5 records – page 1 of 1.

basket

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact84019
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV014.9.1
Description
This basket is woven using the wrapped twining method and is made of swamp grass. The designs were made using aniline dyes and are badly faded; original colours still visible on the inside of lid and basket. The weave on this basket is very finely done. The basket and lid are decorated with bird motifs. Originally birds were yellow on a purple background. The lid has a drop edge that fits over a lip around the top edge of the basket. It is decorated in concentric circles with a dark spot in the centre. The spot includes black as well as the wine colour. The outside is faded to a light brown colour. Nuu-chah-nulth
Object History
The basket was acquired in Victoria in the 1930s before the family moved to Vancouver.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
Nuu-Chah-Nulth
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
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basket

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact84020
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV014.9.2
Description
Basket with red cedar bark base and warps and swamp grass wefts. The base is done in checker weave, while the walls and lid are done using wrapped twining. The base of the basket is secured with two strand twining and then the warps were split and smaller rows of two strand twining follow. The edge of the base is distinguished by one row of three strand twining, which creates a noticeable break in the pattern, before the wrapped twining begins for the walls. Designs, consisting of horizontal stripes, were made using analine dyes, which are extremely light sensitive. Colours are preserved on inside of basket, where light exposure has been much lower. Originally red and black stripes. Nuu-chah-nulth
Object History
The basket was acquired in Victoria in the 1930s before the family moved to Vancouver.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
Nuu-Chah-Nulth
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

carrying basket

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact80210
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV009.1.1
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation and walls that flare slightly towards rim. Decorated in beaded designs of cattail grass and black dyed cherry bark. Darker elements arranged in a butterfly design. Butterflies are said to represent everlasting life by Stó:lō and Nlaka’pamux basket makers. Overcast handles sewn to basket with leather ties. One has been repaired with string. Finished with a braided rim. Triangular shaped stitches attach base to walls of basket. Interior Salish: Stl’atl’imx?
Object History
Basket, ca. 1895-1910, from the collection of the L. Claude Hill family, who owned the property that became the Burnaby Village Museum. According to the Hill family, L. Claude's wife Anne Sarah Hill (nee Kendrick) traded blankets for baskets, although it is not known if this particular basket was obtained in this manner. Indigenous people travelled the trail that crossed Deer Lake Brook (Douglas Road / Canada Way).
Measurements
Measurements: width 24 cm and length 44 cm and depth 18 cm. All measured from top edge to outside.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
School/Style
Coast Salish
Culture
Stl’atl’imx
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Baskets
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Hill, Annie Sara Kenrick
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail

Weaving and Learning through Art

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo15668
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
11 May 2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (76 min., 47 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Assistant Curator, Kate Petrusa. The webinar is titled "Weaving and Learning through Art" and is presented by Nicole Preissl, Explorative Designer of Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Stó:lō decent. The Zoom webinar is the f…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Burnaby Neighbourhood Speaker Series series
Subseries
Neighbourhood Speaker Series - Spring 2021 subseries
Date
11 May 2021
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (76 min., 47 sec.) : digital, col., sd., stereo ; 29 fps
Material Details
Presenter: Nicole Preissl
Host: Kate Petrusa
Date of Presentation: Tuesday, May 11, 7:00 pm - 8:15 pm
Total Number of tracks: 1
Total Length of all tracks: min., sec.
Recording Device: Zoom video communication platform
Recording Note: Film was edited from it's original recorded version (90 min., 05 sec.) to edited version (76 min., 47 sec.) for public viewing on Heritage Burnaby.
Accession Code
BV021.17.5
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video recording of a live Zoom webinar hosted by Burnaby Village Museum Assistant Curator, Kate Petrusa. The webinar is titled "Weaving and Learning through Art" and is presented by Nicole Preissl, Explorative Designer of Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Stó:lō decent. The Zoom webinar is the fifth in a series of six "Neighbourhood Speaker series" webinars exploring a range of topics shared by Indigenous speakers and knowledge keepers that were presented and made available to the public between April 27 and May 12, 2021. The live webinar was also made available on the Burnaby Village Museum's facebook page. Community members were invited to participate by bringing questions during the interactive online session. Nicole supports her presentation with slides and provides a hands on demonstration on weaving. Prior to the webinar, participants were offered materials that were prepared and made available from Burnaby Village Museum. In this interactive webinar, Nicole Preissl, explores the importance of plants within Coast Salish culture and demonstrates the traditional technique of rope-making. In the first part of her presentation, Nicole provides examples of indigenous plants and trees that grow in British Columbia and shares information on thier historical and cultural significance, medicinal and edible properties and how to identify them. Nicole also shares her own experiences and appreciation for natural materials and provides examples of her artwork. In the second half of Nicole's presentation participants are invited to join her demonstration in learning basic weaving techniques. Nicole provides two hands-on demonstrations to follow, one with yarn and one with iris leaves. During and follwing the presentation, Nicole Preissl takes questions from the audience that are moderated by the host, Kate Petrusa.
History/Biography
Nicole Preissl is an explorative designer who uses natural materials to influence her work. From both Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Stó:lō decent, she began introducing traditional artistic customs into her practice as a means of connecting to her culture. In her art practice she uses natural fibres and materials to create textile based designs. Her areas of interest are natural plant dyes, weaving Coast Salish style garments and using raw hide to create thought provoking design pieces.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Social life and customs
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Art
Plants
Plants - Flowers
Plants - Trees
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Baskets
Indigenous peoples - Implements
Indigenous peoples - Clothing
Names
Preissl, Nicole
Tsleil-Waututh Nation
Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Nation
Petrusa, Kate
Burnaby Village Museum
Notes
Title based on content of video recording
Video

Weaving and Learning through Art, 11 May 2021

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work basket

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumartifact80211
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV009.1.2
Description
Oval shaped coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation. Overcast rim with remnants of a loopwork border. Decorated with vertical stripes of imbricated designs in canary grass and black dyed cherry bark. Cherry bark can be distinguished by the small eyes in the surface of the bark. If the basket maker is skilled the bark has a shiny appearance, if it has not been scraped properly it has a greyish tinge. Canary grass is differentiated from cattail and bear grass by its shiny appearance according to a Stó:lō/Stl’atl’imx elder and basket maker from Mount Currie, who was married into Upper Sḵwx̱wú7mesh.
Object History
Basket, ca. 1895-1910, from the collection of the L. Claude Hill family, who owned the property that became the Burnaby Village Museum. According to the Hill family, L. Claude's wife Anne Sarah Hill (nee Kendrick) traded blankets for baskets, although it is not known if this particular basket was obtained in this manner. Indigenous people travelled the trail that crossed Deer Lake Brook (Douglas Road / Canada Way).
Measurements
Measurements: width 31.5 cm and length 51.5 cm and depth 19.5 cm all measured from top edge to outside of basket, not including trim.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
School/Style
Coast Salish
Culture
First Nations
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Baskets
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Hill, Annie Sara Kenrick
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Documents
Less detail