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17 records – page 1 of 1.

Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV985.4184.1
Description
Tub shaped coiled cedar root basket with cedar root foundation and overcast rim. Walls of basket flare slightly towards rim. Imbricated with designs in red cherry bark and grass. Design is known as cluster of flies. The foot on the bottom of the basket, made from two extra rows of coiling, is a fea…
Object History
White beading on the foot of the basket is said to be a feature typical of Spuzzum. This was reported by basket makers from that community during collections research conducted at MOA to Sharon Fortney and Bill Mclennan.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV985.4184.1
Description
Tub shaped coiled cedar root basket with cedar root foundation and overcast rim. Walls of basket flare slightly towards rim. Imbricated with designs in red cherry bark and grass. Design is known as cluster of flies. The foot on the bottom of the basket, made from two extra rows of coiling, is a feature that protects the base of the basket from wear and tear. White beading on the foot. Interior Salish: Nlaka’pamux: Spuzzum possibly
Object History
White beading on the foot of the basket is said to be a feature typical of Spuzzum. This was reported by basket makers from that community during collections research conducted at MOA to Sharon Fortney and Bill Mclennan.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
Nlaka'pamux
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV978.2.12
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation. Parallel slat construction for lid, which is covered in beaded designs. Overcast handles attach to the front and back of basket at both ends. Conoid lid fits overtop of the basket, rather than lying flat. Basket body is completely imb…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV978.2.12
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation. Parallel slat construction for lid, which is covered in beaded designs. Overcast handles attach to the front and back of basket at both ends. Conoid lid fits overtop of the basket, rather than lying flat. Basket body is completely imbricated with canary grass, black-dyed and red cherry bark. This amount of decoration more common on older pieces and was used to protect the surface of the basket. Leather hinges attach lid to body of basket and there are leather ties at front on lid and body of basket. Possible ladder design. Interior Salish: Nlaka’pamux
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
Nlaka'pamux
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV978.2.13
Description
Nut-shaped, coiled cedar root basket with cedar root foundation and watch-spring base and lid construction. Hinged lid is attached with leather ties. Covered in beading, where in the decorative elements are laid flat on surface, rather than folded into cedar root stitches as is done with imbricatio…
Object History
Nut-shaped baskets are identified as one of the oldest types by Haeberlin and Teit (1928: 202-3). They were used for storing berries and were also common work baskets for women, used to hold small tools – awls, thread, shells, trinkets and other odds and ends (202)
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV978.2.13
Description
Nut-shaped, coiled cedar root basket with cedar root foundation and watch-spring base and lid construction. Hinged lid is attached with leather ties. Covered in beading, where in the decorative elements are laid flat on surface, rather than folded into cedar root stitches as is done with imbrication. Designs are in red and black dyed cherry bark. Interior Salish: Nlaka’pamux
Object History
Nut-shaped baskets are identified as one of the oldest types by Haeberlin and Teit (1928: 202-3). They were used for storing berries and were also common work baskets for women, used to hold small tools – awls, thread, shells, trinkets and other odds and ends (202)
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
Nlaka'pamux
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV974.119.1
Description
Trapezoidal shaped, coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation. Finished with an overcast rim with root foundation. Design elements missing from one side of the basket. Steeply angled sides. Coast Salish: Squamish? Interior Salish: Stl’atl’imx: Lil’wat?
Object History
The donor reported that the baskets were traded in the early 1920s for clothes by the donor's mother, who lived in North Vancouver. Her mother told her the "Capilano Indians" used to go door to door with their baskets in North Vancouver. Design elements missing from one side of the basket – possibl…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV974.119.1
Description
Trapezoidal shaped, coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation. Finished with an overcast rim with root foundation. Design elements missing from one side of the basket. Steeply angled sides.
Coast Salish: Squamish? Interior Salish: Stl’atl’imx: Lil’wat?
Object History
The donor reported that the baskets were traded in the early 1920s for clothes by the donor's mother, who lived in North Vancouver. Her mother told her the "Capilano Indians" used to go door to door with their baskets in North Vancouver.
Design elements missing from one side of the basket – possibly the side that would have rested against the owner’s back.
Steeply angled sides keep berries from crushing those at bottom of basket. Work baskets have sides that are more rounded.
Baskets like these were used with a woven tumpline (wool strap) that was worn against the forehead, while basket was carried on back.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
Stl’atl’imx
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV974.119.2
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation and remnants of a loopwork rim. The shiny appearance of this grass suggests it is canary grass. Black dyed and red cherry bark are used for the zigzag designs. Coast Salish: Squamish?
