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Speech given by Jack Davy November 8, 1972 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory234
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to opening remarks given by Dr. Blythe Eagles for Jack Davy's speech. Jack begins his talk by telling anecdotes of early Burnaby school trustees and of early Burnaby teachers.
Date Range
1893-1957
Length
0:09:39
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to opening remarks given by Dr. Blythe Eagles for Jack Davy's speech. Jack begins his talk by telling anecdotes of early Burnaby school trustees and of early Burnaby teachers.
Date Range
1893-1957
Length
0:09:39
Name
Edmonds Street School
Subject
Education
Interview Date
November 8, 1972
Scope and Content
Recording is of a speech given by John "Jack" Davy on November 8, 1972 to the Burnaby Historical Society on the subject of Edmonds School. Jack Davy is introduced by Dr. Blythe Eagles.
Biographical Notes
John “Jack” Davy was raised in New Westminster and his family and the Eagles' family were close friends, with the grandparents and parents getting together regularly to play cards. As a child, Jack delivered the Columbian newspaper. Jack Davy worked for Burnaby schools for over fifty years; twenty-five of those years as principal at Edmonds Street School. During the depression, he worked as a principal of Kitchener Street School.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:29:41
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Davy, Jack
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-1_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of speech given by Jack Davy

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Speech given by Jack Davy November 8, 1972 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory235
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Jack Davy's description of the first Edmonds Street School principal, school activities of the time to the demolition of what he describes as the old grey building.
Date Range
1908-1957
Length
0:09:44
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Jack Davy's description of the first Edmonds Street School principal, school activities of the time to the demolition of what he describes as the old grey building.
Date Range
1908-1957
Length
0:09:44
Name
Edmonds Street School
Subject
Education
Interview Date
November 8, 1972
Scope and Content
Recording is of a speech given by John "Jack" Davy on November 8, 1972 to the Burnaby Historical Society on the subject of Edmonds School. Jack Davy is introduced by Dr. Blythe Eagles.
Biographical Notes
John “Jack” Davy was raised in New Westminster and his family and the Eagles' family were close friends, with the grandparents and parents getting together regularly to play cards. As a child, Jack delivered the Columbian newspaper. Jack Davy worked for Burnaby schools for over fifty years; twenty-five of those years as principal at Edmonds Street School. During the depression, he worked as a principal of Kitchener Street School.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:29:41
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Davy, Jack
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-017-1_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of speech given by Jack Davy

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Interview with Vi Townley May 24, 1978 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory193
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Vi Townley's memories of her father-in-law Colonel Thomas O. Townley. Vi also describes favourite recreational activities of the time.
Date Range
1913-1935
Length
0:04:27
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Vi Townley's memories of her father-in-law Colonel Thomas O. Townley. Vi also describes favourite recreational activities of the time.
Date Range
1913-1935
Photo Info
Townley mansion known as Deerholme, 1913. Item no. 454-001
Length
0:04:27
Name
Townley, Thomas O
Interview Date
May 24, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Vi Townley, May 24, 1978. Major themes discussed are: Deerholme.
Biographical Notes
Vi Townley was the daughter-in-law of Colonel Thomas O. Townley and Frances Townley, the owners of Deerholme.
Total Tracks
2
Total Length
0:10:49
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Townley, Vi
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-014-2_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Vi Townley

Images
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Interview with John Ferguson July 3, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory180
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1931. He describes the neighbourhood of Vancouver Heights and the people that lived there. He also describes the types of goods he sold at his Vancouver Heights Hardware Store.
Date Range
1900-1939
Length
0:08:23
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Ferguson's memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1931. He describes the neighbourhood of Vancouver Heights and the people that lived there. He also describes the types of goods he sold at his Vancouver Heights Hardware Store.
Date Range
1900-1939
Length
0:08:23
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - Hardware Stores
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Interview Date
July 3, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Ferguson by history student Ross S. McLeod, July 3, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
John Ferguson was born in Glasgow in 1900. He came to Canada with his family in 1910, and settled on Vancouver Island. In 1931 John Ferguson purchased the hardware store on the 3900 block of Hastings Street.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:32:21
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Ferguson, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-07_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with John Ferguson

Less detail

Interview with Vi Townley May 24, 1978 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory192
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Vi Townley's description of the Townley mansion, Deerholme.
Date Range
1913-1935
Length
0:06:23
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Vi Townley's description of the Townley mansion, Deerholme.
Date Range
1913-1935
Photo Info
Townley mansion known as Deerholme, 1913. Item no. 454-001
Length
0:06:23
Subject
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6110 Price Street
Burnaby - Price Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Interview Date
May 24, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Vi Townley, May 24, 1978. Major themes discussed are: Deerholme.
Biographical Notes
Vi Townley was the daughter-in-law of Colonel Thomas O. Townley and Frances Townley, the owners of Deerholme.
Total Tracks
2
Total Length
0:10:49
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Townley, Vi
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-014-2_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Vi Townley

Images
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Interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine September 19, 1978 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory229
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of her former neighbour, Burnaby pioneer, Tom Irvine.
Date Range
1913-1958
Length
0:09:40
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of her former neighbour, Burnaby pioneer, Tom Irvine.
Date Range
1913-1958
Photo Info
Tom Irvine sitting with a young girl, 1919. Item no. HV975.33.3o
Length
0:09:40
Name
Irvine, Tom
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Laurel Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
September 19, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Jean Scott conducted by Colin Stevens on September 19, 1978. Major themes include: Tom Irvine and Laurel Street.
Biographical Notes
Jean Scott came from Scotland to Burnaby with her family in 1913 when she was five years old. The Scott family settled on Laurel Street, at the northwest end of Burnaby Lake.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:28:08
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Scott, Jean
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-005-2-1_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine September 19, 1978 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory230
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of Tom Irvine's house, next door to the Scott family's home on Laurel Street.
Date Range
1913-1958
Length
0:08:56
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of Tom Irvine's house, next door to the Scott family's home on Laurel Street.
Date Range
1913-1958
Photo Info
Tom Irvine sitting with a young girl, 1919. Item no. HV975.33.3o
Length
0:08:56
Name
Irvine, Tom
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Laurel Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
September 19, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Jean Scott conducted by Colin Stevens on September 19, 1978. Major themes include: Tom Irvine and Laurel Street.
Biographical Notes
Jean Scott came from Scotland to Burnaby with her family in 1913 when she was five years old. The Scott family settled on Laurel Street, at the northwest end of Burnaby Lake.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:28:08
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Scott, Jean
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-005-2-1_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine September 19, 1978 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory231
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of Tom Irvine as well as the layout of his house, next door to the Scott family's home on Laurel Street.
Date Range
1913-1958
Length
0:09:31
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of Tom Irvine as well as the layout of his house, next door to the Scott family's home on Laurel Street.
Date Range
1913-1958
Photo Info
Tom Irvine sitting with a young girl, 1919. Item no. HV975.33.3o
Length
0:09:31
Name
Irvine, Tom
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Laurel Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
September 19, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Jean Scott conducted by Colin Stevens on September 19, 1978. Major themes include: Tom Irvine and Laurel Street.
Biographical Notes
Jean Scott came from Scotland to Burnaby with her family in 1913 when she was five years old. The Scott family settled on Laurel Street, at the northwest end of Burnaby Lake.
Total Tracks
3
Total Length
0:28:08
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Scott, Jean
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-005-2-1_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Jean Scott on the subject of Tom Irvine

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jean Scott September 19, 1978 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory232
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of her neighbourhood.
Date Range
1913-1958
Length
0:04:24
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of her neighbourhood.
Date Range
1913-1958
Photo Info
Tom Irvine sitting with a young girl, 1919. Item no. HV975.33.3o
Length
0:04:24
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Laurel Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
September 19, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Jean Scott conducted by Colin Stevens on September 19, 1978. Major themes include: Burnaby Lake and Laurel Street.
Biographical Notes
Jean Scott came from Scotland to Burnaby with her family in 1913 when she was five years old. The Scott family settled on Laurel Street, at the northwest end of Burnaby Lake.
Total Tracks
2
Total Length
0:09:38
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Scott, Jean
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-005-2-2_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jean Scott

