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E.W. Bateman House 'Elworth'

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark538
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Description
The E.W. Bateman House is a one-and-one-half storey wood-frame residence set within in a garden landscape. The house and its adjacent garage are the only historic buildings standing on their original site within the Burnaby Village Museum property.
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Edwin & Mary Bateman Residence
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Edwin & Mary Bateman Residence
Civic Address
6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
The E.W. Bateman House is a one-and-one-half storey wood-frame residence set within in a garden landscape. The house and its adjacent garage are the only historic buildings standing on their original site within the Burnaby Village Museum property.
Heritage Value
The E.W. Bateman House was constructed in the Deer Lake Crescent subdivision, that was originally promoted in 1911 as an upper class suburban neighbourhood. It represents one of the first residential developments in the City of Burnaby that required buildings to be of a specific value, thus demonstrating the desire for exclusivity among the successful businessmen who chose to settle in the area. The house and grounds illustrate the reduced scale of upper-class residential construction at a time of modest returning prosperity that followed the end of the First World War, and the social, cultural, lifestyle and leisure sensibilities of the owners in the Deer Lake Crescent subdivision: such values as social aspiration, racial exclusivity, demonstration of architectural taste, and importance of a landscaped garden. The heritage value of the E.W. Bateman House is its comprehensive representation of an upper middle-class suburban residence of the early 1920s. It was built for retired CPR executive Edwin Wettenhall Bateman (1859-1957) and his wife, Mary (Dale) Bateman (1865-1935), by contractor William Dodson in 1922. The Bateman House was designed by English-born and trained architect Enoch Evans (1862-1939) of E. Evans and Son, and is an important surviving residential design by Evans, and a typical example of the eclectic Period Revival influences that were common to domestic architecture in the post-First World War era. The symmetry of the imposing front verandah, supported by exaggerated Ionic columns, gives the relatively-modest house an image of grandeur and formality. Named after Edwin Bateman’s birthplace in Cheshire, England, ‘Elworth’ also symbolizes allegiance to England and the patriotic tenor of the time. The heritage value for this house also lies in its interpretive value within the Burnaby Village Museum. The site is an important cultural feature for the interpretation of Burnaby’s heritage to the public. The E.W. Bateman House was purchased by Burnaby in 1970 and became the focal point for the development of the Museum. Both the interior and exterior of the house have been restored and interpreted to the date of original construction, including recreated room interiors and period furnishings.
Defining Elements
The elements that define the heritage character of the E.W. Bateman House include its: - rectangular form and massing with central entry on long side - side gable roof with front shed dormer with cedar shingle cladding - symmetry of front facade - full open front verandah inset under the roofline, supported with Ionic columns - cedar shingle siding - multi-paned double-hung wooden-sash windows, mixture of 6-over-1 and 8-over-1 - symmetrical disposition of fenestration, with double-assembly units on the ground floor - exterior shutters - two flanking brick chimneys on the side elevations - interior room layouts and original interior features such as quality millwork and original hardware - original garage at the rear of the house
Locality
Deer Lake Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Person
Edwin Bateman (Owner)
Mary Bateman (Owner)
Organization
Burnaby Village Museum
Architect
Enoch Evans
E. Evans and Son
Builder
William Dodson
Function
Primary Current--Museum
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 011-030-356 Legal Description: Parcel 1, District Lot 79 and District Lot 85, Group 1, New Westminster District, Reference Plan 77594
Boundaries
Burnaby Village Museum is comprised of a single municipally-owned property located at 6501 Deer Lake Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
38,488.63
Contributing Resource
Building
Landscape Feature
Structure
Ownership
Public (local)
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Name Access
Bateman, Edwin W.
Bateman, Mary Dale
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - 4900 Deer Lake Avenue
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
Less detail

