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Interview with Betty Blair by Eric Damer October 17, 2012 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory299
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Betty (Warburton) (Atkinson) Blair's memories of events held at the Church, including her own wedding. She discusses her involvement with the church group Canadian Girls in Training. She also discusses her volunteer years at the Burnaby Hospital and her lif…
Date Range
1940-1959
Length
0:07:48
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Betty (Warburton) (Atkinson) Blair's memories of events held at the Church, including her own wedding. She discusses her involvement with the church group Canadian Girls in Training. She also discusses her volunteer years at the Burnaby Hospital and her life when her children were small.
Date Range
1940-1959
Photo Info
Graduating class at Burnaby South High School; Betty Warburton is third from the right in the front row, [1942 or 1943]. Item no. BV004.82.5.
Length
0:07:48
Name
Canadian Girls in Training
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
October 17, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Betty (Warburton) (Atkinson) Blair conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, October 17, 2012. Major theme discussed: life in Burnaby during the war years.
Biographical Notes
Betty Warburton (later Atkinson) (later Blair) was born in 1926 and grew up at three different locations on Frederick Avenue in Burnaby. She went to school in Burnaby; first at Kingsway West for two years, then Nelson Avenue and then Burnaby South High School where she completed senior matriculation. After graduation, Betty worked for a few years in Vancouver before marrying her first husband Don Atkinson and raising their children in Burnaby. Betty (Warburton) (Atkinson) Blair has participated in a range of activities from hiking and Girl Guides to volunteer arthritis care. By the nineteen-sixties she had began to learn pottery and take lessons at Mather House in Burnaby.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:59:03
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Blair, Betty Warburton Atkinson
Interview Location
Burnaby Village Museum
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-003_ Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of interview with Betty Blair

Images
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Interview with Tom Mark by Eric Damer October 12, 2012 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory364
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Thomas "Tom" Mark's memories of his activities outside of work. He discusses his garden and aviary filled with birds, he and his wife's volunteerism, and his memories of how the Fraser Valley flood of 1948 affected Burnaby.
Date Range
1946-1965
Length
0:08:24
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Thomas "Tom" Mark's memories of his activities outside of work. He discusses his garden and aviary filled with birds, he and his wife's volunteerism, and his memories of how the Fraser Valley flood of 1948 affected Burnaby.
Date Range
1946-1965
Length
0:08:24
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
October 12, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Thomas "Tom" Mark conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, October 12, 2012. Major theme discussed: being a volunteer.
Biographical Notes
Thomas "Tom" Mark was born in 1923 and grew up in New Westminster. In 1937 his family moved to Victoria, British Columbia where he finished his schooling and worked for a year in the shipyard before enlisting in the air force. He was stationed in England during the war, and in 1946 he bought a small house in East Burnaby for his English bride and himself. For three years Tom drove a heating fuel truck for Shell Oil and then became the agent for a Shell marine service station on the Fraser River, near the Patullo Bridge. His aviary garnered him the nickname “birdman of Burnaby.” His son attended St. Thomas Moore High School and then Simon Fraser University when it opened in 1965. In 1995 Tom Mark was awarded the Kushiro Cup for Outstanding Citizen of the Year for his volunteer work with the Burnaby Health Department.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:32:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mark, Thomas "Tom"
Interview Location
Burnaby Village Museum
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-018_ Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of interview with Tom Mark

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Interview with Tom Mark by Eric Damer October 12, 2012 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory366
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Thomas "Tom" Mark's experiences as a care giver for his wife as well as a volunteer at the Burnaby Health Department. He mentions being awarded Burnaby's Kushiro Cup Citizen of the Year Award in 1995. Tom finishes his interview with a childhood story involv…
Date Range
1930-1995
Length
0:05:40
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Thomas "Tom" Mark's experiences as a care giver for his wife as well as a volunteer at the Burnaby Health Department. He mentions being awarded Burnaby's Kushiro Cup Citizen of the Year Award in 1995. Tom finishes his interview with a childhood story involving his uncle's roadster.
Date Range
1930-1995
Length
0:05:40
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
October 12, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Thomas "Tom" Mark conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, October 12, 2012. Major theme discussed: being a volunteer.
Biographical Notes
Thomas "Tom" Mark was born in 1923 and grew up in New Westminster. In 1937 his family moved to Victoria, British Columbia where he finished his schooling and worked for a year in the shipyard before enlisting in the air force. He was stationed in England during the war, and in 1946 he bought a small house in East Burnaby for his English bride and himself. For three years Tom drove a heating fuel truck for Shell Oil and then became the agent for a Shell marine service station on the Fraser River, near the Patullo Bridge. His aviary garnered him the nickname “birdman of Burnaby.” His son attended St. Thomas Moore High School and then Simon Fraser University when it opened in 1965. In 1995 Tom Mark was awarded the Kushiro Cup for Outstanding Citizen of the Year for his volunteer work with the Burnaby Health Department.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:32:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mark, Thomas "Tom"
Interview Location
Burnaby Village Museum
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-018_ Track_4
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of interview with Tom Mark

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Interview with Hazel Simnett by Eric Damer October 27, 2012 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory401
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Hazel Simnett's volunteerism and her political activism. Hazel discusses being an organizer for the Burnaby Citizen's Association (BCA) and an active supporter of the libraries in Burnaby. She also discusses what it was like to be a student in the elementar…
Date Range
1942-1975
Length
0:08:03
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Hazel Simnett's volunteerism and her political activism. Hazel discusses being an organizer for the Burnaby Citizen's Association (BCA) and an active supporter of the libraries in Burnaby. She also discusses what it was like to be a student in the elementary school classroom in the nineteen-thirties. Leslie Rossa lends her support to the interview.
Date Range
1942-1975
Photo Info
Hazel Simnett standing in a garden, with a small dog in her arms [194-]. Item no. 549-063.
Length
0:08:03
Name
Burnaby Citizen's Association
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
October 27, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Hazel Simnett conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, October 27, 2012. Leslie Rossa lends her support to the interview. Major theme discussed: political activism in Burnaby.
Biographical Notes
Hazel Simnett was born in Burnaby in 1922 and grew up looking up to her father Frederick Simnett who was very involved in labour and unions. A politically active citizen, Hazel Simnett has supported the Canadian Commonwealth Federation (CCF) and the New Democratic Party (NDP). She once ran as a New Democratic Party candidate for Burnaby City Council. In 2006, Hazel Simnett won the Burnaby Local Hero Award for her volunteer work at the New Vista Society where she served as chair for a number of years. She also served as a member of the Burnaby Historical Society and established the Hazel Simnett Endowment with the Burnaby Public Library to bring a collection of books on Canadian history and social issues.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:36:12
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Simnett, Hazel
Interview Location
Burnaby Village Museum
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-024_ Track_3
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of recording of interview with Hazel Simnett

Images
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Interview with Annie Boulanger by Rod Fowler April 9, 1990 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory484
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s interest in Archives work, especially doing oral histories, for John Adams and Rick Duckles, curators of Heritage Village, and for SFU
Date Range
1970-1990
Length
00:03:39
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s interest in Archives work, especially doing oral histories, for John Adams and Rick Duckles, curators of Heritage Village, and for SFU
Date Range
1970-1990
Length
00:03:39
Name
Burnaby Village Museum
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 9, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Annie Boulanger, conducted by Rod Fowler. Annie Boulanger was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Annie Boulanger’s volunteer community work in Burnaby, including initiating the teaching of french and gymnastics at Seaforth School where her children attended, doing historical research and oral histories for Burnaby Heritage Village and the SFU Archives, becoming a long term member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club, being a member and President of Burnaby Arts Council, and member of the Parks Board's Centre for the Performing Arts Committee (1987). The interview focuses attention on the Arts Council’s financial difficulties between 1985 and 1990, and the need for a comprehensive approach to supporting the arts through a municipal arts policy. Annie Boulanger also talks about her parents’ history, their home on Napier Street and her later home on Government Road, her education and teaching career, and her arts journalism. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Annie Urbanovits Boulanger’s parents emigrated from Hungary to Toronto, Louis in 1925 and Irene in 1930, where they married. Louis and Irene Boulanger moved to Vancouver where Louis worked in the Vancouver Shipyards during WWII and then for Nichols Chemical Company in Barnet for 15 years. While the Urbanovits family lived in Cloverdale, Louis commuted to Kask’s Camp in Barnet, until they moved to Burnaby in 1951 to an old farm purchased on Napier Street. Between 1951 and 1956 Annie completed her BA degree, majoring in chemistry and english with a minor in physical education, and obtained her teaching diploma at UBC. She taught for 4 years in various locations in BC before marrying and moving to Manitoba and Ottawa. She and her husband and five children (two more children to come later) returned to Burnaby in 1964 to a home on Government Street to be close to family. Annie Boulanger became involved in the community first through her children’s school, initiating and teaching french classes in Seaforth School in 1969, and supporting the development of gymnastics in school and as a municipal program. Her interest in Archives lead to doing oral histories for John Adams, curator of Heritage Village [Burnaby Heritage Village], and for SFU Archives. She became a long time member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club in the 1970s, taking a course in writing non-fiction from Chris Potter. In 1983 Annie Boulanger joined the Burnaby Arts Council, becoming President in 1985. She was involved in lobbying the municipality for better monetary support and facilities for the arts and for the creation of a Municipal Arts Policy. She has continued to promote the arts in Burnaby through her appointment to Burnaby’s Visual Arts Advisory Board in 1997, her arts journalism, writing regular book and theatre reviews for the local newspaper, and other activities. She was a member of the Burnaby Centennial Committee and was one of the editors of the book “Burnaby Centennial Anthology”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:41:53
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Boulanger, Annie
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-022_Track_2
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Annie Boulanger

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Dennis Hong and Gil Porter

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivephoto80760
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
November 30, 1997
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 16 x 22.5 cm
Item No.
535-1022
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of Dennis Hong and Gil Porter, volunteers from the Burnaby Safety Society, monitoring traffic speeds in a school zone in south Burnaby.
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
November 30, 1997
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
535-1022
Accession Number
2012-11
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 16 x 22.5 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Dennis Hong and Gil Porter, volunteers from the Burnaby Safety Society, monitoring traffic speeds in a school zone in south Burnaby.
Photographer
Ray, Steve
Creator
Burnaby NewsLeader
Subjects
Persons - Volunteers
Names
Hong, Dennis
Porter, Gil
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Note in black and blue ink on recto of photograph reads: "2573 Bby Steve 74% / Bby pg 11"
Trim marks and/or reproduction instructions on recto (scan is cropped)
Images
Less detail
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
May 10, 1998
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 15.5 x 23.5 cm
Item No.
535-1192
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of volunteers organizing toys donated to Mom’s Place, a charity assisting teen mothers.
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
May 10, 1998
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
535-1192
Accession Number
2012-11
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 15.5 x 23.5 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of volunteers organizing toys donated to Mom’s Place, a charity assisting teen mothers.
Photographer
Ray, Steve
Creator
Burnaby NewsLeader
Subjects
Persons - Volunteers
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Note in black ink on recto of photograph reads: "1018 Bby Steve / 63% Bby p. 3"
Trim marks and/or reproduction instructions on recto (scan is cropped)
Accompanying caption reads: "May 10, 1998 1018: / Sarah, Tracey, and Jen organize some of the 160 toys that Canada Way students collected for Mom's Place - an organization assisting teen mothers. The project was part of Youth Week activities."
Images
Less detail
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[between 1995 and 1998]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 22 x 16.5 cm
Item No.
535-1431
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of an unidentified volunteer reading to a classroom of children.
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
[between 1995 and 1998]
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
535-1431
Accession Number
2012-11
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 22 x 16.5 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of an unidentified volunteer reading to a classroom of children.
Photographer
Ray, Steve
Creator
Burnaby NewsLeader
Subjects
Persons - Volunteers
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Note in black ink on recto of photograph reads: "803 Bby Steve / 78% Bby p. 3"
Trim marks and/or reproduction instructions on recto (scan is cropped)
Images
Less detail

