coast Salish Peoples and its Role at the Museum". The webinar is the third in a series of six webinars presented in partnership by Burnaby Village Museum and Burnaby Public Library. The live webinar was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. Community members were invited to participate by bringing questions during the interactive online sessions. In this webinar both Nicole Preissl and guest Carleeen Thomas make presentations. The webinar opens with an introduction by Nicole Preissl. Nicole shares her own Indigenous lineage and background; her educational background and experiences while a student at Emily Carr University; her interest in Indigenous materials practices and her role and experiences as Indigenous Education Programmer at the Burnaby Village Museum along with her ideas and goals for the future. Nicole supports her presentation with a slide show presentation regarding the evolution of the Indigenous Learning House on the site of the Burnaby Village Museum and the many transformations that it has gone through. Nicole shares her vision that is helping to transform the space further into a more inviting, learning and creative space for visitors and Indigenous peoples. Nicole also highlights the work that she’s been involved with to further develop educational programming and partnerships on site and her work to further develop the Indigenous Matriarch’s garden and the cedar grove area to include more Indigenous plants. Carleen provides information on the history of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation “People of the Inlet” and highlights information on land mapping that was created by the Nation during the Land Treaty process in 1980s; the many negative impacts to the Tsleil-Waututh Nation from contact and colonization; findings from archaeological investigations done in the Tsleil-Waututh territory that record village sites, seasonal camps and pictographs; stories associated with the Tsleil-Waututh Nation’s oral histories including the double-headed serpent; the impacts of contact and development including industrial logging; the many other challenges that the Tsleil-Waututh Nation have faced and the vision and goals for the future. Carleen describes many photographs of people and places in the presentation and provides important stories and oral histories that have been passed down through her family and nation for generations. Following the presentations Nicole and Carleen answer questions from the attendees and comment further on the information that they've shared.
History/Biography
Nicole Preissl is Stó:lo from Leq'á:mel First Nation as well as having ancestry from the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh First Nation and sq̓əc̓iy̓aɁɬ təməxʷ (Katzie) First Nation. On her mother's side she is third generation Canadian Settler with European Heritage. Nicole has a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Emily Carr University with a Major in Design and has been the Burnaby Village Museum Indigenous Education Programmer since 2022. Carleen Thomas is a Tsleil-Waututh Nation (TWN) member, elder, and current Special Projects Manager for the Treaty, Lands, and Resources department. She is the first Indigenous chancellor at Emily Carr University of Art and Design; educator; former TWN council member of 16 years; has chaired and been a representative on countless committees; and most significantly, grandmother of five amazing grandchildren. Carleen Thomas plays a vital role in her community and is a highly motivated and hardworking individual. Thomas obtained a Bachelors of Education from UBC and has deeply rooted knowledge of her culture and people. Carleen sites her grandparents: Hereditary Chief John L. George & Lillian “Dolly” George and her maternal Grandmother Caroline Thomas (nee: Joseph) as some of her key influences in life. Their teachings, unconditional love, and most of all, patience in guiding and preparing Carleen will last a lifetime. She has created a lasting mark for her family, community and for future generations of Indigenous, Coast Salish and Tsleil-Waututh families.
Creator
Burnaby Village Museum
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Food
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - First contact with Europeans
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Social life and customs
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Art
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Languages
Indigenous peoples - Canada - , Treatment of
Indigenous peoples - Indian Territory
Plants
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Rites and ceremonies
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Government relations
Indigenous peoples
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Preissl, Nicole
Thomas, Carleen
Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation
Tsleil-Waututh Nation
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - Burrard Inlet
Burnaby - Deer Lake
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Video

Since Time-Immemorial: A Look at the Rich Culture of Coast Salish Peoples and its Role at the Museum, 20 Sep. 2022

Since Time-Immemorial: A Look at the Rich Culture of Coast Salish Peoples and its Role at the Museum, 20 Sep. 2022

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/media/hpo/_Data/_BVM_Moving_Images/2022_0027_0003_002.mp4
Less detail

Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo18877
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
22 Sep. 2022
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (91 min., 5 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Curator, Jane Lemke with presentations and discussions by Megan Innes, Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra and Denise Fong. The webinar is titled "Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Fall 2022 subseries
Date
22 Sep. 2022
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (91 min., 5 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Host: Jane Lemke
Presenters: Meagan Innes; Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra; Denise Fong
Date of Presentation: Tuesday, September 22, 2022. 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks: 91 min., 5 sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Original recording of 91 min., 5 sec.was edited to 79 min., 2 sec. for viewing on Heritage Burnaby
Accession Code
BV022.27.4
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Curator, Jane Lemke with presentations and discussions by Megan Innes, Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra and Denise Fong. The webinar is titled "Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum". The webinar is the fourth in a series of six webinars presented in partnership by Burnaby Village Museum and Burnaby Public Library. The live webinar was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. Community members were invited to participate by bringing questions during the interactive online sessions. In this webinar speakers and host discuss what it takes to bring more diverse stories into the Burnaby Village Museum and explore the history of discriminatory practices and museological trends at the Burnaby Village Museum and other museums. Speakers highlight recent projects taking place at Burnaby Village Museum to ensure that other diverse stories of communities are being represented and told. Speakers each provide a ten minute presentation followed by discussions. The first speaker in the webinar is Meagan Innes. When talking about place, Meagan talks about her ancestral ties to certain places including the site where Burnaby Village Museum now stands and what it means to her Indigenous ancestors. Meagan shares stories from her grandfather John Cordocedo of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation and how her grandfather, her great grandfather and ancestors have lived, hunted, gathered and traveled on this land. Meagan talks about the work that she’s been involved with at the Burnaby Village Museum including the development of the Indigenous Learning House, the Matriarch’s Garden, the Indigenous History in Burnaby Resource Guide and development of Indigenous educational programing and projects. Meagan reflects on the collaboration and relationships that have developed during this work with Indigenous artists and Indigenous knowledge keepers. The second speaker in the webinar is Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra “Sharn”. Sharn's presentation is titled “From Orientalism and Colonialism to hope and future possibility”. Sharn speaks of her personal experience visiting the Burnaby Village Museum’s Chinese herbalist exhibit with her son and his school in 2019. Sharn expresses the racist impressions that she witnessed from the young students who visited the exhibit and her reaction re-visiting the exhibit in 2021 after the exhibit was revitalized. Sharn describes the much more positive aspects of the revitalized exhibit which transformed it from “Nostalgic Colonialism” to a place of meaningful belonging for racialized communities that includes faces and personal stories. Sharn looks forward to being a part of Burnaby’s next venture which looks at the history of Burnaby’s South Asian Canadian Community and shares some of her research while working on this project. The third speaker in the webinar is Denise Fong. Denise’s presentation is titled “Chinese Canadian History in Burnaby”. Denise provides some background regarding her work as a researcher working for the City of Burnaby. Denise takes us on a journey of her research in compiling non white experiences in Burnaby as well as uncovering personal stories from Burnaby families living and working in Burnaby. Denise points out discriminatory practices within Burnaby including the Chinese and Japanese Exclusion Bylaw in 1892 and the history of Chinese immigration to Canada including the Chinese Head Tax. Denise reflects on her own work, the work of students from UBC and volunteers from the Chinese Canadian History Advisory committee in building relationships with Chinese Canadian families within Burnaby to obtain stories and family records. Denise points out the various projects that these relationships and research have contributed to including; Heritage interpretive plaques installed at the Riverway Golf Course and in the Big Bend area of Burnaby, an award winning exhibit at Burnaby Village Museum “Across the Pacific”, new Chinese Canadian resources available on “Heritage Burnaby”, the revitalization of the Chinese Herbalist shop exhibit “Way Sang Yuen Wat Kee and Co.” at Burnaby Village Museum, the Chinese Market Garden at Burnaby Village Museum, the creation of a "Burnaby Farm Tour" map highlighting Chinese farms in the Big Bend area and a publication titled "Chinese Canadian History in Burnaby Resource Guide". Following the presentations, host Jane Lemke enters a conversation with Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra and Denise Fong. Jane intiates the conversations with questions regarding further work that is necessary for Burnaby Village Museum and other museums to move forward in readdressing the narratives beyond white colonial settler perspectives to include stories of marginalized and racialized people who are under represented and often forgotten.
History/Biography
Jane Lemke has worked in various museums in the Lower Mainland and has been the Curator at Burnaby Village Museum since 2019. Her educational background includes a Master of Arts degree in History and a Master of Museum Studies degree. Her research focus has been on trauma and memory and its role in shaping Canadian identity. She loves sharing memories and stories of Burnaby with the public. Jane sits on the Council of the BC Museums Association and is the Chair of the BC Museums Association Professional Development and Education Committee.
Meagan Innes is from Xwmélts'tstn úxwumixw (Capilano Village). She is a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh First Nation Educator and a multidisciplinary Artist. Meagan completed her Masters of Education around examining connection to place, kinship and to spén´em (plant) s7ek_w’í7tel (siblings) pén´em (plant things). She is an emerging artist who is waking up her Ancestral skills and practicing the ways of her Ancestors. She is exploring reshaping pedagogy to embody traditional ways of knowing and being, more specifically Sḵwx̱wú7mesh traditional ways of learning, knowing and being. She had recently completed the First Nations Language Program at Simon Fraser University to become a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh langauge speaker which is the language of her Ancestors.
Dr. Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra (Sharn) is Coordinator of the South Asian Studies Institute at the University of the Fraser Valley, co-curator of exhibits at the Sikh Heritage Museum, located in the National Historic Site Gur Sikh Temple in Abbotsford, BC, and a sessional faculty in the Department of History at UFV. Sharn’s PhD looks at the affective experiences of racialized museum visitors through a critical race theory lens. She’s a passionate activist, building bridges between community and academia through museum work. She is a past member of the BC Museums Association, and currently a Director with the Pacific Canada Heritage Centre - Museum of Migration.
Denise Fong is a historical researcher with the City of Burnaby and Ph.D. candidate at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on Chinese Canadian identity and meaning making in heritage spaces. Since 2009, Denise has coordinated a number of historical research and public history projects, including SFU’s From C to C: Chinese Canadian Stories of Migration and UBC’s Chinese Canadian Stories: Uncommon Histories from a Common Past. She co-curated two award-winning Chinese Canadian exhibitions locally — Burnaby Village Museum’s Across the Pacific exhibition and the Chinese Canadian Museum of BC/Museum of Vancouver’s A Seat at the Table exhibition. She is a UBC Public Scholar and currently serves as the research director for UBC's Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadian Studies
Creator
Burnaby Village Museum
Subjects
Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Food
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - First contact with Europeans
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Social life and customs
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Art
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Languages
Indigenous peoples - Canada - , Treatment of
Plants
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Persons - South Asian Canadians
Buildings - Civic - Museums
Social Issues - Racism
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Fong, Denise
Lemke, Jane
Innes, Meagan
Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation
Sandhra, Sharanjit Kaur "Sharn" Dr.
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Notes
Title based on contents of item
Video

Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum, 22 Sep. 2022

Stepping over the barrier: Expanding Diversity at the Burnaby Village Museum, 22 Sep. 2022

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/media/hpo/_Data/_BVM_Moving_Images/2022_0027_0004_002.mp4
Less detail

basket

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact84019
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV014.9.1
Description
This basket is woven using the wrapped twining method and is made of swamp grass. The designs were made using aniline dyes and are badly faded; original colours still visible on the inside of lid and basket. The weave on this basket is very finely done. The basket and lid are decorated with bird motifs. Originally birds were yellow on a purple background. The lid has a drop edge that fits over a lip around the top edge of the basket. It is decorated in concentric circles with a dark spot in the centre. The spot includes black as well as the wine colour. The outside is faded to a light brown colour. Nuu-chah-nulth
Object History
The basket was acquired in Victoria in the 1930s before the family moved to Vancouver.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
Nuu-Chah-Nulth
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

carrying basket

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact80210
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV009.1.1
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation and walls that flare slightly towards rim. Decorated in beaded designs of cattail grass and black dyed cherry bark. Darker elements arranged in a butterfly design. Butterflies are said to represent everlasting life by Stó:lō and Nlaka’pamux basket makers. Overcast handles sewn to basket with leather ties. One has been repaired with string. Finished with a braided rim. Triangular shaped stitches attach base to walls of basket. Interior Salish: Stl’atl’imx?
Object History
Basket, ca. 1895-1910, from the collection of the L. Claude Hill family, who owned the property that became the Burnaby Village Museum. According to the Hill family, L. Claude's wife Anne Sarah Hill (nee Kendrick) traded blankets for baskets, although it is not known if this particular basket was obtained in this manner. Indigenous people travelled the trail that crossed Deer Lake Brook (Douglas Road / Canada Way).
Measurements
Measurements: width 24 cm and length 44 cm and depth 18 cm. All measured from top edge to outside.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
School/Style
Coast Salish
Culture
Stl’atl’imx
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Baskets
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Hill, Annie Sara Kenrick
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

work basket

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact80211
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV009.1.2
Description
Oval shaped coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation. Overcast rim with remnants of a loopwork border. Decorated with vertical stripes of imbricated designs in canary grass and black dyed cherry bark. Cherry bark can be distinguished by the small eyes in the surface of the bark. If the basket maker is skilled the bark has a shiny appearance, if it has not been scraped properly it has a greyish tinge. Canary grass is differentiated from cattail and bear grass by its shiny appearance according to a Stó:lō/Stl’atl’imx elder and basket maker from Mount Currie, who was married into Upper Sḵwx̱wú7mesh.
Object History
Basket, ca. 1895-1910, from the collection of the L. Claude Hill family, who owned the property that became the Burnaby Village Museum. According to the Hill family, L. Claude's wife Anne Sarah Hill (nee Kendrick) traded blankets for baskets, although it is not known if this particular basket was obtained in this manner. Indigenous people travelled the trail that crossed Deer Lake Brook (Douglas Road / Canada Way).
Measurements
Measurements: width 31.5 cm and length 51.5 cm and depth 19.5 cm all measured from top edge to outside of basket, not including trim.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
School/Style
Coast Salish
Culture
First Nations
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Baskets
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Hill, Annie Sara Kenrick
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

