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Interview with Reidun Seim by Kathy Bossort January 13, 2016 - Track 12

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory661
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about the building of Simon Fraser University and how it impacted the neighborhood on Curtis Street, including increase in property values, traffic volume and speeding, street congestion due to parking, and students renting local homes. She…
Date Range
1963-2015
Length
0:13:53
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about the building of Simon Fraser University and how it impacted the neighborhood on Curtis Street, including increase in property values, traffic volume and speeding, street congestion due to parking, and students renting local homes. She talks about how the building of the Burnaby Mountain Parkway helped alleviate the traffic problem. She also talks about how SFU has benefitted Burnaby.
Date Range
1963-2015
Length
0:13:53
Name
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby Mountain Parkway
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Transportation
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Curtis Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Westridge Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 13, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Reidun Seim conducted by Kathy Bossort. Reidun Seim was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Reidun Seim’s memories about her parent’s farm on Curtis Street, events in her childhood, and the people who lived in or visited her neighborhood. She takes us on a tour of her neighborhood in the 1940s, telling us stories about families who lived on Curtis Street on and east of 7300 block, including people who lived on Burnaby Mountain in the old Hastings Grove subdivision above the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue. She describes changes to Curtis Street, particularly after it provided access to Simon Fraser University in 1965. She also talks about her teaching career, and about how she values the green space and conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Reidun Seim was born in 1931 in Vancouver B.C. to Sjur and Martine Seim. Sjur and Martine Seim emigrated to Canada from Norway in 1930, and after settling in Vancouver, moved to an acre of land and a new home at the base of Burnaby Mountain in 1932. Sjur attended UBC to learn about poultry farming and began his own chicken and egg business in 1935. The farm animals and large garden also contributed to the family’s livelihood and self-sufficiency. The Curtis Street neighborhood was a lively place and extended well up Curtis Street on the west slope of Burnaby Mountain, where Reidun would babysit for families. Reidun attended Sperling Avenue Elementary School (Gr. 1-8), Burnaby North High School, and Vancouver Normal School for teacher training in 1950-1951. She began teaching primary grades in Port Coquitlam at James Park School. Most of her career was spent in North Delta, teaching at Kennedy and Annieville schools from 1954-1958, appointed Primary Consultant (1958-1960) and Primary Supervisor (1960-1985), before retiring in 1986. Reidun lived at home with her parents on Curtis Street, commuting to Delta, and continues to live in the original farmhouse.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
2:35:58
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Seim, Reidun
Interview Location
Burnaby City Hall in the Law Library
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-017_Track_12
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track twelve of interview with Reidun Seim

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Interview with Mary Lumby by Kathy Bossort January 8, 2016 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory675
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about her move to UniverCity in 2007, why she likes living there and some of the disadvantages. She talks about the challenges of creating a sense of community in UniverCity, comparing it to the active involvement of Forest Hills and Forest …
Date Range
2007-2015
Length
0:17:35
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about her move to UniverCity in 2007, why she likes living there and some of the disadvantages. She talks about the challenges of creating a sense of community in UniverCity, comparing it to the active involvement of Forest Hills and Forest Grove residents in civic affairs, and about problems of isolation on the mountain top, and separation between campus and the residential area.
Date Range
2007-2015
Length
0:17:35
Name
Simon Fraser University
UniverCity
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Public Services
Planning
Persons - Volunteers
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 8, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Mary Lumby conducted by Kathy Bossort. Mary Lumby was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Mary Lumby’s experience living in Forest Hills, raising her children there, and her involvement in community groups and advocating for improved community services in the Forest Hills and Forest Grove neighbourhoods, and her later move to UniverCity. She talks about the history of the Forest Hills subdivision and what she liked about living there, its links with Forest Grove, and challenges facing both communities as a result of their isolation. Her description of living in UniverCity provides an interesting comparison in how community is created. Mary Lumby also talks about her teaching career, her volunteer activities especially related to the environment, the relationship Trans Mountain tank farm had with adjacent neighbourhoods when she lived in Forest Hills, and what the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area means to her.
Biographical Notes
Mary Lumby was born in Vancouver B.C. She moved to Burnaby and the Parkcrest area in 1977, and then to the new Forest Hills subdivision. Later she moved into another developing community, UniverCity, at the top of Burnaby Mountain and adjacent to the Simon Fraser University campus. Mary has been an active community member, volunteer and community advocate. She has been particularly interested in environmental issues, as a teacher, volunteer coordinator for civic events, and citizen representative on Burnaby’s Environment Committee. She continues to be active in community affairs and enjoys living on Burnaby Mountain.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:31:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lumby, Mary M.
Interview Location
Mary Lumby's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-016_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Mary Lumby

