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Interview with William Pritchard and Norman Penner by Dr. Lawrence Fast July / August 1973 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory75
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to the impact of the "red scare" at the time of the Winnipeg Strike of 1919. Norman Penner, William Pritchard and Dr. Lawrence Fast discuss this phenomenon.
Date Range
1919-1933
Length
0:03:53
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to the impact of the "red scare" at the time of the Winnipeg Strike of 1919. Norman Penner, William Pritchard and Dr. Lawrence Fast discuss this phenomenon.
Date Range
1919-1933
Photo Info
William A. Pritchard, Burnaby Reeve 1930-1932 and council member 1928-1930. Item no. 459-016
Length
0:03:53
Subject
Political Theories
Interviewer
Fast, Dr. Lawrence
Interview Date
July / August 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with William Pritchard and writer Norman Penner by Dr. Lawrence Fast. Norman Penner is the editor of the book "Winnipeg 1919" about the strike from the striker's perspective. William Pritchard wrote the speech that was included in the book. Major theme discussed is: The Winnipeg General Strike. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
William "Bill" Arthur Pritchard was born on April 3, 1888 in Salford, England, the son of a miner and factory worker. In May 1911, Bill moved to British Columbia and within a week of arriving became an active member of the Socialist Party of Canada. From 1914 to 1917, he served as editor of the Western Clarion – the SPC newspaper. He became such a well-known socialist figure that when he travelled to Winnipeg to participate in the General Strike in 1919, he was one of only seven people arrested and imprisoned for his participation in the event despite the fact that he was in no way directly involved in its planning nor development. In 1922, Bill and his family settled in North Burnaby in the Capitol Hill District. Almost immediately after his arrival, Bill began to advocate for change and a planned development scheme for the municipality. Pritchard ran successfully for the position of Reeve and held the post until the end of 1932. One of Reeve Pritchard’s highest priorities while in office was to attempt to provide work for as many unemployed as possible all the while trying to elicit more support from the provincial and federal governments. Bill was a strong advocate of the belief that relief work should be focused on projects that would see a comprehensive development scheme for Burnaby – including planned sewers, roads and water supply. Despite Bill's best efforts, however, Burnaby was forced into receivership and at the end of 1932, a Provincial Commission stepped in to take over the governance of the city. Reeve Pritchard, having done all he could as a champion of the unemployed, stepped down as Reeve but left behind an undeniable legacy of courage and determination. He was rewarded for his enormous contributions to the city in 1975 when he was chosen to be made a Freeman of Burnaby. William Pritchard died on October 23, 1981. Norman Penner was born in Winnipeg in 1921 to Rose and Jacob Penner and brother to Roland, Ruth and Walter. Their father Jacob was a leading member of the Communist Party and popular Winnipeg Alderman. Norman graduated from high school in 1937 but did not begin university until much later, preferring to begin his adult life from 1938 to 1941 as a full-time officer of the Winnipeg branch of the Communist Party of Canada. From 1941 to 1946 he served with the Canadian Army which included two-and-a-half years of overseas combat duty. On his return to Canada in 1947 he again returned to his duties as a full-time officer with the communist Labour-Progressive Party (formed in 1941 after the Canadian Communist Party was officially banned). After the abortive Hungarian revolution in 1956, Norman Penner resigned from the party and instead worked as a self-employed manufacturer’s sales representative until 1971. In 1964 he decided to go back to school part time and graduated with a BA from the University of Toronto in 1969. He took an MA in 1971 and a PhD in 1975 from the same institution. Penner was hired as a lecturer at York University's Glendon College in 1972 and soon became a professor, continuing to teach until 1995. He wrote extensively on the Canadian left. Penner edited and introduced "Winnipeg 1919: The Strikers' Own History of the Winnipeg General Strike" in 1973, published "The Canadian Left: A Critical Analysis" in 1977 and contributed three chapters to as well as editing "Keeping Canada Together Means Changing Our Thinking" in 1978. He published "Canadian Communism: The Stalin Years and Beyond" in 1988 and "From Protest to Power: Social Democracy in Canada 1900 to Present" in 1992 as well as numerous articles, reviews and book chapters. Norman Penner was married to Norma Lipes for sixty-seven years. The couple had four children: Steve (Mary Ellen Marus); Joyce (Herman Parsons); Gary (Marlene Kadar); and Bob (Shaena Lambert). Norman Penner died April 16, 2009 at the age of eighty-eight.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Pritchard, William A.
Penner, Norman
Fast, Dr. Lawrence
Interview Location
Library of Vancouver City College, Langara Campus
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-02-1_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with William Pritchard and Norman Penner

