Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Burnaby Mountain Park & Centennial Pavilion

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark794
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
100 Centennial Way
Associated Dates
1958
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
100 Centennial Way
Associated Dates
1958
Heritage Value
The first formal park dedication bylaw covering Burnaby Mountain was passed in 1942, but the boundaries were re-adjusted in 1952 with the creation of the Trans Mountain Pipeline site. Significant portions of the mountain remained as dedicated park, however, and in 1957, the site was chosen to house Burnaby's contribution to the celebration of British Columbia's centennial - the Centennial Pavilion. The grounds around the pavilion became a favourite picnic site that provided for the first time a formal viewpoint and public access to other mountain trails. In the 1980s, the Pavilion underwent major renovations and opened in 1986 as Horizons restaurant.
Historic Neighbourhood
Barnet (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 100 Centennial Way
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
Less detail

Hastings Grove Neighbourhood

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark746
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1905-1924
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1905-1924
Heritage Value
During the height of the real estate boom between 1909 and 1913, Vancouver developer Frederick Munson plotted the subdivision of more than 150 acres of land on Curtis Street east of Sperling Avenue, on the newly logged slopes of remote Burnaby Mountain. Burnaby opened up Curtis Street to facilitate access to Hastings Grove and Munson agreed to pay one-third of the cost but never did. He also paid only $1000.00 down on the agreed price of the land. When he failed to make further payments, the mortgage holders foreclosed and re-sold the properties. People who had bought lots from Munson lost not only the land they though they owned, but also the money they had paid for it. Hastings Grove was a disaster. The converted automobile - which served as the bus - stopped running. The few houses and most of the lots reverted to the Municipality because of non-payment of taxes and are now part of Burnaby Mountain Park. The only remaining building is the old Hastings Grove Store which still stands as an apartment building.
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Images
Less detail
Back to top
Back to Top