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Interview with Mary Lumby by Kathy Bossort January 8, 2016 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory674
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about the Trans Mountain tank farm and its good relationship with neighbouring communities when she lived in Forest Hills, and how that relationship has deteriorated. She also talks about the lack of engagement between communities with Simon…
Date Range
1983-2015
Length
0:07:39
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about the Trans Mountain tank farm and its good relationship with neighbouring communities when she lived in Forest Hills, and how that relationship has deteriorated. She also talks about the lack of engagement between communities with Simon Fraser University and how that has improved.
Date Range
1983-2015
Length
0:07:39
Name
Trans Mountain Oil Pipeline Company
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Forest Hills
Planning Study Area
Lake City Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 8, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Mary Lumby conducted by Kathy Bossort. Mary Lumby was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Mary Lumby’s experience living in Forest Hills, raising her children there, and her involvement in community groups and advocating for improved community services in the Forest Hills and Forest Grove neighbourhoods, and her later move to UniverCity. She talks about the history of the Forest Hills subdivision and what she liked about living there, its links with Forest Grove, and challenges facing both communities as a result of their isolation. Her description of living in UniverCity provides an interesting comparison in how community is created. Mary Lumby also talks about her teaching career, her volunteer activities especially related to the environment, the relationship Trans Mountain tank farm had with adjacent neighbourhoods when she lived in Forest Hills, and what the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area means to her.
Biographical Notes
Mary Lumby was born in Vancouver B.C. She moved to Burnaby and the Parkcrest area in 1977, and then to the new Forest Hills subdivision. Later she moved into another developing community, UniverCity, at the top of Burnaby Mountain and adjacent to the Simon Fraser University campus. Mary has been an active community member, volunteer and community advocate. She has been particularly interested in environmental issues, as a teacher, volunteer coordinator for civic events, and citizen representative on Burnaby’s Environment Committee. She continues to be active in community affairs and enjoys living on Burnaby Mountain.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:31:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lumby, Mary M.
Interview Location
Mary Lumby's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-016_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Mary Lumby

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Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory37
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's impressions of the neighbourhood he grew up in.
Date Range
1925
Length
0:07:37
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's impressions of the neighbourhood he grew up in.
Date Range
1925
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:07:37
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Transportation
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Richmond Park Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_3
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
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Interview with Charles A. Purdon and May E. Purdon July 9, 1975 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory98
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles and May Purdon's memories of the Jubilee neighbourhood in comparison to their previous neighbourhood of Edmonds.
Date Range
1938-1945
Length
0:09:23
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles and May Purdon's memories of the Jubilee neighbourhood in comparison to their previous neighbourhood of Edmonds.
Date Range
1938-1945
Length
0:09:23
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 9, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles A. Purdon and May E. Purdon by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury July 9, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and Canadian politics. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
May Eliza was born in London, England in 1907. She came out to Regina with her family when she was eleven. Charles A. Purdon was born February 28, 1904 in London, England. He came to Canada in 1925 from China where he had been working as an accountant for the previous three years. Charles first came to Vancouver and joined the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) but within a week he was sent to Regina. This is where he met May. May and Charles got married in 1926 and Charles began working as an accountant for the Saskatchewan Wheat Growers, then for the Canadian Wool Growers before being laid off. In October of 1930, Charles and May left Regina for Vancouver Island. Charles drove himself out and May rode the train with her children; twin boys and a daughter, only one year apart. They settled at May’s parent’s second house in Coombs. The Purdons arrived in Burnaby in December of 1932 and rented a house on Edmonds Street. Charles was unable to do road work and instead found work through the Liberal Party and also with the Municipal engineers indoors on a number of projects. In 1938 the Purdons were able to get into a reverted house built by Ernie Winch at Maple Avenue (then Jubilee) and Nelson Avenue that had nine bedrooms. They paid ten dollars a month to the municipality for use of this property. May Eliza Purdon died April 6, 1983 at the age of seventy-six.
Total Length
1:40:03
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Purdon, Charles A.
Purdon, May Eliza
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-19_Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Charles A. Purdon and May E. Purdon

