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Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory547
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s early life growing up in the Cascade-Schou District, playing in the bush as a child, fishing at Stoney Creek, tobogganing on Burnaby Mountain, and learning more about nature as an adult. He also talks about the Pavilion area restaurant calle…
Date Range
1955-1990
Length
0:08:36
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s early life growing up in the Cascade-Schou District, playing in the bush as a child, fishing at Stoney Creek, tobogganing on Burnaby Mountain, and learning more about nature as an adult. He also talks about the Pavilion area restaurant called “The Owl and the Oarsman”.
Date Range
1955-1990
Length
0:08:36
Name
The Owl and the Oarsman Restaurant
Subject
Persons - Children
Plants
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Broadview (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Cascade-Schou Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with John Kirbyson by Kathy Bossort September 28, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory556
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about John Kirbyson’s early life, his family’s move to Burnaby in 1969, his connection to the outdoors, and his experience as a student at SFU earning his bachelors degree in Physical Geography. He also talks about hiking on Burnaby Mountain and working for the City…
Date Range
1954-1978
Length
0:09:35
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about John Kirbyson’s early life, his family’s move to Burnaby in 1969, his connection to the outdoors, and his experience as a student at SFU earning his bachelors degree in Physical Geography. He also talks about hiking on Burnaby Mountain and working for the City of Burnaby while going to school.
Date Range
1954-1978
Length
0:09:35
Name
Crampton, Colin
Simon Fraser University
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services
Subject
Education
Occupations
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Lozells (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Government Road Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 28, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Kirbyson conducted by Kathy Bossort. John Kirbyson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about John Kirbyson’s education and career as parks planner for the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services, and the development of the 1999 Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area Management Plan. The interview explores how parks management balances environmental and recreational values and safety, and the importance of good guidelines and public input in the parks planning process. John Kirbyson also talks about recreational activities and various developments on Burnaby Mountain in the 1990s, such as the Kamui Mintara sculptures.
Biographical Notes
John Kirbyson was born in Vancouver in 1954, to Arnold and Winnifred Kirbyson. After several years spent in Winnipeg and Calgary, the Kirbyson family moved to Hunter Street in Burnaby in 1969 where John remembers living near the City’s nursery. John earned his BSc degree at SFU in Physical Geography (1973-1978) and then worked for the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services between 1978 and 2005, where he moved from labourer to management positions. Supported by the City, he returned to SFU to earn his Masters degree in the School of Resource and Environment Management in 1991, his thesis being on restoration of Deer Lake. He was Manager of Parks Planning, Design and Development in the 1990s at the time that land on Burnaby Mountain was transferred from SFU to the City of Burnaby, and had the opportunity to direct the development of the first management plan for the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. From 2005 to 2010 John was Manager of the Parks, Recreation and Culture Dept. in Penticton, after which he has worked as an environmental consultant for Lees & Associates Landscape Architects and Planners. He is married to wife Linda and has three children: Linnaea, Jeremy and Colin.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:33:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Kirbyson, John W.
Interview Location
John Kirbyson's son's home in Langley
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-002_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with John Kirbyson

Less detail

Interview with John Kirbyson by Kathy Bossort September 28, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory557
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about John Kirbyson’s career with City of Burnaby Parks and Recreation Dept. 1978-2005. He talks about returning to SFU for his Masters degree in the new Natural Resource Management program; trail management on Burnaby Mountain; and relationship between SFU and Park…
Date Range
1978-2005
Length
0:14:04
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about John Kirbyson’s career with City of Burnaby Parks and Recreation Dept. 1978-2005. He talks about returning to SFU for his Masters degree in the new Natural Resource Management program; trail management on Burnaby Mountain; and relationship between SFU and Parks staff managing trails on the mountain.
Date Range
1978-2005
Length
0:14:04
Name
Simon Fraser University
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services
Subject
Education
Public Services - Municipal Services
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 28, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Kirbyson conducted by Kathy Bossort. John Kirbyson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about John Kirbyson’s education and career as parks planner for the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services, and the development of the 1999 Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area Management Plan. The interview explores how parks management balances environmental and recreational values and safety, and the importance of good guidelines and public input in the parks planning process. John Kirbyson also talks about recreational activities and various developments on Burnaby Mountain in the 1990s, such as the Kamui Mintara sculptures.
Biographical Notes
John Kirbyson was born in Vancouver in 1954, to Arnold and Winnifred Kirbyson. After several years spent in Winnipeg and Calgary, the Kirbyson family moved to Hunter Street in Burnaby in 1969 where John remembers living near the City’s nursery. John earned his BSc degree at SFU in Physical Geography (1973-1978) and then worked for the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services between 1978 and 2005, where he moved from labourer to management positions. Supported by the City, he returned to SFU to earn his Masters degree in the School of Resource and Environment Management in 1991, his thesis being on restoration of Deer Lake. He was Manager of Parks Planning, Design and Development in the 1990s at the time that land on Burnaby Mountain was transferred from SFU to the City of Burnaby, and had the opportunity to direct the development of the first management plan for the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. From 2005 to 2010 John was Manager of the Parks, Recreation and Culture Dept. in Penticton, after which he has worked as an environmental consultant for Lees & Associates Landscape Architects and Planners. He is married to wife Linda and has three children: Linnaea, Jeremy and Colin.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:33:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Kirbyson, John W.
Interview Location
John Kirbyson's son's home in Langley
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-002_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with John Kirbyson

