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Open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner July / August 1973 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory80
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to what Pritchard sees as the distinction between a trade union and a socialist party. He also discusses his part in the Winnipeg General Strike and his theories on the governmental conspiracy that took place.
Date Range
1919
Length
0:09:31
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to what Pritchard sees as the distinction between a trade union and a socialist party. He also discusses his part in the Winnipeg General Strike and his theories on the governmental conspiracy that took place.
Date Range
1919
Photo Info
William A. Pritchard, Burnaby Reeve 1930-1932 and council member 1928-1930. Item no. 459-016
Length
0:09:31
Subject
Organizations - Unions
Interview Date
July / August 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a open meeting with William Pritchard and writer Norman Penner. Norman Penner is the editor of the book "Winnipeg 1919" about the strike from the striker's perspective. William Pritchard wrote the speech that was included in the book. Audience members were invited to ask Pritchard questions. Major theme discussed is: The Winnipeg General Strike. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
William "Bill" Arthur Pritchard was born on April 3, 1888 in Salford, England, the son of a miner and factory worker. In May 1911, Bill moved to British Columbia and within a week of arriving became an active member of the Socialist Party of Canada. From 1914 to 1917, he served as editor of the Western Clarion – the SPC newspaper. He became such a well-known socialist figure that when he travelled to Winnipeg to participate in the General Strike in 1919, he was one of only seven people arrested and imprisoned for his participation in the event despite the fact that he was in no way directly involved in its planning nor development. In 1922, Bill and his family settled in North Burnaby in the Capitol Hill District. Almost immediately after his arrival, Bill began to advocate for change and a planned development scheme for the municipality. Pritchard ran successfully for the position of Reeve and held the post until the end of 1932. One of Reeve Pritchard’s highest priorities while in office was to attempt to provide work for as many unemployed as possible all the while trying to elicit more support from the provincial and federal governments. Bill was a strong advocate of the belief that relief work should be focused on projects that would see a comprehensive development scheme for Burnaby – including planned sewers, roads and water supply. Despite Bill's best efforts, however, Burnaby was forced into receivership and at the end of 1932, a Provincial Commission stepped in to take over the governance of the city. Reeve Pritchard, having done all he could as a champion of the unemployed, stepped down as Reeve but left behind an undeniable legacy of courage and determination. He was rewarded for his enormous contributions to the city in 1975 when he was chosen to be made a Freeman of Burnaby. William Pritchard died on October 23, 1981. Norman Penner was born in Winnipeg in 1921 to Rose and Jacob Penner and brother to Roland, Ruth and Walter. Their father Jacob was a leading member of the Communist Party and popular Winnipeg Alderman. Norman graduated from high school in 1937 but did not begin university until much later, preferring to begin his adult life from 1938 to 1941 as a full-time officer of the Winnipeg branch of the Communist Party of Canada. From 1941 to 1946 he served with the Canadian Army which included two-and-a-half years of overseas combat duty. On his return to Canada in 1947 he again returned to his duties as a full-time officer with the communist Labour-Progressive Party (formed in 1941 after the Canadian Communist Party was officially banned). After the abortive Hungarian revolution in 1956, Norman Penner resigned from the party and instead worked as a self-employed manufacturer’s sales representative until 1971. In 1964 he decided to go back to school part time and graduated with a BA from the University of Toronto in 1969. He took an MA in 1971 and a PhD in 1975 from the same institution. Penner was hired as a lecturer at York University's Glendon College in 1972 and soon became a professor, continuing to teach until 1995. He wrote extensively on the Canadian left. Penner edited and introduced "Winnipeg 1919: The Strikers' Own History of the Winnipeg General Strike" in 1973, published "The Canadian Left: A Critical Analysis" in 1977 and contributed three chapters to as well as editing "Keeping Canada Together Means Changing Our Thinking" in 1978. He published "Canadian Communism: The Stalin Years and Beyond" in 1988 and "From Protest to Power: Social Democracy in Canada 1900 to Present" in 1992 as well as numerous articles, reviews and book chapters. Norman Penner was married to Norma Lipes for sixty-seven years. The couple had four children: Steve (Mary Ellen Marus); Joyce (Herman Parsons); Gary (Marlene Kadar); and Bob (Shaena Lambert). Norman Penner died April 16, 2009 at the age of eighty-eight.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:03:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Pritchard, William A.
Penner, Norman
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-02-2_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner

