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Interview with Edith Wight July 21, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory138
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's first impressions of Burnaby, after leaving England.
Date Range
1920-1925
Length
0:09:57
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's first impressions of Burnaby, after leaving England.
Date Range
1920-1925
Length
0:09:57
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Kingsway
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Edith Mary (Hall) Wight by Ross S. McLeod, July 21, 1975 at Edith's home on McKay Avenue, Burnaby. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and working outside the home. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Edith Mary (Hall) Wight arrived in Burnaby in September of 1920 from England, a self-described war bride. Her mother, Fanny (Carnelly) was an accomplished seamstress and her father, Robert Hall a hobbyist painter and carpenter. Edith and her husband Gordon Edward Wight lived at 420 McKay (later renumbered 6060 McKay) throughout their married lives. Within a year of moving to Burnaby, Edith got her first job sewing bedspreads for a large company, launching her career as an interior designer. She also started making dresses on commission. Gordon had a job at a fertilizer plant, which included delivering fruit trees and fertilizer door to door. He would often suggest new curtains or other material goods to the householders he visited, generating clients for Edith. Edith opened an Interior Design studio at South Granville in the first week of September, 1930 with her husband Gordon and Mrs. Ferguson, a previous client who ran a gift shop at the Georgia Hotel. Unfortunately, in 1932 Mrs. Ferguson became ill and was never to return to the studio. Edith and Gordon had two children; Clifford “Cliff” Wight born August 22, 1921 and Eulie Fanny Wight born in 1925. Clifford attended Kingsway West School in 1925 and was a graduate of Burnaby South High School. Eulie Fanny Wight graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia in 1957. Clifford also graduated from the University of British Columbia and was among the handful of students who first established the School of Architecture at UBC. Clifford later married Mary (Berryman) Wight. Gordon Edward Wight died July 30, 1945, his wife Edith Mary (Hall) Wight died November 11, 1986. Eulie Fanny Wight died June 19, 1998. Clifford Wight died February 27, 2005.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:07:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Wight, Edith
Interview Location
McKay Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-23_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Edith Wight

Less detail

Interview with Edith Wight July 21, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory139
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's memories of houses in her neighbourhood as well as her beginnings as an interior designer.
Date Range
1920-1921
Length
0:09:39
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's memories of houses in her neighbourhood as well as her beginnings as an interior designer.
Date Range
1920-1921
Length
0:09:39
Subject
Occupations - Designers
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Kingsway
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Edith Mary (Hall) Wight by Ross S. McLeod, July 21, 1975 at Edith's home on McKay Avenue, Burnaby. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and working outside the home. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Edith Mary (Hall) Wight arrived in Burnaby in September of 1920 from England, a self-described war bride. Her mother, Fanny (Carnelly) was an accomplished seamstress and her father, Robert Hall a hobbyist painter and carpenter. Edith and her husband Gordon Edward Wight lived at 420 McKay (later renumbered 6060 McKay) throughout their married lives. Within a year of moving to Burnaby, Edith got her first job sewing bedspreads for a large company, launching her career as an interior designer. She also started making dresses on commission. Gordon had a job at a fertilizer plant, which included delivering fruit trees and fertilizer door to door. He would often suggest new curtains or other material goods to the householders he visited, generating clients for Edith. Edith opened an Interior Design studio at South Granville in the first week of September, 1930 with her husband Gordon and Mrs. Ferguson, a previous client who ran a gift shop at the Georgia Hotel. Unfortunately, in 1932 Mrs. Ferguson became ill and was never to return to the studio. Edith and Gordon had two children; Clifford “Cliff” Wight born August 22, 1921 and Eulie Fanny Wight born in 1925. Clifford attended Kingsway West School in 1925 and was a graduate of Burnaby South High School. Eulie Fanny Wight graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia in 1957. Clifford also graduated from the University of British Columbia and was among the handful of students who first established the School of Architecture at UBC. Clifford later married Mary (Berryman) Wight. Gordon Edward Wight died July 30, 1945, his wife Edith Mary (Hall) Wight died November 11, 1986. Eulie Fanny Wight died June 19, 1998. Clifford Wight died February 27, 2005.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:07:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Wight, Edith
Interview Location
McKay Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-23_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Edith Wight

Less detail

Interview with Edith Wight July 21, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory140
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's memories of her husband Gordon Wight's employment and his support of her work as an interior designer.
Date Range
1920-1921
Length
0:08:08
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's memories of her husband Gordon Wight's employment and his support of her work as an interior designer.
Date Range
1920-1921
Length
0:08:08
Subject
Occupations - Designers
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Edith Mary (Hall) Wight by Ross S. McLeod, July 21, 1975 at Edith's home on McKay Avenue, Burnaby. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and working outside the home. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Edith Mary (Hall) Wight arrived in Burnaby in September of 1920 from England, a self-described war bride. Her mother, Fanny (Carnelly) was an accomplished seamstress and her father, Robert Hall a hobbyist painter and carpenter. Edith and her husband Gordon Edward Wight lived at 420 McKay (later renumbered 6060 McKay) throughout their married lives. Within a year of moving to Burnaby, Edith got her first job sewing bedspreads for a large company, launching her career as an interior designer. She also started making dresses on commission. Gordon had a job at a fertilizer plant, which included delivering fruit trees and fertilizer door to door. He would often suggest new curtains or other material goods to the householders he visited, generating clients for Edith. Edith opened an Interior Design studio at South Granville in the first week of September, 1930 with her husband Gordon and Mrs. Ferguson, a previous client who ran a gift shop at the Georgia Hotel. Unfortunately, in 1932 Mrs. Ferguson became ill and was never to return to the studio. Edith and Gordon had two children; Clifford “Cliff” Wight born August 22, 1921 and Eulie Fanny Wight born in 1925. Clifford attended Kingsway West School in 1925 and was a graduate of Burnaby South High School. Eulie Fanny Wight graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia in 1957. Clifford also graduated from the University of British Columbia and was among the handful of students who first established the School of Architecture at UBC. Clifford later married Mary (Berryman) Wight. Gordon Edward Wight died July 30, 1945, his wife Edith Mary (Hall) Wight died November 11, 1986. Eulie Fanny Wight died June 19, 1998. Clifford Wight died February 27, 2005.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:07:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Wight, Edith
Interview Location
McKay Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-23_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Edith Wight