Less detail

Interview with John Kirbyson by Kathy Bossort September 28, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory558
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about John Kirbyson’s memories of events in Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park and the Pavilion area around 1990, including the Velodrome, Playground of the Gods totems and the Rose Garden. He talks about balancing recreation and conservation values, and the role of t…
Date Range
1990-2000
Length
0:13:22
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about John Kirbyson’s memories of events in Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park and the Pavilion area around 1990, including the Velodrome, Playground of the Gods totems and the Rose Garden. He talks about balancing recreation and conservation values, and the role of the Environmental Services Division.
Date Range
1990-2000
Length
0:13:22
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Burnaby Mountain Park
Kamui Mintara
City of Burnaby Environmental Services
Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Department
Subject
Recreational Activities
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 28, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with John Kirbyson conducted by Kathy Bossort. John Kirbyson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about John Kirbyson’s education and career as parks planner for the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services, and the development of the 1999 Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area Management Plan. The interview explores how parks management balances environmental and recreational values and safety, and the importance of good guidelines and public input in the parks planning process. John Kirbyson also talks about recreational activities and various developments on Burnaby Mountain in the 1990s, such as the Kamui Mintara sculptures.
Biographical Notes
John Kirbyson was born in Vancouver in 1954, to Arnold and Winnifred Kirbyson. After several years spent in Winnipeg and Calgary, the Kirbyson family moved to Hunter Street in Burnaby in 1969 where John remembers living near the City’s nursery. John earned his BSc degree at SFU in Physical Geography (1973-1978) and then worked for the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services between 1978 and 2005, where he moved from labourer to management positions. Supported by the City, he returned to SFU to earn his Masters degree in the School of Resource and Environment Management in 1991, his thesis being on restoration of Deer Lake. He was Manager of Parks Planning, Design and Development in the 1990s at the time that land on Burnaby Mountain was transferred from SFU to the City of Burnaby, and had the opportunity to direct the development of the first management plan for the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. From 2005 to 2010 John was Manager of the Parks, Recreation and Culture Dept. in Penticton, after which he has worked as an environmental consultant for Lees & Associates Landscape Architects and Planners. He is married to wife Linda and has three children: Linnaea, Jeremy and Colin.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:33:43
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Kirbyson, John W.
Interview Location
John Kirbyson's son's home in Langley
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-002_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with John Kirbyson

