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Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Heritage Value
In their legends, the Squamish native people identified Burnaby's Deer Lake as a mystical location. For generations, one story was told of an underground tunnel connecting Deer Lake with False Creek. In Pauline Johnson's famous book "Legends of Vancouver," the story "Deer Lake" records how Old Chief Capilano chased a giant seal, which escaped through an underground tunnel in False Creek, to Deer Lake in the early 1800s. Aboriginal peoples still came to camp by the Lake up until the early 1900s. At the turn of the century, Deer Lake was recognized for its tranquility and beautiful scenery, which, in turn, attracted New Westminster and Vancouver residents to relocate to the area and build family homes.
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Oakalla Area
Images
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Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
Royal Oak Avenue
Associated Dates
1912
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
Royal Oak Avenue
Associated Dates
1912
Heritage Value
The Oakalla Prison Farm opened in 1912 and was hailed as the most modern facility of its kind. Initially designed to hold 150 men and 50 women, by the 1950s, the population was well over 1000. A working farm, the prison had its own dairy, vegetable gardens and livestock. From the beginning, the location of Oakalla on 185 acres of scenic land next to Burnaby's Deer Lake was the source of contention with residents petitioning the government to relocate the prison and by 1979 it was decided to close the farm and 64 acres of land were transferred to Burnaby for inclusion on the Deer Lake Park. In 1991, Oakalla closed forever and the buildings were demolished to make way for a new residential housing development and an expansion of the park.
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Oakalla Area
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Royal Oak Avenue
Images
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J.D. Shearer House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark513
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
5573 Buckingham Avenue
Description
The J.D. Shearer House is a one and one-half storey British Arts and Crafts-style house distinguished by its picturesque roofline, half-timbered rough-cast stucco cladding on the upper floor and battered window casings. It is located on the south side of Buckingham Avenue at Haszard Street in Burna…
Associated Dates
1912
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Other Names
John D. & Katherine Shearer House
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
John D. & Katherine Shearer House
Civic Address
5573 Buckingham Avenue
Associated Dates
1912
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 10423
Enactment Date
26/08/1996
Description
The J.D. Shearer House is a one and one-half storey British Arts and Crafts-style house distinguished by its picturesque roofline, half-timbered rough-cast stucco cladding on the upper floor and battered window casings. It is located on the south side of Buckingham Avenue at Haszard Street in Burnaby's Deer Lake neighbourhood.
Heritage Value
Built in 1912, the J.D. Shearer House is an excellent example of the high quality residences constructed in the British Arts and Crafts style by affluent citizens in Burnaby's Deer Lake neighbourhood, promoted at the time as the equivalent of the prestigious Shaughnessy Heights development in Vancouver. The site of this house was part of Louis Claude Hill's Buckingham Estate subdivision. Development of these Edwardian era neighbourhoods in Burnaby was facilitated by the B.C. Electric Railway interurban line. In addition, the increasing availability of automobiles to the well-to-do families of the era sped up the process of urbanization in the outlying areas of Vancouver. Built for retired English military officer John D. Shearer and his wife, Katherine, the British Arts and Crafts design of the house represents associations with the Mother Country and the displays of patriotic loyalty considered desirable characteristics at the time. The picturesque charm and character of rural England is evoked in harmony with its woodland setting.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the J.D. Shearer House include its: - location in the Buckingham Estate subdivision in the Deer Lake neighbourhood - residential form, scale and massing as exemplified by its one and one-half storey plus basement height, asymmetrical plan, front bay window and picturesque roofline - British Arts and Crafts details such as the half-timbering and rough-cast stucco on the upper storey, battered window casings, external clinker brick chimney on the east facade, deep overhanging closed eaves and bargeboards with distinctive lower returns - side gabled roof with gabled and shed dormers, clad in cedar - raised central entrance porch - irregular fenestration, including multi-paned transoms over casement windows - two internal red brick chimneys
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Person
John D. Shearer
Katherine Shearer
Function
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Primary Current--Single Dwelling
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
023-316-977
Boundaries
The J.D. Shearer House is comprised of a single residential lot located at 5573 Buckingham Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
1044
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Private
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 5573 Buckingham Avenue
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Dr. William & Ruth Baldwin House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark534
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6543/45 Deer Lake Drive
Description
The Dr. William & Ruth Baldwin House is a two-storey modern post-and-beam structure, located on the southern shore of Deer Lake in Burnaby's Deer Lake Park. The site is steeply sloped, and the main entrance of the house is at the top of the slope facing onto Deer Lake Drive.