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Interview with Judy Hagen by Eric Damer November 7, 2012 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory332
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Judith "Judy" (Robins) Hagen's views on the neighbourhood of Dover Street in Burnaby. She begins by discussing how her family first arrived on Dover Street (when her father Jack Robins was only two years old) and continues their story through her childhood …
Date Range
1918-1948
Length
0:09:53
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Judith "Judy" (Robins) Hagen's views on the neighbourhood of Dover Street in Burnaby. She begins by discussing how her family first arrived on Dover Street (when her father Jack Robins was only two years old) and continues their story through her childhood during the war years, including neighbours and neighbouring buildings.
Date Range
1918-1948
Photo Info
Judith "Judy" Robins (later Hagen) posing in a dance costume, 1949. Item no. 549-036.
Length
0:09:53
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Dover Street
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
November 7, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Judith "Judy" (Robins) Hagen conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, November 7, 2012. Major theme discussed: the neighbourhood of Dover Street.
Biographical Notes
Judy Robins (later Hagen) was born in 1941 and grew up in South Burnaby. Her paternal grandfather, a master stone mason from Devon, moved to Vancouver in 1912 to find work before bringing over the rest of the family. He bought three lots in Burnaby and in 1918 moved his family to a small house on Dover Street (formerly Paul Street). Judy’s father, Jack, married, bought one of his father’s lots and built a new home for his family. Judy attended school and church nearby, took dance and piano lessons and participated actively in Girl Guides. After high school, she attended the University of British Columbia (UBC) and then Simon Fraser University (SFU), worked for a few years and then married in 1967 before moving to Courtaney, British Columbia.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:09:51
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hagen, Judith "Judy" Robins
Interview Location
Nanaimo Museum on Vancouver Island
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-011_ Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of interview with Judy Hagen

Images
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Interview with Mary Lumby by Kathy Bossort January 8, 2016 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory671
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about her career as a teacher in Burnaby at Douglas Road, Suncrest and Stride schools, and her move to the Parkcrest neighborhood in Burnaby in 1977 and in 1983 to Forest Hills. She talks about visiting Burnaby Mountain Park and the Owl & Oa…
Date Range
1965-2003
Length
0:12:46
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about her career as a teacher in Burnaby at Douglas Road, Suncrest and Stride schools, and her move to the Parkcrest neighborhood in Burnaby in 1977 and in 1983 to Forest Hills. She talks about visiting Burnaby Mountain Park and the Owl & Oarsman restaurant, and the history of the development of Forest Hills in the 1980s.
Date Range
1965-2003
Length
0:12:46
Name
Douglas Road School
Suncrest School
Stride Avenue School
Burnaby Mountain Park
Subject
Education
Occupations - Teachers
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Forest Hills
Burnaby - Forest Grove
Planning Study Area
Parkcrest-Aubrey Area
Lake City Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 8, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Mary Lumby conducted by Kathy Bossort. Mary Lumby was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Mary Lumby’s experience living in Forest Hills, raising her children there, and her involvement in community groups and advocating for improved community services in the Forest Hills and Forest Grove neighbourhoods, and her later move to UniverCity. She talks about the history of the Forest Hills subdivision and what she liked about living there, its links with Forest Grove, and challenges facing both communities as a result of their isolation. Her description of living in UniverCity provides an interesting comparison in how community is created. Mary Lumby also talks about her teaching career, her volunteer activities especially related to the environment, the relationship Trans Mountain tank farm had with adjacent neighbourhoods when she lived in Forest Hills, and what the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area means to her.
Biographical Notes
Mary Lumby was born in Vancouver B.C. She moved to Burnaby and the Parkcrest area in 1977, and then to the new Forest Hills subdivision. Later she moved into another developing community, UniverCity, at the top of Burnaby Mountain and adjacent to the Simon Fraser University campus. Mary has been an active community member, volunteer and community advocate. She has been particularly interested in environmental issues, as a teacher, volunteer coordinator for civic events, and citizen representative on Burnaby’s Environment Committee. She continues to be active in community affairs and enjoys living on Burnaby Mountain.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:31:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lumby, Mary M.
Interview Location
Mary Lumby's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-016_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Mary Lumby