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory578
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s first years of employment with Parks, her sources of knowledge about Burnaby Mountain, and the department’s activities in Burnaby Mountain Park. She talks about the loop trail planned for Burnaby Mountain Park in 1958, the Trans Canada Trail p…
Date Range
1958-1992
Length
0:12:40
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s first years of employment with Parks, her sources of knowledge about Burnaby Mountain, and the department’s activities in Burnaby Mountain Park. She talks about the loop trail planned for Burnaby Mountain Park in 1958, the Trans Canada Trail project, events and issues at the Pavilion, and keeping track of trails on SFU lands.
Date Range
1958-1992
Length
0:12:40
Name
Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Department
Burnaby Mountain Park
Kamui Mintara
Trans Canada Trail
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Features - Trails
Planning
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory579
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s historical overview of early public recreation, and intentions to set aside parkland, on Burnaby Mountain; Acting-Commissioner Richard Bolton’s signing of By Law 1772 that created Barnet Mountain Park in 1942; and her explanation about the fun…
Date Range
1910-1960
Length
0:21:54
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s historical overview of early public recreation, and intentions to set aside parkland, on Burnaby Mountain; Acting-Commissioner Richard Bolton’s signing of By Law 1772 that created Barnet Mountain Park in 1942; and her explanation about the function and kinds of park dedications used in Burnaby.
Date Range
1910-1960
Length
0:21:54
Name
Bolton, Richard
Barnet Mountain Park
Burnaby Mountain Park
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Rick Sporns by Kathy Bossort October 30, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory604
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Rick Sporn’s description of the inspiration for and design of the Burnaby Mountain Centennial Rose Garden located in the Pavilion area on Burnaby Mountain. He talks about people involved in the 1991/92 City of Burnaby Centennial legacy project, including Mark …
Date Range
1990-2015
Length
0:12:58
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Rick Sporn’s description of the inspiration for and design of the Burnaby Mountain Centennial Rose Garden located in the Pavilion area on Burnaby Mountain. He talks about people involved in the 1991/92 City of Burnaby Centennial legacy project, including Mark Stockdale and Doug Hosgood who suggested the project and selected and provided advise about the roses, and Bill Bissett, the City’s horticultural foreman.
Date Range
1990-2015
Length
0:12:58
Name
Kamui Mintara
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Rose Garden
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Stockdale, Mark
Hosgood, Doug
Bissett, Bill
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Plants - Flowers
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 30, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Rick Sporns conducted by Kathy Bossort. Rick Sporns was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Rick Sporn’s description of the history and design of Burnaby Mountain Centennial Rose Garden and the significance of the Centennial Pavilion area in the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Rick Sporns also talks about his career with the City of Burnaby’s Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services, management of Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area, and the value of natural areas to Burnaby.
Biographical Notes
Richard Sporns was born in 1957 in Daly Municipality, Manitoba, to Ulrich and Charlotte Sporns. The family moved to the Burquitlam Area of Burnaby in about 1965. Rick Sporns obtained his BSc degree in biology at SFU and a degree in landscape architecture at UBC. In 1985 he began his career in the City of Burnaby’s Park, Recreation and Cultural Services department where he currently is Assistant Manager - Parks Design. Rick was responsible for designing Burnaby Mountain Centennial Rose Garden, a legacy project proposed by Mark Stockdale to commemorate Burnaby’s 1992 Centennial. The rose garden opened to the public July 18, 1992.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:01:40
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sporns, Richard "Rick"
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-008_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Rick Sporns

Less detail

Interview with Barry Jones by Kathy Bossort December 9, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory665
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about buying his Centennial Way home on Burnaby Mountain in 1971, the 1972 proposal for developing the south slope of the mountain, and the 1974 public hearings that resulted in the designation of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.…
Date Range
1970-2015
Length
0:08:17
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Barry Jones’ talking about buying his Centennial Way home on Burnaby Mountain in 1971, the 1972 proposal for developing the south slope of the mountain, and the 1974 public hearings that resulted in the designation of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain. He also talks about what the conservation area means to him and how the area has changed little since 1971.
Date Range
1970-2015
Length
0:08:17
Name
Hastings Grove
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
December 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Barry Jones conducted by Kathy Bossort. Barry Jones was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Barry Jones talking about his home and the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and about the negotiations that resulted in the agreement between Simon Fraser University and the City of Burnaby in 1995. He talks about the building of Burnaby Mountain Parkway and its link to the 1995 agreement, and about his experiences with Trans Mountain tank farm and pipeline. He also talks about his education and career as teacher, school board trustee and politician.
Biographical Notes
Barry Jones was born 1940 in Princeton, BC. His father moved the family to a home on Georgia Street in North Burnaby in 1944 where Barry grew up. He attended UBC majoring in mathematics and chemistry, and unable to find work in his field, taught two years in northern BC. He liked teaching and returned to school, enrolling in education at the newly opened Simon Fraser University in 1965. He taught one year at Moscrop Secondary School in Burnaby and finished his 25 year teaching career in Coquitlam. Barry served ten years as a Burnaby School board trustee, and then ten years as North Burnaby MLA (NDP) beginning in 1986, serving five years in Official Opposition and five years in government under then-premier Mike Harcourt. During his time in government, Barry Jones successfully lobbied for freedom of information legislation. He also played a role in resolving the dispute between SFU and Burnaby over control and ownership of land on Burnaby Mountain and in creating the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area in 1995. He continues to live on Burnaby Mountain in a home he bought in 1971.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:06:23
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Jones, J. Barry
Interview Location
City of Burnaby City Hall law libary
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-015_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Barry Jones