Images
Less detail

Interview with Jean Scott September 19, 1978 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory233
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of the houses in her neighbourhood. She also mentions participating in skating parties on Burnaby Lake.
Date Range
1913-1958
Length
0:05:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Jean Scott's memories of the houses in her neighbourhood. She also mentions participating in skating parties on Burnaby Lake.
Date Range
1913-1958
Photo Info
Tom Irvine sitting with a young girl, 1919. Item no. HV975.33.3o
Length
0:05:15
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
September 19, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Jean Scott conducted by Colin Stevens on September 19, 1978. Major themes include: Burnaby Lake and Laurel Street.
Biographical Notes
Jean Scott came from Scotland to Burnaby with her family in 1913 when she was five years old. The Scott family settled on Laurel Street, at the northwest end of Burnaby Lake.
Total Tracks
2
Total Length
0:09:38
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Scott, Jean
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-005-2-2_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Jean Scott

Images
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Interview with Florence Strachan June 20, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory133
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's early years, her move to Burnaby and her husband's employment at the Barnet Mill.
Date Range
1899-1931
Length
0:09:59
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence Strachan's early years, her move to Burnaby and her husband's employment at the Barnet Mill.
Date Range
1899-1931
Length
0:09:59
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Florence Strachan by Ross S. McLeod and Bettina Bradbury, June 20, 1975. Major theme discussed is: The Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Florence Strachan was born in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1899. She met and married her husband in Scotland before coming to Atlantic Canada by ship in 1922, then from Quebec to Vancouver by train. When Florence’s husband got a job at Barnet Mills in 1924, the couple moved to Burnaby and rented a house at 2551 East Hastings Street. In 1926, the Strachans bought a house at 290 Ellesmere Avenue and concentrated on paying it off as quickly as possible. By 1931 the Mill had shut down, leaving Florence’s husband out of work, and forced to go on Relief. By this time the couple had two children, one born in 1928, and the other in 1930. Florence and her husband marched and picketed with the unemployed throughout the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:28:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Strachan, Florence
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-09_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Florence Strachan

Less detail

Interview with Kathleen Rose July 14, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory146
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's first memories of coming to North Burnaby as well as of her husband's employment. She discusses quilt-making among families experiencing economic hardship.
Date Range
1897-1934
Length
0:10:37
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Kathleen Rose's first memories of coming to North Burnaby as well as of her husband's employment. She discusses quilt-making among families experiencing economic hardship.
Date Range
1897-1934
Length
0:10:37
Subject
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Albert Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Capitol Hill Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 14, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Kathleen Rose by SFU (Simon Fraser University) student Bettina Bradbury, July 14, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression.
Biographical Notes
Kathleen Rose was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1897 and immigrated to Prince Albert, Saskatchewan in 1907 with her family. Kathleen lived on the Prairie for eighteen years before getting married in 1923 and moving to Burnaby to be with her husband. The couple moved to the 4600 block of Albert Street in North Burnaby, where Kathleen’s husband cleared all of the land by hand. The Roses had help putting in the foundation but otherwise built their house themselves. Kathleen’s husband was a longshoreman at that time. They had a son, born in 1925, who suffered from rheumatic fever during the Depression.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:35:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Rose, Kathleen
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-21_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Kathleen Rose

Less detail

Interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill November 7, 1977 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory204
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of Christmas as a young boy, living in the Deer Lake area. He tells stories of the antics he got into with his brothers. Claude's wife, Marion Hill speaks encouraging words.
Date Range
1892-1905
Length
0:09:33
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of Christmas as a young boy, living in the Deer Lake area. He tells stories of the antics he got into with his brothers. Claude's wife, Marion Hill speaks encouraging words.
Date Range
1892-1905
Photo Info
Claude Hill, the son of Bernard and Marian Hill, [1888]. Item no. 477-933
Length
0:09:33
Subject
Holidays - Christmas
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Burnaby - Canada Way
Burnaby - 4990 Canada Way
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
November 7, 1977
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A. Claude Hill and his wife Marion Hill, conducted by Colin Stevens, November 7, 1977. Major themes discussed are: Christmas traditions and his Deer Lake neighbourhood.
Biographical Notes
Claude Hill was born in England about 1885, the eldest son of Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard R. Hill. His younger sibling were Frank, Winnie and Minard Gerald “Gerry.” Claude Hill was named after Bernard’s older brother, Louis Claude Hill. Claude's father, Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Uncle Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. His oldest child, Claude was seven years old at the time and his first years of school in Burnaby were at Douglas Road. Later, Claude rode a horse and buggy with his younger brother to travel to school in New Westminster. A.Claude Hill married Marion "Mamie" in his early twenties.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Claude
Hill, Marion, Mrs A Claude Hill
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-019-1_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill

Images
Less detail

Interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill November 7, 1977 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory205
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of Christmas as a young boy, living in the Deer Lake area. Claude and Marion HIll continue discussing Christmas traditions of the time.
Date Range
1892-1905
Length
0:08:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of Christmas as a young boy, living in the Deer Lake area. Claude and Marion HIll continue discussing Christmas traditions of the time.
Date Range
1892-1905
Photo Info
Claude Hill, the son of Bernard and Marian Hill, [1888]. Item no. 477-933
Length
0:08:15
Subject
Holidays - Christmas
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
November 7, 1977
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A. Claude Hill and his wife Marion Hill, conducted by Colin Stevens, November 7, 1977. Major themes discussed are: Christmas traditions and his Deer Lake neighbourhood.
Biographical Notes
Claude Hill was born in England about 1885, the eldest son of Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard R. Hill. His younger sibling were Frank, Winnie and Minard Gerald “Gerry.” Claude Hill was named after Bernard’s older brother, Louis Claude Hill. Claude's father, Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Uncle Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. His oldest child, Claude was seven years old at the time and his first years of school in Burnaby were at Douglas Road. Later, Claude rode a horse and buggy with his younger brother to travel to school in New Westminster. A.Claude Hill married Marion "Mamie" in his early twenties.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Claude
Hill, Marion, Mrs A Claude Hill
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-019-1_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill

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Interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill November 7, 1977 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory206
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of crossing from England to Canada and of the land clearing process.
Date Range
1892
Length
0:07:14
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of crossing from England to Canada and of the land clearing process.
Date Range
1892
Photo Info
Claude Hill, the son of Bernard and Marian Hill, [1888]. Item no. 477-933
Length
0:07:14
Name
Hill, Bernard R
Subject
Land Clearing
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
November 7, 1977
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A. Claude Hill and his wife Marion Hill, conducted by Colin Stevens, November 7, 1977. Major themes discussed are: Christmas traditions and his Deer Lake neighbourhood.
Biographical Notes
Claude Hill was born in England about 1885, the eldest son of Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard R. Hill. His younger sibling were Frank, Winnie and Minard Gerald “Gerry.” Claude Hill was named after Bernard’s older brother, Louis Claude Hill. Claude's father, Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Uncle Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. His oldest child, Claude was seven years old at the time and his first years of school in Burnaby were at Douglas Road. Later, Claude rode a horse and buggy with his younger brother to travel to school in New Westminster. A.Claude Hill married Marion "Mamie" in his early twenties.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Claude
Hill, Marion, Mrs A Claude Hill
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-019-1_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Claude Hill and his wife

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Recording of John Burton - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory212
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to John Burton's description of the Linotype machine and how it functions.
Date Range
1885-1959
Length
0:09:56
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to John Burton's description of the Linotype machine and how it functions.
Date Range
1885-1959
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:56
Subject
Printing Tools and Equipment
Scope and Content
Recording is of John Burton discussing the history of the weekly newspaper and of the types of printing presses that have been used in Canada, as well as exactly how their parts function. John appears to be describing printing presses that are in the room with him.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:46:18
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-2_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of John Burton

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Recording of John Burton - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory213
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to John Burton's description of the galley press and the proofing process. He also discusses job printing (now referred to as commercial printing).
Date Range
1850-1950
Length
0:09:14
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to John Burton's description of the galley press and the proofing process. He also discusses job printing (now referred to as commercial printing).
Date Range
1850-1950
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:14
Subject
Documentary Artifacts - Newspapers
Printing Tools and Equipment
Scope and Content
Recording is of John Burton discussing the history of the weekly newspaper and of the types of printing presses that have been used in Canada, as well as exactly how their parts function. John appears to be describing printing presses that are in the room with him.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:46:18
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-2_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of recording of John Burton