Bringing Visibility to the Land: A Tsleil-Waututh Perspective on Community Building

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo15665
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
27 Apr. 2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (47 min., 39 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Curator, Jane Lemke. The webinar is titled "Bringing Visibility to the Land: A Tsleil-Waututh Perspective on Community Building" and is presented by Michelle George, Tsleil-Waututh Nation Cultural and Technic…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Spring 2021 subseries
Date
27 Apr. 2021
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (47 min., 39 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Presenters: Michelle George
Host: Jane Lemke
Date of Presentation: Tuesday, April 27, 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks: 47 min., 39 sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Recording Note: Film was edited from it's original recorded version (63 min., 29 sec.) to edited version (47 min., 39 sec.) for public viewing on Heritage Burnaby
Accession Code
BV021.17.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Curator, Jane Lemke. The webinar is titled "Bringing Visibility to the Land: A Tsleil-Waututh Perspective on Community Building" and is presented by Michelle George, Tsleil-Waututh Nation Cultural and Technical Specialist. The Zoom webinar is the first in a series of six "Neighbourhood Speaker series" webinars exploring a range of topics shared by Indigenous speakers and knowledge keepers that were presented and made available to the public between April 27 and May 12, 2021. The live webinar was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. Community members were invited to participate by bringing questions during the interactive online sessions. In this webinar, Michelle George explores the importance of bringing Tsleil-Waututh ways of knowing/knowledge of the land to Burnaby. She grounds her talk with her experience of working with the Burnaby Village Museum on producing the Indigenous History of Burnaby Resource Guide, an award-winning illustrated educational guide. Michelle also speaks to some of the devastating experiences that the Tsleil-Waututh Nation and Indigenous Peoples have suffered since Colonial Settlement and how her Nation has begun to grow in a changing environment. In segments of her talk, Michelle refers to a map titled "Tsleil-Waututh Nation Consultation Area". Following the presentation, Michelle George answers questions from the audience that are moderated by the host, Jane Lemke.
History/Biography
Michelle George is a member of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation (TWN) and currently works as a Tsleil-Waututh Nation Cultural and Technical Specialist for the Treaty, Lands and Resources (TLR) Department. She participates in various projects for the TWN government and community, focusing on Tsleil-Waututh Governance and Community. The goals that she carries in her work are to make sure Tsleil-Waututh culture is included and considered in these Nation-level projects, as well as within the reviews done on external projects within the TWN Consultation area. She has been a member of both the Tsleil-Waututh Land Code Committee and Land Use Planning group. Michelle is also a First Nations Health Authority Traditional Knowledge Keeper, and a past-Elected Councilor for Tsleil-Waututh Nation. Michelle also provides guest lectures at Simon Fraser University, Langara College, and the BC Institute of Technology.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Government relations
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Languages
Indigenous peoples - Canada - , Treatment of
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - First contact with Europeans
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Burnaby Public Library
George, Michelle
Lemke, Jane
Tsleil-Waututh Nation
George, Chief Daniel "Dan"
Geographic Access
Burnaby
British Columbia
British Columbia - Burrard Inlet
Notes
Title based on contents of video recording
Video

Bringing Visibility to the Land: A Tsleil-Waututh Perspective on Community Building, 27 Apr. 2021

Bringing Visibility to the Land: A Tsleil-Waututh Perspective on Community Building, 27 Apr. 2021

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/media/hpo/_Data/_BVM_Moving_Images/2021_0017_0001_002.mp4
Less detail