Less detail

Interview with Mary Lumby by Kathy Bossort January 8, 2016 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory672
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about living in the Forest Hills community, the location of the Burnaby Mountain Urban Trail in Forest Hills, and the Forest Grove community and school. She explains why parents were hesitant to let children play in the conservation area uns…
Date Range
1983-2003
Length
0:10:08
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about living in the Forest Hills community, the location of the Burnaby Mountain Urban Trail in Forest Hills, and the Forest Grove community and school. She explains why parents were hesitant to let children play in the conservation area unsupervised. She tells a story about her children selling pop to the golfers on the Burnaby Mountain Golf Course.
Date Range
1983-2003
Length
0:10:08
Name
Burnaby Mountain Urban Trail
Burnaby Mountain Golf Course
Subject
Geographic Features - Trails
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Persons - Children
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Forest Hills
Planning Study Area
Lake City Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 8, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Mary Lumby conducted by Kathy Bossort. Mary Lumby was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Mary Lumby’s experience living in Forest Hills, raising her children there, and her involvement in community groups and advocating for improved community services in the Forest Hills and Forest Grove neighbourhoods, and her later move to UniverCity. She talks about the history of the Forest Hills subdivision and what she liked about living there, its links with Forest Grove, and challenges facing both communities as a result of their isolation. Her description of living in UniverCity provides an interesting comparison in how community is created. Mary Lumby also talks about her teaching career, her volunteer activities especially related to the environment, the relationship Trans Mountain tank farm had with adjacent neighbourhoods when she lived in Forest Hills, and what the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area means to her.
Biographical Notes
Mary Lumby was born in Vancouver B.C. She moved to Burnaby and the Parkcrest area in 1977, and then to the new Forest Hills subdivision. Later she moved into another developing community, UniverCity, at the top of Burnaby Mountain and adjacent to the Simon Fraser University campus. Mary has been an active community member, volunteer and community advocate. She has been particularly interested in environmental issues, as a teacher, volunteer coordinator for civic events, and citizen representative on Burnaby’s Environment Committee. She continues to be active in community affairs and enjoys living on Burnaby Mountain.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:31:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lumby, Mary M.
Interview Location
Mary Lumby's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-016_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Mary Lumby

Less detail

Interview with Reidun Seim by Kathy Bossort January 13, 2016 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory653
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about what the Curtis Street neighborhood looked like in the 1930s and 1940s. She tells a story about the next door mink farm. She also describes Curtis Street road and the avenues that branched off Curtis Street on Burnaby Mountain above P…
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:10:11
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about what the Curtis Street neighborhood looked like in the 1930s and 1940s. She tells a story about the next door mink farm. She also describes Curtis Street road and the avenues that branched off Curtis Street on Burnaby Mountain above Philips Avenue (First Avenue). These avenues (First to Ninth) were part of a street grid laid out for Hastings Grove in 1911 and are now forest in the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. She also talks about the old Hastings Grove store building, the Adams family who lived in it and the community events held there.
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:10:11
Name
Hastings Grove Store
Hastings Grove
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Curtis Street
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 13, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Reidun Seim conducted by Kathy Bossort. Reidun Seim was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Reidun Seim’s memories about her parent’s farm on Curtis Street, events in her childhood, and the people who lived in or visited her neighborhood. She takes us on a tour of her neighborhood in the 1940s, telling us stories about families who lived on Curtis Street on and east of 7300 block, including people who lived on Burnaby Mountain in the old Hastings Grove subdivision above the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue. She describes changes to Curtis Street, particularly after it provided access to Simon Fraser University in 1965. She also talks about her teaching career, and about how she values the green space and conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Reidun Seim was born in 1931 in Vancouver B.C. to Sjur and Martine Seim. Sjur and Martine Seim emigrated to Canada from Norway in 1930, and after settling in Vancouver, moved to an acre of land and a new home at the base of Burnaby Mountain in 1932. Sjur attended UBC to learn about poultry farming and began his own chicken and egg business in 1935. The farm animals and large garden also contributed to the family’s livelihood and self-sufficiency. The Curtis Street neighborhood was a lively place and extended well up Curtis Street on the west slope of Burnaby Mountain, where Reidun would babysit for families. Reidun attended Sperling Avenue Elementary School (Gr. 1-8), Burnaby North High School, and Vancouver Normal School for teacher training in 1950-1951. She began teaching primary grades in Port Coquitlam at James Park School. Most of her career was spent in North Delta, teaching at Kennedy and Annieville schools from 1954-1958, appointed Primary Consultant (1958-1960) and Primary Supervisor (1960-1985), before retiring in 1986. Reidun lived at home with her parents on Curtis Street, commuting to Delta, and continues to live in the original farmhouse.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
2:35:58
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Seim, Reidun
Interview Location
Burnaby City Hall in the Law Library
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-017_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Reidun Seim