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Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory217
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of the printing industry, both in Burnaby and in Orangeville, Ontario.
Date Range
1912-1931
Length
0:09:52
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of the printing industry, both in Burnaby and in Orangeville, Ontario.
Date Range
1912-1931
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:52
Subject
Printing Tools and Equipment
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
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Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory218
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of the printing industry. He discusses the manufacturing of printing products; of being assembled in Canada verses being made in Canada.
Date Range
1912-1932
Length
0:09:11
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of the printing industry. He discusses the manufacturing of printing products; of being assembled in Canada verses being made in Canada.
Date Range
1912-1932
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:11
Subject
Printing Tools and Equipment
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
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Interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory221
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of the Linotype machine, as well as the history of his grandfather, John Foley, founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper.
Date Range
1860-1932
Length
0:08:48
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's description of the Linotype machine, as well as the history of his grandfather, John Foley, founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper.
Date Range
1860-1932
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:08:48
Name
Foley, John
Subject
Printing Tools and Equipment
Documentary Artifacts - Newspapers
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton at his residence in Surrey by Lynda Mauve Orr, August 24, 1989. This interview focuses on the history of newspaper and printing presses in Canada.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-4_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with John Burton by Lynda Maeve Orr

Images
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Interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory224
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of first coming to Burnaby. He discusses his school years, his father's work and his own employment, including the two years he worked for his uncle at the Orangeville Sun in Ontario.
Date Range
1912-1933
Length
0:09:07
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Burton's memories of first coming to Burnaby. He discusses his school years, his father's work and his own employment, including the two years he worked for his uncle at the Orangeville Sun in Ontario.
Date Range
1912-1933
Photo Info
Burton family home, [1945]. Item no. 216-002
Length
0:09:07
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 12th Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Edmonds Area
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Burton conducted by Jim Wolf on March 4, 1987 in New Westminster. Major themes include New Westminster businesses and his grandfather's newspaper.
Biographical Notes
John Burton was born in 1912 in New Westminster. He went to Second Street School, then Edmonds, then Saint Anne's Convent, and St. Louis College and Connaught before graduating from Burnaby South School in 1930. While at High School, John worked at Cowan's Music Store at 716 Columbia Street in New Westminster on Saturdays and after school. John Burton's grandfather John Foley was the founder of the Orangeville Sun newspaper in Orangeville, Ontario, established in 1861. He ran the paper until his death in 1882, when his son, John Foley Jr. took over as editor and publisher at the age of sixteen. Two of his daughters were involved in the newspaper; Margaret Foley was a regular contributor to the paper, and John Burton's mother was a typesetter. When John Burton was a teenager, he went to Orangeville to learn the trade from his uncle. Unfortunately, he was only there eighteen months when his uncle died December 21, 1932. The family was unable to hold on to the business and the paper amalgamated with the Orangeville Banner newspaper in 1933.
Total Tracks
5
Total Length
0:45:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, John
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-001-5_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with John Burton by Jim Wolf

Images
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Interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill November 7, 1977 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory250
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of how his father cleared land to build a house, including the equipment that was used.
Date Range
1892-1905
Length
0:04:58
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to A. Claude Hill's memories of how his father cleared land to build a house, including the equipment that was used.
Date Range
1892-1905
Photo Info
Claude Hill, the son of Bernard and Marian Hill, [1888]. Item no. 477-933
Length
0:04:58
Name
Hill, Bernard R
Subject
Land Clearing
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Burnaby - Canada Way
Burnaby - 4990 Canada Way
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
November 7, 1977
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with A. Claude Hill and his wife Marion Hill, conducted by Colin Stevens, November 7, 1977. Major themes discussed are: Christmas traditions and his Deer Lake neighbourhood.
Biographical Notes
Claude Hill was born in England about 1885, the eldest son of Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard R. Hill. His younger sibling were Frank, Winnie and Minard Gerald “Gerry.” Claude Hill was named after Bernard’s older brother, Louis Claude Hill. Claude's father, Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Uncle Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. His oldest child, Claude was seven years old at the time and his first years of school in Burnaby were at Douglas Road. Later, Claude rode a horse and buggy with his younger brother to travel to school in New Westminster. A.Claude Hill married Marion "Mamie" in his early twenties.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:00
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Claude
Hill, Marion, Mrs A Claude Hill
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-019-1_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Claude Hill and Marion Hill

Images
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Interview with Jack McGeachie June 18, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory35
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's early childhood including the reasons why his family moved to Burnaby, the small pox house at the border of New Westminster and stories of the unfinished family home at Formby Street.
Date Range
1914-1922
Length
0:09:27
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie's early childhood including the reasons why his family moved to Burnaby, the small pox house at the border of New Westminster and stories of the unfinished family home at Formby Street.
Date Range
1914-1922
Photo Info
McGeachie family; John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie is the eldest child, standing second from the right, 1925 (date of original). Item no. 204-464
Length
0:09:27
Subject
Buildings - Residences - Houses
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Formby Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
East Burnaby (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Richmond Park Area
Second Street Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 18, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with John A."Jack" McGeachie by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 18, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the CCF (Co-operative Commonwealth Federation) and farming in Burnaby. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
John Aloysius “Jack” McGeachie was born January 14, 1914 in Little Mountain, Vancouver to Helen and John McGeachie. Helen and John had four children; John Aloysius “Jack”, Florence Mary, Thomas Joseph “Tom” and Roderick Noel “Rod.” In 1922 the McGeachie family moved from Vancouver to East Burnaby where the children attended Edmonds School. John Sr. became ill and died, leaving the eldest Jack as the main breadwinner of the family when he was still just a teenager. He began his working life at a chicken farm, later learning his trade while working for the Hudson Bay Company. Jack McGeachie married Burnaby Historian Doreen Pixie Johnson. He and Pixie raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:51:13
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McGeachie, John Aloysius "Jack"
Interview Location
Rosewood
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-10_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Jack McGeachie

Images
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Interview with Charles A. Purdon and May E. Purdon July 9, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory91
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles A. Purdon's employment history and first years of marriage to May E. Purdon.
Date Range
1904-1932
Length
0:08:08
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles A. Purdon's employment history and first years of marriage to May E. Purdon.
Date Range
1904-1932
Length
0:08:08
Subject
Transportation - Rail
Geographic Access
Saskatchewan
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 9, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles A. Purdon and May E. Purdon by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury July 9, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and Canadian politics. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
May Eliza was born in London, England in 1907. She came out to Regina with her family when she was eleven. Charles A. Purdon was born February 28, 1904 in London, England. He came to Canada in 1925 from China where he had been working as an accountant for the previous three years. Charles first came to Vancouver and joined the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) but within a week he was sent to Regina. This is where he met May. May and Charles got married in 1926 and Charles began working as an accountant for the Saskatchewan Wheat Growers, then for the Canadian Wool Growers before being laid off. In October of 1930, Charles and May left Regina for Vancouver Island. Charles drove himself out and May rode the train with her children; twin boys and a daughter, only one year apart. They settled at May’s parent’s second house in Coombs. The Purdons arrived in Burnaby in December of 1932 and rented a house on Edmonds Street. Charles was unable to do road work and instead found work through the Liberal Party and also with the Municipal engineers indoors on a number of projects. In 1938 the Purdons were able to get into a reverted house built by Ernie Winch at Maple Avenue (then Jubilee) and Nelson Avenue that had nine bedrooms. They paid ten dollars a month to the municipality for use of this property. May Eliza Purdon died April 6, 1983 at the age of seventy-six.
Total Length
1:40:03
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Purdon, Charles A.
Purdon, May Eliza
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-19_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Charles A. Purdon and May E. Purdon

Less detail

Interview with Harry Royle June 20, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory111
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's early life beginning at Gibraltar, through the war years.
Date Range
1898-1919
Length
0:06:06
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's early life beginning at Gibraltar, through the war years.
Date Range
1898-1919
Photo Info
Harry Royle smiling, in a suit and tie, photographed by Chidwich Studio [193-]. Item no. BV005.20.20
Length
0:06:06
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Harry Royle by Ross S. McLeod (and Bettina Bradbury) June 20, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the running of a grocery store. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Harry Royle was born in Gibraltar in 1898 to a Spanish mother and an English father (all of the Royle children except for one were born in Gibraltar). Harry's father served in the army for twenty-one years and because of that, the family moved regularly. While Harry was still a young baby, the Royle family moved to Ireland for six years, where he began his first years of schooling at the age of four. His dad retired from the army in 1907 and was sent to Canada with the BC Electric Company (the London General Army Buses Company). The rest of his family followed two years afterward in 1909 and settled in South Vancouver. Harry and his three brothers joined the army and were sent overseas as part of the second division. Luckily, they all returned home to Vancouver in 1919. Harry worked at the Hudson's Bay Company "counter jumping" before opening his own store in 1924 at 5527 Hastings Street and Ellesmere Avenue, a confectionery and general hangout for neighbourhood children."Harry's" was only twenty-five foot square and carried groceries obtained mainly from Kelly Douglas wholesalers. Most of Harry's customers worked at the mill at Barnet. Those that worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway were the few that still held jobs during the Depression. The store continued to serve the people of Capitol Hill throughout the Depression and war years, until Harry closed shop in 1945.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:01:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Royle, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-12_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Harry Royle