Less detail

Interview with Edith Wight July 21, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory141
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's memories of the first years of the Interior Design studio that she began with her husband and a former client.
Date Range
1930-1932
Length
0:09:48
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's memories of the first years of the Interior Design studio that she began with her husband and a former client.
Date Range
1930-1932
Length
0:09:48
Subject
Occupations - Designers
Buildings - Commercial
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Edith Mary (Hall) Wight by Ross S. McLeod, July 21, 1975 at Edith's home on McKay Avenue, Burnaby. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and working outside the home. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Edith Mary (Hall) Wight arrived in Burnaby in September of 1920 from England, a self-described war bride. Her mother, Fanny (Carnelly) was an accomplished seamstress and her father, Robert Hall a hobbyist painter and carpenter. Edith and her husband Gordon Edward Wight lived at 420 McKay (later renumbered 6060 McKay) throughout their married lives. Within a year of moving to Burnaby, Edith got her first job sewing bedspreads for a large company, launching her career as an interior designer. She also started making dresses on commission. Gordon had a job at a fertilizer plant, which included delivering fruit trees and fertilizer door to door. He would often suggest new curtains or other material goods to the householders he visited, generating clients for Edith. Edith opened an Interior Design studio at South Granville in the first week of September, 1930 with her husband Gordon and Mrs. Ferguson, a previous client who ran a gift shop at the Georgia Hotel. Unfortunately, in 1932 Mrs. Ferguson became ill and was never to return to the studio. Edith and Gordon had two children; Clifford “Cliff” Wight born August 22, 1921 and Eulie Fanny Wight born in 1925. Clifford attended Kingsway West School in 1925 and was a graduate of Burnaby South High School. Eulie Fanny Wight graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia in 1957. Clifford also graduated from the University of British Columbia and was among the handful of students who first established the School of Architecture at UBC. Clifford later married Mary (Berryman) Wight. Gordon Edward Wight died July 30, 1945, his wife Edith Mary (Hall) Wight died November 11, 1986. Eulie Fanny Wight died June 19, 1998. Clifford Wight died February 27, 2005.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:07:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Wight, Edith
Interview Location
McKay Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-23_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Edith Wight

Less detail

Interview with Edith Wight July 21, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory142
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's memories of the most difficult of the interior design studio that she began with her husband and a former client and what it took to get them on solid footing financially.
Date Range
1932-1934
Length
0:10:03
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's memories of the most difficult of the interior design studio that she began with her husband and a former client and what it took to get them on solid footing financially.
Date Range
1932-1934
Length
0:10:03
Subject
Occupations - Designers
Buildings - Commercial
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Edith Mary (Hall) Wight by Ross S. McLeod, July 21, 1975 at Edith's home on McKay Avenue, Burnaby. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and working outside the home. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Edith Mary (Hall) Wight arrived in Burnaby in September of 1920 from England, a self-described war bride. Her mother, Fanny (Carnelly) was an accomplished seamstress and her father, Robert Hall a hobbyist painter and carpenter. Edith and her husband Gordon Edward Wight lived at 420 McKay (later renumbered 6060 McKay) throughout their married lives. Within a year of moving to Burnaby, Edith got her first job sewing bedspreads for a large company, launching her career as an interior designer. She also started making dresses on commission. Gordon had a job at a fertilizer plant, which included delivering fruit trees and fertilizer door to door. He would often suggest new curtains or other material goods to the householders he visited, generating clients for Edith. Edith opened an Interior Design studio at South Granville in the first week of September, 1930 with her husband Gordon and Mrs. Ferguson, a previous client who ran a gift shop at the Georgia Hotel. Unfortunately, in 1932 Mrs. Ferguson became ill and was never to return to the studio. Edith and Gordon had two children; Clifford “Cliff” Wight born August 22, 1921 and Eulie Fanny Wight born in 1925. Clifford attended Kingsway West School in 1925 and was a graduate of Burnaby South High School. Eulie Fanny Wight graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia in 1957. Clifford also graduated from the University of British Columbia and was among the handful of students who first established the School of Architecture at UBC. Clifford later married Mary (Berryman) Wight. Gordon Edward Wight died July 30, 1945, his wife Edith Mary (Hall) Wight died November 11, 1986. Eulie Fanny Wight died June 19, 1998. Clifford Wight died February 27, 2005.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:07:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Wight, Edith
Interview Location
McKay Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-23_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Edith Wight

Less detail

Interview with Edith Wight July 21, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory143
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's personal memories of house repairs taken on during the 1930s.
Date Range
1936-1938
Length
0:05:14
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's personal memories of house repairs taken on during the 1930s.
Date Range
1936-1938
Length
0:05:14
Geographic Access
Burnaby - McKay Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Edith Mary (Hall) Wight by Ross S. McLeod, July 21, 1975 at Edith's home on McKay Avenue, Burnaby. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and working outside the home. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Edith Mary (Hall) Wight arrived in Burnaby in September of 1920 from England, a self-described war bride. Her mother, Fanny (Carnelly) was an accomplished seamstress and her father, Robert Hall a hobbyist painter and carpenter. Edith and her husband Gordon Edward Wight lived at 420 McKay (later renumbered 6060 McKay) throughout their married lives. Within a year of moving to Burnaby, Edith got her first job sewing bedspreads for a large company, launching her career as an interior designer. She also started making dresses on commission. Gordon had a job at a fertilizer plant, which included delivering fruit trees and fertilizer door to door. He would often suggest new curtains or other material goods to the householders he visited, generating clients for Edith. Edith opened an Interior Design studio at South Granville in the first week of September, 1930 with her husband Gordon and Mrs. Ferguson, a previous client who ran a gift shop at the Georgia Hotel. Unfortunately, in 1932 Mrs. Ferguson became ill and was never to return to the studio. Edith and Gordon had two children; Clifford “Cliff” Wight born August 22, 1921 and Eulie Fanny Wight born in 1925. Clifford attended Kingsway West School in 1925 and was a graduate of Burnaby South High School. Eulie Fanny Wight graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia in 1957. Clifford also graduated from the University of British Columbia and was among the handful of students who first established the School of Architecture at UBC. Clifford later married Mary (Berryman) Wight. Gordon Edward Wight died July 30, 1945, his wife Edith Mary (Hall) Wight died November 11, 1986. Eulie Fanny Wight died June 19, 1998. Clifford Wight died February 27, 2005.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:07:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Wight, Edith
Interview Location
McKay Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-23_ Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Edith Wight