Less detail

Interview with Alfred Bingham June 10, 1975 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory60
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of tree felling in Burnaby.
Date Range
1917-1935
Length
0:08:22
  1 Audio     1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview pertains to Alfred Bingham's memories of tree felling in Burnaby.
Date Range
1917-1935
Photo Info
Alfred Bingham standing next to a 1931 Model T Ford, 1932. Item no. HV976.46.4
Length
0:08:22
Subject
Occupations - Lumberjacks
Plants - Trees
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bradbury, Dr. Bettina
Interview Date
June 10, 1975
Scope and Content
Recording is a taped interview with Alfred Bingham by SFU graduate student Bettina Bradbury June 10, 1975. Major themes discussed are: the Depression, Pioneers, and the Co-operative Movement. To view "Narrow By" terms for each track expand this description and see "Notes".
Biographical Notes
Alfred "Alf" Bingham was born in England in 1892 and moved to Canada in 1912. His first job in Canada was laying track for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) from Edmonton to McBride in 1912. His second was in Vancouver at the Rat Portage Mill on False Creek, working on the Resaw machine. He quit after one week due to poor working conditions. After taking part in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike as a delegate of the Retail and Mailorder Union (A.F.L.) on the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, Alfred moved to Burnaby where he and fellow Burnaby residents Angus McLean and Percy Little worked ten hour days to build a Shingle Mill on the edge of Burnaby Lake for Simpson & Giberson. George Green, carpenter and millwright (author of “The History of Burnaby”) also helped in the construction of the mill. Alfred built his own home from lumber cut from the mill in the Lochdale area on Sherlock Street between Curtis Street and Kitchener Street. On April 10, 1920 Alfred married Mary Jane “Ada” Reynolds. Alfred and Ada often took in foster children during their marriage. Due to her nursing experience, Ada was often called upon to deliver babies in the Burnaby area. Alfred and Ada Bingham were instrumental members of the Army of the Common Good, collecting vegetables and grains from growers in the area and even producing over 125 tons of vegetables from its own gardens to feed children and youth suffering from the lack of resources during the Depression years. The army was in operation for ten years and during that time the members organised the Credit Union movement of British Columbia and drew up the Credit Union act thorough the Vancouver Co-operative Council. They also started Co-Op stores and the Co-Op Wholesale Society. Alfred was also Secretary of the Burnaby Housing committee and in 1946 he became the Secretary of the North Burnaby Labour Progressive Party (LPP). Mary Jane “Ada” (Reynolds) Bingham died on August 9, 1969. Her husband Alfred died on April 29, 1979.
Total Tracks
14
Total Length
1:57:27
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Bingham, Alfred "Alf"
Interviewer Bio
Bettina Bradbury teaches history and women's studies at York University. She is the author of Wife to Widow. Lives, Laws and Politics in Nineteenth-century Montreal. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, June 2011), 520p; Working Families. Age, Gender and Daily Survival in Industrializing Montreal. (Toronto: Canadian Social History Series, McClelland and Stewart, 1993); (Republished Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996) (3rd edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007). These interviews were undertaken after she completed her MA at Simon Fraser University in 1975 with the support of an LIP grant.
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives collection
Series
Oral History series
Item No.
100-13-20-1_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interview was digitized in 2010 allowing it to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council and the BC History Digitization Program of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia. It was recognized by the Heritage Society of BC with an award in 2012.
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Alfred Bingham

Images
Less detail

Interview with Toki Miyashita by Rod Fowler February 27, 1990 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory524
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s involvement with the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko and her interest in the link between BC’s aboriginals and the Ainu of Japan. She describes Toko’s visits, her arrangement for Toko to meet Haida carver Bill Reid, and the events surrounding Burnaby…
Date Range
1980-1990
Length
00:19:08
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s involvement with the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko and her interest in the link between BC’s aboriginals and the Ainu of Japan. She describes Toko’s visits, her arrangement for Toko to meet Haida carver Bill Reid, and the events surrounding Burnaby’s sister-city Kushiro’s gift of Toko’s sculptures to Burnaby for the Centennial. She also describes Toko’s appreciation of the Haida totems and the native people of BC, and his gift of a set of carving tools to Chief Saul Terry
Date Range
1980-1990
Length
00:19:08
Name
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Burnaby Mountain Park
Kamui Mintara
Subject
Celebrations - Centennial
Ceremonial Artifacts - Totem Poles
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 27, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Toki Miyashita, conducted by Rod Fowler. Toki Miyashita was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, her awakening interest in Japanese culture after the war, her subsequent interest in teaching others about Japanese crafts and arts, and becoming a helpful intermediary between Burnaby and visitors from Japan. The interview explores her interest in the Ainu of Japan and their possible link to the aboriginals of BC, her impressions of the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko, and her involvement in the events surrounding the creation of the sculpture “Playground of the Gods” for Burnaby Mountain. The interview also contains interesting details about the art of Japanese flower-arranging. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Toki Miyashita was born in Richmond B.C., ca. 1935, at the Nelson Brothers “fishery”, a second generation Canadian descended from the Oikawa family who settled on Don and Lion Islands (Oikawa-shima). In 1942 the Japanese Canadians in BC were forcibly moved from the coast and their belongings confiscated. Toki Miyashita, her parents, two brothers, and grandparents were first taken to Hastings Park where her father was separated from the family to work in road camps, and the rest of the family were interned in New Denver. Her resourceful grandmother moved the family to land outside the internment camp, growing a large garden from seeds brought with her. In 1946 the family moved to Kamloops and in 1958, after finishing high school, Toki Miyashita moved to Montreal to be with relatives and a small Japanese community. At this time she became interested in Japanese culture and took a Japanese language course at age 22. She learned about Japanese flower-arranging (Ikebana), paper folding (Origami), silk doll making (from a Russian Jew), and how to wear a kimono. She began demonstrating these arts in schools and to other groups, which she continued doing when she, her husband and two young children moved to Burnaby in 1969. Toki Miyashita has been called an unpaid “ambassador” of Japanese culture to the Lower Mainland. She has acted as liaison between Burnaby and her sister city Kushiro in Japan, which involved her in the creation of the Ainu sculpture “Playground of the Gods” on Burnaby Mountain for Burnaby’s Centennial. Toki Miyashita is a recognized Master in Ikebana Sogetsu, a school of flower-arranging, and has served on the board of the Vancouver Ikebana Association. She also served on Burnaby’s Family Court in the 1980s.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
01:34:10
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Miyashita, Toki
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-017_Track_9
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track nine of interview with Toki Miyashita