Object History
The donor reported that the baskets were traded in the early 1920s for clothes by the donor's mother, who lived in North Vancouver. Her mother told her the "Capilano Indians" used to go door to door with their baskets in North Vancouver. Zig zags are sometimes referred to as lightening or snake tra…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV974.119.2
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation and remnants of a loopwork rim. The shiny appearance of this grass suggests it is canary grass. Black dyed and red cherry bark are used for the zigzag designs. Coast Salish: Squamish?
Object History
The donor reported that the baskets were traded in the early 1920s for clothes by the donor's mother, who lived in North Vancouver. Her mother told her the "Capilano Indians" used to go door to door with their baskets in North Vancouver.
Zig zags are sometimes referred to as lightening or snake tracks.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
Squamish
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV974.119.3
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation, lid has parallel slat construction and is covered with beaded designs edged by imbrication in canary grass. Basket has a flat lid that is hinged to body with leather ties. A mistake was made in how the design was applied to one end of…
Object History
The donor reported that the baskets were traded in the early 1920s for clothes by the donor's mother, who lived in North Vancouver. Her mother told her the "Capilano Indians" used to go door to door with their baskets in North Vancouver. Diamonds are considered a star pattern and are common to Squa…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV974.119.3
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation, lid has parallel slat construction and is covered with beaded designs edged by imbrication in canary grass. Basket has a flat lid that is hinged to body with leather ties. A mistake was made in how the design was applied to one end of this basket. This is not common as many weavers would correct this mistake. Completely imbricated walls, beaded design on lid. Coast Salish: Squamish?
Object History
The donor reported that the baskets were traded in the early 1920s for clothes by the donor's mother, who lived in North Vancouver. Her mother told her the "Capilano Indians" used to go door to door with their baskets in North Vancouver.
Diamonds are considered a star pattern and are common to Squamish and Nlaka’pamux basketry. The main design resembles a ladder or fence and is uncommon
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
Culture
Squamish
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV973.69.4
Description
Rectangular shaped coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundations and triangular shaped posterior wall that is higher than the other three. There is a small opening at the top of this wall to allow the basket to be hung. Designs are done in black dyed cherry bark. Beaded designs are made by l…
Object History
A comb basket that was created for sale or trade. The chevron shaped designs are associated with flying geese, and are also used for knitting and weavings. The designs at the top of the basket, above the opening, are called cluster of flies. These designs are common amongst the Coast Salish. There …
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV973.69.4
Description
Rectangular shaped coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundations and triangular shaped posterior wall that is higher than the other three. There is a small opening at the top of this wall to allow the basket to be hung.
Designs are done in black dyed cherry bark. Beaded designs are made by laying decorative materials flat over the surface of the coils, and securing them in place with alternating stitches of the cedar root.
Coast Salish: Tsleil-Waututh?
Object History
A comb basket that was created for sale or trade. The chevron shaped designs are associated with flying geese, and are also used for knitting and weavings. The designs at the top of the basket, above the opening, are called cluster of flies. These designs are common amongst the Coast Salish. There are spaces where the foundation materials show, rows are not even width, the beaded designs are irregular. These are often traits associated with learning.
Measurements
Wth. 3 1/2 inches X Lth. 8 1/4 inches
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
School/Style
Salish
Culture
Tsleil-Waututh
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV973.79.1
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation. Parallel slat base and lid. Walls of basket flare slightly towards the rim. Basket has a conoid lid – one that fits over top of a flange on the rim of the basket. Rim is inset. Sets of triangular shaped stitches attach base to walls. …
Object History
Design variant is uncommon. This may be a zoomorphic design possibly representing an animal head or flying bird.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
HV973.79.1
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation. Parallel slat base and lid. Walls of basket flare slightly towards the rim. Basket has a conoid lid – one that fits over top of a flange on the rim of the basket. Rim is inset. Sets of triangular shaped stitches attach base to walls. Base of basket is protected by a foot, one slat high. Grass used for imbricated designs has a flat appearance typical of cattail grass. Black dyed and red cherry bark used for other design elements. Handles missing
Object History
Design variant is uncommon. This may be a zoomorphic design possibly representing an animal head or flying bird.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
School/Style
Salish
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV006.24.5
Description
The basket is round with a lid and has a geometric design in black. Made using the coiled method
Object History
Resembles California and Southwestern style baskets made of willow, dye and grass.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV006.24.5
Description
The basket is round with a lid and has a geometric design in black. Made using the coiled method
Object History
Resembles California and Southwestern style baskets made of willow, dye and grass.
