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Interview with Mary Lumby by Kathy Bossort January 8, 2016 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory672
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about living in the Forest Hills community, the location of the Burnaby Mountain Urban Trail in Forest Hills, and the Forest Grove community and school. She explains why parents were hesitant to let children play in the conservation area uns…
Date Range
1983-2003
Length
0:10:08
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about living in the Forest Hills community, the location of the Burnaby Mountain Urban Trail in Forest Hills, and the Forest Grove community and school. She explains why parents were hesitant to let children play in the conservation area unsupervised. She tells a story about her children selling pop to the golfers on the Burnaby Mountain Golf Course.
Date Range
1983-2003
Length
0:10:08
Name
Burnaby Mountain Urban Trail
Burnaby Mountain Golf Course
Subject
Geographic Features - Trails
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Persons - Children
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Forest Hills
Planning Study Area
Lake City Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 8, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Mary Lumby conducted by Kathy Bossort. Mary Lumby was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Mary Lumby’s experience living in Forest Hills, raising her children there, and her involvement in community groups and advocating for improved community services in the Forest Hills and Forest Grove neighbourhoods, and her later move to UniverCity. She talks about the history of the Forest Hills subdivision and what she liked about living there, its links with Forest Grove, and challenges facing both communities as a result of their isolation. Her description of living in UniverCity provides an interesting comparison in how community is created. Mary Lumby also talks about her teaching career, her volunteer activities especially related to the environment, the relationship Trans Mountain tank farm had with adjacent neighbourhoods when she lived in Forest Hills, and what the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area means to her.
Biographical Notes
Mary Lumby was born in Vancouver B.C. She moved to Burnaby and the Parkcrest area in 1977, and then to the new Forest Hills subdivision. Later she moved into another developing community, UniverCity, at the top of Burnaby Mountain and adjacent to the Simon Fraser University campus. Mary has been an active community member, volunteer and community advocate. She has been particularly interested in environmental issues, as a teacher, volunteer coordinator for civic events, and citizen representative on Burnaby’s Environment Committee. She continues to be active in community affairs and enjoys living on Burnaby Mountain.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:31:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lumby, Mary M.
Interview Location
Mary Lumby's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-016_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Mary Lumby

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Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory570
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s description of the operation and location of the Olofson’s mink ranch, the challenges of raising mink, and when the family gave up the farm in 1950/51. She describes how she and her sister Anita Lea used a bicycle to go to school.
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:14:54
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s description of the operation and location of the Olofson’s mink ranch, the challenges of raising mink, and when the family gave up the farm in 1950/51. She describes how she and her sister Anita Lea used a bicycle to go to school.
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:14:54
Name
Olofson, Axel
GAK Fur Farm
Sperling Avenue School
Subject
Agriculture
Industries - Fur Trade
Occupations - Farmers
Transportation
Persons - Children
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Westridge Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Other Tracks
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Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Maureen Olofson

Less detail

Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory572
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s childhood at her family’s mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain. She describes neighbourhood friends, pets, playing on the farm and in the bush, going to town, and what the mountain looked like
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:13:41
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s childhood at her family’s mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain. She describes neighbourhood friends, pets, playing on the farm and in the bush, going to town, and what the mountain looked like
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:13:41
Name
Olofson, Axel
GAK Fur Farm
Subject
Persons - Children
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Westridge Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Maureen Olofson

Less detail

Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory576
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson telling several stories about events she remembers from her childhood on her parents mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain and going to Sperling Avenue School.
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:06:57
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson telling several stories about events she remembers from her childhood on her parents mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain and going to Sperling Avenue School.
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:06:57
Name
GAK Fur Farm
Sperling Avenue School
Subject
Recreational Activities
Persons - Children
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Maureen Olofson