Creating Visibility in Wood Working

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo15667
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
6 May 2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (50 min., 03 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum curator, Jane Lemke. The webinar is titled "Creating Visibility in Wood Working" and is presented by Xwalacktun, OBC, Master Carver of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation. The Zoom webinar is the fourth in a series of si…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Spring 2021 subseries
Date
6 May 2021
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (50 min., 03 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Presenter: Xwalacktun
Host: Jane Lemke
Date of Presentation: Thursday, May 6, 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks: 50 min., 03 sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Recording Note: Film was edited from it's original recorded version (66 min., 53 sec.) to edited version (50 min., 03 sec.) for public viewing on Heritage Burnaby.
Accession Code
BV021.17.4
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum curator, Jane Lemke. The webinar is titled "Creating Visibility in Wood Working" and is presented by Xwalacktun, OBC, Master Carver of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation. The Zoom webinar is the fourth in a series of six "Neighbourhood Speaker series" webinars exploring a range of topics shared by Indigenous speakers and knowledge keepers that were presented and made available to the public between April 27 and May 12, 2021. The live webinar was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. Community members were invited to participate by bringing questions during the interactive online sessions. In this webinar, viewers join Xwalacktun as he tours his studio, sharing the tools and processes of carving. Xwalacktun shares photographs detailing the long process of turning a twelve foot-tall tree into a house post for his recently completed installation in the Diamond Family Courtyard of Vancouver General Hospital. At the beginning of the presentation, Xwalacktun shares a welcome song from the late Chief Cie Baker. Following the presentation, Xwalacktun takes questions from the audience that are moderated by the host, Jane Lemke.
History/Biography
Xwalacktun (born Rick Harry) is a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation artist whose works are recognized internationally. He was given his name by his father, a Hereditary Chief from the Seymour Creek area. From 1978 to 1982, Xwalacktun attended Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver, BC, and graduated with a degree in sculpture. Xwalacktun is a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal and the Order of British Columbia (O.B.C.) for his many contributions to various communities. Xwalacktun is an accomplished artist in wood, paper, stone, glass and metals and his work can be seen around the Lower Mainland region. Xwalacktun's biography can also be found on his website: www.xwalacktun.ca
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Art
Indigenous wood-carving - Totem poles
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Rites and ceremonies
Indigenous peoples - Implements
Names
Xwalacktun
Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation
Notes
Title based on content of video recording The following link was shared at the end of the presentation: Xwalacktun’s website: https://www.xwalacktun.ca/
Video

Creating Visibility in Wood Working, 6 May 2021

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Indigenous History in Burnaby Resource Guide

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumlibrary7493
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Author
Burnaby Village Museum
Fortney, Sharon
Edition
First
Publication Date
2019
Call Number
971.100497 BVM
lands and resources, and the lack of treaties in British Columbia. Delegates were chosen from the Cowichan, Secwepemc, Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations to undertake this long journey. However, these efforts did little to stop the alienation of local Indigenous people from their lands
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection
Digital Reference Collection
Material Type
Digital Resource
Accession Code
BV019.64.1
Call Number
971.100497 BVM
Edition
First
Author
Burnaby Village Museum
Fortney, Sharon
Contributor
Kwantlen First Nation
Sḵwx̱wú7mesh First Nation
Tsleil-Waututh First Nation
ʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) First Nation
Place of Publication
Burnaby, BC
Publisher
City of Burnaby
Publication Date
2019
Subjects LoC
Indigenous peoples--British Columbia
Indigenous peoples--British Columbia--History
Indigenous peoples--Canada--History
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Languages
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Societies, etc.
Name Access
Burnaby Village Museum
Object History
2019 version of working document developed by Burnaby Village Museum in collaboration with a number of First Nations partners over the course of several years. We recognize that Burnaby falls within the shared, ancestral and unceded territories of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm and Sḵwx̱wú7mesh speaking people. We equally respect each of the Nations who share territory in Burnaby, and invite and welcome their ongoing participation in developing the contents of the Indigenous History in Burnaby Resource Guide.
Digital Books
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Are we really changing? Reflections on Reconciliation

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo15669
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
12 May 2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (91 min., 26 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Curator, Jane Lemke. The webinar is titled "Are We Really Changing? Reflections on Reconciliation" and is presented by Brandon Gabriel, visual arts from the Kwantlen First Nation. The Zoom webinar is the sixt…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Spring 2021 subseries
Date
12 May 2021
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (91 min., 26 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Presenter: Brandon Gabriel
Host: Jane Lemke
Date of Presentation: Wednesday, May 12, 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks: min., sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Recording Note: Film was edited from it's original recorded version (92 min., 31 sec.) to edited version (91 min., 26 sec.) for public viewing on Heritage Burnaby.
Accession Code
BV021.17.6
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Curator, Jane Lemke. The webinar is titled "Are We Really Changing? Reflections on Reconciliation" and is presented by Brandon Gabriel, visual arts from the Kwantlen First Nation. The Zoom webinar is the sixth in a series of six "Neighbourhood Speaker Series" webinars exploring a range of topics shared by Indigenous speakers and knowledge keepers that were presented and made available to the public between April 27 and May 12, 2021. The live webinar was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. Community members were invited to participate by bringing questions and comments during the interactive online sessions. In this webinar, Brandon supports his presentation with slides and explores the following questions; If we have not changed the way we introduce ourselves to each other and this land then what are we reconciling?" and "If resource exploitation, racism and colonization continue today, how can we change?" Brandon Gabriel, mixed-media artist and activist, looks back at some highlights of his twenty seven year artistic journey and shares what you can do to tackle reconciliation in your own life. Brandon presents counter narratives speaking to the importance of: Land; Languages; Colonial Annihilation and Indigenous Resurgence. Brandon pauses half way through his presentation to ask and reflect on the question "How far back do you know your ancestors on your mother's side?". While listeners are reflecting, Brandon shares a recording of Dennis Leon of Kwantlen First Nation performing the song “True Love”. Following this, Brandon takes questions from the audience and comments on the importance of matriarchal lineage in indigenous culture. In the second half of the presentation, Brandon talks about his own art and shares examples of Indigenous artists work including: Bill Reid, Zacharias Kunuk, Marianne Nicholson; Brian Jungan and Rebecca Bellmore. Following the presentation, Brandon Gabriel takes questions from the audience that are moderated by the host, Jane Lemke.
History/Biography
Brandon Gabriel is an award winning, and Internationally recognized visual artist from the Kwantlen First Nation, in unceded Fort Langley B.C. Brandon was educated at Kwantlen Polytechnic University (1999-2003) and at Emily Carr University of Art and Design (2003-2006). Brandon has over twenty seven years of professional experience as a designer, wood carver, mixed media sculptor, graphic designer, illustrator, and educator. He has exhibited works in the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, South America, the USA, and across Canada.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Art
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Government relations
Indigenous peoples - Canada - , Treatment of
Names
Kwantlen First Nation
Gabriel, Brandon
Lemke, Jane
Leon, Dennis
Geographic Access
Burnaby
Notes
Title based on content of video recording The following link was shared at the end of the presentation: Kwantlen First Nation: https://www.kwantlenfn.ca/
Video