Images
Less detail

Interview with Harry Royle June 20, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory112
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of returning from the war and setting up his general store at Capitol Hill.
Date Range
1919-1945
Length
0:10:17
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of returning from the war and setting up his general store at Capitol Hill.
Date Range
1919-1945
Photo Info
Harry Royle smiling, in a suit and tie, photographed by Chidwich Studio [193-]. Item no. BV005.20.20
Length
0:10:17
Name
Harry's
Subject
Buildings - Commercial - General Stores
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Harry Royle by Ross S. McLeod (and Bettina Bradbury) June 20, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the running of a grocery store. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Harry Royle was born in Gibraltar in 1898 to a Spanish mother and an English father (all of the Royle children except for one were born in Gibraltar). Harry's father served in the army for twenty-one years and because of that, the family moved regularly. While Harry was still a young baby, the Royle family moved to Ireland for six years, where he began his first years of schooling at the age of four. His dad retired from the army in 1907 and was sent to Canada with the BC Electric Company (the London General Army Buses Company). The rest of his family followed two years afterward in 1909 and settled in South Vancouver. Harry and his three brothers joined the army and were sent overseas as part of the second division. Luckily, they all returned home to Vancouver in 1919. Harry worked at the Hudson's Bay Company "counter jumping" before opening his own store in 1924 at 5527 Hastings Street and Ellesmere Avenue, a confectionery and general hangout for neighbourhood children."Harry's" was only twenty-five foot square and carried groceries obtained mainly from Kelly Douglas wholesalers. Most of Harry's customers worked at the mill at Barnet. Those that worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway were the few that still held jobs during the Depression. The store continued to serve the people of Capitol Hill throughout the Depression and war years, until Harry closed shop in 1945.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:01:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Royle, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-12_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Harry Royle

Images
Less detail

Interview with Harry Royle June 20, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory113
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of various negative sentiments of the time. He also discusses the impact of the Depression years as well as his impression of Reeve Pritchard.
Date Range
1919-1945
Length
0:10:17
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Harry Royle's memories of various negative sentiments of the time. He also discusses the impact of the Depression years as well as his impression of Reeve Pritchard.
Date Range
1919-1945
Photo Info
Harry Royle smiling, in a suit and tie, photographed by Chidwich Studio [193-]. Item no. BV005.20.20
Length
0:10:17
Name
Pritchard, William A.
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McLeod, Ross S.
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 20, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Harry Royle by Ross S. McLeod (and Bettina Bradbury) June 20, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression and the running of a grocery store. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Harry Royle was born in Gibraltar in 1898 to a Spanish mother and an English father (all of the Royle children except for one were born in Gibraltar). Harry's father served in the army for twenty-one years and because of that, the family moved regularly. While Harry was still a young baby, the Royle family moved to Ireland for six years, where he began his first years of schooling at the age of four. His dad retired from the army in 1907 and was sent to Canada with the BC Electric Company (the London General Army Buses Company). The rest of his family followed two years afterward in 1909 and settled in South Vancouver. Harry and his three brothers joined the army and were sent overseas as part of the second division. Luckily, they all returned home to Vancouver in 1919. Harry worked at the Hudson's Bay Company "counter jumping" before opening his own store in 1924 at 5527 Hastings Street and Ellesmere Avenue, a confectionery and general hangout for neighbourhood children."Harry's" was only twenty-five foot square and carried groceries obtained mainly from Kelly Douglas wholesalers. Most of Harry's customers worked at the mill at Barnet. Those that worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway were the few that still held jobs during the Depression. The store continued to serve the people of Capitol Hill throughout the Depression and war years, until Harry closed shop in 1945.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:01:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Royle, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-12_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Harry Royle

Images
Less detail

Interview with Marianne May Bateman February 22, 1978 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory190
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's father Edwin Bateman's history of first coming to Canada.
Date Range
1880-1920
Length
0:08:39
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's father Edwin Bateman's history of first coming to Canada.
Date Range
1880-1920
Photo Info
Photograph of Edwin Wettenhall Bateman with his four daughters; Marianne May is sitting on a chair beside her father, [1903}. Item no. BV992.29.1
Length
0:08:39
Name
Bateman, Edwin W.
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 22, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Marianne May "May" Bateman conducted by Colin Stevens, February 22, 1978. Major themes discussed are: Elworth.
Biographical Notes
May Bateman was born in 1894 in Portage LaPrairie, Manitoba to Edwin Wettenhall Bateman and Cassie (Dale) Bateman. May's father, Edwin Bateman was born in 1859 in Sandbach, Cheshire, to James and Caroline Mary Wettenhall Bateman (their home in Sandbach was called Elworth Cottage). When he was twenty-one, E.W. Bateman immigrated to Manitoba, Canada where he met Catherine “Cassie” Dale, daughter of George and Sarah Gillon Dale. They were married in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba on November 9, 1886. Edwin and Cassie had seven children, the eldest Edna Caroline Annie (Corner) born in 1889, George, Mamie (McWilliams) born in 1892, Marianne May “May” Bateman born in 1894, Jessie (Fox Kemp), Carey, and the youngest Warren Stafford born in 1901.Cassie (Dale) Bateman died in Portage La Prairie in 1909. Edwin was transferred to Vancouver by the Canadian Pacific Railway where he married Cassie’s younger sister Mary Dale, born 1865, and moved his six children to Vancouver. The Bateman family first lived at 7th and Balsam in a large new house. It wasn’t until 1920 that they decided to move to the quieter atmosphere of the Burnaby Lake- Deer Lake area. By this time Edwin Wettenhall Bateman was a retired CPR executive. He moved his wife and daughter May to Deer Lake and commissioned 'Elworth' house, designed by English-born and trained architect Enoch Evans. The house was completed by contractor William Dodson in 1922 and located at the site of what would become Burnaby Village Museum, 6501 Deer Lake Avenue. The Batemans lived here for seventeen years before moving back to Vancouver in May of 1935. Mary Bateman died July 5, 1935. Edwin Wettenhall Bateman died on November 25, 1957 at the age of ninety-seven. Marianne May Bateman died in 1990.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bateman, Marianne May
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-014-1_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with May Bateman

Images
Less detail

Interview with Marianne May Bateman February 22, 1978 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory191
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's memories of her family.
Date Range
1910-1935
Length
0:03:23
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Marianne May Bateman's memories of her family.
Date Range
1910-1935
Photo Info
Photograph of Edwin Wettenhall Bateman with his four daughters; Marianne May is sitting on a chair beside her father, [1903}. Item no. BV992.29.1
Length
0:03:23
Name
Bateman, Mary Dale
Bateman, Edwin W.
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 22, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Marianne May "May" Bateman conducted by Colin Stevens, February 22, 1978. Major themes discussed are: Elworth.
Biographical Notes
May Bateman was born in 1894 in Portage LaPrairie, Manitoba to Edwin Wettenhall Bateman and Cassie (Dale) Bateman. May's father, Edwin Bateman was born in 1859 in Sandbach, Cheshire, to James and Caroline Mary Wettenhall Bateman (their home in Sandbach was called Elworth Cottage). When he was twenty-one, E.W. Bateman immigrated to Manitoba, Canada where he met Catherine “Cassie” Dale, daughter of George and Sarah Gillon Dale. They were married in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba on November 9, 1886. Edwin and Cassie had seven children, the eldest Edna Caroline Annie (Corner) born in 1889, George, Mamie (McWilliams) born in 1892, Marianne May “May” Bateman born in 1894, Jessie (Fox Kemp), Carey, and the youngest Warren Stafford born in 1901.Cassie (Dale) Bateman died in Portage La Prairie in 1909. Edwin was transferred to Vancouver by the Canadian Pacific Railway where he married Cassie’s younger sister Mary Dale, born 1865, and moved his six children to Vancouver. The Bateman family first lived at 7th and Balsam in a large new house. It wasn’t until 1920 that they decided to move to the quieter atmosphere of the Burnaby Lake- Deer Lake area. By this time Edwin Wettenhall Bateman was a retired CPR executive. He moved his wife and daughter May to Deer Lake and commissioned 'Elworth' house, designed by English-born and trained architect Enoch Evans. The house was completed by contractor William Dodson in 1922 and located at the site of what would become Burnaby Village Museum, 6501 Deer Lake Avenue. The Batemans lived here for seventeen years before moving back to Vancouver in May of 1935. Mary Bateman died July 5, 1935. Edwin Wettenhall Bateman died on November 25, 1957 at the age of ninety-seven. Marianne May Bateman died in 1990.
Total Tracks
4
Total Length
0:30:44
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bateman, Marianne May
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-014-1_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with May Bateman