Images
Less detail

Open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner July / August 1973 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory83
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to Pritchard's thoughts on whether socialism is stronger now or then. The two men discuss the One Big Union (OBU) movement.
Date Range
1919-1973
Length
0:07:14
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the meeting pertains to Pritchard's thoughts on whether socialism is stronger now or then. The two men discuss the One Big Union (OBU) movement.
Date Range
1919-1973
Photo Info
William A. Pritchard, Burnaby Reeve 1930-1932 and council member 1928-1930. Item no. 459-016
Length
0:07:14
Subject
Political Theories
Organizations - Unions
Interview Date
July / August 1973
Scope and Content
Recording is of a open meeting with William Pritchard and writer Norman Penner. Norman Penner is the editor of the book "Winnipeg 1919" about the strike from the striker's perspective. William Pritchard wrote the speech that was included in the book. Audience members were invited to ask Pritchard questions. Major theme discussed is: The Winnipeg General Strike. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
William "Bill" Arthur Pritchard was born on April 3, 1888 in Salford, England, the son of a miner and factory worker. In May 1911, Bill moved to British Columbia and within a week of arriving became an active member of the Socialist Party of Canada. From 1914 to 1917, he served as editor of the Western Clarion – the SPC newspaper. He became such a well-known socialist figure that when he travelled to Winnipeg to participate in the General Strike in 1919, he was one of only seven people arrested and imprisoned for his participation in the event despite the fact that he was in no way directly involved in its planning nor development. In 1922, Bill and his family settled in North Burnaby in the Capitol Hill District. Almost immediately after his arrival, Bill began to advocate for change and a planned development scheme for the municipality. Pritchard ran successfully for the position of Reeve and held the post until the end of 1932. One of Reeve Pritchard’s highest priorities while in office was to attempt to provide work for as many unemployed as possible all the while trying to elicit more support from the provincial and federal governments. Bill was a strong advocate of the belief that relief work should be focused on projects that would see a comprehensive development scheme for Burnaby – including planned sewers, roads and water supply. Despite Bill's best efforts, however, Burnaby was forced into receivership and at the end of 1932, a Provincial Commission stepped in to take over the governance of the city. Reeve Pritchard, having done all he could as a champion of the unemployed, stepped down as Reeve but left behind an undeniable legacy of courage and determination. He was rewarded for his enormous contributions to the city in 1975 when he was chosen to be made a Freeman of Burnaby. William Pritchard died on October 23, 1981. Norman Penner was born in Winnipeg in 1921 to Rose and Jacob Penner and brother to Roland, Ruth and Walter. Their father Jacob was a leading member of the Communist Party and popular Winnipeg Alderman. Norman graduated from high school in 1937 but did not begin university until much later, preferring to begin his adult life from 1938 to 1941 as a full-time officer of the Winnipeg branch of the Communist Party of Canada. From 1941 to 1946 he served with the Canadian Army which included two-and-a-half years of overseas combat duty. On his return to Canada in 1947 he again returned to his duties as a full-time officer with the communist Labour-Progressive Party (formed in 1941 after the Canadian Communist Party was officially banned). After the abortive Hungarian revolution in 1956, Norman Penner resigned from the party and instead worked as a self-employed manufacturer’s sales representative until 1971. In 1964 he decided to go back to school part time and graduated with a BA from the University of Toronto in 1969. He took an MA in 1971 and a PhD in 1975 from the same institution. Penner was hired as a lecturer at York University's Glendon College in 1972 and soon became a professor, continuing to teach until 1995. He wrote extensively on the Canadian left. Penner edited and introduced "Winnipeg 1919: The Strikers' Own History of the Winnipeg General Strike" in 1973, published "The Canadian Left: A Critical Analysis" in 1977 and contributed three chapters to as well as editing "Keeping Canada Together Means Changing Our Thinking" in 1978. He published "Canadian Communism: The Stalin Years and Beyond" in 1988 and "From Protest to Power: Social Democracy in Canada 1900 to Present" in 1992 as well as numerous articles, reviews and book chapters. Norman Penner was married to Norma Lipes for sixty-seven years. The couple had four children: Steve (Mary Ellen Marus); Joyce (Herman Parsons); Gary (Marlene Kadar); and Bob (Shaena Lambert). Norman Penner died April 16, 2009 at the age of eighty-eight.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:03:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Pritchard, William A.
Penner, Norman
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-02-2_ Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of open meeting with William Pritchard and Norman Penner