George S. & Jessie Haddon House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark508
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
5558 Buckingham Avenue
Description
The George and Jessie Haddon House is a symmetrical two-storey Dutch Colonial-style house with a side-gambrel roof and shed dormers. It is situated in the Burnaby Lake neighborhood in East Burnaby.
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
5558 Buckingham Avenue
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 12064
Enactment Date
19/06/2006
Description
The George and Jessie Haddon House is a symmetrical two-storey Dutch Colonial-style house with a side-gambrel roof and shed dormers. It is situated in the Burnaby Lake neighborhood in East Burnaby.
Heritage Value
Built in 1923, the George and Jessie Haddon House is a significant example of the romantic period revival styles that were popular during the period between the two World Wars. These traditionally styled homes reflected ongoing pride in past traditions but also recognized the modern ideals of economy and good design. At the time, houses displayed traditional and readily-identifiable historical styles as a hallmark of good taste. The use of the various Colonial Revival styles had gained new popularity during the 1920s, and this design could have originated in a residential pattern book, which were in wide circulation and used to expedite residential projects. This house displays the typical features of the Dutch Colonial style, imported from the eastern United States and relatively rare on the West Coast. The house originally featured an unusual porte-cochere with tapered supports, that indicated the growing importance of automobiles at the time. The house was built for George Samuel Haddon (1886-1971) and his wife Jessie (née Reade) Haddon, whom he married in 1915. George Haddon, who was born in British Columbia, was a prominent Vancouver figure and served as Secretary of the Vancouver General Hospital. Following Jessie's death, George Haddon was remarried to Alice Margaret Currie (1890-1951). The George and Jessie Haddon House is further valued for its connection with the continued development of the Burnaby Lake neighbourhood in the 1920s. The area was highly desirable to wealthy Vancouver and New Westminster residents because of its scenery, and easy access was provided by the British Columbia Electric Railway 'Burnaby Lake' interurban line, which opened in June 1911. The Haddon House illustrates the evolving nature of regional transportation and the growing communities made possible by increasing options for transportation. The house originally stood on a larger lot, and was relocated in 2006 to allow for subdivision and legal protection. The current owners restored the porte-cochere in 2014.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the George and Jessie Haddon House include its: - location within the Burnaby Lake neighbourhood - residential form, scale and massing as expressed by its two-storey height and gambrel roof with shed dormers - rough-cast stucco cladding - Colonial Revival details such as the symmetrical façade and massing, and side-gambrel roof with shed dormers - additional exterior features such as an interior chimney, exposed purlins and window boxes supported on large projecting brackets - wooden front door with glazed insets - interior features including original staircase, and wooden door and window trim
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Person
George Samuel Haddon
Alice Margaret Currie
Jessie Haddon
Builder
William Dodson
Function
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D.026-745-127
Boundaries
The George and Jessie Haddon House is comprised of a single residential lot located at 5558 Buckingham Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
1080
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Private
Documentation
City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, Heritage Site Files
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 5558 Buckingham Avenue
Burnaby - 5520 Buckingham Avenue
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
Less detail

Interview with Marianne May Bateman February 22, 1978 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory188
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's memories of the Bateman house Elworth, comparing it to its' present use at the Burnaby Village Museum (then Heritage Village).
Date Range
1920-1978
Length
0:09:03
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's memories of the Bateman house Elworth, comparing it to its' present use at the Burnaby Village Museum (then Heritage Village).
Date Range
1920-1978
Photo Info
Photograph of Edwin Wettenhall Bateman with his four daughters; Marianne May is sitting on a chair beside her father, [1903}. Item no. BV992.29.1
Length
0:09:03
Subject
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - Deer Lake Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 22, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Marianne May "May" Bateman conducted by Colin Stevens, February 22, 1978. Major themes discussed are: Elworth.
Biographical Notes
May Bateman was born in 1894 in Portage LaPrairie, Manitoba to Edwin Wettenhall Bateman and Cassie (Dale) Bateman. May's father, Edwin Bateman was born in 1859 in Sandbach, Cheshire, to James and Caroline Mary Wettenhall Bateman (their home in Sandbach was called Elworth Cottage). When he was twenty-one, E.W. Bateman immigrated to Manitoba, Canada where he met Catherine “Cassie” Dale, daughter of George and Sarah Gillon Dale. They were married in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba on November 9, 1886. Edwin and Cassie had seven children, the eldest Edna Caroline Annie (Corner) born in 1889, George, Mamie (McWilliams) born in 1892, Marianne May “May” Bateman born in 1894, Jessie (Fox Kemp), Carey, and the youngest Warren Stafford born in 1901.Cassie (Dale) Bateman died in Portage La Prairie in 1909. Edwin was transferred to Vancouver by the Canadian Pacific Railway where he married Cassie’s younger sister Mary Dale, born 1865, and moved his six children to Vancouver. The Bateman family first lived at 7th and Balsam in a large new house. It wasn’t until 1920 that they decided to move to the quieter atmosphere of the Burnaby Lake- Deer Lake area. By this time Edwin Wettenhall Bateman was a retired CPR executive. He moved his wife and daughter May to Deer Lake and commissioned 'Elworth' house, designed by English-born and trained architect Enoch Evans. The house was completed by contractor William Dodson in 1922 and located at the site of what would become Burnaby Village Museum, 6501 Deer Lake Avenue. The Batemans lived here for seventeen years before moving back to Vancouver in May of 1935. Mary Bateman died July 5, 1935. Edwin Wettenhall Bateman died on November 25, 1957 at the age of ninety-seven. Marianne May Bateman died in 1990.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bateman, Marianne May
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-014-1_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with May Bateman

