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Interview with Kay Zimmerman by Rod Fowler [February] 1990 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory527
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Kay Zimmerman’s description of the two established political parties in Burnaby in the 1960’s (NPA and BCA) and the founding of a new nonpartisan political group, the Burnaby Voters Association (BVA). She talks about the issues of interest at that time, includ…
Date Range
1960-1970
Length
00:05:10
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Kay Zimmerman’s description of the two established political parties in Burnaby in the 1960’s (NPA and BCA) and the founding of a new nonpartisan political group, the Burnaby Voters Association (BVA). She talks about the issues of interest at that time, including development pressures, need to represent local community interests, the environment, and plans for a new university on Burnaby Mountain
Date Range
1960-1970
Photo Info
Kay Zimmerman, [1973]. Item no. 231-021
Length
00:05:10
Name
Lewarne, William A. "Bill"
Stusiak, Victor V. "Vic"
Burnaby Citizen's Association
Burnaby Voters Association
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Elections
Organizations
Government - Local Government
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
[February] 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Kay Zimmerman, conducted by Rod Fowler. Kay Zimmerman was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Kay Zimmerman’s political activities in Burnaby and her description of her Lochdale neighbourhood in the 1960s. She provides an excellent overview of the municipal political groups and important political issues in Burnaby from 1960 to 1980. She tells the story about an early and successful political action that convinced her that an individual can make a difference. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Kathleen “Kay” Zimmerman, her husband Gordon and their young son Rick moved to Burnaby from Vancouver in 1960 to a house on Curtis Avenue near Duthie Street (a second son Bruce was born in Burnaby). Kay Zimmerman worked 12 years at Royal Columbian Hospital in the admitting office, then 4 years (1974-1979) as special assistant to Senator Ray Perrault, followed by work as a judge on the Citizenship Court before retiring. Gordon Zimmerman worked at the Shell Refinery. A member of the Liberal Party and political activist before arriving in Burnaby, Kay Zimmerman continued her involvement in national and local politics. She campaigned for Ray Perrault during the Trudeau years, and was a founder and active member of the Burnaby Voters Association (BVA). Her political activities encompassed 30 years that saw major changes in Burnaby, including the building of SFU, creation of Heritage Village, an awakening environmental sensibility, and a dramatic increase in population and development in Burnaby.
Total Tracks
10
Total Length
01:04:36
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Zimmerman, Kay
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-018_Track_1
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Kay Zimmerman

Images
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Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory16
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's thoughts on Municipal politics of the time.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:05:09
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's thoughts on Municipal politics of the time.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:05:09
Name
Pritchard, William A.
Subject
Elections
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_7
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
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Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory26
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Cooperative Commonweath Federation (CCF) as well as his mother and father's involvement in politics.
Date Range
1933-1935
Length
0:08:46
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Cooperative Commonweath Federation (CCF) as well as his mother and father's involvement in politics.
Date Range
1933-1935
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:08:46
Name
Weaver, George
Subject
Elections
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_9
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Images
Less detail

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