Images
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Interview with Sev Morin by Rod Fowler April 4, 1990 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory543
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Sev Morin’s involvement in the federal Liberal Party and in municipal politics with Alan Emmott; his mother Anne Marie Morin’s CCF work in Alberta and his brother Rudy Morin’s union activities and affiliation with Harvey Murphy; the political events held at “S…
Date Range
1930-1990
Length
00:07:36
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Sev Morin’s involvement in the federal Liberal Party and in municipal politics with Alan Emmott; his mother Anne Marie Morin’s CCF work in Alberta and his brother Rudy Morin’s union activities and affiliation with Harvey Murphy; the political events held at “Severin’s”; and Sev Morin’s centrist political views
Date Range
1930-1990
Photo Info
Sev Morin (left) of Severin's in Burnaby (formerly the Gai Paree) hosting a gala New Year's celebration, 1979. Item no. 480-712
Length
00:07:36
Name
Liberal Party
Emmott, Alan H
Subject
Organizations - Unions
Elections
Political Theories
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
April 4, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Severin "Sev" Morin, conducted by Rod Fowler. Sev Morin was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Sev Morin’s banquet hall, restaurant and night club business on Kingsway, originally named the “Gai Paree Supper Club” (1947-1976) and later “Severin’s” (1976-1985) and “Diego’s” (1985-1994), its function as a Burnaby landmark, and the entertainment and political people he met through his business. He also describes his many volunteer activities in Burnaby, including member of the SFU Senate, Rotary Club, Variety Club and Telethon, fund raising for Burnaby Hospital, and tourism related groups, and his political work for the federal Liberal party. He talks about his parents’ origins, the lives of his brothers Rudy and Rene, and the family’s involvement in establishing the “Gai Paree”. He also shares his views about the business and cultural development of Burnaby. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Severin “Sev” Rene Morin was born September 21, 1927, in Bonneville, Alberta, to Rene Pierre Morin (1878-1963) and Anne Marie (nee Lachiver) Morin (1886-1956). Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Morin and their son Rene Francois (1905-1954) immigrated to Edmonton, Alberta, from France in 1913, where Rene Pierre Morin worked for the C.N.R. and a second son Adolphe “Rudy” Ferdinand (1922-1969) was born, followed by their third son Severin. In 1943, after R.P. Morin retired, the family moved to Burnaby to a house on Sperling Avenue. Sometime earlier the two older Morin brothers found work in Trail at the smelter and developed musical careers. In 1946/47 the Morin family purchased property on Kingsway and built a banquet hall, the “Gai Paree Supper Club”. Sev and Rudy Morin managed the club and Rene F. Morin moved to Burnaby to join them with his band. The supper club, with its live music and dance floor, became a popular meeting place and wedding venue, eventually expanding into a restaurant and nightclub in the 1970s. The “Gai Paree” was renamed “Severin’s” in 1976 and “Diego’s” in 1985, closing finally in 1994. Sev Morin’s business life included three record stores which he owned with his friend Jack Cullen. Through these businesses Sev Morin was well known in the entertainment and hospitality industry. He and his restaurant also hosted political and social events that made the restaurant a community landmark. Sev Morin contributed many volunteer hours to community and charitable organizations, including an appointment to the SFU Senate, fundraising for the Burnaby Hospital, Director of the Variety Club and Rotary Club, and consultant for a variety of tourism related ventures. He also was active in the federal Liberal Party. Sev Morin and his wife Pauline married in 1950 and had three children. Sev Morin died at age 86 on March 28, 2014.
Total Tracks
10
Total Length
00:56:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Morin, Severin "Sev"
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-021_Track_7
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Sev Morin

Images
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Interview with William J. Copeland by Rod Fowler February 18, 1990 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory435
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Copeland's involvement in the International Association of Fire Fighters union.
Date Range
1960-1990
Length
00:03:16
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Copeland's involvement in the International Association of Fire Fighters union.
Date Range
1960-1990
Photo Info
Mayor Bill Copeland cutting the ribbon for the opening of the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts accompanied by Jack and Doris Shadbolt and Councillors Doug Drummond and Derek Corrigan, 1995. Item no. 535-0067
Length
00:03:16
Subject
Public Services - Fire Protection
Organizations - Unions
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 18, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with former Burnaby Mayor William J. Copeland conducted by Rod Fowler. Bill Copeland was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Bill Copeland’s education, career and experience as a Burnaby firefighter from 1955 to 1987, and his work for the union International Association of Fire Fighters. He talks about his early family life in Burnaby and Vancouver, war service, training with the Federal Fire Service, the organizations he has belonged to, and the careers of his three children. He briefly talks about Burnaby politics and his unexpected election to Mayor of Burnaby. Major themes of the interview, described by track: Track 1: Organizations - Unions; Public Services - Fire Protection; International Association of Fire Fighters; Track 2: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 3: Elections; Track 4: family history and education; Track 5: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 6: Elections
Biographical Notes
William John (Bill) Copeland (1927-2002) was born in Vancouver May 19, 1927. As a young child he lived with his parents on Southwood Street in South Burnaby on a chicken ranch. Bill’s father was a miner and was often away from home. The family moved to Pioneer Mines at Bridge River for a few years and then moved back to Vancouver in 1941 when his father contracted silicosis. Bill served in the navy for about a year near the end of WWII, was in the Canadian Merchant Marine and worked as a pipe fitter, before beginning his career as a fire fighter. He trained with the Federal Fire Service and worked two years at the Wireless Station in Delta. In 1955 he started work as Fire Fighter No. 53 in Burnaby, retiring 33 years later in 1987. Most of his career was spent at the Control Station or Number 1 Firehall, first located at Wiilingdon and Hastings (now No.5 Station) and later on Sperling near Canada Way. Bill worked as a first aid instructor, eventually moving into the training office, and retired as assistant chief. In 1987, shortly after retiring, Bill was asked to run for Mayor for the Burnaby Citizens Association (BCA). Much to his surprise he won. He served with distinction for three terms (1987-1996). Bill, his wife Ruth, and their three children, Doug and Dan (both firefighters) and Emily (a teacher), lived in North Burnaby on Cliff Avenue, the family home for about 35 years. Bill was active in many organizations including the Cliff Avenue soccer organization, St. John Ambulance, Burnaby Red Cross, and CNIB, among others. He began representing firefighters locally in the International Association of Fire Fighters in the early 1960s, eventually becoming President of the provincial association and then Vice President of the 6th District representing Western Canada.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:25:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Copeland, William J
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and business computerization in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-013_Track_1
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with William J. Copeland