Less detail

Interview with Edith Wight July 21, 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory144
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's dealings with gas rations.
Date Range
1946
Length
0:07:04
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's dealings with gas rations.
Date Range
1946
Length
0:07:04
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Edith Mary (Hall) Wight by Ross S. McLeod, July 21, 1975 at Edith's home on McKay Avenue, Burnaby. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and working outside the home. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Edith Mary (Hall) Wight arrived in Burnaby in September of 1920 from England, a self-described war bride. Her mother, Fanny (Carnelly) was an accomplished seamstress and her father, Robert Hall a hobbyist painter and carpenter. Edith and her husband Gordon Edward Wight lived at 420 McKay (later renumbered 6060 McKay) throughout their married lives. Within a year of moving to Burnaby, Edith got her first job sewing bedspreads for a large company, launching her career as an interior designer. She also started making dresses on commission. Gordon had a job at a fertilizer plant, which included delivering fruit trees and fertilizer door to door. He would often suggest new curtains or other material goods to the householders he visited, generating clients for Edith. Edith opened an Interior Design studio at South Granville in the first week of September, 1930 with her husband Gordon and Mrs. Ferguson, a previous client who ran a gift shop at the Georgia Hotel. Unfortunately, in 1932 Mrs. Ferguson became ill and was never to return to the studio. Edith and Gordon had two children; Clifford “Cliff” Wight born August 22, 1921 and Eulie Fanny Wight born in 1925. Clifford attended Kingsway West School in 1925 and was a graduate of Burnaby South High School. Eulie Fanny Wight graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia in 1957. Clifford also graduated from the University of British Columbia and was among the handful of students who first established the School of Architecture at UBC. Clifford later married Mary (Berryman) Wight. Gordon Edward Wight died July 30, 1945, his wife Edith Mary (Hall) Wight died November 11, 1986. Eulie Fanny Wight died June 19, 1998. Clifford Wight died February 27, 2005.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:07:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Wight, Edith
Interview Location
McKay Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-23_ Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Edith Wight

Less detail

Interview with Edith Wight July 21, 1975 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory145
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's memories of the impact of being a working mother during the Depression years.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:07:54
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Edith Mary (Hall) Wight's memories of the impact of being a working mother during the Depression years.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:07:54
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Edith Mary (Hall) Wight by Ross S. McLeod, July 21, 1975 at Edith's home on McKay Avenue, Burnaby. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and working outside the home. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Edith Mary (Hall) Wight arrived in Burnaby in September of 1920 from England, a self-described war bride. Her mother, Fanny (Carnelly) was an accomplished seamstress and her father, Robert Hall a hobbyist painter and carpenter. Edith and her husband Gordon Edward Wight lived at 420 McKay (later renumbered 6060 McKay) throughout their married lives. Within a year of moving to Burnaby, Edith got her first job sewing bedspreads for a large company, launching her career as an interior designer. She also started making dresses on commission. Gordon had a job at a fertilizer plant, which included delivering fruit trees and fertilizer door to door. He would often suggest new curtains or other material goods to the householders he visited, generating clients for Edith. Edith opened an Interior Design studio at South Granville in the first week of September, 1930 with her husband Gordon and Mrs. Ferguson, a previous client who ran a gift shop at the Georgia Hotel. Unfortunately, in 1932 Mrs. Ferguson became ill and was never to return to the studio. Edith and Gordon had two children; Clifford “Cliff” Wight born August 22, 1921 and Eulie Fanny Wight born in 1925. Clifford attended Kingsway West School in 1925 and was a graduate of Burnaby South High School. Eulie Fanny Wight graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia in 1957. Clifford also graduated from the University of British Columbia and was among the handful of students who first established the School of Architecture at UBC. Clifford later married Mary (Berryman) Wight. Gordon Edward Wight died July 30, 1945, his wife Edith Mary (Hall) Wight died November 11, 1986. Eulie Fanny Wight died June 19, 1998. Clifford Wight died February 27, 2005.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:07:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Wight, Edith
Interview Location
McKay Avenue, Burnaby
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-23_ Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Edith Wight

Less detail

Interview with John Ferguson July 3, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory180
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1931. He describes the neighbourhood of Vancouver Heights and the people that lived there. He also describes the types of goods he sold at his Vancouver Heights Hardware Store.
Date Range
1900-1939
Length
0:08:23
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1931. He describes the neighbourhood of Vancouver Heights and the people that lived there. He also describes the types of goods he sold at his Vancouver Heights Hardware Store.
Date Range
1900-1939
Length
0:08:23
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Hardware Stores
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 3, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Ferguson by history student Ross S. McLeod, July 3, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
John Ferguson was born in Glasgow in 1900. He came to Canada with his family in 1910, and settled on Vancouver Island. In 1931 John Ferguson purchased the hardware store on the 3900 block of Hastings Street.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:32:21
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Ferguson, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-07_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with John Ferguson

Less detail

Interview with John Ferguson July 3, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory181
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's description of the visibility of the Unemployed in the Vancouver Heights neighbourhood. He also describes the few items in his store that could be bought with script.
Date Range
1931-1940
Length
0:08:41
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's description of the visibility of the Unemployed in the Vancouver Heights neighbourhood. He also describes the few items in his store that could be bought with script.
Date Range
1931-1940
Length
0:08:41
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Hardware Stores
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 3, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Ferguson by history student Ross S. McLeod, July 3, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
John Ferguson was born in Glasgow in 1900. He came to Canada with his family in 1910, and settled on Vancouver Island. In 1931 John Ferguson purchased the hardware store on the 3900 block of Hastings Street.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:32:21
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Ferguson, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-07_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with John Ferguson