Less detail

Interview with Toki Miyashita by Rod Fowler February 27, 1990 - Track 10

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory525
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s description of how Toko Nuburi and his son [Shusei] worked to create the pole carvings in 1989. She also relates that seeing Toko, a man of the north of Japan, explains her own physical characteristics
Date Range
1989-1990
Length
00:06:41
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Toki Miyashita’s description of how Toko Nuburi and his son [Shusei] worked to create the pole carvings in 1989. She also relates that seeing Toko, a man of the north of Japan, explains her own physical characteristics
Date Range
1989-1990
Length
00:06:41
Name
Burnaby Mountain Centennial Park
Burnaby Mountain Park
Kamui Mintara
Subject
Celebrations - Centennial
Ceremonial Artifacts - Totem Poles
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Fowler, Rod
Interview Date
February 27, 1990
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Toki Miyashita, conducted by Rod Fowler. Toki Miyashita was one of eleven participants interviewed as part of the SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee's oral history series titled, "Voices of Burnaby". The interview is about Toki Miyashita’s family’s internment during WWII, her awakening interest in Japanese culture after the war, her subsequent interest in teaching others about Japanese crafts and arts, and becoming a helpful intermediary between Burnaby and visitors from Japan. The interview explores her interest in the Ainu of Japan and their possible link to the aboriginals of BC, her impressions of the Ainu carver Nuburi Toko, and her involvement in the events surrounding the creation of the sculpture “Playground of the Gods” for Burnaby Mountain. The interview also contains interesting details about the art of Japanese flower-arranging. To view “Narrow By” terms for each track expand this description and see “Notes”.
Biographical Notes
Toki Miyashita was born in Richmond B.C., ca. 1935, at the Nelson Brothers “fishery”, a second generation Canadian descended from the Oikawa family who settled on Don and Lion Islands (Oikawa-shima). In 1942 the Japanese Canadians in BC were forcibly moved from the coast and their belongings confiscated. Toki Miyashita, her parents, two brothers, and grandparents were first taken to Hastings Park where her father was separated from the family to work in road camps, and the rest of the family were interned in New Denver. Her resourceful grandmother moved the family to land outside the internment camp, growing a large garden from seeds brought with her. In 1946 the family moved to Kamloops and in 1958, after finishing high school, Toki Miyashita moved to Montreal to be with relatives and a small Japanese community. At this time she became interested in Japanese culture and took a Japanese language course at age 22. She learned about Japanese flower-arranging (Ikebana), paper folding (Origami), silk doll making (from a Russian Jew), and how to wear a kimono. She began demonstrating these arts in schools and to other groups, which she continued doing when she, her husband and two young children moved to Burnaby in 1969. Toki Miyashita has been called an unpaid “ambassador” of Japanese culture to the Lower Mainland. She has acted as liaison between Burnaby and her sister city Kushiro in Japan, which involved her in the creation of the Ainu sculpture “Playground of the Gods” on Burnaby Mountain for Burnaby’s Centennial. Toki Miyashita is a recognized Master in Ikebana Sogetsu, a school of flower-arranging, and has served on the board of the Vancouver Ikebana Association. She also served on Burnaby’s Family Court in the 1980s.
Total Tracks
11
Total Length
01:34:10
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Miyashita, Toki
Interviewer Bio
Rod Fowler returned to university as a mature student in the 1980s after working about twenty years in the field of economics and computerization in business in England, Europe and Western Canada. He graduated with a BA from SFU in both History and Sociology in 1987, his MA degree in Geography in 1989, and his PhD in Cultural Geography at SFU. He taught courses in Geography, Sociology, History and Canadian Studies at several Lower Mainland colleges, before becoming a full time member of the Geography Department at Kwantlen University College.
Collection/Fonds
SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee fonds
Series
Centennial Oral History project series
Item No.
MSS187-017_Track_10
Transcript Available
Transcript available
Media Type
Sound Recording
Web Notes
Interviews were digitized in 2015 allowing them to be accessible on Heritage Burnaby. The digitization project was initiated by the Community Heritage Commission with support from City of Burnaby Council.
Audio Tracks