Ceina and Bill Griston

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivephoto45259
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1976, published May 6, 1976
Collection/Fonds
Columbian Newspaper collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 24 x 14 cm
Item No.
480-155
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of Ceina and Bill Griston sitting by the fireplace of their Burnaby home, when Ceina Griston was 67 years old and so active in volunteer work that her husband, then 75 years old, acted as her secretary; taking phone messages and keeping track of her schedule for her.
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1976, published May 6, 1976
Collection/Fonds
Columbian Newspaper collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
480-155
Accession Number
2003-02
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 24 x 14 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Ceina and Bill Griston sitting by the fireplace of their Burnaby home, when Ceina Griston was 67 years old and so active in volunteer work that her husband, then 75 years old, acted as her secretary; taking phone messages and keeping track of her schedule for her.
Photographer
Hodge, Craig
Subjects
Persons - Volunteers
Names
Griston, Ceina
Griston, Bill
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 7623 Newcombe Street
Burnaby - Newcombe Street
Historic Neighbourhood
East Burnaby (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Second Street Area
Images
Less detail
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1976, published May 6, 1976
Collection/Fonds
Columbian Newspaper collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 13 x 19 cm
Item No.
480-156
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of Ceina Griston getting into her car when she was sixty-seven years old and very active in volunteer work.
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1976, published May 6, 1976
Collection/Fonds
Columbian Newspaper collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
480-156
Accession Number
2003-02
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 13 x 19 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Ceina Griston getting into her car when she was sixty-seven years old and very active in volunteer work.
Photographer
Hodge, Craig
Subjects
Persons - Volunteers
Names
Griston, Ceina
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
January 14, 1996
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 23 x 15.5 cm
Item No.
535-0136
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of Robyn Littlewood volunteering by painting the storefront door at the New Bicycle Institute and Pro Shop on 6th Street next to the Corner Pocket. The Institute is a project of the non-profit Sanctuary Foundation and provides 'at-risk' youth an opportunity to learn skills and a positive…
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
January 14, 1996
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
535-0136
Accession Number
2012-11
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 23 x 15.5 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Robyn Littlewood volunteering by painting the storefront door at the New Bicycle Institute and Pro Shop on 6th Street next to the Corner Pocket. The Institute is a project of the non-profit Sanctuary Foundation and provides 'at-risk' youth an opportunity to learn skills and a positive outlook.
Photographer
Langdeau, Brian
Creator
Burnaby NewsLeader
Subjects
Persons - Volunteers
Names
Littlewood, Robyn
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Note in red ink on recto of photograph reads: "Brian Bby/NW 47"
Trim marks and/or reproduction instructions on recto (scan is cropped)
Images
Less detail

Evelyn Andru and Mary Hamaluck

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivephoto79146
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
April 28, 1996
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : sepia ; 10 x 15 cm
Item No.
535-0280
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of Evelyn Andru (left) receiving a 15-year volunteer pin from Mary Hamaluck, a staff member in the volunteer services section of the Burnaby Health Department.
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
April 28, 1996
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby NewsLeader photograph collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
535-0280
Accession Number
2012-11
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : sepia ; 10 x 15 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Evelyn Andru (left) receiving a 15-year volunteer pin from Mary Hamaluck, a staff member in the volunteer services section of the Burnaby Health Department.
Creator
Burnaby NewsLeader
Subjects
Persons - Volunteers
Names
Andru, Evelyn
Hamaluck, Mary
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Images
Less detail

Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory22
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the practices and philosophies of Army of the Common Good.
Date Range
1932
Length
0:06:39
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the practices and philosophies of Army of the Common Good.
Date Range
1932
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:06:39
Subject
Organizations
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_5
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with W.H.

Images
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Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory23
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores and their beginnings. Harry mentions the Credit Union.
Date Range
1932-1938
Length
0:09:14
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's involvement with the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores and their beginnings. Harry mentions the Credit Union.
Date Range
1932-1938
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:09:14
Subject
Organizations
Persons - Volunteers
Geographic Access
Burnaby - McKay Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_6
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with W.H.

Images
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Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory24
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the reasons for the closing of the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores. Harry mentions other Cooperative stores throughout Metro Vancouver.
Date Range
1938
Length
0:08:23
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's thoughts on the reasons for the closing of the Army of the Common Good Cooperative stores. Harry mentions other Cooperative stores throughout Metro Vancouver.
Date Range
1938
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:08:23
Subject
Organizations
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_7
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with W.H.

Images
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Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 11

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory68
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1936-1939
Length
0:08:52
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1936-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:08:52
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_11
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eleven of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 12

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory69
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1936-1939
Length
0:08:24
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1936-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:08:24
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_12
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track twelve of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 14

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory71
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's thoughts on the outcomes of participating in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1932-1939
Length
0:07:47
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's thoughts on the outcomes of participating in the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement.
Date Range
1932-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:47
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_14
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track fourteen of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
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Interview with William A. Lewarne by Rod Fowler March 14, 1990 - Track 14

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory454
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Lewarne’s involvement in Burnaby organizations: Burnaby/Willingdon Liberal Association, Seton Villa, Irish Fusileers of Canada, Lions Club, Rotary Club, Burnaby Association for Community Inclusion, and the Burnaby Hospital Foundation
Date Range
1970-1990
Length
00:09:06
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Lewarne’s involvement in Burnaby organizations: Burnaby/Willingdon Liberal Association, Seton Villa, Irish Fusileers of Canada, Lions Club, Rotary Club, Burnaby Association for Community Inclusion, and the Burnaby Hospital Foundation
Date Range
1970-1990
Photo Info
Burnaby Alderman, Bill (William) Lewarne, [1973]. Item no. 231-012
Length
00:09:06
Subject
Organizations
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
March 14, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with former Mayor William “Bill” Lewarne, conducted by Rod Fowler. Bill Lewarne was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Bill Lewarne’s business and political careers, and memories of growing up in South Burnaby in the 1930s. Bill Lewarne talks about his parent’s origins, his family and community struggles during the Depression, the interurban, his education, war service, and joining his father's business. He describes the start, operation and expansion of the family ice cream business, and how business life compared to political life. The interview explores the role of politics in community affairs, his political activities, the history of the BVA, and his involvement in various community organizations. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track, expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
William Alfred “Bill” Lewarne was born in Burnaby in 1926 to Ethel Cecilia Leer (1899- ) and Alfred Lewarne (1893-1962). The family, Ethel, Alfred and their three children Patricia, Beverley and William, moved to a house on Nelson Avenue in Alta Vista in 1931. Ethel still lived in the family home in 1990. Bill Lewarne attended Nelson Avenue School and South Burnaby High School (1932-1944). His father Alfred worked at Colony Farms as a dairy inspector and then for the Port of Vancouver Dairy before being laid off early in the Depression. The family struggled until in 1936 Alfred started his own ice cream business. After graduation Bill was in the army for two years, taking a refrigeration course under the veteran’s training benefit, before joining his father’s business. Three generations of the family operated the successful company, expanding from wholesale, retail and distribution of ice cream products into refrigerated warehouses and the wholesale ice business, until the business was sold to its competitor Dairyland in 1989. Bill Lewarne entered politics in 1965, first with the Nonpartisan Association (NPA) and then as a founder of the Burnaby Citizens Association (BCA). He served as an alderman on Burnaby Council 1973-1975 and 1977-1981 and as Mayor 1981-1987. In 1979 he ran for provincial office for the Social Credit Party against Rosemary Brown but lost. Bill Lewarne married June Lawrence and they had three children Robert, Leslie and Janice. He was active in many organizations: Burnaby/Willingdon Liberal Association, Seton Villa, Irish Fusileers of Canada, Lions Club, Rotary Club, Burnaby Association for Community Inclusion, and the Burnaby Hospital Foundation, and continued to be active on the Board of the BCA. Bill Lewarne died in 1995.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:34:40
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lewarne, William A. "Bill"
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and business computerization in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-019_Track_14
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track fourteen of interview with Bill Lewarne

Images
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Interview with Merrill M. Gordon by Rod Fowler March 19, 1990 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory476
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Merrill Gordon’s marriage and move to Burnaby in 1953, and settling at the house near Cliff Avenue United Church in 1956. He talks about his first encounters with volunteering at Ratepayer meetings attended by his father, and in dance and drama activities at s…
Date Range
1935-1956
Length
00:04:56
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Merrill Gordon’s marriage and move to Burnaby in 1953, and settling at the house near Cliff Avenue United Church in 1956. He talks about his first encounters with volunteering at Ratepayer meetings attended by his father, and in dance and drama activities at school.
Date Range
1935-1956
Photo Info
Burnaby Alderman Merrill Gordon (second from right) following a candidates' meeting, 1973. Item no. 480-263
Length
00:04:56
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Education
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
March 19, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Merrill Gordon, conducted by Rod Fowler.Gordon Merrill was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Merrill Gordon’s childhood in the Depression, including his story about the family’s difficult trek to Burnaby from Alberta; his education, teachers and first volunteer activities at Grandview High School; his career at Fleck Brothers and the start of his own company Blaze Industries and later work in India; and his many volunteer activities in Burnaby. He describes how he started the Cliff Avenue United Football Club, the soccer club's subsequent growth and development, some of the people involved, and the founding of the youth soccer exchange. He also describes his work on the Parks Board and in the arts community, including the 1987 arts centre referendum, and involvement with the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society (1988- ), and mentions his work for other groups including the New Vista Society, library board, and Burnaby Mental Health Committee. He also talks about his political career with the Better Burnaby Committee and Burnaby Voters Association, resulting in his 1972 election to Burnaby’s 1973 council. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Merrill M. Gordon was born in Saskatchewan in 1929 to parents farming north of North Battleford. After a fifth year of crop failure the family of four left the farm in 1934 to join relatives living near the corner of Union and Sperling in Burnaby. With little resources the family adapted as well as possible in the Depression years, moving often in the East Vancouver/North Burnaby area in an attempt to better their situation. Merrill’s father obtained work at sawmills including Kapoor’s Sawmill at Barnet, walking to work over Burnaby Mountain. After attending numerous public schools, Merrill Gordon eventually spent three years at Templeton School and then completed his education at Grandview High School of Commerce, majoring in accounting and commercial law. He worked a few years at Canadian Industries Ltd., then joined Fleck Brothers. In 1965 Merrill Gordon and his wife started their own company Blaze Industries of Canada that manufactured wood burning fireplaces, selling the company to AB Electrolux in 1980. After a short retirement, Merrill Gordon went back to work in 1981 for a company manufacturing solar panels, one project taking him and his wife intermittently to India over a four year period. Merrill Gordon helped found the political group Better Burnaby Committee, later the Burnaby Voters Association, with Alan Emmott and Bill Lewarne, ran for Burnaby Municipal Council and served one year as councillor in 1973. Merrill Gordon is well known for his over 40 years of volunteer work in Burnaby, particularly as founder in 1956 and director of the Cliff Avenue United Football Club, one of the largest soccer clubs in BC. He was also the founder of Burnaby Youth Soccer and the first youth soccer exchange with Washington State. His other volunteer work includes library trustee, Parks Commissioner (1987-1992), Director of New Vista Home for Seniors, Chair of campaign raising funds for building Shadbolt Arts Centre, and Chair of the Burnaby Mental Health Committee. In 1988 Merrill Gordon, Betty Gordon, Dean Lamont and several others formed the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which advocated for the return of unused land to Burnaby from SFU and the subsequent creation of Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Merrill Gordon and Elizabeth Balfour (nee Leitch) (1926-2012) married in 1953 and had two children.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:31:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Gordon, Merrill
Interview Location
unknown
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-020_Track_5
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Merrill Gordon