Are we really changing? Reflections on Reconciliation, 12 May 2021

Are we really changing? Reflections on Reconciliation, 12 May 2021

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/media/hpo/_Data/_BVM_Moving_Images/2021_0017_0006_002.mp4
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Traditional, Ancestral & Unceded: A Conversation on Territorial Acknowledgements

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo15664
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
29 Apr. 2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (87 min., 17 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum curator, Jane Lemke. The webinar is titled "Traditional, Ancestral & Unceded: A Conversation on Territorial Acknowledgements" and is presented by Fancy Poitras, Indigenous Relations Manager for the City of Bu…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Spring 2021 subseries
Date
29 Apr. 2021
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (87 min., 17 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Presenters: Fancy Poitras and Rebekah Mahaffey
Host: Jane Lemke
Date of Presentation: Thursday, April 29, 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks: 87 min., 17 sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Recording Note: Film was edited from it's original recorded version (95 min., 34 sec.) to edited version (87 min., 17 sec.) for public viewing on Heritage Burnaby. This live recording experienced technical difficulties with the viewer window during the first few minutes of the presentation. This is resolved at 15:36.
Accession Code
BV021.17.2
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum curator, Jane Lemke. The webinar is titled "Traditional, Ancestral & Unceded: A Conversation on Territorial Acknowledgements" and is presented by Fancy Poitras, Indigenous Relations Manager for the City of Burnaby and Rebekah Mahaffey, Social Planner for the City of Burnaby. The Zoom webinar is the second in a series of six "Neighbourhood Speaker series" webinars exploring a range of topics shared by Indigenous speakers and knowledge keepers that were presented and made available to the public between April 27 and May 12, 2021. The live webinar was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. Community members were invited to participate by bringing questions during the interactive online sessions. The webinar opens with host, Jane Lemke providing a Land Acknowlegement "The land on which Burnaby now sits is the ancestral and unceded homelands of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm and Sḵwx̱wú7mesh speaking peoples". Jane explains that providing a land acknowledgement is part of the City of Burnaby's official policy and that the land is on the shared territory of many Nations including the sq̓əc̓iy̓aɁɬ təməxʷ (Katzie), Kway-quit-lum, Kwantlen, ʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. Understanding the definitions of language groups, Nations, shared territory and many of the importance words form a basis of the subject matter for this webinar. Fancy Poitras and Rebekah Mahaffey enter a discussion exploring this topic while posing thought provoking questions to each other. As Burnaby's Indigenous Relations Manager, Fancy Poitras conveys her own experiences and knowledge while providing historical references and recommendations for further educational resources around territorial land acknowledgment. Following their discussion, Fancy and Rebekah take questions from the audience that are moderated by the host, Jane Lemke.
History/Biography
Fancy Poitras was hired as the City of Burnaby's first Indigenous Relations Manager in 2021. Prior to her role, she worked for the First Nations Health Authority for more than five years, first as a Senior Policy Analyst, then as the Manager and Acting Director of Strategic Policy; throughout her time with FNHA, she worked on an extensive portfolio of health and wellness, and service design and delivery issues, including primary care, cancer, seniors and elders. Fancy has a Master’s degree in Public Policy and a Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Social Policy Issues from Simon Fraser University, and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from University of Alberta. Fancy is a member of Mikisew Cree First Nation, Treaty 8 territory, and she grew up primarily in the Northwest Territories. Rebekah Mahaffey (she, her, hers) is a Social Policy Planner at the City of Burnaby. She is a settler on these lands, and is of mixed French-Scottish-Irish ancestry. She grew up in Indonesia, Libya and England and has called the west coast home for almost 15 years. Rebekah has degrees in International Development, Art History and Urban Planning. In her work she focuses on inter-culturalism, access and inclusion, anti-racism, and working with Burnaby’s 2SLGBTQQIA community. When not at work, she enjoys hiking, reading, and listening to podcasts. She lives in Vancouver with her young child.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Government relations
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Languages
Indigenous peoples - Canada - , Treatment of
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Burnaby Public Library
Poitras, Fancy
Mahaffey, Rebekah
Lemke, Jane
Tsleil-Waututh Nation
ʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam)
Geographic Access
Burnaby
British Columbia
Notes
Title based on contents of video recording The following links wereshared at the end of the presentation:
My Conversations with Canadians by Lee Maracle: https://bookhugpress.ca/shop/ebooks/essays-ebooks/conversations-with-canadians-by-lee-maracle/
21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act by Bob Joseph: https://www.ictinc.ca/books/21-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-indian-act
CBC documentary series 8th Fire: https://www.cbc.ca/firsthand/blog/8th-fire-wabs-walk-through-history ‘Whose Land’ App: https://apps.apple.com/ca/app/whose-land/id1350310353
“Unreserved” Podcast, Episode: January 20, 2019, ‘Hayden King’: https://www.cbc.ca/radio/unreserved/redrawing-the-lines-1.4973363/i-regret-it-hayden-king-on-writing-ryerson-university-s-territorial-acknowledgement-1.4973371
Guidelines for Indigenous Territory Acknowledgement http://www.burnaby.ca/Assets/Burnaby+Interagency/Guidelines+for+Indigenous+Territory+Acknowledgement.pdf
United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: https://www.un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/declaration-on-the-rights-of-indigenous-peoples.html
Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action: http://trc.ca/assets/pdf/Calls_to_Action_English2.pdf
Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Calls for Justice: https://www.mmiwg-ffada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Calls_for_Justice.pdf
Video