Less detail

Interview with Reidun Seim by Kathy Bossort January 13, 2016 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory654
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about the families and the vineyard and apple orchard on Aubrey Street. She tells stories about picking wild blackberries near Aubrey and raspberries grown on her parent’s farm, and about her mother’s large garden and kale grown for chicken…
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:09:51
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about the families and the vineyard and apple orchard on Aubrey Street. She tells stories about picking wild blackberries near Aubrey and raspberries grown on her parent’s farm, and about her mother’s large garden and kale grown for chicken feed.
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:09:51
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Geographic Features - Gardens
Agriculture - Fruit and Berries
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 7300 Block Curtis Street
Burnaby - Aubrey Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 13, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Reidun Seim conducted by Kathy Bossort. Reidun Seim was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Reidun Seim’s memories about her parent’s farm on Curtis Street, events in her childhood, and the people who lived in or visited her neighborhood. She takes us on a tour of her neighborhood in the 1940s, telling us stories about families who lived on Curtis Street on and east of 7300 block, including people who lived on Burnaby Mountain in the old Hastings Grove subdivision above the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue. She describes changes to Curtis Street, particularly after it provided access to Simon Fraser University in 1965. She also talks about her teaching career, and about how she values the green space and conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Reidun Seim was born in 1931 in Vancouver B.C. to Sjur and Martine Seim. Sjur and Martine Seim emigrated to Canada from Norway in 1930, and after settling in Vancouver, moved to an acre of land and a new home at the base of Burnaby Mountain in 1932. Sjur attended UBC to learn about poultry farming and began his own chicken and egg business in 1935. The farm animals and large garden also contributed to the family’s livelihood and self-sufficiency. The Curtis Street neighborhood was a lively place and extended well up Curtis Street on the west slope of Burnaby Mountain, where Reidun would babysit for families. Reidun attended Sperling Avenue Elementary School (Gr. 1-8), Burnaby North High School, and Vancouver Normal School for teacher training in 1950-1951. She began teaching primary grades in Port Coquitlam at James Park School. Most of her career was spent in North Delta, teaching at Kennedy and Annieville schools from 1954-1958, appointed Primary Consultant (1958-1960) and Primary Supervisor (1960-1985), before retiring in 1986. Reidun lived at home with her parents on Curtis Street, commuting to Delta, and continues to live in the original farmhouse.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
2:35:58
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Seim, Reidun
Interview Location
Burnaby City Hall in the Law Library
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-017_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Reidun Seim

Less detail

Interview with Reidun Seim by Kathy Bossort January 13, 2016 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory655
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue and the public tap available there for residents living on Burnaby Mountain. She talks about the City of Vancouver cemetery property. She describes the families and people who live…
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:12:19
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue and the public tap available there for residents living on Burnaby Mountain. She talks about the City of Vancouver cemetery property. She describes the families and people who lived on Burnwood (2nd Ave), and the mushroom farm that operated next door to the Seim farm.
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:12:19
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Public Services - Public Works
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnwood Avenue
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Westridge Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 13, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Reidun Seim conducted by Kathy Bossort. Reidun Seim was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Reidun Seim’s memories about her parent’s farm on Curtis Street, events in her childhood, and the people who lived in or visited her neighborhood. She takes us on a tour of her neighborhood in the 1940s, telling us stories about families who lived on Curtis Street on and east of 7300 block, including people who lived on Burnaby Mountain in the old Hastings Grove subdivision above the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue. She describes changes to Curtis Street, particularly after it provided access to Simon Fraser University in 1965. She also talks about her teaching career, and about how she values the green space and conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Reidun Seim was born in 1931 in Vancouver B.C. to Sjur and Martine Seim. Sjur and Martine Seim emigrated to Canada from Norway in 1930, and after settling in Vancouver, moved to an acre of land and a new home at the base of Burnaby Mountain in 1932. Sjur attended UBC to learn about poultry farming and began his own chicken and egg business in 1935. The farm animals and large garden also contributed to the family’s livelihood and self-sufficiency. The Curtis Street neighborhood was a lively place and extended well up Curtis Street on the west slope of Burnaby Mountain, where Reidun would babysit for families. Reidun attended Sperling Avenue Elementary School (Gr. 1-8), Burnaby North High School, and Vancouver Normal School for teacher training in 1950-1951. She began teaching primary grades in Port Coquitlam at James Park School. Most of her career was spent in North Delta, teaching at Kennedy and Annieville schools from 1954-1958, appointed Primary Consultant (1958-1960) and Primary Supervisor (1960-1985), before retiring in 1986. Reidun lived at home with her parents on Curtis Street, commuting to Delta, and continues to live in the original farmhouse.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
2:35:58
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Seim, Reidun
Interview Location
Burnaby City Hall in the Law Library
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-017_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Reidun Seim