Track ten of interview with Toki Miyashita

Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory548
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli joining the new environmental organization “Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society” ca. 1988 and his earlier involvement in environmental issues. He talks about the Society’s beginnings, goals and lobbying activities; about the group’s Presiden…
Date Range
1975-1990
Length
0:15:30
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli joining the new environmental organization “Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society” ca. 1988 and his earlier involvement in environmental issues. He talks about the Society’s beginnings, goals and lobbying activities; about the group’s President Dean Lamont and his link with Naheeno Park; other stakeholders involved; and about the early involvement of Chief Leonard George and the Burrard Band youth in the Society’s activities.
Date Range
1975-1990
Length
0:15:30
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Lamont, Dean
George, Leonard
Tsleil-Waututh First Nation
Naheeno Park
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory549
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s description of the issues involved in SFU’s proposed expansion in the 1980s; his ideas about alternatives to SFU’s plans; the broad support for the conservation area preservation concept; and the wider issues for the municipality in the disp…
Date Range
1988-1995
Length
0:08:49
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s description of the issues involved in SFU’s proposed expansion in the 1980s; his ideas about alternatives to SFU’s plans; the broad support for the conservation area preservation concept; and the wider issues for the municipality in the dispute.
Date Range
1988-1995
Length
0:08:49
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Protests and Demonstrations
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory550
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s memories about the members of the Society including Merrill Gordon, Karen Morcke, Diane Hansen and Gavin Ross, and the interests and strengths they brought to the Society. He talks about the loss of deer habitat with the building of UniverCi…
Date Range
1988-1995
Length
0:10:07
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s memories about the members of the Society including Merrill Gordon, Karen Morcke, Diane Hansen and Gavin Ross, and the interests and strengths they brought to the Society. He talks about the loss of deer habitat with the building of UniverCity and the Parkway.
Date Range
1988-1995
Length
0:10:07
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Lamont, Dean
Gordon, Merrill
Morcke, Karen
Hansen, H. Diane
Ross, Gavin
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Animals - Deer
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory551
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s description of the Society’s involvement in environmental issues and projects other than Burnaby Mountain, and its visits to schools to talk about environmental concerns. He talks about his continuing work on recycling programs, including th…
Date Range
1988-2015
Length
0:05:03
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s description of the Society’s involvement in environmental issues and projects other than Burnaby Mountain, and its visits to schools to talk about environmental concerns. He talks about his continuing work on recycling programs, including the one at the Coquitlam school where he is employed.
Date Range
1988-2015
Length
0:05:03
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Subject
Education
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory552
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s description of the kinds of recreation on Burnaby Mountain in the 1980s and 1990s, some of the conflicts and impact on the landscape that resulted, and the need to replace piecemeal management with planning that takes in the whole of the mou…
Date Range
1980-2015
Length
0:13:18
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s description of the kinds of recreation on Burnaby Mountain in the 1980s and 1990s, some of the conflicts and impact on the landscape that resulted, and the need to replace piecemeal management with planning that takes in the whole of the mountain. He talks about Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society’s guided public walks, trail map, and trail improvement work. He also mentions the totem poles in Naheeno Park.
Date Range
1980-2015
Length
0:13:18
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Naheeno Park
Subject
Recreational Activities
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory553
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s beliefs about the value of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area, why people agreed to its preservation, and the role of the Society in rallying support for the preservation concept. He talks about how people use the mountain, and some of t…
Date Range
1988-2015
Length
0:10:02
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s beliefs about the value of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area, why people agreed to its preservation, and the role of the Society in rallying support for the preservation concept. He talks about how people use the mountain, and some of the safety concerns, including the risk of meeting bears on the mountain and the problem of parking.
Date Range
1988-2015
Length
0:10:02
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Subject
Recreational Activities
Geographic Features - Forests
Animals - Bears
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory554
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society’s reaction to the final 1995 agreement which met its goal to preserve the conservation area. Steve Mancinelli describes the ceremony at which Mayor Drummond awarded the Society Burnaby’s 1998 Environment Award. He talk…
Date Range
1995-2015
Length
0:10:34
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society’s reaction to the final 1995 agreement which met its goal to preserve the conservation area. Steve Mancinelli describes the ceremony at which Mayor Drummond awarded the Society Burnaby’s 1998 Environment Award. He talks about his letter writing and his belief about the positive impact people can have if they get politically involved. He illustrates his point with examples.
Date Range
1995-2015
Length
0:10:34
Name
Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Organizations - Societies and Clubs
Persons - Volunteers
Protests and Demonstrations
Public Services
Ceremonies - Award
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Steve Mancinelli by Kathy Bossort September 13, 2015 - Track 9

