Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Simon Fraser University

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark639
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
8888 University Drive
Description
The planning, design concept, design coordination, site development and landscaping for the original part of the campus were all under the control of Erickson/Massey. The complex was conceived as one building, with future growth occurring at the periphery. Tall buildings would have been out of scal…
Associated Dates
1965
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
8888 University Drive
Associated Dates
1965
Description
The planning, design concept, design coordination, site development and landscaping for the original part of the campus were all under the control of Erickson/Massey. The complex was conceived as one building, with future growth occurring at the periphery. Tall buildings would have been out of scale with the massive mountaintop ridge, so a series of horizontal terraced structures were designed that hugged the ridge and dissolve into the landscape. Following the linear peak of the mountain, the scheme organized various parts of the campus along an east/west line. The concept of a central academic quadrangle was conceived within the tradition of Oxford and Cambridge, and to enhance the sense of contemplative quiet, it was designed as a perfect square raised on massive pilotis, allowing stunning views through a landscaped courtyard. The connecting link was a gigantic space frame-developed in conjunction with Jeffrey Lindsay, a one-time associate of Buckminster Fuller-that provided shelter and a gathering-place for the students. Other architects who had placed among the top five in the competition were retained to design the individual components of the original plan: the Academic Quadrangle by Zoltan S. Kiss; the Theatre, Gymnasium & Swimming Pool by Duncan McNab & Associates; the Science Complex by Rhone & Iredale; and the Library by Robert F. Harrison.
Heritage Value
Following the end of the Second World War, there was unprecedented growth throughout the Lower Mainland. Many returning veterans had settled on the coast, and the loosening of wartime restrictions led to the creation of many new suburban developments throughout the region. The growing population strained existing facilities, and there was a recognition that new educational facilities had to be constructed to meet these growing demands. For many years, the only university in the province was the University of British Columbia. In the 1960s, new universities were planned for both Victoria and Burnaby to serve the wave of baby boomers just then going through high school. The dramatic site chosen for the Burnaby university was the top of Burnaby Mountain, with expansive views over mountain ranges and water. An architectural competition was held for a campus of 7,000 students that could eventually be expanded to 18,000. Of the many submissions, the judges reached unanimity on the winner, an outstanding scheme submitted by the firm of Erickson/Massey. The judges went even further, and recommended that every effort be made to ensure that the winning design be built as submitted. The new Chancellor, Gordon Shrum, agreed. The realization of this scheme won extensive recognition for the work of Arthur Erickson and Geoffrey Massey, and launched Erickson’s international career. In Erickson’s words: "Unlike any previous university, Simon Fraser is a direct translation into architecture of the expanding fields of knowledge that defy traditional boundaries, of the vital role of the university as both challenger and conservor of human culture, and of the university community as one in constant intellectual, spiritual and social interchange." The new school opened for classes in September 1965, nicknamed the “instant university,” and quickly gained a radical reputation. The startling futuristic architecture and open layout suited the explosive nature of the mid-1960s, when political and social traditions of all types were being questioned and student protests were common. Many of SFU’s programs were considered experimental, even controversial, and unrest and conflict on the campus continued for a number of years. Since this auspicious beginning 40 years ago, SFU has grown to house 25,000 students on three campuses. The core of the original campus, recognized world-wide as a profound work of architecture, remains essentially intact today.
Locality
Burnaby Mountain
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Architect
Erickson/Massey
Area
1360000.00
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Private
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 8888 University Drive
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
Less detail