Images
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Interview with Merrill M. Gordon by Rod Fowler March 19, 1990 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory477
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about the circumstances behind Merrill Gordon’s founding of the Cliff Avenue United Football Club in 1956, his subsequent involvement and role as President of the club for 15 years, and the growth and history of soccer clubs in Burnaby. He also talks about his frien…
Date Range
1956-1990
Length
00:13:27
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about the circumstances behind Merrill Gordon’s founding of the Cliff Avenue United Football Club in 1956, his subsequent involvement and role as President of the club for 15 years, and the growth and history of soccer clubs in Burnaby. He also talks about his friend Mark Stockdale who was second president of the club for 16 years and creator of the rose garden on Burnaby Mountain.
Date Range
1956-1990
Photo Info
Burnaby Alderman Merrill Gordon (second from right) following a candidates' meeting, 1973. Item no. 480-263
Length
00:13:27
Name
Stockdale, Mark
Cliff Avenue United Football Club
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Rose Garden
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Sports - Soccer
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
March 19, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Merrill Gordon, conducted by Rod Fowler.Gordon Merrill was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Merrill Gordon’s childhood in the Depression, including his story about the family’s difficult trek to Burnaby from Alberta; his education, teachers and first volunteer activities at Grandview High School; his career at Fleck Brothers and the start of his own company Blaze Industries and later work in India; and his many volunteer activities in Burnaby. He describes how he started the Cliff Avenue United Football Club, the soccer club's subsequent growth and development, some of the people involved, and the founding of the youth soccer exchange. He also describes his work on the Parks Board and in the arts community, including the 1987 arts centre referendum, and involvement with the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society (1988- ), and mentions his work for other groups including the New Vista Society, library board, and Burnaby Mental Health Committee. He also talks about his political career with the Better Burnaby Committee and Burnaby Voters Association, resulting in his 1972 election to Burnaby’s 1973 council. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Merrill M. Gordon was born in Saskatchewan in 1929 to parents farming north of North Battleford. After a fifth year of crop failure the family of four left the farm in 1934 to join relatives living near the corner of Union and Sperling in Burnaby. With little resources the family adapted as well as possible in the Depression years, moving often in the East Vancouver/North Burnaby area in an attempt to better their situation. Merrill’s father obtained work at sawmills including Kapoor’s Sawmill at Barnet, walking to work over Burnaby Mountain. After attending numerous public schools, Merrill Gordon eventually spent three years at Templeton School and then completed his education at Grandview High School of Commerce, majoring in accounting and commercial law. He worked a few years at Canadian Industries Ltd., then joined Fleck Brothers. In 1965 Merrill Gordon and his wife started their own company Blaze Industries of Canada that manufactured wood burning fireplaces, selling the company to AB Electrolux in 1980. After a short retirement, Merrill Gordon went back to work in 1981 for a company manufacturing solar panels, one project taking him and his wife intermittently to India over a four year period. Merrill Gordon helped found the political group Better Burnaby Committee, later the Burnaby Voters Association, with Alan Emmott and Bill Lewarne, ran for Burnaby Municipal Council and served one year as councillor in 1973. Merrill Gordon is well known for his over 40 years of volunteer work in Burnaby, particularly as founder in 1956 and director of the Cliff Avenue United Football Club, one of the largest soccer clubs in BC. He was also the founder of Burnaby Youth Soccer and the first youth soccer exchange with Washington State. His other volunteer work includes library trustee, Parks Commissioner (1987-1992), Director of New Vista Home for Seniors, Chair of campaign raising funds for building Shadbolt Arts Centre, and Chair of the Burnaby Mental Health Committee. In 1988 Merrill Gordon, Betty Gordon, Dean Lamont and several others formed the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which advocated for the return of unused land to Burnaby from SFU and the subsequent creation of Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Merrill Gordon and Elizabeth Balfour (nee Leitch) (1926-2012) married in 1953 and had two children.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:31:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Gordon, Merrill
Interview Location
unknown
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-020_Track_6
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Merrill Gordon

Images
Less detail

Interview with Annie Boulanger by Rod Fowler April 9, 1990 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory485
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s membership in and work for Burnaby Writers’ Club and Burnaby Arts Council. She describes the Arts Council’s financial difficulties between 1983 and 1990, her election to President in 1985, the inadequacy of the James Cowan Theatre, and her ho…
Date Range
1970-1990
Length
00:06:30
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s membership in and work for Burnaby Writers’ Club and Burnaby Arts Council. She describes the Arts Council’s financial difficulties between 1983 and 1990, her election to President in 1985, the inadequacy of the James Cowan Theatre, and her hopes for arts facilities in the Deer Lake area.
Date Range
1970-1990
Length
00:06:30
Name
Burnaby Arts Council
Burnaby Writers' Club
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Arts
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 9, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Annie Boulanger, conducted by Rod Fowler. Annie Boulanger was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Annie Boulanger’s volunteer community work in Burnaby, including initiating the teaching of french and gymnastics at Seaforth School where her children attended, doing historical research and oral histories for Burnaby Heritage Village and the SFU Archives, becoming a long term member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club, being a member and President of Burnaby Arts Council, and member of the Parks Board's Centre for the Performing Arts Committee (1987). The interview focuses attention on the Arts Council’s financial difficulties between 1985 and 1990, and the need for a comprehensive approach to supporting the arts through a municipal arts policy. Annie Boulanger also talks about her parents’ history, their home on Napier Street and her later home on Government Road, her education and teaching career, and her arts journalism. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Annie Urbanovits Boulanger’s parents emigrated from Hungary to Toronto, Louis in 1925 and Irene in 1930, where they married. Louis and Irene Boulanger moved to Vancouver where Louis worked in the Vancouver Shipyards during WWII and then for Nichols Chemical Company in Barnet for 15 years. While the Urbanovits family lived in Cloverdale, Louis commuted to Kask’s Camp in Barnet, until they moved to Burnaby in 1951 to an old farm purchased on Napier Street. Between 1951 and 1956 Annie completed her BA degree, majoring in chemistry and english with a minor in physical education, and obtained her teaching diploma at UBC. She taught for 4 years in various locations in BC before marrying and moving to Manitoba and Ottawa. She and her husband and five children (two more children to come later) returned to Burnaby in 1964 to a home on Government Street to be close to family. Annie Boulanger became involved in the community first through her children’s school, initiating and teaching french classes in Seaforth School in 1969, and supporting the development of gymnastics in school and as a municipal program. Her interest in Archives lead to doing oral histories for John Adams, curator of Heritage Village [Burnaby Heritage Village], and for SFU Archives. She became a long time member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club in the 1970s, taking a course in writing non-fiction from Chris Potter. In 1983 Annie Boulanger joined the Burnaby Arts Council, becoming President in 1985. She was involved in lobbying the municipality for better monetary support and facilities for the arts and for the creation of a Municipal Arts Policy. She has continued to promote the arts in Burnaby through her appointment to Burnaby’s Visual Arts Advisory Board in 1997, her arts journalism, writing regular book and theatre reviews for the local newspaper, and other activities. She was a member of the Burnaby Centennial Committee and was one of the editors of the book “Burnaby Centennial Anthology”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:41:53
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Boulanger, Annie
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-022_Track_3
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Annie Boulanger

Less detail

Interview with Annie Boulanger by Rod Fowler April 9, 1990 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory486
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s views on the Parks Board and its committee looking into creating both a new theatre in Metrotown and an Arts Centre at Deer Lake, her belief that this proposal did not meet community needs, the 1987 referendum’s failure, and the subsequent cr…
Date Range
1985-1990
Length
00:06:27
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s views on the Parks Board and its committee looking into creating both a new theatre in Metrotown and an Arts Centre at Deer Lake, her belief that this proposal did not meet community needs, the 1987 referendum’s failure, and the subsequent creation of an Arts Policy Committee for Burnaby
Date Range
1985-1990
Length
00:06:27
Name
Burnaby Arts Council
Burnaby Arts Centre
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Arts
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 9, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Annie Boulanger, conducted by Rod Fowler. Annie Boulanger was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Annie Boulanger’s volunteer community work in Burnaby, including initiating the teaching of french and gymnastics at Seaforth School where her children attended, doing historical research and oral histories for Burnaby Heritage Village and the SFU Archives, becoming a long term member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club, being a member and President of Burnaby Arts Council, and member of the Parks Board's Centre for the Performing Arts Committee (1987). The interview focuses attention on the Arts Council’s financial difficulties between 1985 and 1990, and the need for a comprehensive approach to supporting the arts through a municipal arts policy. Annie Boulanger also talks about her parents’ history, their home on Napier Street and her later home on Government Road, her education and teaching career, and her arts journalism. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Annie Urbanovits Boulanger’s parents emigrated from Hungary to Toronto, Louis in 1925 and Irene in 1930, where they married. Louis and Irene Boulanger moved to Vancouver where Louis worked in the Vancouver Shipyards during WWII and then for Nichols Chemical Company in Barnet for 15 years. While the Urbanovits family lived in Cloverdale, Louis commuted to Kask’s Camp in Barnet, until they moved to Burnaby in 1951 to an old farm purchased on Napier Street. Between 1951 and 1956 Annie completed her BA degree, majoring in chemistry and english with a minor in physical education, and obtained her teaching diploma at UBC. She taught for 4 years in various locations in BC before marrying and moving to Manitoba and Ottawa. She and her husband and five children (two more children to come later) returned to Burnaby in 1964 to a home on Government Street to be close to family. Annie Boulanger became involved in the community first through her children’s school, initiating and teaching french classes in Seaforth School in 1969, and supporting the development of gymnastics in school and as a municipal program. Her interest in Archives lead to doing oral histories for John Adams, curator of Heritage Village [Burnaby Heritage Village], and for SFU Archives. She became a long time member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club in the 1970s, taking a course in writing non-fiction from Chris Potter. In 1983 Annie Boulanger joined the Burnaby Arts Council, becoming President in 1985. She was involved in lobbying the municipality for better monetary support and facilities for the arts and for the creation of a Municipal Arts Policy. She has continued to promote the arts in Burnaby through her appointment to Burnaby’s Visual Arts Advisory Board in 1997, her arts journalism, writing regular book and theatre reviews for the local newspaper, and other activities. She was a member of the Burnaby Centennial Committee and was one of the editors of the book “Burnaby Centennial Anthology”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:41:53
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Boulanger, Annie
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-022_Track_4
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Annie Boulanger