Images
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Interview with Edward Apps by Rod Fowler February 22, 1990 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory458
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ed Apps’ views about the political development in north and south Burnaby, the difference in trade union activity and provision of community services between the two areas, and the belief that moving Municipal Hall to a more central position has lessened antag…
Date Range
1946-1990
Length
00:05:37
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ed Apps’ views about the political development in north and south Burnaby, the difference in trade union activity and provision of community services between the two areas, and the belief that moving Municipal Hall to a more central position has lessened antagonism
Date Range
1946-1990
Length
00:05:37
Subject
Public Services - Municipal Services
Organizations - Unions
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 22, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Edward Apps, conducted by Rod Fowler. Ed Apps was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Ed Apps involvement in community groups, particularly his work in seniors organizations lobbying for seniors’ housing since his retirement, and views about the role of Rate Payer groups, unions and politics in the development of North and South Burnaby. He also talks about his origin in England, his war service, arrival with his wife Margaret in Burnaby in 1946, his work with the Burnaby School Board and for the local union, the location of some of the older schools, the history of his house, and briefly about his wife and children. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Edward Apps was born in 1918 in London, England, and grew up in Kent and Essex. In WWII he flew the third glider to land in Normandy on June 6th, 1944. He and his wife Margaret Hope (1915-1985) immigrated to British Columbia in 1946, joining his wife’s parents, who had immigrated earlier in 1939, in Burnaby Heights in North Burnaby. He worked for the Burnaby School Board as Foreman Painter, and served on CUPE Local 379 Executive, until his retirement in 1982. In 1948 Ed Apps bought his first lot, for $150.00, in the 4700 block on Georgia Street, building houses there and in the 4100 block before buying his present home, a ca.1900 farm building, in the same area in 1954. North Burnaby was “bush country and orchards” in the 1950s; his two sons played in the ravines; and the family used the tram system on Hastings and Boundary Road for transportation. Development of municipal services seemed slower in North than South Burnaby, and Ed Apps remembers the strong role Rate Payers groups had in creating local services and lobbying Municipal Council for provide services. After retirement Ed Apps became involved in several local and provincial seniors organizations, advocating for better housing, including serving on the Executives of the Network of Burnaby Seniors and the Council of Senior Citizens Organization, and was active in the provincial Seniors Research and Resource and CMHC Housing Committee. He also served on the Centennial Committee of Burnaby.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:56:50
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Apps, Ed
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-015_Track_4
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Ed Apps

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Interview with Don and Orville Jantzen by Eric Damer November 19, 2012 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory349
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Don Jantzen's memories of first coming to Burnaby and his decision to become part of the peace movement. Being active in the Trade Union Movement as an International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) member, Don recalls his involvement in marches, peace …
Date Range
1950-1975
Length
0:09:40
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Don Jantzen's memories of first coming to Burnaby and his decision to become part of the peace movement. Being active in the Trade Union Movement as an International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) member, Don recalls his involvement in marches, peace rallies and strikes.
Date Range
1950-1975
Photo Info
Don Jantzen, [198-]. Item no. 549-040.
Length
0:09:40
Subject
Protests and Demonstrations - Strikes
Protests and Demonstrations
Organizations - Unions
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
November 19, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Don Jantzen and his brother Orville Jantzen conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, November 19, 2012. Major themes discussed are: political activism and the trade union movement.
Biographical Notes
Don Jantzen came to Vancouver from the prairies following the war, found work, married, and settled in Burnaby in 1950. Through his work as a longshoreman, Don became active in the trade union movement (ILWU) and eventually became vice president of the Vancouver local. He was also active in politics, helping to launch the Burnaby Citizen’s Association in the early nineteen-fifties and working as campaign manager for candidates in both the provincial and the federal New Democratic Party (NDP). Don has been a participant in local politics for many years as well as a supporter of Habitat for Humanity. Don's younger brother, Orville Jantzen, was born in Saskatchewan but grew up in South Vancouver. He is married with two children. Orville began his career as a salesman for a Burnaby bakery and remained in the food and beverage industry, working in British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan. Since retiring, Orville has been engaged with Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB).
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:32
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Jantzen, Don
Jantzen, Orville
Interview Location
Interviewee's residence
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-015_ Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of interview with Don and Orville Jantzen

Images
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Interview with Don and Orville Jantzen by Eric Damer November 19, 2012 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory350
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Don Jantzen's memories of prominent moments in Canadian Union history and of Burnaby's political landscape. Don mentions the strike of 1967 at the "Big Owe" Olympic Stadium in Montreal and goes on to discuss Burnaby Council's fair wage legislation. He discu…
Date Range
1953-1977
Length
0:08:00
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Don Jantzen's memories of prominent moments in Canadian Union history and of Burnaby's political landscape. Don mentions the strike of 1967 at the "Big Owe" Olympic Stadium in Montreal and goes on to discuss Burnaby Council's fair wage legislation. He discusses the Burnaby Citizen's Association (BCA).
Date Range
1953-1977
Photo Info
Don Jantzen, [198-]. Item no. 549-040.
Length
0:08:00
Name
Burnaby Citizen's Association
Subject
Protests and Demonstrations - Strikes
Protests and Demonstrations
Organizations - Unions
Interviewer
Damer, Eric
Interview Date
November 19, 2012
Scope and Content
Recording is an interview with Don Jantzen and his brother Orville Jantzen conducted by Burnaby Village Museum employee Eric Damer, November 19, 2012. Major themes discussed are: political activism and the trade union movement.
Biographical Notes
Don Jantzen came to Vancouver from the prairies following the war, found work, married, and settled in Burnaby in 1950. Through his work as a longshoreman, Don became active in the trade union movement (ILWU) and eventually became vice president of the Vancouver local. He was also active in politics, helping to launch the Burnaby Citizen’s Association in the early nineteen-fifties and working as campaign manager for candidates in both the provincial and the federal New Democratic Party (NDP). Don has been a participant in local politics for many years as well as a supporter of Habitat for Humanity. Don's younger brother, Orville Jantzen, was born in Saskatchewan but grew up in South Vancouver. He is married with two children. Orville began his career as a salesman for a Burnaby bakery and remained in the food and beverage industry, working in British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan. Since retiring, Orville has been engaged with Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB).
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:32
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Jantzen, Don
Jantzen, Orville
Interview Location
Interviewee's residence
Interviewer Bio
Eric Damer is a lifelong British Columbian born in Victoria, raised in Kamloops, and currently residing in Burnaby. After studying philosophy at the University of Victoria, he became interested in the educational forces that had shaped his own life. He completed master’s and doctoral degrees in educational studies at the University of British Columbia with a particular interest in the history of adult and higher education in the province. In 2012, Eric worked for the City of Burnaby as a field researcher and writer, conducting interviews for the City Archives and Museum Oral History Program.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burna-Boom Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS171-015_ Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of interview with Don and Orville Jantzen