Dr. William & Ruth Baldwin House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark534
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6543/45 Deer Lake Drive
Description
The Dr. William & Ruth Baldwin House is a two-storey modern post-and-beam structure, located on the southern shore of Deer Lake in Burnaby's Deer Lake Park. The site is steeply sloped, and the main entrance of the house is at the top of the slope facing onto Deer Lake Drive.
Associated Dates
1965
Formal Recognition
Community Heritage Register
  6 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6543/45 Deer Lake Drive
Associated Dates
1965
Formal Recognition
Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Council Resolution
Enactment Date
26/05/2003
Description
The Dr. William & Ruth Baldwin House is a two-storey modern post-and-beam structure, located on the southern shore of Deer Lake in Burnaby's Deer Lake Park. The site is steeply sloped, and the main entrance of the house is at the top of the slope facing onto Deer Lake Drive.
Heritage Value
The Baldwin House is valued as a prime example of Burnaby’s post-Second World War modern heritage and progressive architectural style, as well as for its personal connections to internationally-acclaimed architect, Arthur Erickson. Inspired by the modern domestic idiom established earlier in the twentieth century by Frank Lloyd Wright and Richard Neutra, Erickson conceived his architecture as responding directly to the site. A cohesive expression of simple orthogonal lines and ultimate transparency, this structure reduces the idea of post-and-beam West Coast modernism to its most refined elements. A fine example of the evolving talent of Erickson’s earlier work, this house is a landmark modern house in Burnaby and is unique in terms of siting and context. Having just won the 1963 competition for the new Simon Fraser University in Burnaby with his partner, Geoff Massey, and having built fewer than half a dozen homes previously, Erickson’s reputation was growing and his skill as a designer of modern buildings was in great demand. The same year that Erickson/Massey Architects designed SFU, Dr. William Baldwin and his wife, Ruth, personal friends of Erickson, commissioned him to design this house. Erickson was already familiar with the site; as a child he had spent time at this spot when his family visited friends who lived on Deer Lake. Both the Baldwin House and the university were completed in 1965. SFU became internationally famous; the Baldwin House was also considered an architectural success and was recognized in publications of the time. Only a single storey of this two-storey house is visible from the road, as it is built into the hillside in response to its steep site and proximity to Deer Lake. Like many other Erickson designs, this structure was conceived as a pavilion. Constructed of glass and wood, its transparency facilitates visual access to the lake’s edge, acting as an invitation, rather than a barrier, to the landscape. The house blends into the natural surroundings and the site includes other man-made landscape features such as a reflecting pool. As a reaction to the often grey quality of light in the region, Erickson exploits flat planes of water as a source of borrowed light. The refined and purposeful design, transparency, openness of plan and adjacency to the lake combine to give the house a floating appearance at the water's edge. The concept of a floating house set within an accompanying garden was inspired, in part, by the palaces and house boats of Dal Lake in Kashmir and the famed nearby Mughal Gardens. Although Erickson never visited Dal Lake, he travelled extensively throughout India, and specifically mentions the Kashmir reference in relation to this house. There is a rich complexity of other allusions worked into the fabric of the house, unified by a feeling for the conjunction of light, water and land at this special location. Widely renowned as Canada’s most brilliant modern architect, Erickson’s reputation is important to the development and growth of modern architecture in Canada and North America.
Defining Elements
The elements of the Baldwin House that define its character are those materials and details which respond to the location of the building and determine the relation between landscape and building, combining to create a single cohesive site. These include its: - close proximity to water - orthogonal plan and massing, with flat tar-and-gravel roof - stepped down massing orienting the house towards the water - post-and-beam construction, with the width of the beams matched to the width of the posts - wood and glass used as primary building materials - transparency and light achieved by the abundant use of glass - large undivided sheets of single glazing - butt glazed glass corners - abundant and generous balconies, which blur the transition from interior to exterior - horizontal flush cedar siding - use of salvaged brick for chimneys - use of chains as downspouts - built-in rooftop barbeque - built in furniture and fittings dating to the time of construction, such as original hardware, benches, bathroom vanities and kitchen cabinets - landscaped site including reflecting pool, plantings and a dock protruding into the lake
Locality
Deer Lake Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Function
Primary Current--Single Dwelling
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 011-946-032 and P.I.D. No. 011-946-067
Boundaries
The Baldwin House is comprised of two municipally-owned lots located at 6543 and 6545 Deer Lake Drive, Burnaby.
Area
6,070.20
Contributing Resource
Building
Landscape Feature
Ownership
Public (local)
Other Collection
Canadian Architectural Archives, University of Calgary, Collection: Original Plans No. ERI 4A/76.13
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6543 Deer Lake Drive
Burnaby - 6545 Deer Lake Drive
Images
Less detail

Lochdale / Burnaby Mountain p. 143

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumlibrary6277-143
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Book
Burnaby's Heritage
Type
Book Chapter
Publication Date
2007
Notes
North Burnaby
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY University Crescent Erickson/Massey Architects Design Competition, 1963; Campus opened 1965 Under construction, 1965 [AEC] Following the end of the Second World War, there was unprecedented growth throughout the Lower Mainland. Many returning veterans had settled on
  1 Digital Chapter  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Book
Burnaby's Heritage
Type
Book Chapter
Publication Date
2007
Notes
North Burnaby
Original Book
Catalogue record for source book
Digital Book
Less detail

Women's Residence under construction

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivephoto38236
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1965
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 20.3 x 25.3 cm
Item No.
372-010
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of a building under construction at the Simon Fraser University site. A label on the photograph reads in part: "Women's residence. Erickson-Massey Architects. Laing Construction and Equipment Ltd. General Contractors."
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
1965
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives Collection
Series
Burnaby Historical Society Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
372-010
Accession Number
BHS991-2
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 20.3 x 25.3 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
In Archives only
Reproduction Restriction
No reproduction permitted
Scope and Content
Photograph of a building under construction at the Simon Fraser University site. A label on the photograph reads in part: "Women's residence. Erickson-Massey Architects. Laing Construction and Equipment Ltd. General Contractors."
Photographer
Frank, Leonard
Subjects
Construction Tools and Equipment
Names
Simon Fraser University
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 8888 University Drive
Burnaby - University Drive
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Less detail

Deer Lake Park Heritage Precinct p. 94

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/museumlibrary6272-94
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Book
Burnaby's Heritage
Type
Book Chapter
Publication Date
2007
Notes
South Burnaby
DR. WILLIAM & RUTH BALDWIN HOUSE 6543/45 Deer Lake Drive Erickson/Massey Architects 1965 A cohesive expression of simple orthogonal lines and ultimate transparency, this structure reduces the idea of post-ond-beom west coast modernism to its most refined elements. Inspired by the modern
  1 Digital Chapter  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Book
Burnaby's Heritage
Type
Book Chapter
Publication Date
2007
Notes
South Burnaby
Original Book
Catalogue record for source book
Digital Book
Less detail
Back to top
Back to Top