Images
Less detail

Open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner July / August 1973 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory79
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to William Pritchards' speech and his experiences at the trial for the Winnipeg General Strike as well as his stories from his early twenties and the beginnings of his own socialist leanings.
Date Range
1911-1919
Length
0:09:09
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to William Pritchards' speech and his experiences at the trial for the Winnipeg General Strike as well as his stories from his early twenties and the beginnings of his own socialist leanings.
Date Range
1911-1919
Photo Info
William A. Pritchard, Burnaby Reeve 1930-1932 and council member 1928-1930. Item no. 459-016
Length
0:09:09
Subject
Political Theories
Interview Date
July / August 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a open meeting with William Pritchard and writer Norman Penner. Norman Penner is the editor of the book "Winnipeg 1919" about the strike from the striker's perspective. William Pritchard wrote the speech that was included in the book. Audience members were invited to ask Pritchard questions. Major theme discussed is: The Winnipeg General Strike. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
William "Bill" Arthur Pritchard was born on April 3, 1888 in Salford, England, the son of a miner and factory worker. In May 1911, Bill moved to British Columbia and within a week of arriving became an active member of the Socialist Party of Canada. From 1914 to 1917, he served as editor of the Western Clarion – the SPC newspaper. He became such a well-known socialist figure that when he travelled to Winnipeg to participate in the General Strike in 1919, he was one of only seven people arrested and imprisoned for his participation in the event despite the fact that he was in no way directly involved in its planning nor development. In 1922, Bill and his family settled in North Burnaby in the Capitol Hill District. Almost immediately after his arrival, Bill began to advocate for change and a planned development scheme for the municipality. Pritchard ran successfully for the position of Reeve and held the post until the end of 1932. One of Reeve Pritchard’s highest priorities while in office was to attempt to provide work for as many unemployed as possible all the while trying to elicit more support from the provincial and federal governments. Bill was a strong advocate of the belief that relief work should be focused on projects that would see a comprehensive development scheme for Burnaby – including planned sewers, roads and water supply. Despite Bill's best efforts, however, Burnaby was forced into receivership and at the end of 1932, a Provincial Commission stepped in to take over the governance of the city. Reeve Pritchard, having done all he could as a champion of the unemployed, stepped down as Reeve but left behind an undeniable legacy of courage and determination. He was rewarded for his enormous contributions to the city in 1975 when he was chosen to be made a Freeman of Burnaby. William Pritchard died on October 23, 1981. Norman Penner was born in Winnipeg in 1921 to Rose and Jacob Penner and brother to Roland, Ruth and Walter. Their father Jacob was a leading member of the Communist Party and popular Winnipeg Alderman. Norman graduated from high school in 1937 but did not begin university until much later, preferring to begin his adult life from 1938 to 1941 as a full-time officer of the Winnipeg branch of the Communist Party of Canada. From 1941 to 1946 he served with the Canadian Army which included two-and-a-half years of overseas combat duty. On his return to Canada in 1947 he again returned to his duties as a full-time officer with the communist Labour-Progressive Party (formed in 1941 after the Canadian Communist Party was officially banned). After the abortive Hungarian revolution in 1956, Norman Penner resigned from the party and instead worked as a self-employed manufacturer’s sales representative until 1971. In 1964 he decided to go back to school part time and graduated with a BA from the University of Toronto in 1969. He took an MA in 1971 and a PhD in 1975 from the same institution. Penner was hired as a lecturer at York University's Glendon College in 1972 and soon became a professor, continuing to teach until 1995. He wrote extensively on the Canadian left. Penner edited and introduced "Winnipeg 1919: The Strikers' Own History of the Winnipeg General Strike" in 1973, published "The Canadian Left: A Critical Analysis" in 1977 and contributed three chapters to as well as editing "Keeping Canada Together Means Changing Our Thinking" in 1978. He published "Canadian Communism: The Stalin Years and Beyond" in 1988 and "From Protest to Power: Social Democracy in Canada 1900 to Present" in 1992 as well as numerous articles, reviews and book chapters. Norman Penner was married to Norma Lipes for sixty-seven years. The couple had four children: Steve (Mary Ellen Marus); Joyce (Herman Parsons); Gary (Marlene Kadar); and Bob (Shaena Lambert). Norman Penner died April 16, 2009 at the age of eighty-eight.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:03:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Pritchard, William A.
Penner, Norman
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-02-2_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner

Images
Less detail

Open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner July / August 1973 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory82
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to William Pritchard's thoughts on Socialism and Revolution in their various incantations. He also discusses the political leanings of the arrested Winnipeg Strikers.
Date Range
1688-1919
Length
0:08:51
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to William Pritchard's thoughts on Socialism and Revolution in their various incantations. He also discusses the political leanings of the arrested Winnipeg Strikers.
Date Range
1688-1919
Photo Info
William A. Pritchard, Burnaby Reeve 1930-1932 and council member 1928-1930. Item no. 459-016
Length
0:08:51
Name
Woodsworth, James Shaver
Subject
Political Theories
Interview Date
July / August 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a open meeting with William Pritchard and writer Norman Penner. Norman Penner is the editor of the book "Winnipeg 1919" about the strike from the striker's perspective. William Pritchard wrote the speech that was included in the book. Audience members were invited to ask Pritchard questions. Major theme discussed is: The Winnipeg General Strike. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
William "Bill" Arthur Pritchard was born on April 3, 1888 in Salford, England, the son of a miner and factory worker. In May 1911, Bill moved to British Columbia and within a week of arriving became an active member of the Socialist Party of Canada. From 1914 to 1917, he served as editor of the Western Clarion – the SPC newspaper. He became such a well-known socialist figure that when he travelled to Winnipeg to participate in the General Strike in 1919, he was one of only seven people arrested and imprisoned for his participation in the event despite the fact that he was in no way directly involved in its planning nor development. In 1922, Bill and his family settled in North Burnaby in the Capitol Hill District. Almost immediately after his arrival, Bill began to advocate for change and a planned development scheme for the municipality. Pritchard ran successfully for the position of Reeve and held the post until the end of 1932. One of Reeve Pritchard’s highest priorities while in office was to attempt to provide work for as many unemployed as possible all the while trying to elicit more support from the provincial and federal governments. Bill was a strong advocate of the belief that relief work should be focused on projects that would see a comprehensive development scheme for Burnaby – including planned sewers, roads and water supply. Despite Bill's best efforts, however, Burnaby was forced into receivership and at the end of 1932, a Provincial Commission stepped in to take over the governance of the city. Reeve Pritchard, having done all he could as a champion of the unemployed, stepped down as Reeve but left behind an undeniable legacy of courage and determination. He was rewarded for his enormous contributions to the city in 1975 when he was chosen to be made a Freeman of Burnaby. William Pritchard died on October 23, 1981. Norman Penner was born in Winnipeg in 1921 to Rose and Jacob Penner and brother to Roland, Ruth and Walter. Their father Jacob was a leading member of the Communist Party and popular Winnipeg Alderman. Norman graduated from high school in 1937 but did not begin university until much later, preferring to begin his adult life from 1938 to 1941 as a full-time officer of the Winnipeg branch of the Communist Party of Canada. From 1941 to 1946 he served with the Canadian Army which included two-and-a-half years of overseas combat duty. On his return to Canada in 1947 he again returned to his duties as a full-time officer with the communist Labour-Progressive Party (formed in 1941 after the Canadian Communist Party was officially banned). After the abortive Hungarian revolution in 1956, Norman Penner resigned from the party and instead worked as a self-employed manufacturer’s sales representative until 1971. In 1964 he decided to go back to school part time and graduated with a BA from the University of Toronto in 1969. He took an MA in 1971 and a PhD in 1975 from the same institution. Penner was hired as a lecturer at York University's Glendon College in 1972 and soon became a professor, continuing to teach until 1995. He wrote extensively on the Canadian left. Penner edited and introduced "Winnipeg 1919: The Strikers' Own History of the Winnipeg General Strike" in 1973, published "The Canadian Left: A Critical Analysis" in 1977 and contributed three chapters to as well as editing "Keeping Canada Together Means Changing Our Thinking" in 1978. He published "Canadian Communism: The Stalin Years and Beyond" in 1988 and "From Protest to Power: Social Democracy in Canada 1900 to Present" in 1992 as well as numerous articles, reviews and book chapters. Norman Penner was married to Norma Lipes for sixty-seven years. The couple had four children: Steve (Mary Ellen Marus); Joyce (Herman Parsons); Gary (Marlene Kadar); and Bob (Shaena Lambert). Norman Penner died April 16, 2009 at the age of eighty-eight.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:03:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Pritchard, William A.
Penner, Norman
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-02-2_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner

Images
Less detail

Interview with A.W. Dow by Larry R. Jensen November 11, 1974 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory166
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's memories of the outcome of the Depression as well as the politics of the time.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:05:58
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A.W. Dow's memories of the outcome of the Depression as well as the politics of the time.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Dow General Store, [193-]. Item no. HV976.62.1
Length
0:05:58
Subject
Political Theories
Interviewer
Jensen, Larry R.
Interview Date
November 11, 1974
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A.W. Dow by history student Larry R. Jensen, November 11, 1974. This interview was created to gain information for a History 432 paper entitled: "The Lochdale Community: A Study of Depression Times (1929-1939)." Major themes discussed are: the Lochdale Community and the Depression.
Biographical Notes
A.W. Dow went to boarding school in Truro, Cornwall, United Kingdom. A.W. Dow came to the Lochdale Community in 1928. He learnt of the Lochdale store being up for sale through his bride-to-be’s brother, bought it, and became the postmaster and Lochdale General Store owner from 1928 until 1937, renaming it Dow's General Store. In 1937, he and his wife left the store at Hastings Street, bought property and built a combination house and store at 599 Sperling Avenue. A.W. served as Secretary and Treasurer of the Rate Payers' Association. As well, he and his wife were charter members of the Lochdale Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:39
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Dow, A.W.
Interview Location
599 Sperling Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-05_ Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with A.W. Dow