Traditional, Ancestral & Unceded: A Conversation on Territorial Acknowledgements, 29 Apr. 2021

Traditional, Ancestral & Unceded: A Conversation on Territorial Acknowledgements, 29 Apr. 2021

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/media/hpo/_Data/_BVM_Moving_Images/2021_0017_0002_002.mp4
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Coast Salish : their art, culture and legends

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumlibrary1097
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Author
Ashwell, Reg, 1921-2010
Publication Date
c1978
Call Number
970.004 ASH
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection
Reference Collection
Material Type
Book
ISBN
0888390092
9780888390097
Call Number
970.004 ASH
Author
Ashwell, Reg, 1921-2010
Place of Publication
Saanichton, B.C.
Seattle
Publisher
Hancock House
Publication Date
c1978
Physical Description
86 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 22 cm.
Subjects LoC
Art
Subjects
Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Art
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Indigenous dancer at Brentwood mall

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto13235
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1971
Collection/Fonds
Donald Copan collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 8.9 x 12.7 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of an Indigenous person in traditional clothing and dancing inside Brentwood Mall. A large group of people have gathered around to watch.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Donald Copan collection
Series
Copan album series
Date
1971
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 8.9 x 12.7 cm
Accession Code
BV005.54.246
Access Restriction
Restricted access
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of an Indigenous person in traditional clothing and dancing inside Brentwood Mall. A large group of people have gathered around to watch.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Rites and ceremonies
Indigenous peoples - Clothing
Buildings - Commercial - Malls
Names
Brentwood Shopping Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Lougheed Highway
Burnaby - 4567 Lougheed Highway
Media Type
Photograph
Planning Study Area
Brentwood Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
July 23, 2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Indigenous dancers at Brentwood mall

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto2195
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1971
Collection/Fonds
Donald Copan collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 8.9 x 12.7 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of Indigenous peoples dressed in traditional clothing and dancing inside Brentwood Mall. A large group of people have gathered around to watch.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Donald Copan collection
Series
Copan album series
Date
1971
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 8.9 x 12.7 cm
Accession Code
BV005.54.243
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Indigenous peoples dressed in traditional clothing and dancing inside Brentwood Mall. A large group of people have gathered around to watch.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Rites and ceremonies
Indigenous peoples - Clothing
Buildings - Commercial - Malls
Names
Brentwood Shopping Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 4567 Lougheed Highway
Media Type
Photograph
Planning Study Area
Brentwood Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
July 23, 2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Indigenous dancers at Brentwood mall