Less detail

Interview with Annie Boulanger by Rod Fowler April 9, 1990 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory489
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s involvement in the Burnaby Writers’ Club, and its history and founding members Eileen Kernaghan and Chris Potter and other well known writers who were members of the club
Date Range
1960-1990
Length
00:02:20
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Annie Boulanger’s involvement in the Burnaby Writers’ Club, and its history and founding members Eileen Kernaghan and Chris Potter and other well known writers who were members of the club
Date Range
1960-1990
Length
00:02:20
Name
Burnaby Writers' Club
Kernaghan, Eileen
Subject
Arts
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 9, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Annie Boulanger, conducted by Rod Fowler. Annie Boulanger was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Annie Boulanger’s volunteer community work in Burnaby, including initiating the teaching of french and gymnastics at Seaforth School where her children attended, doing historical research and oral histories for Burnaby Heritage Village and the SFU Archives, becoming a long term member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club, being a member and President of Burnaby Arts Council, and member of the Parks Board's Centre for the Performing Arts Committee (1987). The interview focuses attention on the Arts Council’s financial difficulties between 1985 and 1990, and the need for a comprehensive approach to supporting the arts through a municipal arts policy. Annie Boulanger also talks about her parents’ history, their home on Napier Street and her later home on Government Road, her education and teaching career, and her arts journalism. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Annie Urbanovits Boulanger’s parents emigrated from Hungary to Toronto, Louis in 1925 and Irene in 1930, where they married. Louis and Irene Boulanger moved to Vancouver where Louis worked in the Vancouver Shipyards during WWII and then for Nichols Chemical Company in Barnet for 15 years. While the Urbanovits family lived in Cloverdale, Louis commuted to Kask’s Camp in Barnet, until they moved to Burnaby in 1951 to an old farm purchased on Napier Street. Between 1951 and 1956 Annie completed her BA degree, majoring in chemistry and english with a minor in physical education, and obtained her teaching diploma at UBC. She taught for 4 years in various locations in BC before marrying and moving to Manitoba and Ottawa. She and her husband and five children (two more children to come later) returned to Burnaby in 1964 to a home on Government Street to be close to family. Annie Boulanger became involved in the community first through her children’s school, initiating and teaching french classes in Seaforth School in 1969, and supporting the development of gymnastics in school and as a municipal program. Her interest in Archives lead to doing oral histories for John Adams, curator of Heritage Village [Burnaby Heritage Village], and for SFU Archives. She became a long time member of the Burnaby Writers’ Club in the 1970s, taking a course in writing non-fiction from Chris Potter. In 1983 Annie Boulanger joined the Burnaby Arts Council, becoming President in 1985. She was involved in lobbying the municipality for better monetary support and facilities for the arts and for the creation of a Municipal Arts Policy. She has continued to promote the arts in Burnaby through her appointment to Burnaby’s Visual Arts Advisory Board in 1997, her arts journalism, writing regular book and theatre reviews for the local newspaper, and other activities. She was a member of the Burnaby Centennial Committee and was one of the editors of the book “Burnaby Centennial Anthology”.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:41:53
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Boulanger, Annie
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-022_Track_7
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Annie Boulanger

Less detail

Interview with Eileen Kernaghan by Rod Fowler April 10, 1990 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory491
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about how Eileen Kernaghan became involved with the Burnaby Writers’ Society and, as a representative of this club, a member of the Burnaby Arts Council in Canada’s Centennial Year 1967. She describes how the structure of the Arts Council changed, and its focus on t…
Date Range
1967-1972
Length
00:05:55
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about how Eileen Kernaghan became involved with the Burnaby Writers’ Society and, as a representative of this club, a member of the Burnaby Arts Council in Canada’s Centennial Year 1967. She describes how the structure of the Arts Council changed, and its focus on the newly acquired Art Centre buildings at Deer Lake
Date Range
1967-1972
Photo Info
Eileen Kernaghan standing in front of four poets at the Poetry Pocket Cafe in New Westminster, October 15, 1995. Item no. 535-0014
Length
00:05:55
Name
Burnaby Arts Council
Burnaby Writers' Club
Burnaby Arts Centre
Subject
Arts
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 10, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Eileen Kernaghan, conducted by Rod Fowler. Eileen Kernaghan was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Eileen Kernaghan’s activities with the Burnaby Writers’ Society and the Burnaby Arts Council, describing the history of these organizations between 1967 and 1990. She describes the financial and other challenges facing the arts community, the various programs initiated by the Arts Council, and the development of the Burnaby Arts Centre facilities at Deer Lake. She also talks about her education, writing career, the Neville Street neighbourhood, and her and her husband’s bookstore business. Ghosts believed to inhabit some of the Arts Centre's heritage buildings are also a topic of conversation. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Eileen Kernaghan was born January 6, 1939, to William Alfred Monk (1910-2003) and Belinda Maude Monk (1908-1996), and grew up on a dairy farm near Grindrod in the North Okanagan. She attended a two room school in Grindrod, completed Junior and Senior High School in Enderby, and at age 17 in 1956, left home to attend UBC. She taught school in the North Okanagan area in the late 1950s, during which time she married her husband Patrick Kernaghan. They moved to Vancouver in 1961, Burnaby in 1963, and settled on Neville Street in the South Slope area in 1966 with their three children. Pat Kernaghan worked at Oakalla Prison as a correctional officer until his retirement in 1988. Eileen and Patrick Kernaghan owned and operated a bookstore on Neville Street from 1987 to 1999. They later moved to New Westminster. Eileen Kernaghan began her writing career at twelve years old with a story published in the Vancouver Sun. After her youngest child began school, with more free time, she started writing again and has become an award winning author of fantasy and science fiction novels. She helped found the Burnaby Writers’ Society in 1967, taught writing workshops, and wrote its popular Newsletter for many years. In 1971 the Society put together a small handbook for BC writers, a venture that was expanded and published by Douglas MacIntyre in 1975 as “The Upper Left-Hand Corner: a writer’s handbook for the Northwest”. The book became a Canadian best-seller. During this same period Eileen Kernaghan began her successful “Grey Isles” trilogy. In 1967 she joined the Burnaby Arts Council, worked as its Coordinator from 1973 to 1984, and was a determined advocate for municipal government support for the arts in Burnaby.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:26:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Kernaghan, Eileen
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-023_Track_1
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Eileen Kernaghan

Images
Less detail

Interview with Eileen Kernaghan by Rod Fowler April 10, 1990 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory492
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about how the Arts Council equipped the James Cowan Theatre, with a grand opening in 1971; hired staff, including Directors Byron Johnstad followed by LLoyd Barry, and Coordinators Phyllis Webb followed by Louise Holst; and developed programming and projects such as…
Date Range
1967-1972
Length
00:04:48
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about how the Arts Council equipped the James Cowan Theatre, with a grand opening in 1971; hired staff, including Directors Byron Johnstad followed by LLoyd Barry, and Coordinators Phyllis Webb followed by Louise Holst; and developed programming and projects such as the Sculpture Garden
Date Range
1967-1972
Photo Info
Eileen Kernaghan standing in front of four poets at the Poetry Pocket Cafe in New Westminster, October 15, 1995. Item no. 535-0014
Length
00:04:48
Name
Burnaby Arts Council
Burnaby Arts Centre
Subject
Arts
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 10, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Eileen Kernaghan, conducted by Rod Fowler. Eileen Kernaghan was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Eileen Kernaghan’s activities with the Burnaby Writers’ Society and the Burnaby Arts Council, describing the history of these organizations between 1967 and 1990. She describes the financial and other challenges facing the arts community, the various programs initiated by the Arts Council, and the development of the Burnaby Arts Centre facilities at Deer Lake. She also talks about her education, writing career, the Neville Street neighbourhood, and her and her husband’s bookstore business. Ghosts believed to inhabit some of the Arts Centre's heritage buildings are also a topic of conversation. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Eileen Kernaghan was born January 6, 1939, to William Alfred Monk (1910-2003) and Belinda Maude Monk (1908-1996), and grew up on a dairy farm near Grindrod in the North Okanagan. She attended a two room school in Grindrod, completed Junior and Senior High School in Enderby, and at age 17 in 1956, left home to attend UBC. She taught school in the North Okanagan area in the late 1950s, during which time she married her husband Patrick Kernaghan. They moved to Vancouver in 1961, Burnaby in 1963, and settled on Neville Street in the South Slope area in 1966 with their three children. Pat Kernaghan worked at Oakalla Prison as a correctional officer until his retirement in 1988. Eileen and Patrick Kernaghan owned and operated a bookstore on Neville Street from 1987 to 1999. They later moved to New Westminster. Eileen Kernaghan began her writing career at twelve years old with a story published in the Vancouver Sun. After her youngest child began school, with more free time, she started writing again and has become an award winning author of fantasy and science fiction novels. She helped found the Burnaby Writers’ Society in 1967, taught writing workshops, and wrote its popular Newsletter for many years. In 1971 the Society put together a small handbook for BC writers, a venture that was expanded and published by Douglas MacIntyre in 1975 as “The Upper Left-Hand Corner: a writer’s handbook for the Northwest”. The book became a Canadian best-seller. During this same period Eileen Kernaghan began her successful “Grey Isles” trilogy. In 1967 she joined the Burnaby Arts Council, worked as its Coordinator from 1973 to 1984, and was a determined advocate for municipal government support for the arts in Burnaby.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:26:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Kernaghan, Eileen
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-023_Track_2
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Eileen Kernaghan

Images
Less detail

Interview with Eileen Kernaghan by Rod Fowler April 10, 1990 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory493
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is Eileen Kernaghan’s description of the Arts Council’s development of the Sunday crafts festival in the park, starting in 1971 or ’72 and continuing for about 20 years, with speculations as to why interest decreased.
Date Range
1971-1990
Length
00:05:54
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is Eileen Kernaghan’s description of the Arts Council’s development of the Sunday crafts festival in the park, starting in 1971 or ’72 and continuing for about 20 years, with speculations as to why interest decreased.
Date Range
1971-1990
Photo Info
Eileen Kernaghan standing in front of four poets at the Poetry Pocket Cafe in New Westminster, October 15, 1995. Item no. 535-0014
Length
00:05:54
Name
Burnaby Arts Council
Subject
Arts
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 10, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Eileen Kernaghan, conducted by Rod Fowler. Eileen Kernaghan was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Eileen Kernaghan’s activities with the Burnaby Writers’ Society and the Burnaby Arts Council, describing the history of these organizations between 1967 and 1990. She describes the financial and other challenges facing the arts community, the various programs initiated by the Arts Council, and the development of the Burnaby Arts Centre facilities at Deer Lake. She also talks about her education, writing career, the Neville Street neighbourhood, and her and her husband’s bookstore business. Ghosts believed to inhabit some of the Arts Centre's heritage buildings are also a topic of conversation. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Eileen Kernaghan was born January 6, 1939, to William Alfred Monk (1910-2003) and Belinda Maude Monk (1908-1996), and grew up on a dairy farm near Grindrod in the North Okanagan. She attended a two room school in Grindrod, completed Junior and Senior High School in Enderby, and at age 17 in 1956, left home to attend UBC. She taught school in the North Okanagan area in the late 1950s, during which time she married her husband Patrick Kernaghan. They moved to Vancouver in 1961, Burnaby in 1963, and settled on Neville Street in the South Slope area in 1966 with their three children. Pat Kernaghan worked at Oakalla Prison as a correctional officer until his retirement in 1988. Eileen and Patrick Kernaghan owned and operated a bookstore on Neville Street from 1987 to 1999. They later moved to New Westminster. Eileen Kernaghan began her writing career at twelve years old with a story published in the Vancouver Sun. After her youngest child began school, with more free time, she started writing again and has become an award winning author of fantasy and science fiction novels. She helped found the Burnaby Writers’ Society in 1967, taught writing workshops, and wrote its popular Newsletter for many years. In 1971 the Society put together a small handbook for BC writers, a venture that was expanded and published by Douglas MacIntyre in 1975 as “The Upper Left-Hand Corner: a writer’s handbook for the Northwest”. The book became a Canadian best-seller. During this same period Eileen Kernaghan began her successful “Grey Isles” trilogy. In 1967 she joined the Burnaby Arts Council, worked as its Coordinator from 1973 to 1984, and was a determined advocate for municipal government support for the arts in Burnaby.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:26:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Kernaghan, Eileen
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-023_Track_3
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Eileen Kernaghan