Less detail

Interview with John Ferguson July 3, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory183
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's impressions on the lasting effects of the Depression. He also discusses the types of purchases his customers would make during the Depression.
Date Range
1930-1975
Length
0:07:34
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's impressions on the lasting effects of the Depression. He also discusses the types of purchases his customers would make during the Depression.
Date Range
1930-1975
Length
0:07:34
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Hardware Stores
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 3, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Ferguson by history student Ross S. McLeod, July 3, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
John Ferguson was born in Glasgow in 1900. He came to Canada with his family in 1910, and settled on Vancouver Island. In 1931 John Ferguson purchased the hardware store on the 3900 block of Hastings Street.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:32:21
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Ferguson, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-07_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with John Ferguson

Less detail

Interview with Jack Davy and Thomas James Sanderson 22-Jul-75 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory87
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jack Davy and Tommy Sanderson's memories of the apprentice system offered as an alternative to high school as well as the Depression's effect on the schools.
Date Range
1931-1940
Length
0:09:36
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jack Davy and Tommy Sanderson's memories of the apprentice system offered as an alternative to high school as well as the Depression's effect on the schools.
Date Range
1931-1940
Length
0:09:36
Subject
Education
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
22-Jul-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with two school principals who were working during the depression; John "Jack" Davy and Thomas James "Tommy" Sanderson by Ross S. McLeod. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and scholastic studies. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John “Jack” Davy was raised in New Westminster and his family and the Eagles' family were close friends, with the grandparents and parents getting together regularly to play cards. As a child, Jack delivered the Columbian newspaper. Jack Davy worked for Burnaby schools for over fifty years; twenty-five of those years as principal at Edmonds Street School. During the depression, he worked as a principal of Kitchener Street School. Thomas James “Tommy” Sanderson was born to Ellen Jane Garvin and Thomas F. Sanderson. The couple married on January 14, 1903 at Mount Pleasant and lived first at English Bay. Tommy had an older brother, Gordon John and a sister, Flora Jane (later Rawden). The three children were raised in the Sanderson family home at 3812 Inman Avenue, one block north of Central Park. From 1919 to 1920, their father, Thomas F. Sanderson served as Reeve of Burnaby. Tommy Sanderson attended Inman Avenue School, then Kingsway West before graduating from Burnaby South High School in 1926. In 1931, he began his teaching career back at Burnaby South High School. From 1938, Tommy was principal at Sperling Avenue School. During the course of his career, he also worked as vice-principal of Edmonds Street School, principal at Capitol Hill School, Kingsway West School, McPhearson Junior High and Burnaby North High School. Tommy married Dorothy Alberta Reid of Chilliwack July 12, 1932 and had two children Robert “Bobby” and Margaret. The family first lived at 1921 Gilley Avenue, New Westminster then 2073 Waverley Avenue, Burnaby while Bobby and Margaret attended Nelson Avenue School, then Burnaby South High School.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:43:20
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Davy, Jack
Sanderson, Thomas "Tommy" James
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-24_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Jack Davy and Thomas James Sanderson

Less detail

Interview with Jack Davy and Thomas James Sanderson 22-Jul-75 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory88
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jack Davy and Tommy Sanderson's memories of the effect that the appointment of a Commissioner had on teacher's employment.
Date Range
1931-1933
Length
0:08:43
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jack Davy and Tommy Sanderson's memories of the effect that the appointment of a Commissioner had on teacher's employment.
Date Range
1931-1933
Length
0:08:43
Subject
Occupations - Teachers
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
22-Jul-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with two school principals who were working during the depression; John "Jack" Davy and Thomas James "Tommy" Sanderson by Ross S. McLeod. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and scholastic studies. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John “Jack” Davy was raised in New Westminster and his family and the Eagles' family were close friends, with the grandparents and parents getting together regularly to play cards. As a child, Jack delivered the Columbian newspaper. Jack Davy worked for Burnaby schools for over fifty years; twenty-five of those years as principal at Edmonds Street School. During the depression, he worked as a principal of Kitchener Street School. Thomas James “Tommy” Sanderson was born to Ellen Jane Garvin and Thomas F. Sanderson. The couple married on January 14, 1903 at Mount Pleasant and lived first at English Bay. Tommy had an older brother, Gordon John and a sister, Flora Jane (later Rawden). The three children were raised in the Sanderson family home at 3812 Inman Avenue, one block north of Central Park. From 1919 to 1920, their father, Thomas F. Sanderson served as Reeve of Burnaby. Tommy Sanderson attended Inman Avenue School, then Kingsway West before graduating from Burnaby South High School in 1926. In 1931, he began his teaching career back at Burnaby South High School. From 1938, Tommy was principal at Sperling Avenue School. During the course of his career, he also worked as vice-principal of Edmonds Street School, principal at Capitol Hill School, Kingsway West School, McPhearson Junior High and Burnaby North High School. Tommy married Dorothy Alberta Reid of Chilliwack July 12, 1932 and had two children Robert “Bobby” and Margaret. The family first lived at 1921 Gilley Avenue, New Westminster then 2073 Waverley Avenue, Burnaby while Bobby and Margaret attended Nelson Avenue School, then Burnaby South High School.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:43:20
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Davy, Jack
Sanderson, Thomas "Tommy" James
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-24_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Jack Davy and Thomas James Sanderson