Associated Dates
1965
Formal Recognition
Community Heritage Register
  6 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6543/45 Deer Lake Drive
Associated Dates
1965
Formal Recognition
Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Council Resolution
Enactment Date
26/05/2003
Description
The Dr. William & Ruth Baldwin House is a two-storey modern post-and-beam structure, located on the southern shore of Deer Lake in Burnaby's Deer Lake Park. The site is steeply sloped, and the main entrance of the house is at the top of the slope facing onto Deer Lake Drive.
Heritage Value
The Baldwin House is valued as a prime example of Burnaby’s post-Second World War modern heritage and progressive architectural style, as well as for its personal connections to internationally-acclaimed architect, Arthur Erickson. Inspired by the modern domestic idiom established earlier in the twentieth century by Frank Lloyd Wright and Richard Neutra, Erickson conceived his architecture as responding directly to the site. A cohesive expression of simple orthogonal lines and ultimate transparency, this structure reduces the idea of post-and-beam West Coast modernism to its most refined elements. A fine example of the evolving talent of Erickson’s earlier work, this house is a landmark modern house in Burnaby and is unique in terms of siting and context. Having just won the 1963 competition for the new Simon Fraser University in Burnaby with his partner, Geoff Massey, and having built fewer than half a dozen homes previously, Erickson’s reputation was growing and his skill as a designer of modern buildings was in great demand. The same year that Erickson/Massey Architects designed SFU, Dr. William Baldwin and his wife, Ruth, personal friends of Erickson, commissioned him to design this house. Erickson was already familiar with the site; as a child he had spent time at this spot when his family visited friends who lived on Deer Lake. Both the Baldwin House and the university were completed in 1965. SFU became internationally famous; the Baldwin House was also considered an architectural success and was recognized in publications of the time. Only a single storey of this two-storey house is visible from the road, as it is built into the hillside in response to its steep site and proximity to Deer Lake. Like many other Erickson designs, this structure was conceived as a pavilion. Constructed of glass and wood, its transparency facilitates visual access to the lake’s edge, acting as an invitation, rather than a barrier, to the landscape. The house blends into the natural surroundings and the site includes other man-made landscape features such as a reflecting pool. As a reaction to the often grey quality of light in the region, Erickson exploits flat planes of water as a source of borrowed light. The refined and purposeful design, transparency, openness of plan and adjacency to the lake combine to give the house a floating appearance at the water's edge. The concept of a floating house set within an accompanying garden was inspired, in part, by the palaces and house boats of Dal Lake in Kashmir and the famed nearby Mughal Gardens. Although Erickson never visited Dal Lake, he travelled extensively throughout India, and specifically mentions the Kashmir reference in relation to this house. There is a rich complexity of other allusions worked into the fabric of the house, unified by a feeling for the conjunction of light, water and land at this special location. Widely renowned as Canada’s most brilliant modern architect, Erickson’s reputation is important to the development and growth of modern architecture in Canada and North America.
Defining Elements
The elements of the Baldwin House that define its character are those materials and details which respond to the location of the building and determine the relation between landscape and building, combining to create a single cohesive site. These include its: - close proximity to water - orthogonal plan and massing, with flat tar-and-gravel roof - stepped down massing orienting the house towards the water - post-and-beam construction, with the width of the beams matched to the width of the posts - wood and glass used as primary building materials - transparency and light achieved by the abundant use of glass - large undivided sheets of single glazing - butt glazed glass corners - abundant and generous balconies, which blur the transition from interior to exterior - horizontal flush cedar siding - use of salvaged brick for chimneys - use of chains as downspouts - built-in rooftop barbeque - built in furniture and fittings dating to the time of construction, such as original hardware, benches, bathroom vanities and kitchen cabinets - landscaped site including reflecting pool, plantings and a dock protruding into the lake
Locality
Deer Lake Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Function
Primary Current--Single Dwelling
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 011-946-032 and P.I.D. No. 011-946-067
Boundaries
The Baldwin House is comprised of two municipally-owned lots located at 6543 and 6545 Deer Lake Drive, Burnaby.
Area
6,070.20
Contributing Resource
Building
Landscape Feature
Ownership
Public (local)
Other Collection
Canadian Architectural Archives, University of Calgary, Collection: Original Plans No. ERI 4A/76.13
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6543 Deer Lake Drive
Burnaby - 6545 Deer Lake Drive
Images
Less detail
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