Images
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Interview with Edward Apps by Rod Fowler February 22, 1990 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory457
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ed Apps’ work as Foreman Painter for the Burnaby School Board, and his positions in the local and provincial union CUPE, from 1953 to 1982. He briefly describes some of the old schools and how he got involved in community organizations after retirement
Date Range
1946-1990
Length
00:09:48
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ed Apps’ work as Foreman Painter for the Burnaby School Board, and his positions in the local and provincial union CUPE, from 1953 to 1982. He briefly describes some of the old schools and how he got involved in community organizations after retirement
Date Range
1946-1990
Length
00:09:48
Subject
Buildings - Schools
Organizations - Unions
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 22, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Edward Apps, conducted by Rod Fowler. Ed Apps was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Ed Apps involvement in community groups, particularly his work in seniors organizations lobbying for seniors’ housing since his retirement, and views about the role of Rate Payer groups, unions and politics in the development of North and South Burnaby. He also talks about his origin in England, his war service, arrival with his wife Margaret in Burnaby in 1946, his work with the Burnaby School Board and for the local union, the location of some of the older schools, the history of his house, and briefly about his wife and children. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Edward Apps was born in 1918 in London, England, and grew up in Kent and Essex. In WWII he flew the third glider to land in Normandy on June 6th, 1944. He and his wife Margaret Hope (1915-1985) immigrated to British Columbia in 1946, joining his wife’s parents, who had immigrated earlier in 1939, in Burnaby Heights in North Burnaby. He worked for the Burnaby School Board as Foreman Painter, and served on CUPE Local 379 Executive, until his retirement in 1982. In 1948 Ed Apps bought his first lot, for $150.00, in the 4700 block on Georgia Street, building houses there and in the 4100 block before buying his present home, a ca.1900 farm building, in the same area in 1954. North Burnaby was “bush country and orchards” in the 1950s; his two sons played in the ravines; and the family used the tram system on Hastings and Boundary Road for transportation. Development of municipal services seemed slower in North than South Burnaby, and Ed Apps remembers the strong role Rate Payers groups had in creating local services and lobbying Municipal Council for provide services. After retirement Ed Apps became involved in several local and provincial seniors organizations, advocating for better housing, including serving on the Executives of the Network of Burnaby Seniors and the Council of Senior Citizens Organization, and was active in the provincial Seniors Research and Resource and CMHC Housing Committee. He also served on the Centennial Committee of Burnaby.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:56:50
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Apps, Ed
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-015_Track_3
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Ed Apps