Images
Less detail

Interview with Minard Hill February 9, 1978 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory194
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's early memories of the neighbourhood of Burnaby Lake, including the houses that his father built. Gerry discusses his early work as a surveyor.
Date Range
1893-1913
Length
0:10:01
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's early memories of the neighbourhood of Burnaby Lake, including the houses that his father built. Gerry discusses his early work as a surveyor.
Date Range
1893-1913
Photo Info
Minard Gerald Hill in uniform, 1914. Item no. 477-926
Length
0:10:01
Name
Hill, Bernard R
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 9, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill conducted by Colin Stevens, February 9, 1978. Major themes discussed are: the Burnaby Lake Neighbourhood, Gilley Brothers Logging Company and his father, Bernard Hill.
Biographical Notes
Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill was born in Burnaby on July 31, 1893 to Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard Richard Hill. He was the youngest child in the family with older siblings Frank, Claude and Winnie. Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Gerry attended Miss Harriet Woodward’s kindergarten class, and went on to Edmonds School with Miss Ellen Lister as his teacher. He later went to Central high school in New Westminster, often on horseback. Gerry served in World War I, signing his recruitment papers November 9, 1914. When he returned home, he worked felling trees, then as an apprentice surveyor and finally as a carpenter. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill married Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” Vidal on September 28, 1920 and single-handedly built a house for him and his wife about a thousand feet from his parents’ home. He also bought property at Yellow Point, Vancouver Island around this time. By the early 1930s Gerry had moved to Yellow Point permanently and begun work building the lodge. Elizabeth and Gerry’s child, Richard Grant McEwan Hill was born at Ladysmith hospital. Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” (Vidal) Hill died February 11, 1984 at the age of eighty-seven. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill died January 30, 1988 at the age of ninety-three.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:13:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Minard Gerald "Gerry"
Interview Location
Yellow Point, Vancouver Island
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-1_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Minard Hill

Images
Less detail

Interview with Minard Hill February 9, 1978 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory195
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's early memories of the neighbourhood of Burnaby Lake.
Date Range
1912-1914
Length
0:09:46
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's early memories of the neighbourhood of Burnaby Lake.
Date Range
1912-1914
Photo Info
Minard Gerald Hill in uniform, 1914. Item no. 477-926
Length
0:09:46
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 9, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill conducted by Colin Stevens, February 9, 1978. Major themes discussed are: the Burnaby Lake Neighbourhood, Gilley Brothers Logging Company and his father, Bernard Hill.
Biographical Notes
Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill was born in Burnaby on July 31, 1893 to Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard Richard Hill. He was the youngest child in the family with older siblings Frank, Claude and Winnie. Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Gerry attended Miss Harriet Woodward’s kindergarten class, and went on to Edmonds School with Miss Ellen Lister as his teacher. He later went to Central high school in New Westminster, often on horseback. Gerry served in World War I, signing his recruitment papers November 9, 1914. When he returned home, he worked felling trees, then as an apprentice surveyor and finally as a carpenter. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill married Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” Vidal on September 28, 1920 and single-handedly built a house for him and his wife about a thousand feet from his parents’ home. He also bought property at Yellow Point, Vancouver Island around this time. By the early 1930s Gerry had moved to Yellow Point permanently and begun work building the lodge. Elizabeth and Gerry’s child, Richard Grant McEwan Hill was born at Ladysmith hospital. Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” (Vidal) Hill died February 11, 1984 at the age of eighty-seven. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill died January 30, 1988 at the age of ninety-three.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:13:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Minard Gerald "Gerry"
Interview Location
Yellow Point, Vancouver Island
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-1_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Minard Hill

Images
Less detail

Interview with Minard Hill February 9, 1978 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory196
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's relatives in England, his father's early life as well as life on the strawberry farm in Burnaby.
Date Range
1880-1914
Length
0:10:09
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's relatives in England, his father's early life as well as life on the strawberry farm in Burnaby.
Date Range
1880-1914
Photo Info
Minard Gerald Hill in uniform, 1914. Item no. 477-926
Length
0:10:09
Name
Hill, Bernard R
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Douglas Road
Burnaby - Canada Way
Burnaby - 4990 Canada Way
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 9, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill conducted by Colin Stevens, February 9, 1978. Major themes discussed are: the Burnaby Lake Neighbourhood, Gilley Brothers Logging Company and his father, Bernard Hill.
Biographical Notes
Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill was born in Burnaby on July 31, 1893 to Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard Richard Hill. He was the youngest child in the family with older siblings Frank, Claude and Winnie. Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Gerry attended Miss Harriet Woodward’s kindergarten class, and went on to Edmonds School with Miss Ellen Lister as his teacher. He later went to Central high school in New Westminster, often on horseback. Gerry served in World War I, signing his recruitment papers November 9, 1914. When he returned home, he worked felling trees, then as an apprentice surveyor and finally as a carpenter. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill married Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” Vidal on September 28, 1920 and single-handedly built a house for him and his wife about a thousand feet from his parents’ home. He also bought property at Yellow Point, Vancouver Island around this time. By the early 1930s Gerry had moved to Yellow Point permanently and begun work building the lodge. Elizabeth and Gerry’s child, Richard Grant McEwan Hill was born at Ladysmith hospital. Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” (Vidal) Hill died February 11, 1984 at the age of eighty-seven. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill died January 30, 1988 at the age of ninety-three.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:13:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Minard Gerald "Gerry"
Interview Location
Yellow Point, Vancouver Island
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-1_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Minard Hill

Images
Less detail

Interview with Minard Hill February 9, 1978 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory197
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of the people in his Burnaby neighbourhood.
Date Range
1912-1914
Length
0:05:46
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of the people in his Burnaby neighbourhood.
Date Range
1912-1914
Photo Info
Minard Gerald Hill in uniform, 1914. Item no. 477-926
Length
0:05:46
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 9, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill conducted by Colin Stevens, February 9, 1978. Major themes discussed are: the Burnaby Lake Neighbourhood, Gilley Brothers Logging Company and his father, Bernard Hill.
Biographical Notes
Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill was born in Burnaby on July 31, 1893 to Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard Richard Hill. He was the youngest child in the family with older siblings Frank, Claude and Winnie. Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Gerry attended Miss Harriet Woodward’s kindergarten class, and went on to Edmonds School with Miss Ellen Lister as his teacher. He later went to Central high school in New Westminster, often on horseback. Gerry served in World War I, signing his recruitment papers November 9, 1914. When he returned home, he worked felling trees, then as an apprentice surveyor and finally as a carpenter. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill married Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” Vidal on September 28, 1920 and single-handedly built a house for him and his wife about a thousand feet from his parents’ home. He also bought property at Yellow Point, Vancouver Island around this time. By the early 1930s Gerry had moved to Yellow Point permanently and begun work building the lodge. Elizabeth and Gerry’s child, Richard Grant McEwan Hill was born at Ladysmith hospital. Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” (Vidal) Hill died February 11, 1984 at the age of eighty-seven. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill died January 30, 1988 at the age of ninety-three.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:13:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Minard Gerald "Gerry"
Interview Location
Yellow Point, Vancouver Island
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-1_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Minard Hill