Less detail

Interview with Reidun Seim by Kathy Bossort January 13, 2016 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory656
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about the people who lived on Curtis Street and 4th Avenue on Burnaby Mountain. Fourth avenue was part of a street grid laid out for Hastings Grove in 1911 and is now forest in the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area.
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:09:15
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about the people who lived on Curtis Street and 4th Avenue on Burnaby Mountain. Fourth avenue was part of a street grid laid out for Hastings Grove in 1911 and is now forest in the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area.
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:09:15
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Westridge Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 13, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Reidun Seim conducted by Kathy Bossort. Reidun Seim was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Reidun Seim’s memories about her parent’s farm on Curtis Street, events in her childhood, and the people who lived in or visited her neighborhood. She takes us on a tour of her neighborhood in the 1940s, telling us stories about families who lived on Curtis Street on and east of 7300 block, including people who lived on Burnaby Mountain in the old Hastings Grove subdivision above the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue. She describes changes to Curtis Street, particularly after it provided access to Simon Fraser University in 1965. She also talks about her teaching career, and about how she values the green space and conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Reidun Seim was born in 1931 in Vancouver B.C. to Sjur and Martine Seim. Sjur and Martine Seim emigrated to Canada from Norway in 1930, and after settling in Vancouver, moved to an acre of land and a new home at the base of Burnaby Mountain in 1932. Sjur attended UBC to learn about poultry farming and began his own chicken and egg business in 1935. The farm animals and large garden also contributed to the family’s livelihood and self-sufficiency. The Curtis Street neighborhood was a lively place and extended well up Curtis Street on the west slope of Burnaby Mountain, where Reidun would babysit for families. Reidun attended Sperling Avenue Elementary School (Gr. 1-8), Burnaby North High School, and Vancouver Normal School for teacher training in 1950-1951. She began teaching primary grades in Port Coquitlam at James Park School. Most of her career was spent in North Delta, teaching at Kennedy and Annieville schools from 1954-1958, appointed Primary Consultant (1958-1960) and Primary Supervisor (1960-1985), before retiring in 1986. Reidun lived at home with her parents on Curtis Street, commuting to Delta, and continues to live in the original farmhouse.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
2:35:58
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Seim, Reidun
Interview Location
Burnaby City Hall in the Law Library
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-017_Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Reidun Seim