Less detail

Interview with Jack Davy and Thomas James Sanderson 22-Jul-75 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory90
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jack Davy and Tommy Sanderson's overall impressions of the Depression years.
Date Range
1931-1939
Length
0:06:01
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jack Davy and Tommy Sanderson's overall impressions of the Depression years.
Date Range
1931-1939
Length
0:06:01
Subject
Occupations - Teachers
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
22-Jul-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with two school principals who were working during the depression; John "Jack" Davy and Thomas James "Tommy" Sanderson by Ross S. McLeod. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and scholastic studies. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John “Jack” Davy was raised in New Westminster and his family and the Eagles' family were close friends, with the grandparents and parents getting together regularly to play cards. As a child, Jack delivered the Columbian newspaper. Jack Davy worked for Burnaby schools for over fifty years; twenty-five of those years as principal at Edmonds Street School. During the depression, he worked as a principal of Kitchener Street School. Thomas James “Tommy” Sanderson was born to Ellen Jane Garvin and Thomas F. Sanderson. The couple married on January 14, 1903 at Mount Pleasant and lived first at English Bay. Tommy had an older brother, Gordon John and a sister, Flora Jane (later Rawden). The three children were raised in the Sanderson family home at 3812 Inman Avenue, one block north of Central Park. From 1919 to 1920, their father, Thomas F. Sanderson served as Reeve of Burnaby. Tommy Sanderson attended Inman Avenue School, then Kingsway West before graduating from Burnaby South High School in 1926. In 1931, he began his teaching career back at Burnaby South High School. From 1938, Tommy was principal at Sperling Avenue School. During the course of his career, he also worked as vice-principal of Edmonds Street School, principal at Capitol Hill School, Kingsway West School, McPhearson Junior High and Burnaby North High School. Tommy married Dorothy Alberta Reid of Chilliwack July 12, 1932 and had two children Robert “Bobby” and Margaret. The family first lived at 1921 Gilley Avenue, New Westminster then 2073 Waverley Avenue, Burnaby while Bobby and Margaret attended Nelson Avenue School, then Burnaby South High School.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:43:20
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Davy, Jack
Sanderson, Thomas "Tommy" James
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-24_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Jack Davy and Thomas James Sanderson

Less detail

Interview with Harry Royle June 20, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory111
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's early life beginning at Gibraltar, through the war years.
Date Range
1898-1919
Length
0:06:06
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's early life beginning at Gibraltar, through the war years.
Date Range
1898-1919
Photo Info
Harry Royle smiling, in a suit and tie, photographed by Chidwich Studio [193-]. Item no. BV005.20.20
Length
0:06:06
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Harry Royle by Ross S. McLeod (and Bettina Bradbury) June 20, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the running of a grocery store. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Harry Royle was born in Gibraltar in 1898 to a Spanish mother and an English father (all of the Royle children except for one were born in Gibraltar). Harry's father served in the army for twenty-one years and because of that, the family moved regularly. While Harry was still a young baby, the Royle family moved to Ireland for six years, where he began his first years of schooling at the age of four. His dad retired from the army in 1907 and was sent to Canada with the BC Electric Company (the London General Army Buses Company). The rest of his family followed two years afterward in 1909 and settled in South Vancouver. Harry and his three brothers joined the army and were sent overseas as part of the second division. Luckily, they all returned home to Vancouver in 1919. Harry worked at the Hudson's Bay Company "counter jumping" before opening his own store in 1924 at 5527 Hastings Street and Ellesmere Avenue, a confectionery and general hangout for neighbourhood children."Harry's" was only twenty-five foot square and carried groceries obtained mainly from Kelly Douglas wholesalers. Most of Harry's customers worked at the mill at Barnet. Those that worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway were the few that still held jobs during the Depression. The store continued to serve the people of Capitol Hill throughout the Depression and war years, until Harry closed shop in 1945.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:01:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Royle, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-12_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Harry Royle

Images
Less detail

Interview with Harry Royle June 20, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory112
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of returning from the war and setting up his general store at Capitol Hill.
Date Range
1919-1945
Length
0:10:17
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of returning from the war and setting up his general store at Capitol Hill.
Date Range
1919-1945
Photo Info
Harry Royle smiling, in a suit and tie, photographed by Chidwich Studio [193-]. Item no. BV005.20.20
Length
0:10:17
Name
Harry's
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - General Stores
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Harry Royle by Ross S. McLeod (and Bettina Bradbury) June 20, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the running of a grocery store. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Harry Royle was born in Gibraltar in 1898 to a Spanish mother and an English father (all of the Royle children except for one were born in Gibraltar). Harry's father served in the army for twenty-one years and because of that, the family moved regularly. While Harry was still a young baby, the Royle family moved to Ireland for six years, where he began his first years of schooling at the age of four. His dad retired from the army in 1907 and was sent to Canada with the BC Electric Company (the London General Army Buses Company). The rest of his family followed two years afterward in 1909 and settled in South Vancouver. Harry and his three brothers joined the army and were sent overseas as part of the second division. Luckily, they all returned home to Vancouver in 1919. Harry worked at the Hudson's Bay Company "counter jumping" before opening his own store in 1924 at 5527 Hastings Street and Ellesmere Avenue, a confectionery and general hangout for neighbourhood children."Harry's" was only twenty-five foot square and carried groceries obtained mainly from Kelly Douglas wholesalers. Most of Harry's customers worked at the mill at Barnet. Those that worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway were the few that still held jobs during the Depression. The store continued to serve the people of Capitol Hill throughout the Depression and war years, until Harry closed shop in 1945.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:01:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Royle, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-12_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Harry Royle

Images
Less detail

Interview with Harry Royle June 20, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory114
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's thoughts on the use of credit at stores. He discusses his stores' distribution of World War II quota goods and mentions other stores' practices.
Date Range
1929-1945
Length
0:10:17
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's thoughts on the use of credit at stores. He discusses his stores' distribution of World War II quota goods and mentions other stores' practices.
Date Range
1929-1945
Photo Info
Harry Royle smiling, in a suit and tie, photographed by Chidwich Studio [193-]. Item no. BV005.20.20
Length
0:10:17
Name
Harry's
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Harry Royle by Ross S. McLeod (and Bettina Bradbury) June 20, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the running of a grocery store. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Harry Royle was born in Gibraltar in 1898 to a Spanish mother and an English father (all of the Royle children except for one were born in Gibraltar). Harry's father served in the army for twenty-one years and because of that, the family moved regularly. While Harry was still a young baby, the Royle family moved to Ireland for six years, where he began his first years of schooling at the age of four. His dad retired from the army in 1907 and was sent to Canada with the BC Electric Company (the London General Army Buses Company). The rest of his family followed two years afterward in 1909 and settled in South Vancouver. Harry and his three brothers joined the army and were sent overseas as part of the second division. Luckily, they all returned home to Vancouver in 1919. Harry worked at the Hudson's Bay Company "counter jumping" before opening his own store in 1924 at 5527 Hastings Street and Ellesmere Avenue, a confectionery and general hangout for neighbourhood children."Harry's" was only twenty-five foot square and carried groceries obtained mainly from Kelly Douglas wholesalers. Most of Harry's customers worked at the mill at Barnet. Those that worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway were the few that still held jobs during the Depression. The store continued to serve the people of Capitol Hill throughout the Depression and war years, until Harry closed shop in 1945.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:01:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Royle, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-12_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Harry Royle