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto13233
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1971
Collection/Fonds
Donald Copan collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 8.9 x 12.7 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of Indigenous peoples dressed in traditional clothing and dancing inside Brentwood Mall. A large group of people have gathered around to watch.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Donald Copan collection
Series
Copan album series
Date
1971
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 8.9 x 12.7 cm
Accession Code
BV005.54.244
Access Restriction
Restricted access
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Indigenous peoples dressed in traditional clothing and dancing inside Brentwood Mall. A large group of people have gathered around to watch.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Rites and ceremonies
Indigenous peoples - Clothing
Buildings - Commercial - Malls
Names
Brentwood Shopping Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Lougheed Highway
Burnaby - 4567 Lougheed Highway
Media Type
Photograph
Planning Study Area
Brentwood Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
July 23, 2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Indigenous dancers at Brentwood mall

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto13234
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1971
Collection/Fonds
Donald Copan collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 8.9 x 12.7 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of Indigenous peoples dressed in traditional clothing and dancing inside Brentwood Mall. A large group of people have gathered around to watch.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Donald Copan collection
Series
Copan album series
Date
1971
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 8.9 x 12.7 cm
Accession Code
BV005.54.245
Access Restriction
Restricted access
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Indigenous peoples dressed in traditional clothing and dancing inside Brentwood Mall. A large group of people have gathered around to watch.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Rites and ceremonies
Indigenous peoples - Clothing
Buildings - Commercial - Malls
Names
Brentwood Shopping Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Lougheed Highway
Burnaby - 4567 Lougheed Highway
Media Type
Photograph
Planning Study Area
Brentwood Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
July 23, 2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Indigenous dancers at Brentwood mall

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumphoto13236
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1971
Collection/Fonds
Donald Copan collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 8.9 x 12.7 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of an Indigenous peoples gathered in a circle with non-indigenous people inside Brentwood Mall. Indigenous peoples are dressed in traditional clothing. A large group of people have gathered around to watch.
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Donald Copan collection
Series
Copan album series
Date
1971
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 8.9 x 12.7 cm
Accession Code
BV005.54.247
Access Restriction
Restricted access
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of an Indigenous peoples gathered in a circle with non-indigenous people inside Brentwood Mall. Indigenous peoples are dressed in traditional clothing. A large group of people have gathered around to watch.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Rites and ceremonies
Indigenous peoples - Clothing
Buildings - Commercial - Malls
Names
Brentwood Shopping Centre
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Lougheed Highway
Burnaby - 4567 Lougheed Highway
Media Type
Photograph
Planning Study Area
Brentwood Area
Scan Resolution
600
Scan Date
July 23, 2020
Scale
100
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
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Where rivers, mountains and people meet : Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Lil'wat Cultural Centre

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumlibrary7602
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Publication Date
2010
Call Number
970.3 SQU
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection
Reference Collection
Material Type
Book
Call Number
970.3 SQU
Contributor
Sḵwx̱wú7mesh First Nation
Lil'wat Nation
Spo7ez Cultural Centre & Community Society
Place of Publication
Whistler, BC
Publisher
Spo7ez Cultural Centre & Community Society
Publication Date
2010
Physical Description
162 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 26 cm.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Social life and customs
Notes
Text in Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Lilwat7ul & English
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basket

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact17681
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV978.2.13
Description
Nut-shaped, coiled cedar root basket with cedar root foundation and watch-spring base and lid construction. Hinged lid is attached with leather ties. Covered in beading, where in the decorative elements are laid flat on surface, rather than folded into cedar root stitches as is done with imbrication. Designs are in red and black dyed cherry bark. Interior Salish: Nlaka’pamux
Object History
Nut-shaped baskets are identified as one of the oldest types by Haeberlin and Teit (1928: 202-3). They were used for storing berries and were also common work baskets for women, used to hold small tools – awls, thread, shells, trinkets and other odds and ends (202).
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
Nlaka'pamux
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
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basket

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact27529
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV974.119.3
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation, lid has parallel slat construction and is covered with beaded designs edged by imbrication in canary grass. Basket has a flat lid that is hinged to body with leather ties. A mistake was made in how the design was applied to one end of this basket. This is not common as many weavers would correct this mistake. Completely imbricated walls, beaded design on lid. Coast Salish: Sḵwx̱wú7mesh?
Object History
The donor reported that the baskets were traded in the early 1920s for clothes by the donor's mother, who lived in North Vancouver. Her mother told her the "Capilano Indians" used to go door to door with their baskets in North Vancouver.
Diamonds are considered a star pattern and are common to Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Nlaka’pamux basketry. The main design resembles a ladder or fence and is uncommon.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
Sḵwx̱wú7mesh
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
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100 records – page 1 of 5.