Country Made
United States of America
Province Made
California
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV006.24.6
Description
The basket is round with a lid and has a geometric design in black. Made using the coiled method.
Object History
Resembles California and Southwestern style baskets made of willow, dye and grass.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV006.24.6
Description
The basket is round with a lid and has a geometric design in black. Made using the coiled method.
Object History
Resembles California and Southwestern style baskets made of willow, dye and grass.
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV009.1.1
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation and walls that flare slightly towards rim. Decorated in beaded designs of cattail grass and black dyed cherry bark. Darker elements arranged in a butterfly design. Butterflies are said to represent everlasting life by Stó:lo and Nlaka’…
Object History
Basket, ca. 1895-1910, from the collection of the L. Claude Hill family, who owned the property that became the Burnaby Village Museum. According to the Hill family, L. Claude's wife Anne Sarah Hill (nee Kendrick) traded blankets for baskets, although it is not known if this particular basket was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV009.1.1
Description
Rectangular coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation and walls that flare slightly towards rim. Decorated in beaded designs of cattail grass and black dyed cherry bark. Darker elements arranged in a butterfly design. Butterflies are said to represent everlasting life by Stó:lo and Nlaka’pamux basket makers. Overcast handles sewn to basket with leather ties. One has been repaired with string. Finished with a braided rim. Triangular shaped stitches attach base to walls of basket. Interior Salish: Stl’atl’imx?
Object History
Basket, ca. 1895-1910, from the collection of the L. Claude Hill family, who owned the property that became the Burnaby Village Museum. According to the Hill family, L. Claude's wife Anne Sarah Hill (nee Kendrick) traded blankets for baskets, although it is not known if this particular basket was obtained in this manner. Indigenous people travelled the trail that crossed Deer Lake Brook (Douglas Road / Canada Way).
Measurements
Measurements: width 24 cm and length 44 cm and depth 18 cm. All measured from top edge to outside.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
School/Style
Salish
Culture
Stl’atl’imx
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Hill, Annie Sara Kenrick
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV009.1.2
Description
Oval shaped coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation. Overcast rim with remnants of a loopwork border. Decorated with vertical stripes of imbricated designs in canary grass and black dyed cherry bark. Cherry bark can be distinguished by the small eyes in the surface of the bark. If the b…
Object History
Basket, ca. 1895-1910, from the collection of the L. Claude Hill family, who owned the property that became the Burnaby Village Museum. According to the Hill family, L. Claude's wife Anne Sarah Hill (nee Kendrick) traded blankets for baskets, although it is not known if this particular basket was o…
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV009.1.2
Description
Oval shaped coiled cedar root basket with cedar slat foundation. Overcast rim with remnants of a loopwork border. Decorated with vertical stripes of imbricated designs in canary grass and black dyed cherry bark. Cherry bark can be distinguished by the small eyes in the surface of the bark. If the basket maker is skilled the bark has a shiny appearance, if it has not been scraped properly it has a greyish tinge. Canary grass is differentiated from cattail and bear grass by its shiny appearance according to a Stó:lo/Stl’atl’imx elder and basket maker from Mount Currie, who was married into Upper Squamish.
Object History
Basket, ca. 1895-1910, from the collection of the L. Claude Hill family, who owned the property that became the Burnaby Village Museum. According to the Hill family, L. Claude's wife Anne Sarah Hill (nee Kendrick) traded blankets for baskets, although it is not known if this particular basket was obtained in this manner. Indigenous people travelled the trail that crossed Deer Lake Brook (Douglas Road / Canada Way).
Measurements
Measurements: width 31.5 cm and length 51.5 cm and depth 19.5 cm all measured from top edge to outside of basket, not including trim.
Country Made
Canada
Province Made
British Columbia
School/Style
Salish
Culture
First Nations
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Name Access
Hill, Louis Claude "Claude"
Hill, Annie Sara Kenrick
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.12.1
Description
tray; a First Nations made, basketry tray; low sides and two raised handles opposite each other; decorative star or flower pattern woven into the bottom in varying shades of brown; multiple areas of loss around outer sides of rim.