Images
Less detail

Interview with Eileen Kernaghan by Rod Fowler April 10, 1990 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory494
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Eileen Kernaghan taking on the job of Coordinator for the Arts Council from 1979 to 1984, the start of Burnaby Summer Theatre, Playground Theatre, and a newsletter, and the choice to do less risky programming due to the 1980’s recession.
Date Range
1971-1990
Length
00:04:58
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Eileen Kernaghan taking on the job of Coordinator for the Arts Council from 1979 to 1984, the start of Burnaby Summer Theatre, Playground Theatre, and a newsletter, and the choice to do less risky programming due to the 1980’s recession.
Date Range
1971-1990
Photo Info
Eileen Kernaghan standing in front of four poets at the Poetry Pocket Cafe in New Westminster, October 15, 1995. Item no. 535-0014
Length
00:04:58
Name
Burnaby Arts Council
Subject
Arts
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 10, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Eileen Kernaghan, conducted by Rod Fowler. Eileen Kernaghan was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Eileen Kernaghan’s activities with the Burnaby Writers’ Society and the Burnaby Arts Council, describing the history of these organizations between 1967 and 1990. She describes the financial and other challenges facing the arts community, the various programs initiated by the Arts Council, and the development of the Burnaby Arts Centre facilities at Deer Lake. She also talks about her education, writing career, the Neville Street neighbourhood, and her and her husband’s bookstore business. Ghosts believed to inhabit some of the Arts Centre's heritage buildings are also a topic of conversation. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Eileen Kernaghan was born January 6, 1939, to William Alfred Monk (1910-2003) and Belinda Maude Monk (1908-1996), and grew up on a dairy farm near Grindrod in the North Okanagan. She attended a two room school in Grindrod, completed Junior and Senior High School in Enderby, and at age 17 in 1956, left home to attend UBC. She taught school in the North Okanagan area in the late 1950s, during which time she married her husband Patrick Kernaghan. They moved to Vancouver in 1961, Burnaby in 1963, and settled on Neville Street in the South Slope area in 1966 with their three children. Pat Kernaghan worked at Oakalla Prison as a correctional officer until his retirement in 1988. Eileen and Patrick Kernaghan owned and operated a bookstore on Neville Street from 1987 to 1999. They later moved to New Westminster. Eileen Kernaghan began her writing career at twelve years old with a story published in the Vancouver Sun. After her youngest child began school, with more free time, she started writing again and has become an award winning author of fantasy and science fiction novels. She helped found the Burnaby Writers’ Society in 1967, taught writing workshops, and wrote its popular Newsletter for many years. In 1971 the Society put together a small handbook for BC writers, a venture that was expanded and published by Douglas MacIntyre in 1975 as “The Upper Left-Hand Corner: a writer’s handbook for the Northwest”. The book became a Canadian best-seller. During this same period Eileen Kernaghan began her successful “Grey Isles” trilogy. In 1967 she joined the Burnaby Arts Council, worked as its Coordinator from 1973 to 1984, and was a determined advocate for municipal government support for the arts in Burnaby.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:26:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Kernaghan, Eileen
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-023_Track_4
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Eileen Kernaghan

Images
Less detail

Interview with Eileen Kernaghan by Rod Fowler April 10, 1990 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory495
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Eileen Kernaghan’s involvement with the Burnaby Writers’ Society, serving variously as newsletter editor, President and Treasurer. She describes the club’s diverse membership, its role, and how it functions
Date Range
1967-1990
Length
00:06:19
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Eileen Kernaghan’s involvement with the Burnaby Writers’ Society, serving variously as newsletter editor, President and Treasurer. She describes the club’s diverse membership, its role, and how it functions
Date Range
1967-1990
Photo Info
Eileen Kernaghan standing in front of four poets at the Poetry Pocket Cafe in New Westminster, October 15, 1995. Item no. 535-0014
Length
00:06:19
Name
Burnaby Writers' Club
Subject
Arts
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 10, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Eileen Kernaghan, conducted by Rod Fowler. Eileen Kernaghan was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Eileen Kernaghan’s activities with the Burnaby Writers’ Society and the Burnaby Arts Council, describing the history of these organizations between 1967 and 1990. She describes the financial and other challenges facing the arts community, the various programs initiated by the Arts Council, and the development of the Burnaby Arts Centre facilities at Deer Lake. She also talks about her education, writing career, the Neville Street neighbourhood, and her and her husband’s bookstore business. Ghosts believed to inhabit some of the Arts Centre's heritage buildings are also a topic of conversation. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Eileen Kernaghan was born January 6, 1939, to William Alfred Monk (1910-2003) and Belinda Maude Monk (1908-1996), and grew up on a dairy farm near Grindrod in the North Okanagan. She attended a two room school in Grindrod, completed Junior and Senior High School in Enderby, and at age 17 in 1956, left home to attend UBC. She taught school in the North Okanagan area in the late 1950s, during which time she married her husband Patrick Kernaghan. They moved to Vancouver in 1961, Burnaby in 1963, and settled on Neville Street in the South Slope area in 1966 with their three children. Pat Kernaghan worked at Oakalla Prison as a correctional officer until his retirement in 1988. Eileen and Patrick Kernaghan owned and operated a bookstore on Neville Street from 1987 to 1999. They later moved to New Westminster. Eileen Kernaghan began her writing career at twelve years old with a story published in the Vancouver Sun. After her youngest child began school, with more free time, she started writing again and has become an award winning author of fantasy and science fiction novels. She helped found the Burnaby Writers’ Society in 1967, taught writing workshops, and wrote its popular Newsletter for many years. In 1971 the Society put together a small handbook for BC writers, a venture that was expanded and published by Douglas MacIntyre in 1975 as “The Upper Left-Hand Corner: a writer’s handbook for the Northwest”. The book became a Canadian best-seller. During this same period Eileen Kernaghan began her successful “Grey Isles” trilogy. In 1967 she joined the Burnaby Arts Council, worked as its Coordinator from 1973 to 1984, and was a determined advocate for municipal government support for the arts in Burnaby.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:26:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Kernaghan, Eileen
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-023_Track_5
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Eileen Kernaghan

Images
Less detail

Interview with Toki Miyashita by Rod Fowler February 27, 1990 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory518
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita and her family’s move to Burnaby in 1969 to an apartment near Brentwood Mall. She tells about continuing to demonstrate origami in schools and teach Ikebana in the community.
Date Range
1969-1990
Length
00:04:54
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita and her family’s move to Burnaby in 1969 to an apartment near Brentwood Mall. She tells about continuing to demonstrate origami in schools and teach Ikebana in the community.
Date Range
1969-1990
Length
00:04:54
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Arts
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Brentwood Area
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 27, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Toki Miyashita, conducted by Rod Fowler. Toki Miyashita was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, her awakening interest in Japanese culture after the war, her subsequent interest in teaching others about Japanese crafts and arts, and becoming a helpful intermediary between Burnaby and visitors from Japan. The interview explores her interest in the Ainu of Japan and their possible link to the aboriginals of BC, her impressions of the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko, and her involvement in the events surrounding the creation of the sculpture “Playground of the Gods” for Burnaby Mountain. The interview also contains interesting details about the art of Japanese flower-arranging. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Toki Miyashita was born in Richmond B.C., ca. 1935, at the Nelson Brothers “fishery”, a second generation Canadian descended from the Oikawa family who settled on Don and Lion Islands (Oikawa-shima). In 1942 the Japanese Canadians in BC were forcibly moved from the coast and their belongings confiscated. Toki Miyashita, her parents, two brothers, and grandparents were first taken to Hastings Park where her father was separated from the family to work in road camps, and the rest of the family were interned in New Denver. Her resourceful grandmother moved the family to land outside the internment camp, growing a large garden from seeds brought with her. In 1946 the family moved to Kamloops and in 1958, after finishing high school, Toki Miyashita moved to Montreal to be with relatives and a small Japanese community. At this time she became interested in Japanese culture and took a Japanese language course at age 22. She learned about Japanese flower-arranging (Ikebana), paper folding (Origami), silk doll making (from a Russian Jew), and how to wear a kimono. She began demonstrating these arts in schools and to other groups, which she continued doing when she, her husband and two young children moved to Burnaby in 1969. Toki Miyashita has been called an unpaid “ambassador” of Japanese culture to the Lower Mainland. She has acted as liaison between Burnaby and her sister city Kushiro in Japan, which involved her in the creation of the Ainu sculpture “Playground of the Gods” on Burnaby Mountain for Burnaby’s Centennial. Toki Miyashita is a recognized Master in Ikebana Sogetsu, a school of flower-arranging, and has served on the board of the Vancouver Ikebana Association. She also served on Burnaby’s Family Court in the 1980s.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
01:34:10
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Miyashita, Toki
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-017_Track_3
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Toki Miyashita

Less detail

Interview with Kay Zimmerman by Rod Fowler [February] 1990 - Track 10

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory536
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Kay Zimmerman’s explanation why she didn’t join organizations not involving her number one interest politics, and about the political power of belonging to Cliff Avenue soccer.
Date Range
1960-1990
Length
00:03:45
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Kay Zimmerman’s explanation why she didn’t join organizations not involving her number one interest politics, and about the political power of belonging to Cliff Avenue soccer.
Date Range
1960-1990
Photo Info
Kay Zimmerman, [1973]. Item no. 231-021
Length
00:03:45
Name
Cliff Avenue United Football Club
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Elections
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
[February] 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Kay Zimmerman, conducted by Rod Fowler. Kay Zimmerman was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Kay Zimmerman’s political activities in Burnaby and her description of her Lochdale neighbourhood in the 1960s. She provides an excellent overview of the municipal political groups and important political issues in Burnaby from 1960 to 1980. She tells the story about an early and successful political action that convinced her that an individual can make a difference. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Kathleen “Kay” Zimmerman, her husband Gordon and their young son Rick moved to Burnaby from Vancouver in 1960 to a house on Curtis Avenue near Duthie Street (a second son Bruce was born in Burnaby). Kay Zimmerman worked 12 years at Royal Columbian Hospital in the admitting office, then 4 years (1974-1979) as special assistant to Senator Ray Perrault, followed by work as a judge on the Citizenship Court before retiring. Gordon Zimmerman worked at the Shell Refinery. A member of the Liberal Party and political activist before arriving in Burnaby, Kay Zimmerman continued her involvement in national and local politics. She campaigned for Ray Perrault during the Trudeau years, and was a founder and active member of the Burnaby Voters Association (BVA). Her political activities encompassed 30 years that saw major changes in Burnaby, including the building of SFU, creation of Heritage Village, an awakening environmental sensibility, and a dramatic increase in population and development in Burnaby.
Total Tracks
10
Total Length
01:04:36
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Zimmerman, Kay
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-018_Track_10
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track ten of interview with Kay Zimmerman