Images
Less detail

Open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner July / August 1973 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory83
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to Pritchard's thoughts on whether socialism is stronger now or then. The two men discuss the One Big Union (OBU) movement.
Date Range
1919-1973
Length
0:07:14
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to Pritchard's thoughts on whether socialism is stronger now or then. The two men discuss the One Big Union (OBU) movement.
Date Range
1919-1973
Photo Info
William A. Pritchard, Burnaby Reeve 1930-1932 and council member 1928-1930. Item no. 459-016
Length
0:07:14
Subject
Political Theories
Organizations - Unions
Interview Date
July / August 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a open meeting with William Pritchard and writer Norman Penner. Norman Penner is the editor of the book "Winnipeg 1919" about the strike from the striker's perspective. William Pritchard wrote the speech that was included in the book. Audience members were invited to ask Pritchard questions. Major theme discussed is: The Winnipeg General Strike. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
William "Bill" Arthur Pritchard was born on April 3, 1888 in Salford, England, the son of a miner and factory worker. In May 1911, Bill moved to British Columbia and within a week of arriving became an active member of the Socialist Party of Canada. From 1914 to 1917, he served as editor of the Western Clarion – the SPC newspaper. He became such a well-known socialist figure that when he travelled to Winnipeg to participate in the General Strike in 1919, he was one of only seven people arrested and imprisoned for his participation in the event despite the fact that he was in no way directly involved in its planning nor development. In 1922, Bill and his family settled in North Burnaby in the Capitol Hill District. Almost immediately after his arrival, Bill began to advocate for change and a planned development scheme for the municipality. Pritchard ran successfully for the position of Reeve and held the post until the end of 1932. One of Reeve Pritchard’s highest priorities while in office was to attempt to provide work for as many unemployed as possible all the while trying to elicit more support from the provincial and federal governments. Bill was a strong advocate of the belief that relief work should be focused on projects that would see a comprehensive development scheme for Burnaby – including planned sewers, roads and water supply. Despite Bill's best efforts, however, Burnaby was forced into receivership and at the end of 1932, a Provincial Commission stepped in to take over the governance of the city. Reeve Pritchard, having done all he could as a champion of the unemployed, stepped down as Reeve but left behind an undeniable legacy of courage and determination. He was rewarded for his enormous contributions to the city in 1975 when he was chosen to be made a Freeman of Burnaby. William Pritchard died on October 23, 1981. Norman Penner was born in Winnipeg in 1921 to Rose and Jacob Penner and brother to Roland, Ruth and Walter. Their father Jacob was a leading member of the Communist Party and popular Winnipeg Alderman. Norman graduated from high school in 1937 but did not begin university until much later, preferring to begin his adult life from 1938 to 1941 as a full-time officer of the Winnipeg branch of the Communist Party of Canada. From 1941 to 1946 he served with the Canadian Army which included two-and-a-half years of overseas combat duty. On his return to Canada in 1947 he again returned to his duties as a full-time officer with the communist Labour-Progressive Party (formed in 1941 after the Canadian Communist Party was officially banned). After the abortive Hungarian revolution in 1956, Norman Penner resigned from the party and instead worked as a self-employed manufacturer’s sales representative until 1971. In 1964 he decided to go back to school part time and graduated with a BA from the University of Toronto in 1969. He took an MA in 1971 and a PhD in 1975 from the same institution. Penner was hired as a lecturer at York University's Glendon College in 1972 and soon became a professor, continuing to teach until 1995. He wrote extensively on the Canadian left. Penner edited and introduced "Winnipeg 1919: The Strikers' Own History of the Winnipeg General Strike" in 1973, published "The Canadian Left: A Critical Analysis" in 1977 and contributed three chapters to as well as editing "Keeping Canada Together Means Changing Our Thinking" in 1978. He published "Canadian Communism: The Stalin Years and Beyond" in 1988 and "From Protest to Power: Social Democracy in Canada 1900 to Present" in 1992 as well as numerous articles, reviews and book chapters. Norman Penner was married to Norma Lipes for sixty-seven years. The couple had four children: Steve (Mary Ellen Marus); Joyce (Herman Parsons); Gary (Marlene Kadar); and Bob (Shaena Lambert). Norman Penner died April 16, 2009 at the age of eighty-eight.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:03:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Pritchard, William A.
Penner, Norman
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-02-2_ Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner

Images
Less detail

Interview with John Mallory June 24, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory123
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Mallory's thoughts on the economic struggle of the worker verses the overly political struggle of the time. John also explains how block committees functioned.
Date Range
1929-1939
Length
0:07:16
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Mallory's thoughts on the economic struggle of the worker verses the overly political struggle of the time. John also explains how block committees functioned.
Date Range
1929-1939
Length
0:07:16
Subject
Organizations
Political Theories
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 24, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Mallory by Simon Fraser University (SFU) masters student Bettina Bradbury June 24, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the Unemployment movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Audrey Mallory was born in Carman, Manitoba on January 10, 1903 to John and Bertha Nina (Rodgers) Mallory. The Mallory family moved to Deep Creek, British Columbia for a time before arriving in New Westminster. John Audrey Mallory married Janet Ellis Morice on November 15, 1924. John Mallory helped to build a mill at Powell River where he played baseball before he moved to Burnaby in the late 1920s. He built a house at 11th Avenue and 13th Street. He later moved to 1851 4th Street, working a few months out of the year as a construction foreman. He also worked renovating various mills. Towards the end of the thirties, he had established his own heating and plumbing business. John Mallory was very active in the labour movement, beginning with the Independent Labour Party which was renamed the Independent Labour Party Socialists, then the Socialist Party of Canada. He joined the Workers' Unity League (WUL) and their affiliates the Unemployed Workers Association at this time as well. Together with fellow organizers, John fixed up the Edmonds Hall and held fundraising parties for the Unemployment movement. Seen by others as an agitator, John organized countless strike movements, protests and demonstrations in his capacity as an organizer for the Workers' Unity League. John left the Socialist Party of Canada due to what he saw as their intolerance with other parts of the working class movement to join the Communist Party of Canada. He was later expelled from the Communist Party for "Trotskist leanings." Bertha Nina (Rodgers) Mallory died May 20, 1964 at the age of eighty-two. Her husband John Mallory died April 1, 1966 at the age of ninety-four. John Audrey Mallory died July 7, 1981 at the age of seventy-eight.
Total Tracks
13
Total Length
1:56:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mallory, John
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-11_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with John Mallory