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory555
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s wish to see improvements to the trail system on Burnaby Mountain, and his description of changes in the forest and of some of the things he found on the mountain when mapping the trails, including big trees, an old shooting blind, student ca…
Date Range
1995-2015
Length
0:09:53
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Steve Mancinelli’s wish to see improvements to the trail system on Burnaby Mountain, and his description of changes in the forest and of some of the things he found on the mountain when mapping the trails, including big trees, an old shooting blind, student camps, and the rose bushes on the UniverCity site. He walks the mountain still, with his two daughters. His only regret looking back is the unhappy end to the involvement of the First Nation in the preservation of the conservation area.
Date Range
1995-2015
Length
0:09:53
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Tsleil-Waututh First Nation
Subject
Recreational Activities
Geographic Features - Forests
Geographic Features - Trails
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
September 13, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Steve Mancinelli conducted by Kathy Bossort. Steve Mancinelli was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society between 1988 and 1997 and its advocacy for the protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain prior to the land transfer from SFU to Burnaby in 1995. Steve Mancinelli also talks about his other environmental and political activities, recreation on Burnaby Mountain, and the value of its natural assets.
Biographical Notes
Stephen Mancinelli was born in Vancouver in 1953 to Mario and Joan Mancinelli, one of three sons. The Mancinelli family moved to Burnaby in 1955 to the Cascade-Schou District. Steve attended Schou School (Gr. 1- 7) and Moscrop School (Gr. 8-10), playing as a child in the bush on the future Discovery Park site, before the family moved to Port Coquitlam. Steve moved back to Burnaby when he was 18, married his wife Glenda in 1980, and raised his family of two daughters (Julia and Aimee) in the Capital Hill District, before moving to Coquitlam in 2002. Employed as a sheet metal worker for 25 years, Steve has recently worked as a custodian for Coquitlam School District 43 for 19 years. Steve was one of the founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, and has also been a member of the Capital Hill Community Association, on the Board of Directors for Burnaby Psychiatric Services, and a Regional Director for the Green Party. Steve took an early interest in organic gardening, planting trees, and finding inventive ways to recycle waste and promote responsible use of the environment. Steve’s experience working on environmental issues was an important asset to the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed ca. 1988 to become a key advocate for preserving parkland on Burnaby Mountain. The Society was awarded the City of Burnaby 1998 Environment Award in Communications for its work in preserving the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. In 2001 Steve was awarded an Environmental Star in Community Stewardship for being “active in preserving and enhancing Burnaby’s natural environment for over thirty years”.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
1:31:42
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Mancinelli, Stephen J. "Steve"
Interview Location
Steve Mancinelli's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-001_Track_9
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track nine of interview with Steve Mancinelli

Less detail

Interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen by Kathy Bossort October 9, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory563
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview introduces Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen. Karen Morcke talks about coming to SFU from Germany as a student in 1968 and then working as an instructor at SFU until she retired in 1995. She describes the trails on Burnaby Mountain when she first started walking them. Dian…
Date Range
1965-1995
Length
0:05:25
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview introduces Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen. Karen Morcke talks about coming to SFU from Germany as a student in 1968 and then working as an instructor at SFU until she retired in 1995. She describes the trails on Burnaby Mountain when she first started walking them. Diane Hansen describes moving to Westridge in 1971.
Date Range
1965-1995
Length
0:05:25
Name
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Recreational Activities
Geographic Features - Trails
Education
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Westridge Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 9, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen conducted by Kathy Bossort. Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history and activities of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society of which Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen were founding members, and the environmental and recreational value of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. Karen Morcke also talks about walking the trails on Burnaby Mountain from 1968 to present and her involvement in other environmental groups.
Biographical Notes
Diane Hansen was born in Winnipeg in 1941, trained as a nurse in Toronto, and moved with her husband Ingolf Hansen to the Westridge Area in Burnaby in 1971, where Diane lived until 2010. Diane has one daughter Kristin. Karen Morcke was born in Germany in 1940, immigrating to Canada in 1968 to attend SFU. After completing her Masters degree in 1970 Karen was hired by SFU as a language instructor from which she retired in 1995. She has one son Erik and has lived almost continuously in North Burnaby since 1968. Both Diane Hansen and Karen Morcke have been active volunteers in local environmental groups and were founding members of the Burnaby Mountain Preservation Society, which formed about 1989 to lobby for a conservation area that integrated SFU land below the campus ring road with City of Burnaby parkland on Burnaby Mountain. Diane has also been active in wild bird rescue groups. Karen walked the trails on Burnaby Mountain to and from work, and began lobbying for protection of green space on Burnaby Mountain in the 1970s.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:10:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Morcke, Karen
Hansen, H. Diane
Interview Location
Karen Morcke's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-003_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Karen Morcke and Diane Hansen