Images
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Interview with Minard Hill February 9, 1978 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory198
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of the carpentry projects and contracts that he undertook; this includes the building of a boat and an outhouse. He mentions the generosity of Doran's Mill.
Date Range
1912-1914
Length
0:08:56
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of the carpentry projects and contracts that he undertook; this includes the building of a boat and an outhouse. He mentions the generosity of Doran's Mill.
Date Range
1912-1914
Photo Info
Minard Gerald Hill in uniform, 1914. Item no. 477-926
Length
0:08:56
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 9, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill conducted by Colin Stevens, February 9, 1978. Major themes discussed are: the Burnaby Lake Neighbourhood, Gilley Brothers Logging Company and his father, Bernard Hill.
Biographical Notes
Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill was born in Burnaby on July 31, 1893 to Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard Richard Hill. He was the youngest child in the family with older siblings Frank, Claude and Winnie. Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Gerry attended Miss Harriet Woodward’s kindergarten class, and went on to Edmonds School with Miss Ellen Lister as his teacher. He later went to Central high school in New Westminster, often on horseback. Gerry served in World War I, signing his recruitment papers November 9, 1914. When he returned home, he worked felling trees, then as an apprentice surveyor and finally as a carpenter. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill married Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” Vidal on September 28, 1920 and single-handedly built a house for him and his wife about a thousand feet from his parents’ home. He also bought property at Yellow Point, Vancouver Island around this time. By the early 1930s Gerry had moved to Yellow Point permanently and begun work building the lodge. Elizabeth and Gerry’s child, Richard Grant McEwan Hill was born at Ladysmith hospital. Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” (Vidal) Hill died February 11, 1984 at the age of eighty-seven. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill died January 30, 1988 at the age of ninety-three.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:13:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Minard Gerald "Gerry"
Interview Location
Yellow Point, Vancouver Island
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-1_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Minard Hill

Images
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Interview with Minard Hill February 9, 1978 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory201
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of the Royal Oak Hotel and his former neighbours at the south side of Deer Lake.
Date Range
1902-1920
Length
0:10:36
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill's memories of the Royal Oak Hotel and his former neighbours at the south side of Deer Lake.
Date Range
1902-1920
Photo Info
Minard Gerald Hill in uniform, 1914. Item no. 477-926
Length
0:10:36
Name
Royal Oak Hotel
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Stevens, Colin
Interview Date
February 9, 1978
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Minard Gerald "Gerry" Hill conducted by Colin Stevens, February 9, 1978. Major themes discussed are: the Burnaby Lake Neighbourhood, Gilley Brothers Logging Company and his father, Bernard Hill.
Biographical Notes
Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill was born in Burnaby on July 31, 1893 to Marian (Berkeley) and Bernard Richard Hill. He was the youngest child in the family with older siblings Frank, Claude and Winnie. Bernard R. Hill was born in Bengal, India while his father worked for the East Indian Railway. He and his older brother Claude became strawberry farmers in Burnaby despite their years of training as engineers. Between them, the Hill brothers owned all the land between Burnaby Lake and Deer Lake where Deer Creek runs, and half way around Deer Lake. Bernard built his family home at Douglas Road near Deer Lake in 1892. After the decline in the strawberry industry, Bernard worked as a surveyor for the municipality. He also served as Burnaby Councillor and School Trustee. Gerry attended Miss Harriet Woodward’s kindergarten class, and went on to Edmonds School with Miss Ellen Lister as his teacher. He later went to Central high school in New Westminster, often on horseback. Gerry served in World War I, signing his recruitment papers November 9, 1914. When he returned home, he worked felling trees, then as an apprentice surveyor and finally as a carpenter. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill married Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” Vidal on September 28, 1920 and single-handedly built a house for him and his wife about a thousand feet from his parents’ home. He also bought property at Yellow Point, Vancouver Island around this time. By the early 1930s Gerry had moved to Yellow Point permanently and begun work building the lodge. Elizabeth and Gerry’s child, Richard Grant McEwan Hill was born at Ladysmith hospital. Charlotte Elizabeth “Elizabeth” (Vidal) Hill died February 11, 1984 at the age of eighty-seven. Minard Gerald “Gerry” Hill died January 30, 1988 at the age of ninety-three.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:13:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Hill, Minard Gerald "Gerry"
Interview Location
Yellow Point, Vancouver Island
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-018-1_ Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Minard Hill

Images
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Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory255
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's personal memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1919 and the work that the early settlers did for Burnaby, including a mention of woman's backbreaking labour. Alfred describes Burnaby as being organized around the two villages of Edmonds and V…
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:09:44
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's personal memories of first coming to Burnaby in 1919 and the work that the early settlers did for Burnaby, including a mention of woman's backbreaking labour. Alfred describes Burnaby as being organized around the two villages of Edmonds and Vancouver Heights. He discusses the Army of the Common Good and the Credit Union movement of British Columbia.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:09:44
Subject
Protests and Demonstrations
Organizations
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_5
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
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Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory258
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "THE RUM RUNNERS AND BOOTLEG WHISKY IN BURNABY" and "BURNABY. NORTH. SOUTH. EAST? AND WEST 1892---1943" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1892-1963
Length
0:07:05
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "THE RUM RUNNERS AND BOOTLEG WHISKY IN BURNABY" and "BURNABY. NORTH. SOUTH. EAST? AND WEST 1892---1943" both written in 1963.
Date Range
1892-1963
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:05
Name
Hawthorn, Mary
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_8
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track eight of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory259
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "The ICE AGE and other observations before Burnaby", "The Coming of the Great Trees in Burnaby", "AND THEN MODERN CIVILIZATION STRUCK BURNABY" each written in March of 1962.
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:07:31
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "The ICE AGE and other observations before Burnaby", "The Coming of the Great Trees in Burnaby", "AND THEN MODERN CIVILIZATION STRUCK BURNABY" each written in March of 1962.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:07:31
Subject
Plants - Trees
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_9
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track nine of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
Less detail

Alfred Bingham's writings - Track 10

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory260
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "OUR HOUSE BURNS DOWN. 1922. Sherlock and Kitchener." that he wrote in 1963. Alfred reads "The Story of the Burnaby Giants of long ago" written by Eloise Street, published in the I…
Date Range
1919-1939
Length
0:06:51
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording includes Alfred Bingham's continuation of reading his series of short stories. He reads; "OUR HOUSE BURNS DOWN. 1922. Sherlock and Kitchener." that he wrote in 1963. Alfred reads "The Story of the Burnaby Giants of long ago" written by Eloise Street, published in the Indian Time Magazine March, 1954.
Date Range
1919-1939
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:06:51
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Scope and Content
Recording is of Alfred Bingham's writings, as read by Alfred Bingham. Major themes discussed are: Pioneers, early days in Burnaby and the Co-op Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Aungus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
12
Total Length
1:38:06
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-2_Track_10
Transcript Available
MSS142-001 contains transcripts for each of the short stories
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track ten of recording of Alfred Bingham's writings

Images
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Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory243
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of the work that he and his brother did on the roadways; Canada Way, Kingsway. He discusses helping out at the Hatt-Cook residence as a boy as well as the tram system of the time. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husb…
Date Range
1892-1911
Length
0:09:58
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of the work that he and his brother did on the roadways; Canada Way, Kingsway. He discusses helping out at the Hatt-Cook residence as a boy as well as the tram system of the time. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husband with these descriptions.
Date Range
1892-1911
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:09:58
Subject
Construction - Road Construction
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory244
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of riding the tram as a young man and briefly, of working for Ed Brown. Murdock mentions Reeve Byrne and the development of first water system in Burnaby. He also discusses Gilley Brother's Logging Company practices near his fath…
Date Range
1906-1975
Length
0:09:00
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of riding the tram as a young man and briefly, of working for Ed Brown. Murdock mentions Reeve Byrne and the development of first water system in Burnaby. He also discusses Gilley Brother's Logging Company practices near his father's ranch of six acres, which grew mostly strawberries to sell in Vancouver.
Date Range
1906-1975
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:09:00
Subject
Agriculture - Fruit and Berries
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Windsor Street
Burnaby - Imperial Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Kingsway-Beresford Area
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory245
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's opinion of shopping at a store in the present day. He mentions George Green's book "History of Burnaby", the Royal Oak Hotel and the development of Alta Vista. As well, Murdock mentions his father Robert William McMurray. Lillian (Wray) M…
Date Range
1904-1975
Length
0:09:45
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's opinion of shopping at a store in the present day. He mentions George Green's book "History of Burnaby", the Royal Oak Hotel and the development of Alta Vista. As well, Murdock mentions his father Robert William McMurray. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husband with these descriptions.
Date Range
1904-1975
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:09:45
Name
McMurray, R.W.
Royal Oak Hotel
Subject
Buildings - Commercial
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory246
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock and Lillian McMurray's trip back to Murdock's mother's hometown in in Northern Scotland. The discussion starts up again on the topic of Lillian (Wray) McMurray's father, Edward Wray's business, the Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office, then again with…
Date Range
1916-1975
Length
0:09:05
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock and Lillian McMurray's trip back to Murdock's mother's hometown in in Northern Scotland. The discussion starts up again on the topic of Lillian (Wray) McMurray's father, Edward Wray's business, the Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office, then again with a description of the cordwood business Murdock had with Emerson Doran.
Date Range
1916-1975
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:09:05
Name
Wray, Edward
Subject
Buildings - Commercial
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track four of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory247
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of his first team of horses. Lillian (Wray) McMurray and her husband discuss their son Bob McMurray's volunteerism and professional activities.
Date Range
1904-1975
Length
0:09:26
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's memories of his first team of horses. Lillian (Wray) McMurray and her husband discuss their son Bob McMurray's volunteerism and professional activities.
Date Range
1904-1975
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:09:26
Name
McMurray, Bob
Subject
Transportation - Sleighs
Animals - Horses
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track five of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