Less detail

Interview with Reidun Seim by Kathy Bossort January 13, 2016 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory650
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about her father’s immigration to the USA in 1904 at age 16, his return to Norway and marrying Martine, her parents emigration from Norway to Vancouver in 1930, her father’s purchase of an acre of land on Curtis Street and building a two ro…
Date Range
1904-1940
Length
0:11:22
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim talking about her father’s immigration to the USA in 1904 at age 16, his return to Norway and marrying Martine, her parents emigration from Norway to Vancouver in 1930, her father’s purchase of an acre of land on Curtis Street and building a two room house for the family, Reidun’s birth in 1931, and the family’s move to Curtis Street in 1932. She talks about her childhood memories of playing on a big stump and cedar log in the yard.
Date Range
1904-1940
Length
0:11:22
Name
Seim, Sjur
Seim, Martine
Subject
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Land Clearing
Persons - Children
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 7300 Block Curtis Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 13, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Reidun Seim conducted by Kathy Bossort. Reidun Seim was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Reidun Seim’s memories about her parent’s farm on Curtis Street, events in her childhood, and the people who lived in or visited her neighborhood. She takes us on a tour of her neighborhood in the 1940s, telling us stories about families who lived on Curtis Street on and east of 7300 block, including people who lived on Burnaby Mountain in the old Hastings Grove subdivision above the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue. She describes changes to Curtis Street, particularly after it provided access to Simon Fraser University in 1965. She also talks about her teaching career, and about how she values the green space and conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Reidun Seim was born in 1931 in Vancouver B.C. to Sjur and Martine Seim. Sjur and Martine Seim emigrated to Canada from Norway in 1930, and after settling in Vancouver, moved to an acre of land and a new home at the base of Burnaby Mountain in 1932. Sjur attended UBC to learn about poultry farming and began his own chicken and egg business in 1935. The farm animals and large garden also contributed to the family’s livelihood and self-sufficiency. The Curtis Street neighborhood was a lively place and extended well up Curtis Street on the west slope of Burnaby Mountain, where Reidun would babysit for families. Reidun attended Sperling Avenue Elementary School (Gr. 1-8), Burnaby North High School, and Vancouver Normal School for teacher training in 1950-1951. She began teaching primary grades in Port Coquitlam at James Park School. Most of her career was spent in North Delta, teaching at Kennedy and Annieville schools from 1954-1958, appointed Primary Consultant (1958-1960) and Primary Supervisor (1960-1985), before retiring in 1986. Reidun lived at home with her parents on Curtis Street, commuting to Delta, and continues to live in the original farmhouse.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
2:35:58
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Seim, Reidun
Interview Location
Burnaby City Hall in the Law Library
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-017_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Reidun Seim

Less detail

Interview with Reidun Seim by Kathy Bossort January 13, 2016 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory657
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim telling stories about her mother building Reidun and her friends a playhouse, about walking on Burnaby Mountain and cutting Christmas trees, and tobogganing on Curtis Street.
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:08:05
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Reidun Seim telling stories about her mother building Reidun and her friends a playhouse, about walking on Burnaby Mountain and cutting Christmas trees, and tobogganing on Curtis Street.
Date Range
1930-1950
Length
0:08:05
Subject
Recreational Activities
Persons - Children
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Lochdale Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 13, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Reidun Seim conducted by Kathy Bossort. Reidun Seim was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Reidun Seim’s memories about her parent’s farm on Curtis Street, events in her childhood, and the people who lived in or visited her neighborhood. She takes us on a tour of her neighborhood in the 1940s, telling us stories about families who lived on Curtis Street on and east of 7300 block, including people who lived on Burnaby Mountain in the old Hastings Grove subdivision above the end of municipal water service at Philips Avenue. She describes changes to Curtis Street, particularly after it provided access to Simon Fraser University in 1965. She also talks about her teaching career, and about how she values the green space and conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Reidun Seim was born in 1931 in Vancouver B.C. to Sjur and Martine Seim. Sjur and Martine Seim emigrated to Canada from Norway in 1930, and after settling in Vancouver, moved to an acre of land and a new home at the base of Burnaby Mountain in 1932. Sjur attended UBC to learn about poultry farming and began his own chicken and egg business in 1935. The farm animals and large garden also contributed to the family’s livelihood and self-sufficiency. The Curtis Street neighborhood was a lively place and extended well up Curtis Street on the west slope of Burnaby Mountain, where Reidun would babysit for families. Reidun attended Sperling Avenue Elementary School (Gr. 1-8), Burnaby North High School, and Vancouver Normal School for teacher training in 1950-1951. She began teaching primary grades in Port Coquitlam at James Park School. Most of her career was spent in North Delta, teaching at Kennedy and Annieville schools from 1954-1958, appointed Primary Consultant (1958-1960) and Primary Supervisor (1960-1985), before retiring in 1986. Reidun lived at home with her parents on Curtis Street, commuting to Delta, and continues to live in the original farmhouse.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
2:35:58
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Seim, Reidun
Interview Location
Burnaby City Hall in the Law Library
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-017_Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Reidun Seim

Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory547
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s early life growing up in the Cascade-Schou District, playing in the bush as a child, fishing at Stoney Creek, tobogganing on Burnaby Mountain, and learning more about nature as an adult. He also talks about the Pavilion area restaurant calle…
Date Range
1955-1990
Length
0:08:36
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s early life growing up in the Cascade-Schou District, playing in the bush as a child, fishing at Stoney Creek, tobogganing on Burnaby Mountain, and learning more about nature as an adult. He also talks about the Pavilion area restaurant called “The Owl and the Oarsman”.
Date Range
1955-1990
Length
0:08:36
Name
The Owl and the Oarsman Restaurant
Subject
Persons - Children
Plants
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Broadview (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Cascade-Schou Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Tony Fabian by Kathy Bossort October 29, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory596
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Tony Fabian’s memories of his childhood and growing up in Saskatchewan and Richmond BC. He tells about being taken from his family at an early age and being placed with an immigrant farming family; how hard life was as a child working on a farm; and the often …
Date Range
1934-1955
Length
0:20:52
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Tony Fabian’s memories of his childhood and growing up in Saskatchewan and Richmond BC. He tells about being taken from his family at an early age and being placed with an immigrant farming family; how hard life was as a child working on a farm; and the often abusive ways he saw people treat farmland and animals. He relates how his experiences developed his land ethic and love of nature.
Date Range
1934-1955
Length
0:20:52
Subject
Industries - Agriculture
Persons - Children
Geographic Access
Saskatchewan - Fort Battleford
British Columbia - Richmond
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 29, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Tony Fabian conducted by Kathy Bossort. Tony Fabian was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Tony Fabian’s part in park creation and protection of natural areas in Burnaby, particularly as a member of the Park and Recreation Commission in the 1970s; his childhood and how that contributed to his land ethic; and the history of the uses made of and setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Tony S. Fabian was born in 1934 in north Saskatchewan. At less than a year old Tony, along with his siblings, was removed from his family home and eventually placed with an immigrant farm family. As a child he worked on the farm and witnessed what he considered abusive treatment of the land and farm animals. When he was about 12 years old his adoptive family moved to the BC coast where he went on his own, working for a variety of farmers in Richmond and Delta. At 19 he contracted polio, quit farm work, and found work with the telephone company. In 1956 Tony married, and in 1957 he and his wife moved to a home on Hardwick Street in Burnaby where he still lives. Tony entered civic politics in the 1960s when he objected to development on Hardwick Park and became concerned about the destruction of Burnaby’s natural landscapes. He became a life long advocate for preserving natural areas and helped to create large parks in Burnaby on the foreshore of the Fraser River and on Burrard Inlet. He served as a member of the Parks and Recreation Commission 1970-1975, is a long time volunteer with the Burnaby Lake Park Association, and continues to stay current on local and regional environmental issues. In 2008 Tony was presented with the City of Burnaby Environment Award for Community Stewardship.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:43:22
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Fabian, Tony S.
Interview Location
Tony Fabian's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-007_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Tony Fabian

Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.

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