Images
Less detail

Volunteers building Lozells Hall

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivephoto37059
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
September 1, 1924 (date of original), copied 1992
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 12.7 x 17.7 cm print
Item No.
315-522
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of volunteers involved with the building of the original Lozell's Hall.
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
September 1, 1924 (date of original), copied 1992
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Centennial Anthology series
Description Level
Item
Item No.
315-522
Accession Number
BHS994-4
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 12.7 x 17.7 cm print
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of volunteers involved with the building of the original Lozell's Hall.
Subjects
Animals - Dogs
Persons - Volunteers
Names
Lozell's Hall
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Government Road
Burnaby - Lozells Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Lozells (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Government Road Area
Images
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Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory66
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement with the Army of the Common Good, including asserting influence on the Communist Party and the opening of the first Common Good store.
Date Range
1932
Length
0:09:43
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of his involvement with the Army of the Common Good, including asserting influence on the Communist Party and the opening of the first Common Good store.
Date Range
1932
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:43
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Organizations
Buildings - Commercial - Grocery Stores
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_9
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track nine of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 10

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory67
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of the Army of the Common Good, specifically how Labour Units (LU) worked.
Date Range
1932-1933
Length
0:09:36
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of the Army of the Common Good, specifically how Labour Units (LU) worked.
Date Range
1932-1933
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:36
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Grocery Stores
Persons - Volunteers
Organizations
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_10
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track ten of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
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Interview with Edward Apps by Rod Fowler February 22, 1990 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory459
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ed Apps’ views about the role Ratepayer Associations played in neighbourhood development, their diminished role as their functions have been taken over by Council, the Parks Board and political party slates, and the pros and cons for the change
Date Range
1960-1990
Length
00:14:36
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ed Apps’ views about the role Ratepayer Associations played in neighbourhood development, their diminished role as their functions have been taken over by Council, the Parks Board and political party slates, and the pros and cons for the change
Date Range
1960-1990
Length
00:14:36
Subject
Public Services - Municipal Services
Organizations
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 22, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Edward Apps, conducted by Rod Fowler. Ed Apps was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Ed Apps involvement in community groups, particularly his work in seniors organizations lobbying for seniors’ housing since his retirement, and views about the role of Rate Payer groups, unions and politics in the development of North and South Burnaby. He also talks about his origin in England, his war service, arrival with his wife Margaret in Burnaby in 1946, his work with the Burnaby School Board and for the local union, the location of some of the older schools, the history of his house, and briefly about his wife and children. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Edward Apps was born in 1918 in London, England, and grew up in Kent and Essex. In WWII he flew the third glider to land in Normandy on June 6th, 1944. He and his wife Margaret Hope (1915-1985) immigrated to British Columbia in 1946, joining his wife’s parents, who had immigrated earlier in 1939, in Burnaby Heights in North Burnaby. He worked for the Burnaby School Board as Foreman Painter, and served on CUPE Local 379 Executive, until his retirement in 1982. In 1948 Ed Apps bought his first lot, for $150.00, in the 4700 block on Georgia Street, building houses there and in the 4100 block before buying his present home, a ca.1900 farm building, in the same area in 1954. North Burnaby was “bush country and orchards” in the 1950s; his two sons played in the ravines; and the family used the tram system on Hastings and Boundary Road for transportation. Development of municipal services seemed slower in North than South Burnaby, and Ed Apps remembers the strong role Rate Payers groups had in creating local services and lobbying Municipal Council for provide services. After retirement Ed Apps became involved in several local and provincial seniors organizations, advocating for better housing, including serving on the Executives of the Network of Burnaby Seniors and the Council of Senior Citizens Organization, and was active in the provincial Seniors Research and Resource and CMHC Housing Committee. He also served on the Centennial Committee of Burnaby.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:56:50
Other Tracks
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Interviewee Name
Apps, Ed
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-015_Track_5
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Ed Apps

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Interview with Merrill M. Gordon by Rod Fowler March 19, 1990 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory478
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Merrill Gordon’s political career and his volunteer work with Cliff Avenue soccer, the Burnaby Mental Health Association, the library board, and the New Vista Society. He talks about his association with Alan Emmott and the founding of the Better Burnaby Commi…
Date Range
1956-1990
Length
00:07:05
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Merrill Gordon’s political career and his volunteer work with Cliff Avenue soccer, the Burnaby Mental Health Association, the library board, and the New Vista Society. He talks about his association with Alan Emmott and the founding of the Better Burnaby Committee (BBC), his election to Burnaby Council in 1972 with BVA, and his membership in and work for the federal NDP
Date Range
1956-1990
Photo Info
Burnaby Alderman Merrill Gordon (second from right) following a candidates' meeting, 1973. Item no. 480-263
Length
00:07:05
Name
Emmott, Alan H
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Officials - Aldermen and Councillors
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
March 19, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Merrill Gordon, conducted by Rod Fowler.Gordon Merrill was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Merrill Gordon’s childhood in the Depression, including his story about the family’s difficult trek to Burnaby from Alberta; his education, teachers and first volunteer activities at Grandview High School; his career at Fleck Brothers and the start of his own company Blaze Industries and later work in India; and his many volunteer activities in Burnaby. He describes how he started the Cliff Avenue United Football Club, the soccer club's subsequent growth and development, some of the people involved, and the founding of the youth soccer exchange. He also describes his work on the Parks Board and in the arts community, including the 1987 arts centre referendum, and involvement with the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society (1988- ), and mentions his work for other groups including the New Vista Society, library board, and Burnaby Mental Health Committee. He also talks about his political career with the Better Burnaby Committee and Burnaby Voters Association, resulting in his 1972 election to Burnaby’s 1973 council. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Merrill M. Gordon was born in Saskatchewan in 1929 to parents farming north of North Battleford. After a fifth year of crop failure the family of four left the farm in 1934 to join relatives living near the corner of Union and Sperling in Burnaby. With little resources the family adapted as well as possible in the Depression years, moving often in the East Vancouver/North Burnaby area in an attempt to better their situation. Merrill’s father obtained work at sawmills including Kapoor’s Sawmill at Barnet, walking to work over Burnaby Mountain. After attending numerous public schools, Merrill Gordon eventually spent three years at Templeton School and then completed his education at Grandview High School of Commerce, majoring in accounting and commercial law. He worked a few years at Canadian Industries Ltd., then joined Fleck Brothers. In 1965 Merrill Gordon and his wife started their own company Blaze Industries of Canada that manufactured wood burning fireplaces, selling the company to AB Electrolux in 1980. After a short retirement, Merrill Gordon went back to work in 1981 for a company manufacturing solar panels, one project taking him and his wife intermittently to India over a four year period. Merrill Gordon helped found the political group Better Burnaby Committee, later the Burnaby Voters Association, with Alan Emmott and Bill Lewarne, ran for Burnaby Municipal Council and served one year as councillor in 1973. Merrill Gordon is well known for his over 40 years of volunteer work in Burnaby, particularly as founder in 1956 and director of the Cliff Avenue United Football Club, one of the largest soccer clubs in BC. He was also the founder of Burnaby Youth Soccer and the first youth soccer exchange with Washington State. His other volunteer work includes library trustee, Parks Commissioner (1987-1992), Director of New Vista Home for Seniors, Chair of campaign raising funds for building Shadbolt Arts Centre, and Chair of the Burnaby Mental Health Committee. In 1988 Merrill Gordon, Betty Gordon, Dean Lamont and several others formed the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which advocated for the return of unused land to Burnaby from SFU and the subsequent creation of Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Merrill Gordon and Elizabeth Balfour (nee Leitch) (1926-2012) married in 1953 and had two children.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:31:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Gordon, Merrill
Interview Location
unknown
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-020_Track_7
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Merrill Gordon

Images
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Interview with Toki Miyashita by Rod Fowler February 27, 1990 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory523
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s six years service on Burnaby’s Family Court. She talks about what the Court does and the need for better services for battered women. She also relates that when Municipal officials receive visitors from Japan she is often asked to help.
Date Range
1984-1990
Length
00:04:47
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s six years service on Burnaby’s Family Court. She talks about what the Court does and the need for better services for battered women. She also relates that when Municipal officials receive visitors from Japan she is often asked to help.
Date Range
1984-1990
Length
00:04:47
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Legal System
Industries - Tourism
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 27, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Toki Miyashita, conducted by Rod Fowler. Toki Miyashita was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, her awakening interest in Japanese culture after the war, her subsequent interest in teaching others about Japanese crafts and arts, and becoming a helpful intermediary between Burnaby and visitors from Japan. The interview explores her interest in the Ainu of Japan and their possible link to the aboriginals of BC, her impressions of the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko, and her involvement in the events surrounding the creation of the sculpture “Playground of the Gods” for Burnaby Mountain. The interview also contains interesting details about the art of Japanese flower-arranging. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Toki Miyashita was born in Richmond B.C., ca. 1935, at the Nelson Brothers “fishery”, a second generation Canadian descended from the Oikawa family who settled on Don and Lion Islands (Oikawa-shima). In 1942 the Japanese Canadians in BC were forcibly moved from the coast and their belongings confiscated. Toki Miyashita, her parents, two brothers, and grandparents were first taken to Hastings Park where her father was separated from the family to work in road camps, and the rest of the family were interned in New Denver. Her resourceful grandmother moved the family to land outside the internment camp, growing a large garden from seeds brought with her. In 1946 the family moved to Kamloops and in 1958, after finishing high school, Toki Miyashita moved to Montreal to be with relatives and a small Japanese community. At this time she became interested in Japanese culture and took a Japanese language course at age 22. She learned about Japanese flower-arranging (Ikebana), paper folding (Origami), silk doll making (from a Russian Jew), and how to wear a kimono. She began demonstrating these arts in schools and to other groups, which she continued doing when she, her husband and two young children moved to Burnaby in 1969. Toki Miyashita has been called an unpaid “ambassador” of Japanese culture to the Lower Mainland. She has acted as liaison between Burnaby and her sister city Kushiro in Japan, which involved her in the creation of the Ainu sculpture “Playground of the Gods” on Burnaby Mountain for Burnaby’s Centennial. Toki Miyashita is a recognized Master in Ikebana Sogetsu, a school of flower-arranging, and has served on the board of the Vancouver Ikebana Association. She also served on Burnaby’s Family Court in the 1980s.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
01:34:10
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Miyashita, Toki
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-017_Track_8
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Toki Miyashita

