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Jackson, Edith. [s.l]: [s.n.] (Book) 577 JAC
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection
Special Collection
Type
Book
Accession Code
BV987.5.66
Call No.
577 JAC
Author
Jackson, Edith
Place of Publication
[s.l]
Publisher
[s.n.]
Physical Description
20 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.)
Inscription
"EDITH JACKSON" - hand printed on front cover "Good" - hand written on back cover
Subjects LoC
Botany -- Pictorial works
Natural History -- Pictorial works
Nature -- Pictorial works
Zoology -- Pictorial works
Subjects
Education
Plants
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Edmonds Street
Notes
contains dried specimens of leaves and flowers
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Book
History of Burnaby
Type
Book Chapter
Publication Date
1947
Notes
This book is not divided into chapters. Sections have been created by Museum staff, based on the arrangement of topics in the book.
. Sparling to teach, but when the building was ready for use. In January of 1894, he sent a letter advising them that, having secured a school In Vancouver, he was not available. The letter was forwarded In the care of of Miss Ethel Lucretla LePage, and contained a Miss Ethel LePage suggestion that
  1 Digital Chapter  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Book
History of Burnaby
Type
Book Chapter
Publication Date
1947
Notes
This book is not divided into chapters. Sections have been created by Museum staff, based on the arrangement of topics in the book.
tadpole and the finished article in glass containers, for ocular demonstration within the school-room; the caterpillar’s cocoon and chrisalis, and finally the many-hued and gaudy butterfly; the beauties of the ruby-throated humming-bird which paused on vibrant wing before the honey-cup of the fiowers
  1 Digital Chapter  

Interview with Toki Miyashita by Rod Fowler February 27, 1990 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory517
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s growing interest in Japanese culture and arts, studying the Japanese language after she was 22 in Montreal. She talks about how she learned paper-folding (origami), to make silk dolls, flower-arranging (Ikebana), and how to wear a kimono, and …
Date Range
1942-1969
Length
00:07:41
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s growing interest in Japanese culture and arts, studying the Japanese language after she was 22 in Montreal. She talks about how she learned paper-folding (origami), to make silk dolls, flower-arranging (Ikebana), and how to wear a kimono, and then began to teach others these skills in Montreal .
Date Range
1942-1969
Length
00:07:41
Subject
Education
Arts
Persons - Japanese Canadians
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 27, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Toki Miyashita, conducted by Rod Fowler. Toki Miyashita was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, her awakening interest in Japanese culture after the war, her subsequent interest in teaching others about Japanese crafts and arts, and becoming a helpful intermediary between Burnaby and visitors from Japan. The interview explores her interest in the Ainu of Japan and their possible link to the aboriginals of BC, her impressions of the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko, and her involvement in the events surrounding the creation of the sculpture “Playground of the Gods” for Burnaby Mountain. The interview also contains interesting details about the art of Japanese flower-arranging. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Toki Miyashita was born in Richmond B.C., ca. 1935, at the Nelson Brothers “fishery”, a second generation Canadian descended from the Oikawa family who settled on Don and Lion Islands (Oikawa-shima). In 1942 the Japanese Canadians in BC were forcibly moved from the coast and their belongings confiscated. Toki Miyashita, her parents, two brothers, and grandparents were first taken to Hastings Park where her father was separated from the family to work in road camps, and the rest of the family were interned in New Denver. Her resourceful grandmother moved the family to land outside the internment camp, growing a large garden from seeds brought with her. In 1946 the family moved to Kamloops and in 1958, after finishing high school, Toki Miyashita moved to Montreal to be with relatives and a small Japanese community. At this time she became interested in Japanese culture and took a Japanese language course at age 22. She learned about Japanese flower-arranging (Ikebana), paper folding (Origami), silk doll making (from a Russian Jew), and how to wear a kimono. She began demonstrating these arts in schools and to other groups, which she continued doing when she, her husband and two young children moved to Burnaby in 1969. Toki Miyashita has been called an unpaid “ambassador” of Japanese culture to the Lower Mainland. She has acted as liaison between Burnaby and her sister city Kushiro in Japan, which involved her in the creation of the Ainu sculpture “Playground of the Gods” on Burnaby Mountain for Burnaby’s Centennial. Toki Miyashita is a recognized Master in Ikebana Sogetsu, a school of flower-arranging, and has served on the board of the Vancouver Ikebana Association. She also served on Burnaby’s Family Court in the 1980s.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
01:34:10
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Miyashita, Toki
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-017_Track_2
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Toki Miyashita