Images
Less detail

Interview with Harry Royle June 20, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory115
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of the process of accepting script as payment for groceries. He also discusses the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) Block System.
Date Range
1930-1938
Length
0:10:02
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of the process of accepting script as payment for groceries. He also discusses the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) Block System.
Date Range
1930-1938
Photo Info
Harry Royle smiling, in a suit and tie, photographed by Chidwich Studio [193-]. Item no. BV005.20.20
Length
0:10:02
Name
Harry's
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Harry Royle by Ross S. McLeod (and Bettina Bradbury) June 20, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the running of a grocery store. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Harry Royle was born in Gibraltar in 1898 to a Spanish mother and an English father (all of the Royle children except for one were born in Gibraltar). Harry's father served in the army for twenty-one years and because of that, the family moved regularly. While Harry was still a young baby, the Royle family moved to Ireland for six years, where he began his first years of schooling at the age of four. His dad retired from the army in 1907 and was sent to Canada with the BC Electric Company (the London General Army Buses Company). The rest of his family followed two years afterward in 1909 and settled in South Vancouver. Harry and his three brothers joined the army and were sent overseas as part of the second division. Luckily, they all returned home to Vancouver in 1919. Harry worked at the Hudson's Bay Company "counter jumping" before opening his own store in 1924 at 5527 Hastings Street and Ellesmere Avenue, a confectionery and general hangout for neighbourhood children."Harry's" was only twenty-five foot square and carried groceries obtained mainly from Kelly Douglas wholesalers. Most of Harry's customers worked at the mill at Barnet. Those that worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway were the few that still held jobs during the Depression. The store continued to serve the people of Capitol Hill throughout the Depression and war years, until Harry closed shop in 1945.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:01:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Royle, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-12_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Harry Royle

Images
Less detail

Interview with Harry Royle June 20, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory116
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's thoughts on the unions of today. He also talks about Reeve William A. Pritchard and the Capitol Hill neighbourhood at the time of the Depression.
Date Range
1930-1975
Length
0:10:04
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's thoughts on the unions of today. He also talks about Reeve William A. Pritchard and the Capitol Hill neighbourhood at the time of the Depression.
Date Range
1930-1975
Photo Info
Harry Royle smiling, in a suit and tie, photographed by Chidwich Studio [193-]. Item no. BV005.20.20
Length
0:10:04
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Harry Royle by Ross S. McLeod (and Bettina Bradbury) June 20, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the running of a grocery store. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Harry Royle was born in Gibraltar in 1898 to a Spanish mother and an English father (all of the Royle children except for one were born in Gibraltar). Harry's father served in the army for twenty-one years and because of that, the family moved regularly. While Harry was still a young baby, the Royle family moved to Ireland for six years, where he began his first years of schooling at the age of four. His dad retired from the army in 1907 and was sent to Canada with the BC Electric Company (the London General Army Buses Company). The rest of his family followed two years afterward in 1909 and settled in South Vancouver. Harry and his three brothers joined the army and were sent overseas as part of the second division. Luckily, they all returned home to Vancouver in 1919. Harry worked at the Hudson's Bay Company "counter jumping" before opening his own store in 1924 at 5527 Hastings Street and Ellesmere Avenue, a confectionery and general hangout for neighbourhood children."Harry's" was only twenty-five foot square and carried groceries obtained mainly from Kelly Douglas wholesalers. Most of Harry's customers worked at the mill at Barnet. Those that worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway were the few that still held jobs during the Depression. The store continued to serve the people of Capitol Hill throughout the Depression and war years, until Harry closed shop in 1945.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:01:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Royle, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-12_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Images
Less detail

Interview with Harry Royle June 20, 1975 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory117
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of the Depression years and the difference of the politics of today. He also tells the story of his involvement with the capture of Frank Badgley.
Date Range
1930-1939
Length
0:10:46
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of the Depression years and the difference of the politics of today. He also tells the story of his involvement with the capture of Frank Badgley.
Date Range
1930-1939
Photo Info
Harry Royle smiling, in a suit and tie, photographed by Chidwich Studio [193-]. Item no. BV005.20.20
Length
0:10:46
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Harry Royle by Ross S. McLeod (and Bettina Bradbury) June 20, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the running of a grocery store. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Harry Royle was born in Gibraltar in 1898 to a Spanish mother and an English father (all of the Royle children except for one were born in Gibraltar). Harry's father served in the army for twenty-one years and because of that, the family moved regularly. While Harry was still a young baby, the Royle family moved to Ireland for six years, where he began his first years of schooling at the age of four. His dad retired from the army in 1907 and was sent to Canada with the BC Electric Company (the London General Army Buses Company). The rest of his family followed two years afterward in 1909 and settled in South Vancouver. Harry and his three brothers joined the army and were sent overseas as part of the second division. Luckily, they all returned home to Vancouver in 1919. Harry worked at the Hudson's Bay Company "counter jumping" before opening his own store in 1924 at 5527 Hastings Street and Ellesmere Avenue, a confectionery and general hangout for neighbourhood children."Harry's" was only twenty-five foot square and carried groceries obtained mainly from Kelly Douglas wholesalers. Most of Harry's customers worked at the mill at Barnet. Those that worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway were the few that still held jobs during the Depression. The store continued to serve the people of Capitol Hill throughout the Depression and war years, until Harry closed shop in 1945.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:01:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Royle, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-12_Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Images
Less detail