Images
Less detail

Murdock and Lillian McMurray interview November 17, 1975 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory248
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's impressions of municipal politics. The McMurrays discuss the municipal hall. Murdock also mentions Constable Hatt-Cook. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husband with these descriptions.
Date Range
1919-1975
Length
0:08:24
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the recording pertains to Murdock McMurray's impressions of municipal politics. The McMurrays discuss the municipal hall. Murdock also mentions Constable Hatt-Cook. Lillian (Wray) McMurray is heard helping her husband with these descriptions.
Date Range
1919-1975
Photo Info
Emerson Doran (left) and Murdoch McMurray, 1917. Item no. 229-004
Length
0:08:24
Name
Hatt-Cook, H.
Interviewer
McGeachie, Pixie
Interview Date
November 17, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Murdock McMurray and his wife Lillian (Wray) McMurray conducted by Pixie McGeachie on November 17, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Burnaby's development, the Wray Shoe store and Murdock McMurray's cordwood delivery business.
Biographical Notes
Murdock McMurray was born in Vancouver in 1892 to Wilhelmina May and Robert William McMurray. Other children in the family included older siblings John “Jack” and Margaret Lillian, younger siblings Minnie May born May 4, 1895 and Hampton born June 8, 1902. Murdock’s father Robert worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) but retired shortly after moving his family to Burnaby in 1906. He bought six acres of land of what had been previously the Gilley Ranch, the base of operations for Gilley Bros. Ltd. at 2519 Windsor Street (later renumbered and renamed to the 6400 block Imperial Street). Murdock McMurray quit school early to apprentice as a printer. By sixteen he had left the trade and gone into partnership with his older brother Jack. With a team of horses, harness and a wagon, the brothers helped to macadamize roads, haul building supplies for new homes, deliver cord wood for heating, clear land and excavate basements. When Jack McMurray set off to serve overseas during World War I as a driver in the engineer corps, Murdock bought his team of horses and continued working, mainly in the Deer Lake district. In 1916 Murdoch McMurray partnered with Emerson Doran, nephew of the owner of Doran's Mill to buy Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard. As everything was geared towards the war effort, Murdock and Emerson soon ran out of work and had to sell the business. Murdock sold off his horses and equipment and went to work at the ship yard on Pitt River. By 1919 Jack McMurray had returned home from overseas and was working as a fireman at the Shull Lumber and Shingle Mill on the Fraser River. In 1921, he and Murdock teamed up with Emerson Doran and repurchased the Edmonds Coal and Wood fuel yard which they ran together until 1947. Murdock McMurray married Lillian Wray on September 17, 1925. Lillian was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wray, who came to settle in the Jubilee area of Burnaby in 1919. The family lived on Dow Road and Edward Wray operated Jubilee Shoe Store and Post Office. He was known throughout the district as "Wray - The Shoe Man." Mrs. Wray died in 1957 at the age of eight-six and Edward Wray died January 14, 1967 at age of ninety-three. Murdock and Lillian lived at Inverness Street (now Arcola) and raised three children together, Bob, Jack and Bessie. Murdock McMurray died in New Westminster on April 28, 1985 at the age of ninety-two. Lillian Ethel (Wray) McMurray died in Burnaby on February 28, 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
0:58:55
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
McMurray, Lillian Wray
McMurray, Murdoch
Interviewer Bio
Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie was a resident of Burnaby for over sixty years. Pixie married John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie and raised their children Kathi (Dunlop) and David McGeachie in the house the couple built themselves in 1947. Pixie served as the editor for the Burnaby Examiner newspaper and wrote a column entitled "Burnaby History" for The News. In 1974 she authored her first book titled "Bygones of Burnaby" which was one of the first to develop anecdotal stories about pioneer life in Burnaby. She authored "Burnaby - A Proud Century" in 1992 and in 2002 she wrote a biography of the city's namesake in the book "Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby's letters from Colonial B.C." She also contributed many hours of volunteering; helping to establish Burnaby's first museum Heritage Village in 1971, serving as President of the Burnaby Historical Society from 1991-1993. She served a six year term on Burnaby's Heritage Commission leading the charge to preserve many historic sites throughout the city, and during her twenty years as the Community Archives volunteer archivist for the historical society, she succeeded in gathering thousands of rare and valuable historic photographs and documents which now forms the core of the photograph collection on the Heritage Burnaby website (as these items were donated by the Society to the City Archives in 2007). The City of Burnaby awarded Pixie McGeachie the Kushiro Cup as Citizen of the year in 2002. In 2006 she received a Heritage BC project award for leading the Friends of Interurban 1223 project, and in 2008 Heritage BC recognised her again by presenting her with the Ruby Nobb Award. John Aloysius "Jack" McGeachie died October 12, 1981 at the age of sixty-seven. Doreen "Pixie" (Johnson) McGeachie died August 14, 2010 at the age of eighty-nine. On 24 September, 2011, the City of Burnaby dedicated the reading at the City Archives in honour of Pixie and formally named it the Pixie McGeachie Reading Room in recognition of her years of service to the community.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
MSS137-010_ Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track six of recording of interview with Lillian and Murdock McMurray

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Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory10
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's early childhood including the reasons why her family first moved to Burnaby, other early residents of the Deer Lake district, farming practices, and why the Hart family chose to leave Burnaby in 1917.
Date Range
1898-1917
Length
0:06:11
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's early childhood including the reasons why her family first moved to Burnaby, other early residents of the Deer Lake district, farming practices, and why the Hart family chose to leave Burnaby in 1917.
Date Range
1898-1917
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:06:11
Name
Woodward, Harriet
Subject
Agriculture - Fruit and Berries
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Deer Lake
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

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Interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury July 2, 1975 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory11
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's time in Vancouver and her early married life in the Edmonds district, as well as her husband's work at Fraser Mills.
Date Range
1917-[1929]
Length
0:03:29
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Florence (Hart) Godwin's time in Vancouver and her early married life in the Edmonds district, as well as her husband's work at Fraser Mills.
Date Range
1917-[1929]
Photo Info
Florence Hart Godwin on her wedding day, August 7, 1922. Item no. 477-601
Length
0:03:29
Name
Fraser Mills
Godwin, Harold
Subject
Industries - Pulp and Paper
Transportation - Buses
Historic Neighbourhood
Edmonds (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July 2, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Florence Hart Godwin by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury, July 2, 1975. Major themes discussed are: Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) and the Edmonds Historic Neighbourhood. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes."
Biographical Notes
Florence Hart was born in 1898 in New Westminster. Florence first saw Burnaby in April of 1905 on a trip made by horse and buggy from the family home in New Westminster where her father worked as a real estate agent. By 1911, he had built a permanent home for his family in Burnaby, building what is now known as the Hart house and is currently owned by the municipality. Frederick John “Fred” Hart married Alice Chapman in Yale BC on August 13, 1895. They had four children together; Kingsley Chapman born May 27, 1897, Florence Elizabeth born October 23, 1898, and ten years later, Edwyna and Jack. They followed their family nurse, Miss Maude Woodward to Burnaby and purchased thirteen acres of land at Deer Lake to build a summer cottage. Mrs Hill and the children spent the summer months there while Frederick continued working in New Westminster, joining his family on the weekends. Florence Hart attended Douglas Road School before boarding at Crofton House in Vancouver. Kingsley Hart had enlisted in the army on March 23, 1915 when he was only seventeen years old. He was killed in action on September 26, 1916. The Hart family then moved to Kerrisdale, Vancouver. Florence worked at the Carnegie Library. On August 7, 1922 Florence Hart married Harold “Hal” Godwin and moved back to Edmonds in Burnaby where they remained for their entire married lives. In 1929, Florence and Harold’s daughter, Elizabeth Godwin was born. Alice (Chapman) Hart died May 24, 1935 at the age of sixty-eight. Frederick John Hart died August 29, 1945 at the age of seventy-seven. Florence Hart Godwin was named Good Citizen of Burnaby in 1971 and received a life membership to the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) for her long tenure. Both Florence and her husband Harold were awarded life memberships from the VON (Victorian Order of Nurses) for more than half a century of service. Harold Ward Godwin died December 12, 1962 at the age of sixty-six.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:47:57
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Godwin, Florence Hart
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-17_Track_2
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Florence Hart Godwin by Bettina Bradbury