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Interview with Sev Morin by Rod Fowler April 4, 1990 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory545
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Sev Morin’s appointment to SFU Senate and his views about the university, and his involvement in other organizations such as Rotary, the Variety Club and Telethon, Burnaby Hospital (with Bill Lewarne), the Restaurant Association, and Vancouver AM Tourism Assoc…
Date Range
1970-1990
Length
00:04:50
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Sev Morin’s appointment to SFU Senate and his views about the university, and his involvement in other organizations such as Rotary, the Variety Club and Telethon, Burnaby Hospital (with Bill Lewarne), the Restaurant Association, and Vancouver AM Tourism Association
Date Range
1970-1990
Photo Info
Sev Morin (left) of Severin's in Burnaby (formerly the Gai Paree) hosting a gala New Year's celebration, 1979. Item no. 480-712
Length
00:04:50
Name
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Industries - Tourism
Events - Fundraising
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 4, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Severin "Sev" Morin, conducted by Rod Fowler. Sev Morin was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Sev Morin’s banquet hall, restaurant and night club business on Kingsway, originally named the “Gai Paree Supper Club” (1947-1976) and later “Severin’s” (1976-1985) and “Diego’s” (1985-1994), its function as a Burnaby landmark, and the entertainment and political people he met through his business. He also describes his many volunteer activities in Burnaby, including member of the SFU Senate, Rotary Club, Variety Club and Telethon, fund raising for Burnaby Hospital, and tourism related groups, and his political work for the federal Liberal party. He talks about his parents’ origins, the lives of his brothers Rudy and Rene, and the family’s involvement in establishing the “Gai Paree”. He also shares his views about the business and cultural development of Burnaby. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Severin “Sev” Rene Morin was born September 21, 1927, in Bonneville, Alberta, to Rene Pierre Morin (1878-1963) and Anne Marie (nee Lachiver) Morin (1886-1956). Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Morin and their son Rene Francois (1905-1954) immigrated to Edmonton, Alberta, from France in 1913, where Rene Pierre Morin worked for the C.N.R. and a second son Adolphe “Rudy” Ferdinand (1922-1969) was born, followed by their third son Severin. In 1943, after R.P. Morin retired, the family moved to Burnaby to a house on Sperling Avenue. Sometime earlier the two older Morin brothers found work in Trail at the smelter and developed musical careers. In 1946/47 the Morin family purchased property on Kingsway and built a banquet hall, the “Gai Paree Supper Club”. Sev and Rudy Morin managed the club and Rene F. Morin moved to Burnaby to join them with his band. The supper club, with its live music and dance floor, became a popular meeting place and wedding venue, eventually expanding into a restaurant and nightclub in the 1970s. The “Gai Paree” was renamed “Severin’s” in 1976 and “Diego’s” in 1985, closing finally in 1994. Sev Morin’s business life included three record stores which he owned with his friend Jack Cullen. Through these businesses Sev Morin was well known in the entertainment and hospitality industry. He and his restaurant also hosted political and social events that made the restaurant a community landmark. Sev Morin contributed many volunteer hours to community and charitable organizations, including an appointment to the SFU Senate, fundraising for the Burnaby Hospital, Director of the Variety Club and Rotary Club, and consultant for a variety of tourism related ventures. He also was active in the federal Liberal Party. Sev Morin and his wife Pauline married in 1950 and had three children. Sev Morin died at age 86 on March 28, 2014.
Total Tracks
10
Total Length
00:56:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Morin, Severin "Sev"
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-021_Track_9
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track nine of interview with Sev Morin

Images
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Interview with Mary Lumby by Kathy Bossort January 8, 2016 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory676
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about her involvement in environmental groups and events in Burnaby, in particular her membership on Burnaby’s Environment Committee as a citizen representative, and her coordination of 1992 Ecofestival events held in Burnaby’s Centennial. S…
Date Range
1990-2015
Length
0:18:10
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about her involvement in environmental groups and events in Burnaby, in particular her membership on Burnaby’s Environment Committee as a citizen representative, and her coordination of 1992 Ecofestival events held in Burnaby’s Centennial. She also talks about the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, environmental issues for Burnaby Mountain, and the land stewardship shown by SFU and the City.
Date Range
1990-2015
Length
0:18:10
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Lamont, Dean
UniverCity
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Events - Festivals
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 8, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Mary Lumby conducted by Kathy Bossort. Mary Lumby was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Mary Lumby’s experience living in Forest Hills, raising her children there, and her involvement in community groups and advocating for improved community services in the Forest Hills and Forest Grove neighbourhoods, and her later move to UniverCity. She talks about the history of the Forest Hills subdivision and what she liked about living there, its links with Forest Grove, and challenges facing both communities as a result of their isolation. Her description of living in UniverCity provides an interesting comparison in how community is created. Mary Lumby also talks about her teaching career, her volunteer activities especially related to the environment, the relationship Trans Mountain tank farm had with adjacent neighbourhoods when she lived in Forest Hills, and what the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area means to her.
Biographical Notes
Mary Lumby was born in Vancouver B.C. She moved to Burnaby and the Parkcrest area in 1977, and then to the new Forest Hills subdivision. Later she moved into another developing community, UniverCity, at the top of Burnaby Mountain and adjacent to the Simon Fraser University campus. Mary has been an active community member, volunteer and community advocate. She has been particularly interested in environmental issues, as a teacher, volunteer coordinator for civic events, and citizen representative on Burnaby’s Environment Committee. She continues to be active in community affairs and enjoys living on Burnaby Mountain.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:31:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lumby, Mary M.
Interview Location
Mary Lumby's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-016_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Mary Lumby

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Interview with Merrill M. Gordon by Rod Fowler March 19, 1990 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory479
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Merrill Gordon’s founding and operation of the youth soccer exchange with Washington State, and the importance of soccer to the community. He discusses the problem of isolation between north and south Burnaby, planned development in Burnaby, and the contributi…
Date Range
1956-1990
Length
00:10:17
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Merrill Gordon’s founding and operation of the youth soccer exchange with Washington State, and the importance of soccer to the community. He discusses the problem of isolation between north and south Burnaby, planned development in Burnaby, and the contributions of Ratepayer groups and volunteers
Date Range
1956-1990
Photo Info
Burnaby Alderman Merrill Gordon (second from right) following a candidates' meeting, 1973. Item no. 480-263
Length
00:10:17
Subject
Persons - Volunteers
Sports - Soccer
Public Services - Municipal Services
Planning
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
March 19, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Merrill Gordon, conducted by Rod Fowler.Gordon Merrill was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Merrill Gordon’s childhood in the Depression, including his story about the family’s difficult trek to Burnaby from Alberta; his education, teachers and first volunteer activities at Grandview High School; his career at Fleck Brothers and the start of his own company Blaze Industries and later work in India; and his many volunteer activities in Burnaby. He describes how he started the Cliff Avenue United Football Club, the soccer club's subsequent growth and development, some of the people involved, and the founding of the youth soccer exchange. He also describes his work on the Parks Board and in the arts community, including the 1987 arts centre referendum, and involvement with the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society (1988- ), and mentions his work for other groups including the New Vista Society, library board, and Burnaby Mental Health Committee. He also talks about his political career with the Better Burnaby Committee and Burnaby Voters Association, resulting in his 1972 election to Burnaby’s 1973 council. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Merrill M. Gordon was born in Saskatchewan in 1929 to parents farming north of North Battleford. After a fifth year of crop failure the family of four left the farm in 1934 to join relatives living near the corner of Union and Sperling in Burnaby. With little resources the family adapted as well as possible in the Depression years, moving often in the East Vancouver/North Burnaby area in an attempt to better their situation. Merrill’s father obtained work at sawmills including Kapoor’s Sawmill at Barnet, walking to work over Burnaby Mountain. After attending numerous public schools, Merrill Gordon eventually spent three years at Templeton School and then completed his education at Grandview High School of Commerce, majoring in accounting and commercial law. He worked a few years at Canadian Industries Ltd., then joined Fleck Brothers. In 1965 Merrill Gordon and his wife started their own company Blaze Industries of Canada that manufactured wood burning fireplaces, selling the company to AB Electrolux in 1980. After a short retirement, Merrill Gordon went back to work in 1981 for a company manufacturing solar panels, one project taking him and his wife intermittently to India over a four year period. Merrill Gordon helped found the political group Better Burnaby Committee, later the Burnaby Voters Association, with Alan Emmott and Bill Lewarne, ran for Burnaby Municipal Council and served one year as councillor in 1973. Merrill Gordon is well known for his over 40 years of volunteer work in Burnaby, particularly as founder in 1956 and director of the Cliff Avenue United Football Club, one of the largest soccer clubs in BC. He was also the founder of Burnaby Youth Soccer and the first youth soccer exchange with Washington State. His other volunteer work includes library trustee, Parks Commissioner (1987-1992), Director of New Vista Home for Seniors, Chair of campaign raising funds for building Shadbolt Arts Centre, and Chair of the Burnaby Mental Health Committee. In 1988 Merrill Gordon, Betty Gordon, Dean Lamont and several others formed the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which advocated for the return of unused land to Burnaby from SFU and the subsequent creation of Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Merrill Gordon and Elizabeth Balfour (nee Leitch) (1926-2012) married in 1953 and had two children.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
1:31:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Gordon, Merrill
Interview Location
unknown
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-020_Track_8
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Merrill Gordon

Images
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Interview with Kay Zimmerman by Rod Fowler [February] 1990 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory531
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Kay Zimmerman’s discussion about the pros and cons of volunteer organizations operating public services for the municipality, in particular the Parks and Recreation Commission taking control of Heritage Village, a volunteer initiated Centennial Project
Date Range
1967-1990
Length
00:04:42
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Kay Zimmerman’s discussion about the pros and cons of volunteer organizations operating public services for the municipality, in particular the Parks and Recreation Commission taking control of Heritage Village, a volunteer initiated Centennial Project
Date Range
1967-1990
Photo Info
Kay Zimmerman, [1973]. Item no. 231-021
Length
00:04:42
Subject
Public Services - Municipal Services
Organizations - Historical Societies
Persons - Volunteers
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
[February] 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Kay Zimmerman, conducted by Rod Fowler. Kay Zimmerman was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Kay Zimmerman’s political activities in Burnaby and her description of her Lochdale neighbourhood in the 1960s. She provides an excellent overview of the municipal political groups and important political issues in Burnaby from 1960 to 1980. She tells the story about an early and successful political action that convinced her that an individual can make a difference. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Kathleen “Kay” Zimmerman, her husband Gordon and their young son Rick moved to Burnaby from Vancouver in 1960 to a house on Curtis Avenue near Duthie Street (a second son Bruce was born in Burnaby). Kay Zimmerman worked 12 years at Royal Columbian Hospital in the admitting office, then 4 years (1974-1979) as special assistant to Senator Ray Perrault, followed by work as a judge on the Citizenship Court before retiring. Gordon Zimmerman worked at the Shell Refinery. A member of the Liberal Party and political activist before arriving in Burnaby, Kay Zimmerman continued her involvement in national and local politics. She campaigned for Ray Perrault during the Trudeau years, and was a founder and active member of the Burnaby Voters Association (BVA). Her political activities encompassed 30 years that saw major changes in Burnaby, including the building of SFU, creation of Heritage Village, an awakening environmental sensibility, and a dramatic increase in population and development in Burnaby.
Total Tracks
10
Total Length
01:04:36
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Zimmerman, Kay
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-018_Track_5
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Kay Zimmerman

