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Burnaby Art Gallery Collection

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Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1890 (date of original) -1983
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Art Gallery Collection
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
2 files of textual records and 58 photographs
Storage Location
BHS241
BHS242
MSS066
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of photographs of the Burnaby Art Gallery. Prior to being the Art Gallery, this building was the home of Henry T. Ceperley (built 1911), and was known as "Fairacres." In 1939, the local Catholic Diocese funded a group of five Benedictine monks to establish a Priory in B.C., and "Fa…
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1890 (date of original) -1983
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Art Gallery Collection
Physical Description
2 files of textual records and 58 photographs
Description Level
Fonds
Storage Location
BHS241
BHS242
MSS066
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of photographs of the Burnaby Art Gallery. Prior to being the Art Gallery, this building was the home of Henry T. Ceperley (built 1911), and was known as "Fairacres." In 1939, the local Catholic Diocese funded a group of five Benedictine monks to establish a Priory in B.C., and "Fairacres" was purchased and used for this purpose. This property was acquired in 1966 by City of Burnaby for use as a civic art gallery as part of the new Arts Centre in Deer Lake Park and designated as a heritage property in 1992.
History/Biography
Henry and Grace Ceperley purchased a strawberry farm from George Clayton in 1909. Their home, named Fairacres, was built on the north shore of Deer Lake in 1911. The house was designed by the English architect, R.P.S. Twizell. The Ceperley House, with its river rock veranda, beautiful hand-crafted woodwork, stained-glass and tile, remains one of the finest examples of Edwardian architecture in the Lower Mainland. In 1917 Grace Ceperley died and left Fairacres to her husband, H.T. Ceperley with the stipulation that when the home was sold the proceeds would be used to build a playground for the children of Vancouver in Stanley Park. Grace and H.T. Ceperley had one daughter named Ethelwyn who married James Edward Hall. Ethelwyn and James Edward Hall had three children, Edith Ceperley, James Edward "Junior" and Florence Renn. In 1939 a community of five Benedictine monks came from Mount Angel, Oregon to establish a priory in British Columbia. They decided to purchase the Ceperley House for their monastery. A large gymnasium was built on the property which was later converted into the James Cowan Theatre when the property was acquired by the City of Burnaby in 1966. For a brief time the house was used as a fraternity for some of the first students to attend Simon Fraser University. The old mansion began its life as an art museum in the 1960's. Since its beginnings as an association in 1967, the Burnaby Art Gallery has been dedicated to presenting a historical and contemporary art program by local, regional, national and international artists; facilitating the development of emerging artists; providing diverse art educational programming; acquiring culturally significant works on paper. The City of Burnaby assumed management of the gallery, its collection, staff and governance in 1998, with the art gallery then taking on the added responsibility of caring for and managing the City of Burnaby’s Permanent Art Collection. During that same year the City began restorations of the exterior of Ceperley House and upgraded the building for improved public use. The renovations were completed in 2000, transforming the house back to its appearance of 1911. The Gallery along with the other cultural facilities in Deer Lake Park, the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts and the Burnaby Village Museum are part of the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Department of the City of Burnaby. There are two main galleries, a lounge gallery with a fireplace and easy chairs and The Shopping Bag, a gallery shop run by volunteers. The goals of the gallery are to: provide access to contemporary Canadian art, present works from the permanent collection; collect contemporary works on paper; and offer challenging and educational exhibition related programming.
Media Type
Textual Record
Photograph
Less detail
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