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Interview with William Pritchard and Norman Penner by Dr. Lawrence Fast July / August 1973 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory74
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to how the book "Winnipeg 1919", edited by Norman Penner, came into being. Both Norman Penner and labour activist William A. Pritchard answer questions posed by Dr. Lawrence Fast about the Winnipeg General Strike, the subsequent trial and the striker's account…
Date Range
predominate 1919, 1973
Length
0:09:54
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to how the book "Winnipeg 1919", edited by Norman Penner, came into being. Both Norman Penner and labour activist William A. Pritchard answer questions posed by Dr. Lawrence Fast about the Winnipeg General Strike, the subsequent trial and the striker's account written while in jail.
Date Range
predominate 1919, 1973
Photo Info
William A. Pritchard, Burnaby Reeve 1930-1932 and council member 1928-1930. Item no. 459-016
Length
0:09:54
Subject
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Manitoba - Winnipeg
Interviewer
Fast, Dr. Lawrence
Interview Date
July / August 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with William Pritchard and writer Norman Penner by Dr. Lawrence Fast. Norman Penner is the editor of the book "Winnipeg 1919" about the strike from the striker's perspective. William Pritchard wrote the speech that was included in the book. Major theme discussed is: The Winnipeg General Strike. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
William "Bill" Arthur Pritchard was born on April 3, 1888 in Salford, England, the son of a miner and factory worker. In May 1911, Bill moved to British Columbia and within a week of arriving became an active member of the Socialist Party of Canada. From 1914 to 1917, he served as editor of the Western Clarion – the SPC newspaper. He became such a well-known socialist figure that when he travelled to Winnipeg to participate in the General Strike in 1919, he was one of only seven people arrested and imprisoned for his participation in the event despite the fact that he was in no way directly involved in its planning nor development. In 1922, Bill and his family settled in North Burnaby in the Capitol Hill District. Almost immediately after his arrival, Bill began to advocate for change and a planned development scheme for the municipality. Pritchard ran successfully for the position of Reeve and held the post until the end of 1932. One of Reeve Pritchard’s highest priorities while in office was to attempt to provide work for as many unemployed as possible all the while trying to elicit more support from the provincial and federal governments. Bill was a strong advocate of the belief that relief work should be focused on projects that would see a comprehensive development scheme for Burnaby – including planned sewers, roads and water supply. Despite Bill's best efforts, however, Burnaby was forced into receivership and at the end of 1932, a Provincial Commission stepped in to take over the governance of the city. Reeve Pritchard, having done all he could as a champion of the unemployed, stepped down as Reeve but left behind an undeniable legacy of courage and determination. He was rewarded for his enormous contributions to the city in 1975 when he was chosen to be made a Freeman of Burnaby. William Pritchard died on October 23, 1981. Norman Penner was born in Winnipeg in 1921 to Rose and Jacob Penner and brother to Roland, Ruth and Walter. Their father Jacob was a leading member of the Communist Party and popular Winnipeg Alderman. Norman graduated from high school in 1937 but did not begin university until much later, preferring to begin his adult life from 1938 to 1941 as a full-time officer of the Winnipeg branch of the Communist Party of Canada. From 1941 to 1946 he served with the Canadian Army which included two-and-a-half years of overseas combat duty. On his return to Canada in 1947 he again returned to his duties as a full-time officer with the communist Labour-Progressive Party (formed in 1941 after the Canadian Communist Party was officially banned). After the abortive Hungarian revolution in 1956, Norman Penner resigned from the party and instead worked as a self-employed manufacturer’s sales representative until 1971. In 1964 he decided to go back to school part time and graduated with a BA from the University of Toronto in 1969. He took an MA in 1971 and a PhD in 1975 from the same institution. Penner was hired as a lecturer at York University's Glendon College in 1972 and soon became a professor, continuing to teach until 1995. He wrote extensively on the Canadian left. Penner edited and introduced "Winnipeg 1919: The Strikers' Own History of the Winnipeg General Strike" in 1973, published "The Canadian Left: A Critical Analysis" in 1977 and contributed three chapters to as well as editing "Keeping Canada Together Means Changing Our Thinking" in 1978. He published "Canadian Communism: The Stalin Years and Beyond" in 1988 and "From Protest to Power: Social Democracy in Canada 1900 to Present" in 1992 as well as numerous articles, reviews and book chapters. Norman Penner was married to Norma Lipes for sixty-seven years. The couple had four children: Steve (Mary Ellen Marus); Joyce (Herman Parsons); Gary (Marlene Kadar); and Bob (Shaena Lambert). Norman Penner died April 16, 2009 at the age of eighty-eight.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:47
Other Tracks
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Interviewee Name
Pritchard, William A.
Penner, Norman
Fast, Dr. Lawrence
Interview Location
Library of Vancouver City College, Langara Campus
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-02-1_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with William Pritchard and Norman Penner

Images
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Interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen by Kathy Bossort October 9, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory564
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen describing the founding of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society and how they became members. They talk about the Society’s goal, members Dean Lamont and Merrill and Betty Gordon, and the work of SFU Professor Colin Crampton. …
Date Range
1988-1997
Length
0:15:54
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen describing the founding of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society and how they became members. They talk about the Society’s goal, members Dean Lamont and Merrill and Betty Gordon, and the work of SFU Professor Colin Crampton. Karen Morcke talks about the significance of the names on the cairn that memorializes the dedication of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. They also talk about the results of the 1995 agreement between City and SFU.
Date Range
1988-1997
Length
0:15:54
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Lamont, Dean
Gordon, Merrill
Crampton, Colin
Harcourt, Mike
Sihota, Moe
Copeland, William J
Corrigan, Derek
Drummond, Douglas P "Doug"
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen conducted by Kathy Bossort. Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history and activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society of which Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were founding members, and the environmental and recreational value of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Karen Morcke also talks about walking the trails on Burnaby Mountain from 1968 to present and her involvement in other environmental groups.
Biographical Notes
Diane Hansen was born in Winnipeg in 1941, trained as a nurse in Toronto, and moved with her husband Ingolf Hansen to the Westridge Area in Burnaby in 1971, where Diane lived until 2010. Diane has one daughter Kristin. Karen Morcke was born in Germany in 1940, immigrating to Canada in 1968 to attend SFU. After completing her Masters degree in 1970 Karen was hired by SFU as a language instructor from which she retired in 1995. She has one son Erik and has lived almost continuously in North Burnaby since 1968. Both Diane Hansen and Karen Morcke have been active volunteers in local environmental groups and were founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed about 1989 to lobby for a conservation area that integrated SFU land below the campus ring road with City of Burnaby parkland on Burnaby Mountain. Diane has also been active in wild bird rescue groups. Karen walked the trails on Burnaby Mountain to and from work, and began lobbying for protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain in the 1970s.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:10:35
Other Tracks
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Interviewee Name
Morcke, Karen
Hansen, H. Diane
Interview Location
Karen Morcke's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-003_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen

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