Less detail

Interview with Toki Miyashita by Rod Fowler February 27, 1990 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory520
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s involvement in the Multicultural Society, flower-arranging groups, and her own practice and willingness to respond to requests for presentations. She describes how traditional rules govern doll-making, Ikebana and the wearing of the kimono.
Date Range
1969-1990
Length
00:07:05
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s involvement in the Multicultural Society, flower-arranging groups, and her own practice and willingness to respond to requests for presentations. She describes how traditional rules govern doll-making, Ikebana and the wearing of the kimono.
Date Range
1969-1990
Length
00:07:05
Subject
Arts
Education
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 27, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Toki Miyashita, conducted by Rod Fowler. Toki Miyashita was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, her awakening interest in Japanese culture after the war, her subsequent interest in teaching others about Japanese crafts and arts, and becoming a helpful intermediary between Burnaby and visitors from Japan. The interview explores her interest in the Ainu of Japan and their possible link to the aboriginals of BC, her impressions of the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko, and her involvement in the events surrounding the creation of the sculpture “Playground of the Gods” for Burnaby Mountain. The interview also contains interesting details about the art of Japanese flower-arranging. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Toki Miyashita was born in Richmond B.C., ca. 1935, at the Nelson Brothers “fishery”, a second generation Canadian descended from the Oikawa family who settled on Don and Lion Islands (Oikawa-shima). In 1942 the Japanese Canadians in BC were forcibly moved from the coast and their belongings confiscated. Toki Miyashita, her parents, two brothers, and grandparents were first taken to Hastings Park where her father was separated from the family to work in road camps, and the rest of the family were interned in New Denver. Her resourceful grandmother moved the family to land outside the internment camp, growing a large garden from seeds brought with her. In 1946 the family moved to Kamloops and in 1958, after finishing high school, Toki Miyashita moved to Montreal to be with relatives and a small Japanese community. At this time she became interested in Japanese culture and took a Japanese language course at age 22. She learned about Japanese flower-arranging (Ikebana), paper folding (Origami), silk doll making (from a Russian Jew), and how to wear a kimono. She began demonstrating these arts in schools and to other groups, which she continued doing when she, her husband and two young children moved to Burnaby in 1969. Toki Miyashita has been called an unpaid “ambassador” of Japanese culture to the Lower Mainland. She has acted as liaison between Burnaby and her sister city Kushiro in Japan, which involved her in the creation of the Ainu sculpture “Playground of the Gods” on Burnaby Mountain for Burnaby’s Centennial. Toki Miyashita is a recognized Master in Ikebana Sogetsu, a school of flower-arranging, and has served on the board of the Vancouver Ikebana Association. She also served on Burnaby’s Family Court in the 1980s.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
01:34:10
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Miyashita, Toki
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-017_Track_5
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Toki Miyashita

Less detail

Interview with Toki Miyashita by Rod Fowler February 27, 1990 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory524
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s involvement with the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko and her interest in the link between BC’s aboriginals and the Ainu of Japan. She describes Toko’s visits, her arrangement for Toko to meet Haida carver Bill Reid, and the events surrounding Burnaby…
Date Range
1980-1990
Length
00:19:08
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s involvement with the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko and her interest in the link between BC’s aboriginals and the Ainu of Japan. She describes Toko’s visits, her arrangement for Toko to meet Haida carver Bill Reid, and the events surrounding Burnaby’s sister-city Kushiro’s gift of Toko’s sculptures to Burnaby for the Centennial. She also describes Toko’s appreciation of the Haida totems and the native people of BC, and his gift of a set of carving tools to Chief Saul Terry
Date Range
1980-1990
Length
00:19:08
Name
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Burnaby Mountain Park
Kamui Mintara
Subject
Celebrations - Centennial
Ceremonial Artifacts - Totem Poles
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 27, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Toki Miyashita, conducted by Rod Fowler. Toki Miyashita was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, her awakening interest in Japanese culture after the war, her subsequent interest in teaching others about Japanese crafts and arts, and becoming a helpful intermediary between Burnaby and visitors from Japan. The interview explores her interest in the Ainu of Japan and their possible link to the aboriginals of BC, her impressions of the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko, and her involvement in the events surrounding the creation of the sculpture “Playground of the Gods” for Burnaby Mountain. The interview also contains interesting details about the art of Japanese flower-arranging. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Toki Miyashita was born in Richmond B.C., ca. 1935, at the Nelson Brothers “fishery”, a second generation Canadian descended from the Oikawa family who settled on Don and Lion Islands (Oikawa-shima). In 1942 the Japanese Canadians in BC were forcibly moved from the coast and their belongings confiscated. Toki Miyashita, her parents, two brothers, and grandparents were first taken to Hastings Park where her father was separated from the family to work in road camps, and the rest of the family were interned in New Denver. Her resourceful grandmother moved the family to land outside the internment camp, growing a large garden from seeds brought with her. In 1946 the family moved to Kamloops and in 1958, after finishing high school, Toki Miyashita moved to Montreal to be with relatives and a small Japanese community. At this time she became interested in Japanese culture and took a Japanese language course at age 22. She learned about Japanese flower-arranging (Ikebana), paper folding (Origami), silk doll making (from a Russian Jew), and how to wear a kimono. She began demonstrating these arts in schools and to other groups, which she continued doing when she, her husband and two young children moved to Burnaby in 1969. Toki Miyashita has been called an unpaid “ambassador” of Japanese culture to the Lower Mainland. She has acted as liaison between Burnaby and her sister city Kushiro in Japan, which involved her in the creation of the Ainu sculpture “Playground of the Gods” on Burnaby Mountain for Burnaby’s Centennial. Toki Miyashita is a recognized Master in Ikebana Sogetsu, a school of flower-arranging, and has served on the board of the Vancouver Ikebana Association. She also served on Burnaby’s Family Court in the 1980s.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
01:34:10
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Miyashita, Toki
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-017_Track_9
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track nine of interview with Toki Miyashita