Interview with Florence Strachan June 20, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory133
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's early years, her move to Burnaby and her husband's employment at the Barnet Mill.
Date Range
1899-1931
Length
0:09:59
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's early years, her move to Burnaby and her husband's employment at the Barnet Mill.
Date Range
1899-1931
Length
0:09:59
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Florence Strachan by Ross S. McLeod and Bettina Bradbury, June 20, 1975. Major theme discussed is: The Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Florence Strachan was born in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1899. She met and married her husband in Scotland before coming to Atlantic Canada by ship in 1922, then from Quebec to Vancouver by train. When Florence’s husband got a job at Barnet Mills in 1924, the couple moved to Burnaby and rented a house at 2551 East Hastings Street. In 1926, the Strachans bought a house at 290 Ellesmere Avenue and concentrated on paying it off as quickly as possible. By 1931 the Mill had shut down, leaving Florence’s husband out of work, and forced to go on Relief. By this time the couple had two children, one born in 1928, and the other in 1930. Florence and her husband marched and picketed with the unemployed throughout the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:28:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Strachan, Florence
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-09_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Florence Strachan

Less detail

Interview with Florence Strachan June 20, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory134
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's involvement with the Unemployed Organization in North Burnaby. She mentions Reeve William A. Pritchard. She also discusses how her family managed through the Depression.
Date Range
1931-1939
Length
0:07:47
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's involvement with the Unemployed Organization in North Burnaby. She mentions Reeve William A. Pritchard. She also discusses how her family managed through the Depression.
Date Range
1931-1939
Length
0:07:47
Subject
Organizations
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Florence Strachan by Ross S. McLeod and Bettina Bradbury, June 20, 1975. Major theme discussed is: The Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Florence Strachan was born in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1899. She met and married her husband in Scotland before coming to Atlantic Canada by ship in 1922, then from Quebec to Vancouver by train. When Florence’s husband got a job at Barnet Mills in 1924, the couple moved to Burnaby and rented a house at 2551 East Hastings Street. In 1926, the Strachans bought a house at 290 Ellesmere Avenue and concentrated on paying it off as quickly as possible. By 1931 the Mill had shut down, leaving Florence’s husband out of work, and forced to go on Relief. By this time the couple had two children, one born in 1928, and the other in 1930. Florence and her husband marched and picketed with the unemployed throughout the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:28:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Strachan, Florence
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-09_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Florence Strachan

Less detail

Interview with Florence Strachan June 20, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory135
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's thoughts on the impact of the Depression to the neighbourhood of Capitol Hill. She also describes the Squatter's Shacks along the Burrard Inlet.
Date Range
1931-1939
Length
0:05:22
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's thoughts on the impact of the Depression to the neighbourhood of Capitol Hill. She also describes the Squatter's Shacks along the Burrard Inlet.
Date Range
1931-1939
Length
0:05:22
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Florence Strachan by Ross S. McLeod and Bettina Bradbury, June 20, 1975. Major theme discussed is: The Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Florence Strachan was born in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1899. She met and married her husband in Scotland before coming to Atlantic Canada by ship in 1922, then from Quebec to Vancouver by train. When Florence’s husband got a job at Barnet Mills in 1924, the couple moved to Burnaby and rented a house at 2551 East Hastings Street. In 1926, the Strachans bought a house at 290 Ellesmere Avenue and concentrated on paying it off as quickly as possible. By 1931 the Mill had shut down, leaving Florence’s husband out of work, and forced to go on Relief. By this time the couple had two children, one born in 1928, and the other in 1930. Florence and her husband marched and picketed with the unemployed throughout the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:28:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Strachan, Florence
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-09_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Florence Strachan

Less detail

Interview with Florence Strachan June 20, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory136
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's involvement with the Unemployed Organization in North Burnaby as well as her personal life during the Depression.
Date Range
1931-1939
Length
0:05:39
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's involvement with the Unemployed Organization in North Burnaby as well as her personal life during the Depression.
Date Range
1931-1939
Length
0:05:39
Subject
Organizations
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Florence Strachan by Ross S. McLeod and Bettina Bradbury, June 20, 1975. Major theme discussed is: The Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Florence Strachan was born in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1899. She met and married her husband in Scotland before coming to Atlantic Canada by ship in 1922, then from Quebec to Vancouver by train. When Florence’s husband got a job at Barnet Mills in 1924, the couple moved to Burnaby and rented a house at 2551 East Hastings Street. In 1926, the Strachans bought a house at 290 Ellesmere Avenue and concentrated on paying it off as quickly as possible. By 1931 the Mill had shut down, leaving Florence’s husband out of work, and forced to go on Relief. By this time the couple had two children, one born in 1928, and the other in 1930. Florence and her husband marched and picketed with the unemployed throughout the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:28:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Strachan, Florence
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-09_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Florence Strachan

Less detail

Interview with John Ferguson July 3, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory182
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's opinion of Reeve William A. Pritchard and the municipal politics of the time. He also discusses the sentiment he felt among the Unemployed.
Date Range
1931-1940
Length
0:07:44
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's opinion of Reeve William A. Pritchard and the municipal politics of the time. He also discusses the sentiment he felt among the Unemployed.
Date Range
1931-1940
Length
0:07:44
Name
Pritchard, William A.
Subject
Organizations
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 3, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Ferguson by history student Ross S. McLeod, July 3, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
John Ferguson was born in Glasgow in 1900. He came to Canada with his family in 1910, and settled on Vancouver Island. In 1931 John Ferguson purchased the hardware store on the 3900 block of Hastings Street.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:32:21
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Ferguson, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-07_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with John Ferguson