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Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV993.43.6
Description
Constitution and By-Laws - Booklet -- [1975]. Booklet from the Burnaby Civic Employees Local Union #23 of the Constitution and By-Laws as amended to October 1975. The booklet was chartered by Canadian Union of Public Employees 1963. The booklet contains various information about the Burnaby Civic E…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV993.43.6
Description
Constitution and By-Laws - Booklet -- [1975]. Booklet from the Burnaby Civic Employees Local Union #23 of the Constitution and By-Laws as amended to October 1975. The booklet was chartered by Canadian Union of Public Employees 1963. The booklet contains various information about the Burnaby Civic Employees Local Union. The booklet measures 10cm x 15cm.
Colour
white
Title
Burnaby Civic Employees Local Union #23 Constitution and By-Laws
Subjects
Documentary Artifacts
Documentary Artifacts - Booklets
Organizations
Organizations - Unions
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV001.1.183
Description
Pin, round; red border around cream-coloured background with red dot on bottom centre and green printing; above date is logo for United Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees and Railroad Shop Laborers.
Object History
Union dues button for the United Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees and Railroad Shop Laborers which was affiliated with the American Federation of Labour. Railroad way workers oversaw the maintenace of railroad tracks. (For more information see http://americanhistory.si.edu/onthemove/coll…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV001.1.183
Description
Pin, round; red border around cream-coloured background with red dot on bottom centre and green printing; above date is logo for United Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees and Railroad Shop Laborers.
Object History
Union dues button for the United Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees and Railroad Shop Laborers which was affiliated with the American Federation of Labour. Railroad way workers oversaw the maintenace of railroad tracks. (For more information see http://americanhistory.si.edu/onthemove/collection/object_186.html)
Marks/Labels
"JULY / AUG / SEPT", green letters printed around top "1920", larger green numbers printed in centre "U.B.M.W.E.R.S.L.", green letters printed around dot and surrounded by a green circle
Subjects
Adornment
Adornment - Lapel Pins
Transportation
Transportation - Rail
Organizations
Organizations - Unions
Record Type
Artifact
Images
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Interview with William J. Copeland by Rod Fowler February 18, 1990 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory436
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Copeland's training as a firefighter in the Federal Fire Service at the Wireless Station in Delta, and his career in Burnaby, mainly at Control Station.
Date Range
1953-1990
Length
00:02:44
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Copeland's training as a firefighter in the Federal Fire Service at the Wireless Station in Delta, and his career in Burnaby, mainly at Control Station.
Date Range
1953-1990
Photo Info
Mayor Bill Copeland cutting the ribbon for the opening of the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts accompanied by Jack and Doris Shadbolt and Councillors Doug Drummond and Derek Corrigan, 1995. Item no. 535-0067
Length
00:02:44
Subject
Public Services - Fire Protection
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 18, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with former Burnaby Mayor William J. Copeland conducted by Rod Fowler. Bill Copeland was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Bill Copeland’s education, career and experience as a Burnaby firefighter from 1955 to 1987, and his work for the union International Association of Fire Fighters. He talks about his early family life in Burnaby and Vancouver, war service, training with the Federal Fire Service, the organizations he has belonged to, and the careers of his three children. He briefly talks about Burnaby politics and his unexpected election to Mayor of Burnaby. Major themes of the interview, described by track: Track 1: Organizations - Unions; Public Services - Fire Protection; International Association of Fire Fighters; Track 2: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 3: Elections; Track 4: family history and education; Track 5: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 6: Elections
Biographical Notes
William John (Bill) Copeland (1927-2002) was born in Vancouver May 19, 1927. As a young child he lived with his parents on Southwood Street in South Burnaby on a chicken ranch. Bill’s father was a miner and was often away from home. The family moved to Pioneer Mines at Bridge River for a few years and then moved back to Vancouver in 1941 when his father contracted silicosis. Bill served in the navy for about a year near the end of WWII, was in the Canadian Merchant Marine and worked as a pipe fitter, before beginning his career as a fire fighter. He trained with the Federal Fire Service and worked two years at the Wireless Station in Delta. In 1955 he started work as Fire Fighter No. 53 in Burnaby, retiring 33 years later in 1987. Most of his career was spent at the Control Station or Number 1 Firehall, first located at Wiilingdon and Hastings (now No.5 Station) and later on Sperling near Canada Way. Bill worked as a first aid instructor, eventually moving into the training office, and retired as assistant chief. In 1987, shortly after retiring, Bill was asked to run for Mayor for the Burnaby Citizens Association (BCA). Much to his surprise he won. He served with distinction for three terms (1987-1996). Bill, his wife Ruth, and their three children, Doug and Dan (both firefighters) and Emily (a teacher), lived in North Burnaby on Cliff Avenue, the family home for about 35 years. Bill was active in many organizations including the Cliff Avenue soccer organization, St. John Ambulance, Burnaby Red Cross, and CNIB, among others. He began representing firefighters locally in the International Association of Fire Fighters in the early 1960s, eventually becoming President of the provincial association and then Vice President of the 6th District representing Western Canada.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:25:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Copeland, William J
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and business computerization in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-013_Track_2
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with William J. Copeland

Images
Less detail

Interview with William J. Copeland by Rod Fowler February 18, 1990 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory437
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Copeland's election to Mayor in 1987, attributing it to being well known through his work as a fire fighter and as a volunteer with various organizations such as the soccer club Cliff Avenue Union FC, Burnaby Red Cross, St. John Ambulance, CNIB, the firef…
Date Range
1955-1990
Length
00:04:32
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Copeland's election to Mayor in 1987, attributing it to being well known through his work as a fire fighter and as a volunteer with various organizations such as the soccer club Cliff Avenue Union FC, Burnaby Red Cross, St. John Ambulance, CNIB, the firefighters' union, among others
Date Range
1955-1990
Photo Info
Mayor Bill Copeland cutting the ribbon for the opening of the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts accompanied by Jack and Doris Shadbolt and Councillors Doug Drummond and Derek Corrigan, 1995. Item no. 535-0067
Length
00:04:32
Subject
Elections
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 18, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with former Burnaby Mayor William J. Copeland conducted by Rod Fowler. Bill Copeland was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Bill Copeland’s education, career and experience as a Burnaby firefighter from 1955 to 1987, and his work for the union International Association of Fire Fighters. He talks about his early family life in Burnaby and Vancouver, war service, training with the Federal Fire Service, the organizations he has belonged to, and the careers of his three children. He briefly talks about Burnaby politics and his unexpected election to Mayor of Burnaby. Major themes of the interview, described by track: Track 1: Organizations - Unions; Public Services - Fire Protection; International Association of Fire Fighters; Track 2: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 3: Elections; Track 4: family history and education; Track 5: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 6: Elections
Biographical Notes
William John (Bill) Copeland (1927-2002) was born in Vancouver May 19, 1927. As a young child he lived with his parents on Southwood Street in South Burnaby on a chicken ranch. Bill’s father was a miner and was often away from home. The family moved to Pioneer Mines at Bridge River for a few years and then moved back to Vancouver in 1941 when his father contracted silicosis. Bill served in the navy for about a year near the end of WWII, was in the Canadian Merchant Marine and worked as a pipe fitter, before beginning his career as a fire fighter. He trained with the Federal Fire Service and worked two years at the Wireless Station in Delta. In 1955 he started work as Fire Fighter No. 53 in Burnaby, retiring 33 years later in 1987. Most of his career was spent at the Control Station or Number 1 Firehall, first located at Wiilingdon and Hastings (now No.5 Station) and later on Sperling near Canada Way. Bill worked as a first aid instructor, eventually moving into the training office, and retired as assistant chief. In 1987, shortly after retiring, Bill was asked to run for Mayor for the Burnaby Citizens Association (BCA). Much to his surprise he won. He served with distinction for three terms (1987-1996). Bill, his wife Ruth, and their three children, Doug and Dan (both firefighters) and Emily (a teacher), lived in North Burnaby on Cliff Avenue, the family home for about 35 years. Bill was active in many organizations including the Cliff Avenue soccer organization, St. John Ambulance, Burnaby Red Cross, and CNIB, among others. He began representing firefighters locally in the International Association of Fire Fighters in the early 1960s, eventually becoming President of the provincial association and then Vice President of the 6th District representing Western Canada.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:25:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Copeland, William J
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and business computerization in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-013_Track_3
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with William J. Copeland