Object History
The tray and two baskets (see BV017.11.3 and BV017.11.4) were acquired by the donor's grandparents, Matilda and Robert William Handel, when they were living in North Vancouver. They were made by one of the local First Nations weavers, name unknown.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.12.1
Description
tray; a First Nations made, basketry tray; low sides and two raised handles opposite each other; decorative star or flower pattern woven into the bottom in varying shades of brown; multiple areas of loss around outer sides of rim.
Object History
The tray and two baskets (see BV017.11.3 and BV017.11.4) were acquired by the donor's grandparents, Matilda and Robert William Handel, when they were living in North Vancouver. They were made by one of the local First Nations weavers, name unknown.
Measurements
Approx. Dia.: 43 cm
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.11.3
Description
basket with lid; First Nations basket with lid; The basket is round, with two handles opposite each other. The handles are wrapped twine. The wrapping is missing from one handle. The lid has a knob handle in the centre. Basket and lid are decorated with a dark and light spiraling pattern. Had been …
Object History
The basket was acquired by the donor's grandparents, Matilda and Robert William Handel, when they were living in North Vancouver. They were made by one of the local First Nations weavers, name unknown.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.11.3
Description
basket with lid; First Nations basket with lid; The basket is round, with two handles opposite each other. The handles are wrapped twine. The wrapping is missing from one handle. The lid has a knob handle in the centre. Basket and lid are decorated with a dark and light spiraling pattern. Had been used for storing knitting.
Object History
The basket was acquired by the donor's grandparents, Matilda and Robert William Handel, when they were living in North Vancouver. They were made by one of the local First Nations weavers, name unknown.
Measurements
Approx. H: 32 cm Dia.: 34 cm
Culture
Musqueam
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.11.4
Description
basket with lid; First Nations basket with lid; The basket is round, with a single handle (opposite handle is missing). The lid has a knob handle in the centre. Basket and lid are decorated with a dark and light spiraling pattern. Had been used for storing knitting.
Object History
The basket was acquired by the donor's grandparents, Matilda and Robert William Handel, when they were living in North Vancouver. They were made by one of the local First Nations weavers, name unknown.
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV017.11.4
Description
basket with lid; First Nations basket with lid; The basket is round, with a single handle (opposite handle is missing). The lid has a knob handle in the centre. Basket and lid are decorated with a dark and light spiraling pattern. Had been used for storing knitting.
Object History
The basket was acquired by the donor's grandparents, Matilda and Robert William Handel, when they were living in North Vancouver. They were made by one of the local First Nations weavers, name unknown.
Measurements
Approx. H: 37 cm Dia.: 36 cm
Culture
Musqueam
Subjects
Persons
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Container
Container - Baskets
Record Type
Artifact
Images
Less detail

Interview with Toki Miyashita by Rod Fowler February 27, 1990 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory524
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s involvement with the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko and her interest in the link between BC’s aboriginals and the Ainu of Japan. She describes Toko’s visits, her arrangement for Toko to meet Haida carver Bill Reid, and the events surrounding Burnaby…
Date Range
1980-1990
Length
00:19:08
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s involvement with the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko and her interest in the link between BC’s aboriginals and the Ainu of Japan. She describes Toko’s visits, her arrangement for Toko to meet Haida carver Bill Reid, and the events surrounding Burnaby’s sister-city Kushiro’s gift of Toko’s sculptures to Burnaby for the Centennial. She also describes Toko’s appreciation of the Haida totems and the native people of BC, and his gift of a set of carving tools to Chief Saul Terry
Date Range
1980-1990
Length
00:19:08
Name
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Burnaby Mountain Park
Kamui Mintara
Subject
Celebrations - Centennial
Ceremonial Artifacts - Totem Poles
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 27, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Toki Miyashita, conducted by Rod Fowler. Toki Miyashita was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, her awakening interest in Japanese culture after the war, her subsequent interest in teaching others about Japanese crafts and arts, and becoming a helpful intermediary between Burnaby and visitors from Japan. The interview explores her interest in the Ainu of Japan and their possible link to the aboriginals of BC, her impressions of the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko, and her involvement in the events surrounding the creation of the sculpture “Playground of the Gods” for Burnaby Mountain. The interview also contains interesting details about the art of Japanese flower-arranging. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Toki Miyashita was born in Richmond B.C., ca. 1935, at the Nelson Brothers “fishery”, a second generation Canadian descended from the Oikawa family who settled on Don and Lion Islands (Oikawa-shima). In 1942 the Japanese Canadians in BC were forcibly moved from the coast and their belongings confiscated. Toki Miyashita, her parents, two brothers, and grandparents were first taken to Hastings Park where her father was separated from the family to work in road camps, and the rest of the family were interned in New Denver. Her resourceful grandmother moved the family to land outside the internment camp, growing a large garden from seeds brought with her. In 1946 the family moved to Kamloops and in 1958, after finishing high school, Toki Miyashita moved to Montreal to be with relatives and a small Japanese community. At this time she became interested in Japanese culture and took a Japanese language course at age 22. She learned about Japanese flower-arranging (Ikebana), paper folding (Origami), silk doll making (from a Russian Jew), and how to wear a kimono. She began demonstrating these arts in schools and to other groups, which she continued doing when she, her husband and two young children moved to Burnaby in 1969. Toki Miyashita has been called an unpaid “ambassador” of Japanese culture to the Lower Mainland. She has acted as liaison between Burnaby and her sister city Kushiro in Japan, which involved her in the creation of the Ainu sculpture “Playground of the Gods” on Burnaby Mountain for Burnaby’s Centennial. Toki Miyashita is a recognized Master in Ikebana Sogetsu, a school of flower-arranging, and has served on the board of the Vancouver Ikebana Association. She also served on Burnaby’s Family Court in the 1980s.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
01:34:10
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Miyashita, Toki
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-017_Track_9
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track nine of interview with Toki Miyashita

Less detail

Interview with Toki Miyashita by Rod Fowler February 27, 1990 - Track 10

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory525
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s description of how Toko Nuburi and his son [Shusei] worked to create the pole carvings in 1989. She also relates that seeing Toko, a man of the north of Japan, explains her own physical characteristics
Date Range
1989-1990
Length
00:06:41
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s description of how Toko Nuburi and his son [Shusei] worked to create the pole carvings in 1989. She also relates that seeing Toko, a man of the north of Japan, explains her own physical characteristics
Date Range
1989-1990
Length
00:06:41
Name
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Burnaby Mountain Park
Kamui Mintara
Subject
Celebrations - Centennial
Ceremonial Artifacts - Totem Poles
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 27, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Toki Miyashita, conducted by Rod Fowler. Toki Miyashita was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, her awakening interest in Japanese culture after the war, her subsequent interest in teaching others about Japanese crafts and arts, and becoming a helpful intermediary between Burnaby and visitors from Japan. The interview explores her interest in the Ainu of Japan and their possible link to the aboriginals of BC, her impressions of the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko, and her involvement in the events surrounding the creation of the sculpture “Playground of the Gods” for Burnaby Mountain. The interview also contains interesting details about the art of Japanese flower-arranging. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Toki Miyashita was born in Richmond B.C., ca. 1935, at the Nelson Brothers “fishery”, a second generation Canadian descended from the Oikawa family who settled on Don and Lion Islands (Oikawa-shima). In 1942 the Japanese Canadians in BC were forcibly moved from the coast and their belongings confiscated. Toki Miyashita, her parents, two brothers, and grandparents were first taken to Hastings Park where her father was separated from the family to work in road camps, and the rest of the family were interned in New Denver. Her resourceful grandmother moved the family to land outside the internment camp, growing a large garden from seeds brought with her. In 1946 the family moved to Kamloops and in 1958, after finishing high school, Toki Miyashita moved to Montreal to be with relatives and a small Japanese community. At this time she became interested in Japanese culture and took a Japanese language course at age 22. She learned about Japanese flower-arranging (Ikebana), paper folding (Origami), silk doll making (from a Russian Jew), and how to wear a kimono. She began demonstrating these arts in schools and to other groups, which she continued doing when she, her husband and two young children moved to Burnaby in 1969. Toki Miyashita has been called an unpaid “ambassador” of Japanese culture to the Lower Mainland. She has acted as liaison between Burnaby and her sister city Kushiro in Japan, which involved her in the creation of the Ainu sculpture “Playground of the Gods” on Burnaby Mountain for Burnaby’s Centennial. Toki Miyashita is a recognized Master in Ikebana Sogetsu, a school of flower-arranging, and has served on the board of the Vancouver Ikebana Association. She also served on Burnaby’s Family Court in the 1980s.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
01:34:10
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Interviewee Name
Miyashita, Toki
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-017_Track_10
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track ten of interview with Toki Miyashita

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