Less detail

Interview with Jack Davy and Thomas James Sanderson 22-Jul-75 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory89
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jack Davy and Tommy Sanderson's attitudes towards the Commissioner as well as to the unemployed in Burnaby.
Date Range
1931-1939
Length
0:09:35
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jack Davy and Tommy Sanderson's attitudes towards the Commissioner as well as to the unemployed in Burnaby.
Date Range
1931-1939
Length
0:09:35
Name
Burnaby South High School
Subject
Occupations - Teachers
Officials - Commissioners
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
22-Jul-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with two school principals who were working during the depression; John "Jack" Davy and Thomas James "Tommy" Sanderson by Ross S. McLeod. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and scholastic studies. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John “Jack” Davy was raised in New Westminster and his family and the Eagles' family were close friends, with the grandparents and parents getting together regularly to play cards. As a child, Jack delivered the Columbian newspaper. Jack Davy worked for Burnaby schools for over fifty years; twenty-five of those years as principal at Edmonds Street School. During the depression, he worked as a principal of Kitchener Street School. Thomas James “Tommy” Sanderson was born to Ellen Jane Garvin and Thomas F. Sanderson. The couple married on January 14, 1903 at Mount Pleasant and lived first at English Bay. Tommy had an older brother, Gordon John and a sister, Flora Jane (later Rawden). The three children were raised in the Sanderson family home at 3812 Inman Avenue, one block north of Central Park. From 1919 to 1920, their father, Thomas F. Sanderson served as Reeve of Burnaby. Tommy Sanderson attended Inman Avenue School, then Kingsway West before graduating from Burnaby South High School in 1926. In 1931, he began his teaching career back at Burnaby South High School. From 1938, Tommy was principal at Sperling Avenue School. During the course of his career, he also worked as vice-principal of Edmonds Street School, principal at Capitol Hill School, Kingsway West School, McPhearson Junior High and Burnaby North High School. Tommy married Dorothy Alberta Reid of Chilliwack July 12, 1932 and had two children Robert “Bobby” and Margaret. The family first lived at 1921 Gilley Avenue, New Westminster then 2073 Waverley Avenue, Burnaby while Bobby and Margaret attended Nelson Avenue School, then Burnaby South High School.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:43:20
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Davy, Jack
Sanderson, Thomas "Tommy" James
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-24_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Jack Davy and Thomas James Sanderson

Less detail

Interview with Harry Royle June 20, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory113
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of various negative sentiments of the time. He also discusses the impact of the Depression years as well as his impression of Reeve Pritchard.
Date Range
1919-1945
Length
0:10:17
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of various negative sentiments of the time. He also discusses the impact of the Depression years as well as his impression of Reeve Pritchard.
Date Range
1919-1945
Photo Info
Harry Royle smiling, in a suit and tie, photographed by Chidwich Studio [193-]. Item no. BV005.20.20
Length
0:10:17
Name
Pritchard, William A.
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Harry Royle by Ross S. McLeod (and Bettina Bradbury) June 20, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the running of a grocery store. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Harry Royle was born in Gibraltar in 1898 to a Spanish mother and an English father (all of the Royle children except for one were born in Gibraltar). Harry's father served in the army for twenty-one years and because of that, the family moved regularly. While Harry was still a young baby, the Royle family moved to Ireland for six years, where he began his first years of schooling at the age of four. His dad retired from the army in 1907 and was sent to Canada with the BC Electric Company (the London General Army Buses Company). The rest of his family followed two years afterward in 1909 and settled in South Vancouver. Harry and his three brothers joined the army and were sent overseas as part of the second division. Luckily, they all returned home to Vancouver in 1919. Harry worked at the Hudson's Bay Company "counter jumping" before opening his own store in 1924 at 5527 Hastings Street and Ellesmere Avenue, a confectionery and general hangout for neighbourhood children."Harry's" was only twenty-five foot square and carried groceries obtained mainly from Kelly Douglas wholesalers. Most of Harry's customers worked at the mill at Barnet. Those that worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway were the few that still held jobs during the Depression. The store continued to serve the people of Capitol Hill throughout the Depression and war years, until Harry closed shop in 1945.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:01:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Royle, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-12_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Harry Royle

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jack Davy and Thomas James Sanderson 22-Jul-75 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory86
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jack Davy and Tommy Sanderson's descriptions of the neighbourhoods surrounding the schools that they worked at during the Depression. They also discuss the structure of elementary through high school as it was during this time.
Date Range
1931-1940
Length
0:09:31
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jack Davy and Tommy Sanderson's descriptions of the neighbourhoods surrounding the schools that they worked at during the Depression. They also discuss the structure of elementary through high school as it was during this time.
Date Range
1931-1940
Length
0:09:31
Name
Kitchener Street School
Sperling Avenue School
Burnaby South High School
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
22-Jul-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with two school principals who were working during the depression; John "Jack" Davy and Thomas James "Tommy" Sanderson by Ross S. McLeod. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and scholastic studies. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John “Jack” Davy was raised in New Westminster and his family and the Eagles' family were close friends, with the grandparents and parents getting together regularly to play cards. As a child, Jack delivered the Columbian newspaper. Jack Davy worked for Burnaby schools for over fifty years; twenty-five of those years as principal at Edmonds Street School. During the depression, he worked as a principal of Kitchener Street School. Thomas James “Tommy” Sanderson was born to Ellen Jane Garvin and Thomas F. Sanderson. The couple married on January 14, 1903 at Mount Pleasant and lived first at English Bay. Tommy had an older brother, Gordon John and a sister, Flora Jane (later Rawden). The three children were raised in the Sanderson family home at 3812 Inman Avenue, one block north of Central Park. From 1919 to 1920, their father, Thomas F. Sanderson served as Reeve of Burnaby. Tommy Sanderson attended Inman Avenue School, then Kingsway West before graduating from Burnaby South High School in 1926. In 1931, he began his teaching career back at Burnaby South High School. From 1938, Tommy was principal at Sperling Avenue School. During the course of his career, he also worked as vice-principal of Edmonds Street School, principal at Capitol Hill School, Kingsway West School, McPhearson Junior High and Burnaby North High School. Tommy married Dorothy Alberta Reid of Chilliwack July 12, 1932 and had two children Robert “Bobby” and Margaret. The family first lived at 1921 Gilley Avenue, New Westminster then 2073 Waverley Avenue, Burnaby while Bobby and Margaret attended Nelson Avenue School, then Burnaby South High School.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:43:20
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Davy, Jack
Sanderson, Thomas "Tommy" James
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-24_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack Davy and Thomas James Sanderson

Less detail

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