Less detail

Interview with Toki Miyashita by Rod Fowler February 27, 1990 - Track 10

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory525
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s description of how Toko Nuburi and his son [Shusei] worked to create the pole carvings in 1989. She also relates that seeing Toko, a man of the north of Japan, explains her own physical characteristics
Date Range
1989-1990
Length
00:06:41
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s description of how Toko Nuburi and his son [Shusei] worked to create the pole carvings in 1989. She also relates that seeing Toko, a man of the north of Japan, explains her own physical characteristics
Date Range
1989-1990
Length
00:06:41
Name
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Burnaby Mountain Park
Kamui Mintara
Subject
Celebrations - Centennial
Ceremonial Artifacts - Totem Poles
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 27, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Toki Miyashita, conducted by Rod Fowler. Toki Miyashita was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, her awakening interest in Japanese culture after the war, her subsequent interest in teaching others about Japanese crafts and arts, and becoming a helpful intermediary between Burnaby and visitors from Japan. The interview explores her interest in the Ainu of Japan and their possible link to the aboriginals of BC, her impressions of the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko, and her involvement in the events surrounding the creation of the sculpture “Playground of the Gods” for Burnaby Mountain. The interview also contains interesting details about the art of Japanese flower-arranging. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Toki Miyashita was born in Richmond B.C., ca. 1935, at the Nelson Brothers “fishery”, a second generation Canadian descended from the Oikawa family who settled on Don and Lion Islands (Oikawa-shima). In 1942 the Japanese Canadians in BC were forcibly moved from the coast and their belongings confiscated. Toki Miyashita, her parents, two brothers, and grandparents were first taken to Hastings Park where her father was separated from the family to work in road camps, and the rest of the family were interned in New Denver. Her resourceful grandmother moved the family to land outside the internment camp, growing a large garden from seeds brought with her. In 1946 the family moved to Kamloops and in 1958, after finishing high school, Toki Miyashita moved to Montreal to be with relatives and a small Japanese community. At this time she became interested in Japanese culture and took a Japanese language course at age 22. She learned about Japanese flower-arranging (Ikebana), paper folding (Origami), silk doll making (from a Russian Jew), and how to wear a kimono. She began demonstrating these arts in schools and to other groups, which she continued doing when she, her husband and two young children moved to Burnaby in 1969. Toki Miyashita has been called an unpaid “ambassador” of Japanese culture to the Lower Mainland. She has acted as liaison between Burnaby and her sister city Kushiro in Japan, which involved her in the creation of the Ainu sculpture “Playground of the Gods” on Burnaby Mountain for Burnaby’s Centennial. Toki Miyashita is a recognized Master in Ikebana Sogetsu, a school of flower-arranging, and has served on the board of the Vancouver Ikebana Association. She also served on Burnaby’s Family Court in the 1980s.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
01:34:10
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Miyashita, Toki
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-017_Track_10
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track ten of interview with Toki Miyashita

Less detail

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