Images
Less detail

Interview with Marianne May Bateman February 22, 1978 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory189
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's memories of the Bateman house Elworth, comparing it to its' present use at the Burnaby Village Museum (then Heritage Village).
Date Range
1920-1978
Length
0:09:40
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's memories of the Bateman house Elworth, comparing it to its' present use at the Burnaby Village Museum (then Heritage Village).
Date Range
1920-1978
Photo Info
Photograph of Edwin Wettenhall Bateman with his four daughters; Marianne May is sitting on a chair beside her father, [1903}. Item no. BV992.29.1
Length
0:09:40
Subject
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - Deer Lake Drive
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 22, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Marianne May "May" Bateman conducted by Colin Stevens, February 22, 1978. Major themes discussed are: Elworth.
Biographical Notes
May Bateman was born in 1894 in Portage LaPrairie, Manitoba to Edwin Wettenhall Bateman and Cassie (Dale) Bateman. May's father, Edwin Bateman was born in 1859 in Sandbach, Cheshire, to James and Caroline Mary Wettenhall Bateman (their home in Sandbach was called Elworth Cottage). When he was twenty-one, E.W. Bateman immigrated to Manitoba, Canada where he met Catherine “Cassie” Dale, daughter of George and Sarah Gillon Dale. They were married in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba on November 9, 1886. Edwin and Cassie had seven children, the eldest Edna Caroline Annie (Corner) born in 1889, George, Mamie (McWilliams) born in 1892, Marianne May “May” Bateman born in 1894, Jessie (Fox Kemp), Carey, and the youngest Warren Stafford born in 1901.Cassie (Dale) Bateman died in Portage La Prairie in 1909. Edwin was transferred to Vancouver by the Canadian Pacific Railway where he married Cassie’s younger sister Mary Dale, born 1865, and moved his six children to Vancouver. The Bateman family first lived at 7th and Balsam in a large new house. It wasn’t until 1920 that they decided to move to the quieter atmosphere of the Burnaby Lake- Deer Lake area. By this time Edwin Wettenhall Bateman was a retired CPR executive. He moved his wife and daughter May to Deer Lake and commissioned 'Elworth' house, designed by English-born and trained architect Enoch Evans. The house was completed by contractor William Dodson in 1922 and located at the site of what would become Burnaby Village Museum, 6501 Deer Lake Avenue. The Batemans lived here for seventeen years before moving back to Vancouver in May of 1935. Mary Bateman died July 5, 1935. Edwin Wettenhall Bateman died on November 25, 1957 at the age of ninety-seven. Marianne May Bateman died in 1990.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bateman, Marianne May
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-014-1_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with May Bateman

Images
Less detail

Interview with Marianne May Bateman February 22, 1978 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory190
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's father Edwin Bateman's history of first coming to Canada.
Date Range
1880-1920
Length
0:08:39
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's father Edwin Bateman's history of first coming to Canada.
Date Range
1880-1920
Photo Info
Photograph of Edwin Wettenhall Bateman with his four daughters; Marianne May is sitting on a chair beside her father, [1903}. Item no. BV992.29.1
Length
0:08:39
Name
Bateman, Edwin W.
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 22, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Marianne May "May" Bateman conducted by Colin Stevens, February 22, 1978. Major themes discussed are: Elworth.
Biographical Notes
May Bateman was born in 1894 in Portage LaPrairie, Manitoba to Edwin Wettenhall Bateman and Cassie (Dale) Bateman. May's father, Edwin Bateman was born in 1859 in Sandbach, Cheshire, to James and Caroline Mary Wettenhall Bateman (their home in Sandbach was called Elworth Cottage). When he was twenty-one, E.W. Bateman immigrated to Manitoba, Canada where he met Catherine “Cassie” Dale, daughter of George and Sarah Gillon Dale. They were married in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba on November 9, 1886. Edwin and Cassie had seven children, the eldest Edna Caroline Annie (Corner) born in 1889, George, Mamie (McWilliams) born in 1892, Marianne May “May” Bateman born in 1894, Jessie (Fox Kemp), Carey, and the youngest Warren Stafford born in 1901.Cassie (Dale) Bateman died in Portage La Prairie in 1909. Edwin was transferred to Vancouver by the Canadian Pacific Railway where he married Cassie’s younger sister Mary Dale, born 1865, and moved his six children to Vancouver. The Bateman family first lived at 7th and Balsam in a large new house. It wasn’t until 1920 that they decided to move to the quieter atmosphere of the Burnaby Lake- Deer Lake area. By this time Edwin Wettenhall Bateman was a retired CPR executive. He moved his wife and daughter May to Deer Lake and commissioned 'Elworth' house, designed by English-born and trained architect Enoch Evans. The house was completed by contractor William Dodson in 1922 and located at the site of what would become Burnaby Village Museum, 6501 Deer Lake Avenue. The Batemans lived here for seventeen years before moving back to Vancouver in May of 1935. Mary Bateman died July 5, 1935. Edwin Wettenhall Bateman died on November 25, 1957 at the age of ninety-seven. Marianne May Bateman died in 1990.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bateman, Marianne May
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-014-1_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with May Bateman