Less detail

Interview with Betty Blair by Eric Damer October 17, 2012 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory300
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Betty (Warburton) (Atkinson) Blair's teaching of parenting effectiveness training and the role of the Parent-Teacher Association. She discusses her love for libraries and secondhand books and how she passed that on to her own children. Betty tells a story o…
Date Range
1930-1970
Length
0:09:04
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Betty (Warburton) (Atkinson) Blair's teaching of parenting effectiveness training and the role of the Parent-Teacher Association. She discusses her love for libraries and secondhand books and how she passed that on to her own children. Betty tells a story of her early political life, and of her and her mother's respect for Ernie and Harold Winch.
Date Range
1930-1970
Photo Info
Graduating class at Burnaby South High School; Betty Warburton is third from the right in the front row, [1942 or 1943]. Item no. BV004.82.5.
Length
0:09:04
Subject
Education
Political Theories
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
October 17, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Betty (Warburton) (Atkinson) Blair conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, October 17, 2012. Major theme discussed: life in Burnaby during the war years.
Biographical Notes
Betty Warburton (later Atkinson) (later Blair) was born in 1926 and grew up at three different locations on Frederick Avenue in Burnaby. She went to school in Burnaby; first at Kingsway West for two years, then Nelson Avenue and then Burnaby South High School where she completed senior matriculation. After graduation, Betty worked for a few years in Vancouver before marrying her first husband Don Atkinson and raising their children in Burnaby. Betty (Warburton) (Atkinson) Blair has participated in a range of activities from hiking and Girl Guides to volunteer arthritis care. By the nineteen-sixties she had began to learn pottery and take lessons at Mather House in Burnaby.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:59:03
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Blair, Betty Warburton Atkinson
Interview Location
Burnaby Village Museum
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-003_ Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of recording of interview with Betty Blair

Images
Less detail

Interview with John and Julia Poole by Eric Damer November 24, 2012 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory384
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to popular culture. Julia (Kong) Poole discusses popular music of the time, including a popular local band. John discusses his involvement in Drag Racing. John and Julia discuss the difference between the generations (seeing interest in the wars being stronger…
Date Range
1964-2012
Length
0:09:20
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to popular culture. Julia (Kong) Poole discusses popular music of the time, including a popular local band. John discusses his involvement in Drag Racing. John and Julia discuss the difference between the generations (seeing interest in the wars being stronger now than it was before). Julia mentions the Communist takeover in China.
Date Range
1964-2012
Photo Info
Julia Kong (later Poole) while at Burnaby North High School, [1968]. Item no. 549-058.
Length
0:09:20
Subject
Political Theories
Sports - Automobile Racing
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
November 24, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with John Poole and Julia (Kong) Poole conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, November 24, 2012. Major themes discussed are: education and recreational activities of the ninteen-sixties.
Biographical Notes
Julia Kong's father moved his family to Capitol Hill in 1953 when Julia was two years old. Julia attended Capitol Hill Elementary and later Burnaby North High School, where she was active in student politics and as a cheerleader. Outside of school she participated in Girl Guides, was an active swimmer, and volunteered in various capacities. After graduation, Julia studied to become a teacher, which included a practicum at Capitol Hill Elementary, and then began a career in education. John Poole, whose father had transferred to the Burnaby RCMP in 1961 when John was ten, attended Burnaby North High School at the same time as Julia, but had earlier attended Schou Street and Lochdale Elementary Schools. John was active in baseball, soccer, and Boy Scouts, and took a keen interest in cars. After high school he opened a transmission shop in Abbotsford before settling into a career with the Vancouver Fire Department. John and Julia married at the Burnaby Village Museum church in 1980 and began their family roots with their first home on Capitol Hill. They later moved with their three children to Surrey where Julia continues to work for the Surrey School district and John is enjoying his retirement.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:03:16
Other Tracks
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Interviewee Name
Poole, Julia Kong
Poole, John
Interview Location
Burnaby Village Museum
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-021_ Track_6
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track six of recording of interview with John and Julia Poole