Images
Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory548
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli joining the new environmental organization “Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society” ca. 1988 and his earlier involvement in environmental issues. He talks about the Society’s beginnings, goals and lobbying activities; about the group’s Presiden…
Date Range
1975-1990
Length
0:15:30
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli joining the new environmental organization “Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society” ca. 1988 and his earlier involvement in environmental issues. He talks about the Society’s beginnings, goals and lobbying activities; about the group’s President Dean Lamont and his link with Naheeno Park; other stakeholders involved; and about the early involvement of Chief Leonard George and the Burrard Band youth in the Society’s activities.
Date Range
1975-1990
Length
0:15:30
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Lamont, Dean
George, Leonard
Tsleil-Waututh First Nation
Naheeno Park
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory549
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s description of the issues involved in SFU’s proposed expansion in the 1980s; his ideas about alternatives to SFU’s plans; the broad support for the conservation area preservation concept; and the wider issues for the municipality in the disp…
Date Range
1988-1995
Length
0:08:49
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s description of the issues involved in SFU’s proposed expansion in the 1980s; his ideas about alternatives to SFU’s plans; the broad support for the conservation area preservation concept; and the wider issues for the municipality in the dispute.
Date Range
1988-1995
Length
0:08:49
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory550
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s memories about the members of the Society including Merrill Gordon, Karen Morcke, Diane Hansen and Gavin Ross, and the interests and strengths they brought to the Society. He talks about the loss of deer habitat with the building of UniverCi…
Date Range
1988-1995
Length
0:10:07
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s memories about the members of the Society including Merrill Gordon, Karen Morcke, Diane Hansen and Gavin Ross, and the interests and strengths they brought to the Society. He talks about the loss of deer habitat with the building of UniverCity and the Parkway.
Date Range
1988-1995
Length
0:10:07
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Lamont, Dean
Gordon, Merrill
Morcke, Karen
Hansen, H. Diane
Ross, Gavin
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Animals - Deer
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen by Kathy Bossort October 9, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory564
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen describing the founding of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society and how they became members. They talk about the Society’s goal, members Dean Lamont and Merrill and Betty Gordon, and the work of SFU Professor Colin Crampton. …
Date Range
1988-1997
Length
0:15:54
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen describing the founding of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society and how they became members. They talk about the Society’s goal, members Dean Lamont and Merrill and Betty Gordon, and the work of SFU Professor Colin Crampton. Karen Morcke talks about the significance of the names on the cairn that memorializes the dedication of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. They also talk about the results of the 1995 agreement between City and SFU.
Date Range
1988-1997
Length
0:15:54
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Lamont, Dean
Gordon, Merrill
Crampton, Colin
Harcourt, Mike
Sihota, Moe
Copeland, William J
Corrigan, Derek
Drummond, Douglas P "Doug"
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen conducted by Kathy Bossort. Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history and activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society of which Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were founding members, and the environmental and recreational value of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Karen Morcke also talks about walking the trails on Burnaby Mountain from 1968 to present and her involvement in other environmental groups.
Biographical Notes
Diane Hansen was born in Winnipeg in 1941, trained as a nurse in Toronto, and moved with her husband Ingolf Hansen to the Westridge Area in Burnaby in 1971, where Diane lived until 2010. Diane has one daughter Kristin. Karen Morcke was born in Germany in 1940, immigrating to Canada in 1968 to attend SFU. After completing her Masters degree in 1970 Karen was hired by SFU as a language instructor from which she retired in 1995. She has one son Erik and has lived almost continuously in North Burnaby since 1968. Both Diane Hansen and Karen Morcke have been active volunteers in local environmental groups and were founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed about 1989 to lobby for a conservation area that integrated SFU land below the campus ring road with City of Burnaby parkland on Burnaby Mountain. Diane has also been active in wild bird rescue groups. Karen walked the trails on Burnaby Mountain to and from work, and began lobbying for protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain in the 1970s.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:10:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Morcke, Karen
Hansen, H. Diane
Interview Location
Karen Morcke's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-003_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen

Less detail

Interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen by Kathy Bossort October 9, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory565
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen describing the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society’s meetings, resources, and activities to make the public aware of the value and threat to parkland on Burnaby Mountain.
Date Range
1988-1997
Length
0:15:00
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen describing the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society’s meetings, resources, and activities to make the public aware of the value and threat to parkland on Burnaby Mountain.
Date Range
1988-1997
Length
0:15:00
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
George, Leonard
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen conducted by Kathy Bossort. Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history and activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society of which Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were founding members, and the environmental and recreational value of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Karen Morcke also talks about walking the trails on Burnaby Mountain from 1968 to present and her involvement in other environmental groups.
Biographical Notes
Diane Hansen was born in Winnipeg in 1941, trained as a nurse in Toronto, and moved with her husband Ingolf Hansen to the Westridge Area in Burnaby in 1971, where Diane lived until 2010. Diane has one daughter Kristin. Karen Morcke was born in Germany in 1940, immigrating to Canada in 1968 to attend SFU. After completing her Masters degree in 1970 Karen was hired by SFU as a language instructor from which she retired in 1995. She has one son Erik and has lived almost continuously in North Burnaby since 1968. Both Diane Hansen and Karen Morcke have been active volunteers in local environmental groups and were founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed about 1989 to lobby for a conservation area that integrated SFU land below the campus ring road with City of Burnaby parkland on Burnaby Mountain. Diane has also been active in wild bird rescue groups. Karen walked the trails on Burnaby Mountain to and from work, and began lobbying for protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain in the 1970s.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:10:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Morcke, Karen
Hansen, H. Diane
Interview Location
Karen Morcke's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-003_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen

Less detail

Interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen by Kathy Bossort October 9, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory566
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen describing other environmental organizations that worked with Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society or on which they were members, including Burnaby Lake Park Association, GVRD Creating Our Future report (1990), and IMPACT. Karen …
Date Range
1988-2015
Length
0:05:37
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen describing other environmental organizations that worked with Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society or on which they were members, including Burnaby Lake Park Association, GVRD Creating Our Future report (1990), and IMPACT. Karen Morcke talks about the role that Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park plays in addition to the conservation area.
Date Range
1988-2015
Length
0:05:37
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Burnaby Lake Park Association
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen conducted by Kathy Bossort. Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history and activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society of which Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were founding members, and the environmental and recreational value of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Karen Morcke also talks about walking the trails on Burnaby Mountain from 1968 to present and her involvement in other environmental groups.
Biographical Notes
Diane Hansen was born in Winnipeg in 1941, trained as a nurse in Toronto, and moved with her husband Ingolf Hansen to the Westridge Area in Burnaby in 1971, where Diane lived until 2010. Diane has one daughter Kristin. Karen Morcke was born in Germany in 1940, immigrating to Canada in 1968 to attend SFU. After completing her Masters degree in 1970 Karen was hired by SFU as a language instructor from which she retired in 1995. She has one son Erik and has lived almost continuously in North Burnaby since 1968. Both Diane Hansen and Karen Morcke have been active volunteers in local environmental groups and were founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed about 1989 to lobby for a conservation area that integrated SFU land below the campus ring road with City of Burnaby parkland on Burnaby Mountain. Diane has also been active in wild bird rescue groups. Karen walked the trails on Burnaby Mountain to and from work, and began lobbying for protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain in the 1970s.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:10:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Morcke, Karen
Hansen, H. Diane
Interview Location
Karen Morcke's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-003_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen

Less detail

Interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen by Kathy Bossort October 9, 2015 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory567
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen’s description of the negotiations between SFU and the City of Burnaby, the City’s 1998 Environment Award to the Society, and how the conservation area has developed. Karen Morcke talks about her participation in the 1974 public he…
Date Range
1974-2015
Length
0:12:26
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen’s description of the negotiations between SFU and the City of Burnaby, the City’s 1998 Environment Award to the Society, and how the conservation area has developed. Karen Morcke talks about her participation in the 1974 public hearings, her concern about development at the bottom of the mountain, and the changing meaning of the term “conservation”.
Date Range
1974-2015
Length
0:12:26
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen conducted by Kathy Bossort. Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history and activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society of which Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were founding members, and the environmental and recreational value of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Karen Morcke also talks about walking the trails on Burnaby Mountain from 1968 to present and her involvement in other environmental groups.
Biographical Notes
Diane Hansen was born in Winnipeg in 1941, trained as a nurse in Toronto, and moved with her husband Ingolf Hansen to the Westridge Area in Burnaby in 1971, where Diane lived until 2010. Diane has one daughter Kristin. Karen Morcke was born in Germany in 1940, immigrating to Canada in 1968 to attend SFU. After completing her Masters degree in 1970 Karen was hired by SFU as a language instructor from which she retired in 1995. She has one son Erik and has lived almost continuously in North Burnaby since 1968. Both Diane Hansen and Karen Morcke have been active volunteers in local environmental groups and were founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed about 1989 to lobby for a conservation area that integrated SFU land below the campus ring road with City of Burnaby parkland on Burnaby Mountain. Diane has also been active in wild bird rescue groups. Karen walked the trails on Burnaby Mountain to and from work, and began lobbying for protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain in the 1970s.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:10:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Morcke, Karen
Hansen, H. Diane
Interview Location
Karen Morcke's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-003_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen

Less detail

Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory575
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s volunteer activities with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and Dania Homes Society, which includes giving talks to seniors about Burnaby Mountain parks. She also talks about kinds of accessible activities that people can do on Burna…
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:05:09
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s volunteer activities with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and Dania Homes Society, which includes giving talks to seniors about Burnaby Mountain parks. She also talks about kinds of accessible activities that people can do on Burnaby Mountain.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:05:09
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Swedish Canadian Rest Home and Manor
Dania Home
Subject
Recreational Activities
Geographic Features - Parks
Persons - Volunteers
Persons - Seniors
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
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Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Maureen Olofson

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Interview with John Templeton, Alan James and Christine Leston by Kathy Bossort October 26, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory587
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview introduces John Templeton, Alan James and Christine Leston, three members of the stream keepers group Stoney Creek Environment Committee (SCEC), and their description of The Great Salmon Send-Off event on Stoney Creek and its start in 1990. John Templeton also talks ab…
Date Range
1970-2015
Length
0:14:04
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview introduces John Templeton, Alan James and Christine Leston, three members of the stream keepers group Stoney Creek Environment Committee (SCEC), and their description of The Great Salmon Send-Off event on Stoney Creek and its start in 1990. John Templeton also talks about the life cycle of chum and coho salmon.
Date Range
1970-2015
Length
0:14:04
Name
Stoney Creek Environment Committee
Great Salmon Send-Off
Subject
Geographic Features - Streams
Events
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Brunette River
Burnaby - Stoney Creek
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 26, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Templeton, Alan James & Christine Leston, members of the Stoney Creek Environment Committee, conducted by Kathy Bossort. The three members of SCEC were among 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history and work of the stream keeper group Stoney Creek Environment Committee (SCEC) and the Stoney Creek Environmental Working Group, and about SCEC’s founder Jennifer Atkinson. The interview is made richer by the complementary views of the three interviewees, John Templeton (SCEC Chair), Alan James (Member-at-Large - Education), and Christine Leston (Treasurer).
Biographical Notes
The Stoney Creek Environment Committee is a streamkeeper group and registered non-profit society dedicated to protecting and restoring viable salmon-bearing streams within the Stoney Creek Watershed. (Stoney Creek originates on Burnaby Mountain and is part of the Brunette watershed which empties into the Fraser River.) The volunteer group, formed in 1995, was guided by the tireless efforts of Jennifer Atchison (1938-2010) after whom the Jennifer Atchison Environmental Centre in North Burnaby is named. The volunteer members of SCEC monitor water quality, generate inventories and reports on the biophysical assets and health of the watershed, provide educational opportunities, enhance stream and stream bank habitat, and speak on behalf of the Stoney Creek watershed. One of its key events is The Great Salmon Send-Off, the release of young salmon into Stoney Creek in May, which celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2015. The Stoney Creek Environmental Working Group (1999-present), managed by the City of Burnaby, undertakes to coordinate the actions of all stakeholders in the Stoney Creek watershed. It is comprised of representatives from community groups, such as SCEC, governmental and institutional agencies, and industries who are committed to sustaining and improving the quality of the Stoney Creek watershed’s water, wildlife and environment. John Templeton, currently SCEC Chair, joined SCEC in 2004. He was born in Coleraine ,County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, in 1957, and after immigrating to Canada, came to live in Burnaby in 1992, first in Forest Grove (1992-2014) and then in Forest Hills. He works as a millwright. Alan James,Member-at-large - Education, joined SCEC in 2003 He was born in 1939 in Berkeley, California, and came to live in Burnaby in about 2000. He is a retired geophycisist and computer consultant. Christine Leston joined SCEC in 1997, serving first as Secretary and then as Treasurer. She was born in 1943 in Cheshire, England, and came to live in Burnaby in 1974, first in Greentree Village, then Simon Fraser Village (1974-2004) and now the Edmonds area. She is a retired technical writer.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:08:27
Other Tracks
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Interviewee Name
Templeton, John R.
James, Alan C.
Leston, Christine
Interview Location
Jennifer Atchison Environmental Centre, Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-006_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with John Templeton, Alan James & Christine Leston

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