Less detail

Interview with Reidun Seim by Kathy Bossort January 13, 2016 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory658
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about the Olofson mink farm on 4th Avenue and the Biggenson house on 8th Avenue (Centennial Way). She also talks about bears and deer in neighborhood gardens, coyotes, and the Lambert cherry tree on the Seim farm. She tells about her father…
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:11:31
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about the Olofson mink farm on 4th Avenue and the Biggenson house on 8th Avenue (Centennial Way). She also talks about bears and deer in neighborhood gardens, coyotes, and the Lambert cherry tree on the Seim farm. She tells about her father giving up chicken farming in the 1950s.
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:11:31
Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Westridge Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 13, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Reidun Seim conducted by Kathy Bossort. Reidun Seim was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Reidun Seim’s memories about her parent’s farm on Curtis Street, events in her childhood, and the people who lived in or visited her neighborhood. She takes us on a tour of her neighborhood in the 1940s, telling us stories about families who lived on Curtis Street on and east of 7300 block, including people who lived on Burnaby Mountain in the old Hastings Grove subdivision above the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue. She describes changes to Curtis Street, particularly after it provided access to Simon Fraser University in 1965. She also talks about her teaching career, and about how she values the green space and conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Reidun Seim was born in 1931 in Vancouver B.C. to Sjur and Martine Seim. Sjur and Martine Seim emigrated to Canada from Norway in 1930, and after settling in Vancouver, moved to an acre of land and a new home at the base of Burnaby Mountain in 1932. Sjur attended UBC to learn about poultry farming and began his own chicken and egg business in 1935. The farm animals and large garden also contributed to the family’s livelihood and self-sufficiency. The Curtis Street neighborhood was a lively place and extended well up Curtis Street on the west slope of Burnaby Mountain, where Reidun would babysit for families. Reidun attended Sperling Avenue Elementary School (Gr. 1-8), Burnaby North High School, and Vancouver Normal School for teacher training in 1950-1951. She began teaching primary grades in Port Coquitlam at James Park School. Most of her career was spent in North Delta, teaching at Kennedy and Annieville schools from 1954-1958, appointed Primary Consultant (1958-1960) and Primary Supervisor (1960-1985), before retiring in 1986. Reidun lived at home with her parents on Curtis Street, commuting to Delta, and continues to live in the original farmhouse.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
2:35:58
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Seim, Reidun
Interview Location
Burnaby City Hall in the Law Library
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-017_Track_9
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track nine of interview with Reidun Seim

Less detail

Interview with Reidun Seim by Kathy Bossort January 13, 2016 - Track 10

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory659
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about changes on Curtis Street beginning in the 1950s. She tells about a surveyor for the Trans Mountain pipeline coming on to the Seim farm. She tells stories about the fish seller and milk delivery on Curtis Street.
Date Range
1930-1960
Length
0:10:06
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about changes on Curtis Street beginning in the 1950s. She tells about a surveyor for the Trans Mountain pipeline coming on to the Seim farm. She tells stories about the fish seller and milk delivery on Curtis Street.
Date Range
1930-1960
Length
0:10:06
Name
Trans Mountain Oil Pipeline Company
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 7300 Block Curtis Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Westridge Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 13, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Reidun Seim conducted by Kathy Bossort. Reidun Seim was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Reidun Seim’s memories about her parent’s farm on Curtis Street, events in her childhood, and the people who lived in or visited her neighborhood. She takes us on a tour of her neighborhood in the 1940s, telling us stories about families who lived on Curtis Street on and east of 7300 block, including people who lived on Burnaby Mountain in the old Hastings Grove subdivision above the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue. She describes changes to Curtis Street, particularly after it provided access to Simon Fraser University in 1965. She also talks about her teaching career, and about how she values the green space and conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Reidun Seim was born in 1931 in Vancouver B.C. to Sjur and Martine Seim. Sjur and Martine Seim emigrated to Canada from Norway in 1930, and after settling in Vancouver, moved to an acre of land and a new home at the base of Burnaby Mountain in 1932. Sjur attended UBC to learn about poultry farming and began his own chicken and egg business in 1935. The farm animals and large garden also contributed to the family’s livelihood and self-sufficiency. The Curtis Street neighborhood was a lively place and extended well up Curtis Street on the west slope of Burnaby Mountain, where Reidun would babysit for families. Reidun attended Sperling Avenue Elementary School (Gr. 1-8), Burnaby North High School, and Vancouver Normal School for teacher training in 1950-1951. She began teaching primary grades in Port Coquitlam at James Park School. Most of her career was spent in North Delta, teaching at Kennedy and Annieville schools from 1954-1958, appointed Primary Consultant (1958-1960) and Primary Supervisor (1960-1985), before retiring in 1986. Reidun lived at home with her parents on Curtis Street, commuting to Delta, and continues to live in the original farmhouse.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
2:35:58
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Seim, Reidun
Interview Location
Burnaby City Hall in the Law Library
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-017_Track_10
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track ten of interview with Reidun Seim