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Interview with Sev Morin by Rod Fowler April 4, 1990 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory543
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Sev Morin’s involvement in the federal Liberal Party and in municipal politics with Alan Emmott; his mother Anne Marie Morin’s CCF work in Alberta and his brother Rudy Morin’s union activities and affiliation with Harvey Murphy; the political events held at “S…
Date Range
1930-1990
Length
00:07:36
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Sev Morin’s involvement in the federal Liberal Party and in municipal politics with Alan Emmott; his mother Anne Marie Morin’s CCF work in Alberta and his brother Rudy Morin’s union activities and affiliation with Harvey Murphy; the political events held at “Severin’s”; and Sev Morin’s centrist political views
Date Range
1930-1990
Photo Info
Sev Morin (left) of Severin's in Burnaby (formerly the Gai Paree) hosting a gala New Year's celebration, 1979. Item no. 480-712
Length
00:07:36
Name
Liberal Party
Emmott, Alan H
Subject
Organizations - Unions
Elections
Political Theories
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 4, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Severin "Sev" Morin, conducted by Rod Fowler. Sev Morin was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Sev Morin’s banquet hall, restaurant and night club business on Kingsway, originally named the “Gai Paree Supper Club” (1947-1976) and later “Severin’s” (1976-1985) and “Diego’s” (1985-1994), its function as a Burnaby landmark, and the entertainment and political people he met through his business. He also describes his many volunteer activities in Burnaby, including member of the SFU Senate, Rotary Club, Variety Club and Telethon, fund raising for Burnaby Hospital, and tourism related groups, and his political work for the federal Liberal party. He talks about his parents’ origins, the lives of his brothers Rudy and Rene, and the family’s involvement in establishing the “Gai Paree”. He also shares his views about the business and cultural development of Burnaby. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Severin “Sev” Rene Morin was born September 21, 1927, in Bonneville, Alberta, to Rene Pierre Morin (1878-1963) and Anne Marie (nee Lachiver) Morin (1886-1956). Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Morin and their son Rene Francois (1905-1954) immigrated to Edmonton, Alberta, from France in 1913, where Rene Pierre Morin worked for the C.N.R. and a second son Adolphe “Rudy” Ferdinand (1922-1969) was born, followed by their third son Severin. In 1943, after R.P. Morin retired, the family moved to Burnaby to a house on Sperling Avenue. Sometime earlier the two older Morin brothers found work in Trail at the smelter and developed musical careers. In 1946/47 the Morin family purchased property on Kingsway and built a banquet hall, the “Gai Paree Supper Club”. Sev and Rudy Morin managed the club and Rene F. Morin moved to Burnaby to join them with his band. The supper club, with its live music and dance floor, became a popular meeting place and wedding venue, eventually expanding into a restaurant and nightclub in the 1970s. The “Gai Paree” was renamed “Severin’s” in 1976 and “Diego’s” in 1985, closing finally in 1994. Sev Morin’s business life included three record stores which he owned with his friend Jack Cullen. Through these businesses Sev Morin was well known in the entertainment and hospitality industry. He and his restaurant also hosted political and social events that made the restaurant a community landmark. Sev Morin contributed many volunteer hours to community and charitable organizations, including an appointment to the SFU Senate, fundraising for the Burnaby Hospital, Director of the Variety Club and Rotary Club, and consultant for a variety of tourism related ventures. He also was active in the federal Liberal Party. Sev Morin and his wife Pauline married in 1950 and had three children. Sev Morin died at age 86 on March 28, 2014.
Total Tracks
10
Total Length
00:56:44
Other Tracks
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Interviewee Name
Morin, Severin "Sev"
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-021_Track_7
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Sev Morin

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9 records – page 1 of 1.

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