Images
Less detail

Interview with William J. Copeland by Rod Fowler February 18, 1990 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory439
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about particular fires that Bill remembers, the kinds of calls attended, and the stress caused by some of the calls and the shift work.
Date Range
1955-1986
Length
00:06:41
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about particular fires that Bill remembers, the kinds of calls attended, and the stress caused by some of the calls and the shift work.
Date Range
1955-1986
Photo Info
Mayor Bill Copeland cutting the ribbon for the opening of the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts accompanied by Jack and Doris Shadbolt and Councillors Doug Drummond and Derek Corrigan, 1995. Item no. 535-0067
Length
00:06:41
Subject
Public Services - Fire Protection
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 18, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with former Burnaby Mayor William J. Copeland conducted by Rod Fowler. Bill Copeland was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Bill Copeland’s education, career and experience as a Burnaby firefighter from 1955 to 1987, and his work for the union International Association of Fire Fighters. He talks about his early family life in Burnaby and Vancouver, war service, training with the Federal Fire Service, the organizations he has belonged to, and the careers of his three children. He briefly talks about Burnaby politics and his unexpected election to Mayor of Burnaby. Major themes of the interview, described by track: Track 1: Organizations - Unions; Public Services - Fire Protection; International Association of Fire Fighters; Track 2: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 3: Elections; Track 4: family history and education; Track 5: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 6: Elections
Biographical Notes
William John (Bill) Copeland (1927-2002) was born in Vancouver May 19, 1927. As a young child he lived with his parents on Southwood Street in South Burnaby on a chicken ranch. Bill’s father was a miner and was often away from home. The family moved to Pioneer Mines at Bridge River for a few years and then moved back to Vancouver in 1941 when his father contracted silicosis. Bill served in the navy for about a year near the end of WWII, was in the Canadian Merchant Marine and worked as a pipe fitter, before beginning his career as a fire fighter. He trained with the Federal Fire Service and worked two years at the Wireless Station in Delta. In 1955 he started work as Fire Fighter No. 53 in Burnaby, retiring 33 years later in 1987. Most of his career was spent at the Control Station or Number 1 Firehall, first located at Wiilingdon and Hastings (now No.5 Station) and later on Sperling near Canada Way. Bill worked as a first aid instructor, eventually moving into the training office, and retired as assistant chief. In 1987, shortly after retiring, Bill was asked to run for Mayor for the Burnaby Citizens Association (BCA). Much to his surprise he won. He served with distinction for three terms (1987-1996). Bill, his wife Ruth, and their three children, Doug and Dan (both firefighters) and Emily (a teacher), lived in North Burnaby on Cliff Avenue, the family home for about 35 years. Bill was active in many organizations including the Cliff Avenue soccer organization, St. John Ambulance, Burnaby Red Cross, and CNIB, among others. He began representing firefighters locally in the International Association of Fire Fighters in the early 1960s, eventually becoming President of the provincial association and then Vice President of the 6th District representing Western Canada.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:25:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Copeland, William J
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and business computerization in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-013_Track_5
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with William J. Copeland