Images
Less detail

Interview with Marianne May Bateman February 22, 1978 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory191
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's memories of her family.
Date Range
1910-1935
Length
0:03:23
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's memories of her family.
Date Range
1910-1935
Photo Info
Photograph of Edwin Wettenhall Bateman with his four daughters; Marianne May is sitting on a chair beside her father, [1903}. Item no. BV992.29.1
Length
0:03:23
Name
Bateman, Mary Dale
Bateman, Edwin W.
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 22, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Marianne May "May" Bateman conducted by Colin Stevens, February 22, 1978. Major themes discussed are: Elworth.
Biographical Notes
May Bateman was born in 1894 in Portage LaPrairie, Manitoba to Edwin Wettenhall Bateman and Cassie (Dale) Bateman. May's father, Edwin Bateman was born in 1859 in Sandbach, Cheshire, to James and Caroline Mary Wettenhall Bateman (their home in Sandbach was called Elworth Cottage). When he was twenty-one, E.W. Bateman immigrated to Manitoba, Canada where he met Catherine “Cassie” Dale, daughter of George and Sarah Gillon Dale. They were married in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba on November 9, 1886. Edwin and Cassie had seven children, the eldest Edna Caroline Annie (Corner) born in 1889, George, Mamie (McWilliams) born in 1892, Marianne May “May” Bateman born in 1894, Jessie (Fox Kemp), Carey, and the youngest Warren Stafford born in 1901.Cassie (Dale) Bateman died in Portage La Prairie in 1909. Edwin was transferred to Vancouver by the Canadian Pacific Railway where he married Cassie’s younger sister Mary Dale, born 1865, and moved his six children to Vancouver. The Bateman family first lived at 7th and Balsam in a large new house. It wasn’t until 1920 that they decided to move to the quieter atmosphere of the Burnaby Lake- Deer Lake area. By this time Edwin Wettenhall Bateman was a retired CPR executive. He moved his wife and daughter May to Deer Lake and commissioned 'Elworth' house, designed by English-born and trained architect Enoch Evans. The house was completed by contractor William Dodson in 1922 and located at the site of what would become Burnaby Village Museum, 6501 Deer Lake Avenue. The Batemans lived here for seventeen years before moving back to Vancouver in May of 1935. Mary Bateman died July 5, 1935. Edwin Wettenhall Bateman died on November 25, 1957 at the age of ninety-seven. Marianne May Bateman died in 1990.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bateman, Marianne May
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-014-1_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with May Bateman