Less detail

Interview with Reidun Seim by Kathy Bossort January 13, 2016 - Track 14

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory663
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about how the people living in the Curtis Street neighbourhood needed to be self-sufficient, and about how her mother walked to a store on Howard and Hastings Streets. She talks about the local taxi, bus and trolley services, describing in …
Date Range
1930-1960
Length
0:16:10
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about how the people living in the Curtis Street neighbourhood needed to be self-sufficient, and about how her mother walked to a store on Howard and Hastings Streets. She talks about the local taxi, bus and trolley services, describing in detail the Toonerville Trolley. She also talks about going to the new Burnaby North High School in Grade nine. She also talks about how Parker and Curtis Streets were eventually joined.
Date Range
1930-1960
Length
0:16:10
Name
Burnaby North High School
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Transportation
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Curtis Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 13, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Reidun Seim conducted by Kathy Bossort. Reidun Seim was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Reidun Seim’s memories about her parent’s farm on Curtis Street, events in her childhood, and the people who lived in or visited her neighborhood. She takes us on a tour of her neighborhood in the 1940s, telling us stories about families who lived on Curtis Street on and east of 7300 block, including people who lived on Burnaby Mountain in the old Hastings Grove subdivision above the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue. She describes changes to Curtis Street, particularly after it provided access to Simon Fraser University in 1965. She also talks about her teaching career, and about how she values the green space and conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Reidun Seim was born in 1931 in Vancouver B.C. to Sjur and Martine Seim. Sjur and Martine Seim emigrated to Canada from Norway in 1930, and after settling in Vancouver, moved to an acre of land and a new home at the base of Burnaby Mountain in 1932. Sjur attended UBC to learn about poultry farming and began his own chicken and egg business in 1935. The farm animals and large garden also contributed to the family’s livelihood and self-sufficiency. The Curtis Street neighborhood was a lively place and extended well up Curtis Street on the west slope of Burnaby Mountain, where Reidun would babysit for families. Reidun attended Sperling Avenue Elementary School (Gr. 1-8), Burnaby North High School, and Vancouver Normal School for teacher training in 1950-1951. She began teaching primary grades in Port Coquitlam at James Park School. Most of her career was spent in North Delta, teaching at Kennedy and Annieville schools from 1954-1958, appointed Primary Consultant (1958-1960) and Primary Supervisor (1960-1985), before retiring in 1986. Reidun lived at home with her parents on Curtis Street, commuting to Delta, and continues to live in the original farmhouse.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
2:35:58
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Seim, Reidun
Interview Location
Burnaby City Hall in the Law Library
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-017_Track_14
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track fourteen of interview with Reidun Seim

Less detail

Interview with Mary Lumby by Kathy Bossort January 8, 2016 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory673
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about the link between the communities of Forest Hills and Forest Grove, about Forest Grove Elementary School, and about how residents advocated for community services, particularly parks for children. She talks about how neighbourhood desig…
Date Range
1983-2003
Length
0:11:05
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about the link between the communities of Forest Hills and Forest Grove, about Forest Grove Elementary School, and about how residents advocated for community services, particularly parks for children. She talks about how neighbourhood design balances protecting the natural environment with needed community services, and the problem of isolation for the communities.
Date Range
1983-2003
Length
0:11:05
Name
Forest Grove Elementary School
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Subject
Public Services - Municipal Services
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Geographic Features - Parks
Persons - Volunteers
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Forest Hills
Burnaby - Forest Grove
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Planning Study Area
Lake City Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 8, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Mary Lumby conducted by Kathy Bossort. Mary Lumby was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Mary Lumby’s experience living in Forest Hills, raising her children there, and her involvement in community groups and advocating for improved community services in the Forest Hills and Forest Grove neighbourhoods, and her later move to UniverCity. She talks about the history of the Forest Hills subdivision and what she liked about living there, its links with Forest Grove, and challenges facing both communities as a result of their isolation. Her description of living in UniverCity provides an interesting comparison in how community is created. Mary Lumby also talks about her teaching career, her volunteer activities especially related to the environment, the relationship Trans Mountain tank farm had with adjacent neighbourhoods when she lived in Forest Hills, and what the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area means to her.
Biographical Notes
Mary Lumby was born in Vancouver B.C. She moved to Burnaby and the Parkcrest area in 1977, and then to the new Forest Hills subdivision. Later she moved into another developing community, UniverCity, at the top of Burnaby Mountain and adjacent to the Simon Fraser University campus. Mary has been an active community member, volunteer and community advocate. She has been particularly interested in environmental issues, as a teacher, volunteer coordinator for civic events, and citizen representative on Burnaby’s Environment Committee. She continues to be active in community affairs and enjoys living on Burnaby Mountain.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:31:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lumby, Mary M.
Interview Location
Mary Lumby's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-016_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Mary Lumby

Less detail

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