Images
Less detail

Interview with William J. Copeland by Rod Fowler February 18, 1990 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory440
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Copeland's possibility of running for a second term and the political group he represents (BCA)
Date Range
1990
Length
00:01:45
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Copeland's possibility of running for a second term and the political group he represents (BCA)
Date Range
1990
Photo Info
Mayor Bill Copeland cutting the ribbon for the opening of the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts accompanied by Jack and Doris Shadbolt and Councillors Doug Drummond and Derek Corrigan, 1995. Item no. 535-0067
Length
00:01:45
Subject
Elections
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 18, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with former Burnaby Mayor William J. Copeland conducted by Rod Fowler. Bill Copeland was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Bill Copeland’s education, career and experience as a Burnaby firefighter from 1955 to 1987, and his work for the union International Association of Fire Fighters. He talks about his early family life in Burnaby and Vancouver, war service, training with the Federal Fire Service, the organizations he has belonged to, and the careers of his three children. He briefly talks about Burnaby politics and his unexpected election to Mayor of Burnaby. Major themes of the interview, described by track: Track 1: Organizations - Unions; Public Services - Fire Protection; International Association of Fire Fighters; Track 2: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 3: Elections; Track 4: family history and education; Track 5: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 6: Elections
Biographical Notes
William John (Bill) Copeland (1927-2002) was born in Vancouver May 19, 1927. As a young child he lived with his parents on Southwood Street in South Burnaby on a chicken ranch. Bill’s father was a miner and was often away from home. The family moved to Pioneer Mines at Bridge River for a few years and then moved back to Vancouver in 1941 when his father contracted silicosis. Bill served in the navy for about a year near the end of WWII, was in the Canadian Merchant Marine and worked as a pipe fitter, before beginning his career as a fire fighter. He trained with the Federal Fire Service and worked two years at the Wireless Station in Delta. In 1955 he started work as Fire Fighter No. 53 in Burnaby, retiring 33 years later in 1987. Most of his career was spent at the Control Station or Number 1 Firehall, first located at Wiilingdon and Hastings (now No.5 Station) and later on Sperling near Canada Way. Bill worked as a first aid instructor, eventually moving into the training office, and retired as assistant chief. In 1987, shortly after retiring, Bill was asked to run for Mayor for the Burnaby Citizens Association (BCA). Much to his surprise he won. He served with distinction for three terms (1987-1996). Bill, his wife Ruth, and their three children, Doug and Dan (both firefighters) and Emily (a teacher), lived in North Burnaby on Cliff Avenue, the family home for about 35 years. Bill was active in many organizations including the Cliff Avenue soccer organization, St. John Ambulance, Burnaby Red Cross, and CNIB, among others. He began representing firefighters locally in the International Association of Fire Fighters in the early 1960s, eventually becoming President of the provincial association and then Vice President of the 6th District representing Western Canada.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:25:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Copeland, William J
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and business computerization in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-013_Track_6
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with William J. Copeland

Images
Less detail

Interview with William J. Copeland by Rod Fowler February 18, 1990 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory438
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Copeland's childhood in Burnaby and Vancouver, his father's work as a miner, his war service, education, and his three children
Date Range
1927-1990
Length
00:06:37
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Bill Copeland's childhood in Burnaby and Vancouver, his father's work as a miner, his war service, education, and his three children
Date Range
1927-1990
Photo Info
Mayor Bill Copeland cutting the ribbon for the opening of the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts accompanied by Jack and Doris Shadbolt and Councillors Doug Drummond and Derek Corrigan, 1995. Item no. 535-0067
Length
00:06:37
Subject
Wars - World War, 1939-1945
Education
Mining and Mineral Harvesting Tools and Equipment
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 18, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with former Burnaby Mayor William J. Copeland conducted by Rod Fowler. Bill Copeland was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is mainly about Bill Copeland’s education, career and experience as a Burnaby firefighter from 1955 to 1987, and his work for the union International Association of Fire Fighters. He talks about his early family life in Burnaby and Vancouver, war service, training with the Federal Fire Service, the organizations he has belonged to, and the careers of his three children. He briefly talks about Burnaby politics and his unexpected election to Mayor of Burnaby. Major themes of the interview, described by track: Track 1: Organizations - Unions; Public Services - Fire Protection; International Association of Fire Fighters; Track 2: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 3: Elections; Track 4: family history and education; Track 5: Public Services - Fire Protection; Track 6: Elections
Biographical Notes
William John (Bill) Copeland (1927-2002) was born in Vancouver May 19, 1927. As a young child he lived with his parents on Southwood Street in South Burnaby on a chicken ranch. Bill’s father was a miner and was often away from home. The family moved to Pioneer Mines at Bridge River for a few years and then moved back to Vancouver in 1941 when his father contracted silicosis. Bill served in the navy for about a year near the end of WWII, was in the Canadian Merchant Marine and worked as a pipe fitter, before beginning his career as a fire fighter. He trained with the Federal Fire Service and worked two years at the Wireless Station in Delta. In 1955 he started work as Fire Fighter No. 53 in Burnaby, retiring 33 years later in 1987. Most of his career was spent at the Control Station or Number 1 Firehall, first located at Wiilingdon and Hastings (now No.5 Station) and later on Sperling near Canada Way. Bill worked as a first aid instructor, eventually moving into the training office, and retired as assistant chief. In 1987, shortly after retiring, Bill was asked to run for Mayor for the Burnaby Citizens Association (BCA). Much to his surprise he won. He served with distinction for three terms (1987-1996). Bill, his wife Ruth, and their three children, Doug and Dan (both firefighters) and Emily (a teacher), lived in North Burnaby on Cliff Avenue, the family home for about 35 years. Bill was active in many organizations including the Cliff Avenue soccer organization, St. John Ambulance, Burnaby Red Cross, and CNIB, among others. He began representing firefighters locally in the International Association of Fire Fighters in the early 1960s, eventually becoming President of the provincial association and then Vice President of the 6th District representing Western Canada.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
0:25:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Copeland, William J
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and business computerization in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-013_Track_4
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with William J. Copeland

Images
Less detail

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