Images
Less detail

Interview with Warren McWilliams - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory202
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Warren McWilliam's memories of his grandparent's home, Elworth and his grandmother, Mary (Dale) Bateman. He also mentions his childhood friends in the neighbourhood.
Date Range
1920-1930
Length
0:08:32
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Warren McWilliam's memories of his grandparent's home, Elworth and his grandmother, Mary (Dale) Bateman. He also mentions his childhood friends in the neighbourhood.
Date Range
1920-1930
Photo Info
Warren McWilliams in E. W. Bateman's McLaughlin-Buick, 1919. Item no. BV994.22.4
Length
0:08:32
Name
Bateman, Mary Dale
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Warren McWilliams. Major themes discussed are: Elworth and his grandparents, Edwin and Mary (Dale) Bateman.
Biographical Notes
When Warren McWilliam's grandfather, Edwin Bateman was twenty-one he immigrated to Manitoba, Canada where he met Catherine “Cassie” Dale. They were married in 1886 and had seven children, the eldest Edna Caroline Annie (Corner) born in 1889, George, Mamie Dale (McWilliams) born in Portage La Prairie in 1892, Marianne May “May” Bateman born in Hartney, Manitoba in 1894, Jessie (Fox Kemp), Carey, and the youngest Warren Stafford born in 1901. Cassie died in Portage La Prairie in 1909. Edwin was transferred to Vancouver by the CPR where he married Cassie’s younger sister Mary Dale and moved his six children to Vancouver. In 1920 Edwin Bateman moved his wife and youngest daughter May to Deer Lake and commissioned 'Elworth' house, designed by English-born and trained architect Enoch Evans. The house was completed by contractor William Dodson in 1922 and located at the site of what would become Burnaby Village Museum, 6501 Deer Lake Avenue. Mamie Bateman married George Lloyd McWilliams May 19, 1915 and had one child, Warren McWilliams. When Warren was very young, the McWilliams family moved into a small house just across Douglas Road from the Bateman’s and Mamie and Warren were daily visitors to Elworth house for ten years. Warren McWilliams attended Douglas Road School and spent a lot of time at Deer Lake swimming and skating. E.W. Bateman died in 1957 at the age of ninety-nine. George Lloyd McWilliams died June 30, 1961 at the age of seventy-four, his wife Mamie Dale (Bateman) McWilliams died June 1, 1979 at the age of eight-seven.
Total Tracks
2
Total Length
0:14:18
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McWilliams, Warren
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-2_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Warren McWilliams

Images
Less detail

Interview with Warren McWilliams - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory203
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Warren McWilliam's memories of his grandparent's home, Elworth and his grandfather Edwin W. Bateman.
Date Range
1920-1930
Length
0:05:46
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Warren McWilliam's memories of his grandparent's home, Elworth and his grandfather Edwin W. Bateman.
Date Range
1920-1930
Photo Info
Warren McWilliams in E. W. Bateman's McLaughlin-Buick, 1919. Item no. BV994.22.4
Length
0:05:46
Name
Bateman, Edwin W.
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Warren McWilliams. Major themes discussed are: Elworth and his grandparents, Edwin and Mary (Dale) Bateman.
Biographical Notes
When Warren McWilliam's grandfather, Edwin Bateman was twenty-one he immigrated to Manitoba, Canada where he met Catherine “Cassie” Dale. They were married in 1886 and had seven children, the eldest Edna Caroline Annie (Corner) born in 1889, George, Mamie Dale (McWilliams) born in Portage La Prairie in 1892, Marianne May “May” Bateman born in Hartney, Manitoba in 1894, Jessie (Fox Kemp), Carey, and the youngest Warren Stafford born in 1901. Cassie died in Portage La Prairie in 1909. Edwin was transferred to Vancouver by the CPR where he married Cassie’s younger sister Mary Dale and moved his six children to Vancouver. In 1920 Edwin Bateman moved his wife and youngest daughter May to Deer Lake and commissioned 'Elworth' house, designed by English-born and trained architect Enoch Evans. The house was completed by contractor William Dodson in 1922 and located at the site of what would become Burnaby Village Museum, 6501 Deer Lake Avenue. Mamie Bateman married George Lloyd McWilliams May 19, 1915 and had one child, Warren McWilliams. When Warren was very young, the McWilliams family moved into a small house just across Douglas Road from the Bateman’s and Mamie and Warren were daily visitors to Elworth house for ten years. Warren McWilliams attended Douglas Road School and spent a lot of time at Deer Lake swimming and skating. E.W. Bateman died in 1957 at the age of ninety-nine. George Lloyd McWilliams died June 30, 1961 at the age of seventy-four, his wife Mamie Dale (Bateman) McWilliams died June 1, 1979 at the age of eight-seven.
Total Tracks
2
Total Length
0:14:18
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McWilliams, Warren
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-2_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Warren McWilliams

Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Book
Burnaby's Heritage
Type
Book Chapter
Publication Date
2007
Notes
South Burnaby
) Haddon, whom he married in 1915. After Jessie died, George married Alice Margaret Gurrie (1890-1951). It is a high-quality single-family residence built by local contractor William Dodson. It is typical of period revival houses built in the period between the two World Wars that reflected the modern
  1 Digital Chapter  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Book
Burnaby's Heritage
Type
Book Chapter
Publication Date
2007
Notes
South Burnaby
Original Book
Catalogue record for source book
Digital Book
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