Images
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Interview with W.H. O'Brien July / August 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory18
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's early childhood including the reasons why his family first moved to Burnaby, his first experiences of unemployment and what initially drew him to the Working Organization in Burnaby and their protest against evictions.
Date Range
1914-1932
Length
0:08:44
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to W.H. "Harry" O'Brien's early childhood including the reasons why his family first moved to Burnaby, his first experiences of unemployment and what initially drew him to the Working Organization in Burnaby and their protest against evictions.
Date Range
1914-1932
Photo Info
Harry and Gertrude (Crossan) O'Brien on their wedding day, October 12, 1940. Item no. 315-005
Length
0:08:44
Subject
Organizations
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Inman Avenue
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
July / August 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with W.H. "Harry" O'Brien by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury. Major themes discussed are: the Army of the Common Good, the Union of the Unemployed and the Common Good Credit Union (now the South Burnaby Credit Union). To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
W.H. “Harry” O’Brien was born in the coal mining town of Nanaimo, British Columbia on October 20, 1914. He came to Burnaby with his parents and five siblings in 1927. Harry’s mother, a school teacher, wanted her children to live closer to school in order to obtain a better education, so the O’Brien family settled at Inman Avenue, Burnaby. Harry left school in June of 1929. Harry’s father worked as the caretaker at Central Park around this time and Harry helped him to clear brush, plant trees and enforce the land clearing and wood cutting permit regulations held by men who were on script. Although too young to vote by just over a week, Harry O'Brien worked as a scrutineer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) during the 1935 Federal Election. On October 12, 1940 Harry O'Brien married Gertrude Crossan at St. John the Divine in Burnaby. The Crossan family came to Burnaby from Winnipeg in 1933 and settled at Nelson Avenue. Gertrude's mother, Mary Anne Crossan, was Gilmore Avenue School's first teacher. Harry began his involvement with the Unemployment Organization in Burnaby by participating in an organised protest against the municipality for homeowner evictions brought on by unpaid taxes. The South Burnaby Union of the Unemployed organised in order to protest rules around receiving Relief. Harry became involved, eventually becoming one of the spearheads of the organization, taking over as secretary by 1936. Harry was an original member of the Army of the Common Good, helping to produce over one hundred and twenty-five tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed Burnaby citizens suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The members of the Army of the Common Good who cut wood for consumption or worked in the gardens were given credit for their work through LU (Labour Units) which they could then use to buy groceries and that at the Army's Cooperative stores, one of which was at McKay Avenue, where Harry began working as Manager of Groceries in 1937. The Credit Union movement of British Columbia was also organized by Harry O'Brien and his fellow Army of the Common Good members. W.H. "Harry" O'Brien died July 1, 1992.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:17:56
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
O'Brien, Harry
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-25_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with W.H.

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Interview with Charles B. Brown May 21, 1975 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory27
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's early days working at Burnaby's Municipal Hall, first as an office boy.
Date Range
1909-1938
Length
00:07:15
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Charles Boyer Brown's early days working at Burnaby's Municipal Hall, first as an office boy.
Date Range
1909-1938
Photo Info
Charles Boyer Brown, by photographer Nicholas Rossmo [1950]. Item no. 307-008
Length
00:07:15
Subject
Occupations - Civic Workers
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
May 21, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Charles B. Brown by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury May 21, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, the Commissioner and municipal politics in general. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Charles Boyer Brown was born on June 16, 1894 in the town of Ongar, Essex, England. He came to Canada as a young child with his parents Jean and Percy Brown. In 1903, the family settled in New Westminster and by 1911, Charles had joined the Burnaby municipal staff working as an office boy. The outbreak of World War One interrupted Charlie’s career as he immediately enlisted with the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 to 1918. While overseas he met and married Lillian Bernice Bryan and they returned to Canada together after the war and Charles resumed his position in municipal administration. For a short time, Charles was appointed as the Municipal Assessor, but in 1927 he became the Assistant Municipal Clerk. In 1933, Charles was made Municipal Clerk, a post he held until he retired in 1959. Charles has also been credited with playing a significant role in administering the city while it was under the rule of the provincial commission from 1932-1942. Recognized for his expertise in civic affairs, Charles was appointed by the provincial government to a committee formed to review and revise the Municipal Act. He was also a member of the BC Municipal Officers’ Association from its formation in 1936 and was made its chair in 1953. While these civic duties occupied much of his time, Charles still managed to participate as a volunteer on many sport and youth clubs in the city and served as the secretary for the Kingsway Rotary Club. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to Burnaby, both paid and volunteer, Charles was presented with the Gold Key award in 1959, the same year he finally retired from municipal administration. During Charles’ lifetime, many changes took place in the Municipality that he loved. He saw Burnaby grow in population and progress and he could be proud of the significant part he played in that growth and development. Charles Brown died on August 11, 1981.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
0:58:01
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Brown, Charles B. "Charlie"
Interview Location
Walker Avenue
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-06_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Charles B. Brown

Images
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Interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell 24-Jun-75 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory50
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne's childhood years living in Burnaby, through her first years of marriage.
Date Range
1899-1923
Length
0:08:23
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Ethel Lewarne's childhood years living in Burnaby, through her first years of marriage.
Date Range
1899-1923
Photo Info
Leer family; Ethel Leer Lewarne is standing on the far right, 1911. Item no. 204-052
Length
0:08:23
Subject
Occupations - Grocers
Historic Neighbourhood
Alta Vista (Historic Neighbourhood)
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
24-Jun-75
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Ethel (Leer) Lewarne and Beverley (Lewarne) Burrell by SFU (Simon Fraser University) graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 24, 1975. Major theme discussed is: the Depression. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Ethel Cecilia Leer was born in 1899 in London, England to George Frederick and Sarah Ann Leer. In 1908, the Leer family immigrated to Vancouver, Canada. George Frederick Leer began working for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Ethel’s younger brother George Leer was born about this time. A third child was born but unfortunately did not live past infancy. The Leers arrived in Burnaby in 1911 and bought two lots in Alta Vista at the corner of Portland and McGregor. George Frederick and Sarah Ann were active members of the All Saints Anglican Church on Royal Oak. Ethel went to Dundonald school from 1911 to 1913 with Miss Bowell as her teacher, then on to Britannia High School from 1913 to 1915. Ethel’s father, George Frederick Leer died March 23, 1919 at the age of forty-one. Ethel Cecilia Leer married Alfred Lewarne on December 26, 1921 in Burnaby. Alfred was born February 9, 1893 in Cornwall, England. Before marriage he worked for a creamery in Vancouver. After marriage, Alfred began his own ice cream business in Burnaby. The Lewarnes bought a lot along Nelson Avenue and built a house. Their first child Patricia "Tricia" (later McCleod) was born in 1923, their second was Beverley “Bev” (later Burrell). Their third child, William A. “Bill” Lewarne was born in 1926. Bill grew up to become one of the most popular Mayors in Burnaby’s history, serving from 1981 to 1987. He also served as a member of Council from 1973 to 1975 and 1977 to 1981. After Alfred Lewarne’s death on May 5, 1962 at the age of sixty-nine, Ethel continued living in the family home. Ethel’s mother, Sarah Ann Leer died May 11, 1963 at the age of eighty-seven.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:00:59
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lewarne, Ethel Leer
Burrell, Beverley "Bev" Lewarne
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-13_Track_1
Transcript Available
None
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Ethel Lewarne and Beverley Burrell

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89 records – page 1 of 2.

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