Less detail

Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory569
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s parents immigration to Saskatchewan, her mother Kerstin in 1912 and father Axel in 1928, Maureen’s birth on a trip to Sweden in 1938, and her family’s move to Burnaby in 1942 and the start of their mink ranch, the GAK Fur Farm, near Curtis Av…
Date Range
1906-1950
Length
0:09:08
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s parents immigration to Saskatchewan, her mother Kerstin in 1912 and father Axel in 1928, Maureen’s birth on a trip to Sweden in 1938, and her family’s move to Burnaby in 1942 and the start of their mink ranch, the GAK Fur Farm, near Curtis Avenue in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on Burnaby Mountain.
Date Range
1906-1950
Length
0:09:08
Name
Olofson, Axel
GAK Fur Farm
Skofteby, Gus
Ericksson, Karin
Subject
Agriculture
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Westridge Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Maureen Olofson

Less detail

Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory570
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s description of the operation and location of the Olofson’s mink ranch, the challenges of raising mink, and when the family gave up the farm in 1950/51. She describes how she and her sister Anita Lea used a bicycle to go to school.
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:14:54
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s description of the operation and location of the Olofson’s mink ranch, the challenges of raising mink, and when the family gave up the farm in 1950/51. She describes how she and her sister Anita Lea used a bicycle to go to school.
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:14:54
Name
Olofson, Axel
GAK Fur Farm
Sperling Avenue School
Subject
Agriculture
Industries - Fur Trade
Occupations - Farmers
Transportation
Persons - Children
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Westridge Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Maureen Olofson

Less detail

Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory571
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s description of the food sources on the farm including the garden, food animals, berry picking and bears. She also describes what her parents did after giving up the farm, opening sporting good stores on Hastings Street and then in North Vanco…
Date Range
1942-1980
Length
0:06:55
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s description of the food sources on the farm including the garden, food animals, berry picking and bears. She also describes what her parents did after giving up the farm, opening sporting good stores on Hastings Street and then in North Vancouver.
Date Range
1942-1980
Length
0:06:55
Name
Olofson, Axel
GAK Fur Farm
Subject
Agriculture
Animals - Livestock
Animals - Bears
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Westridge Area
Lochdale Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Maureen Olofson

Less detail

Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory572
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s childhood at her family’s mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain. She describes neighbourhood friends, pets, playing on the farm and in the bush, going to town, and what the mountain looked like
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:13:41
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s childhood at her family’s mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain. She describes neighbourhood friends, pets, playing on the farm and in the bush, going to town, and what the mountain looked like
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:13:41
Name
Olofson, Axel
GAK Fur Farm
Subject
Persons - Children
Recreational Activities
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Westridge Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Maureen Olofson

Less detail

Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory573
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s training for her career as a teacher, returning to Burnaby in 1977, the schools she worked at in Burnaby including SFU, and what she likes about Burnaby. She talks about her retirement in 1997 and taking SFU “55plus” courses.
Date Range
1950-2015
Length
0:06:21
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s training for her career as a teacher, returning to Burnaby in 1977, the schools she worked at in Burnaby including SFU, and what she likes about Burnaby. She talks about her retirement in 1997 and taking SFU “55plus” courses.
Date Range
1950-2015
Length
0:06:21
Name
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Occupations - Teachers
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Maureen Olofson

Less detail

Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory574
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s current activities on Burnaby Mountain and how she feels about use of the mountain today and in the past.
Date Range
1950-2015
Length
0:16:59
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s current activities on Burnaby Mountain and how she feels about use of the mountain today and in the past.
Date Range
1950-2015
Length
0:16:59
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Recreational Activities
Industries
Geographic Features - Forests
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Maureen Olofson

Less detail

Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory575
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s volunteer activities with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and Dania Homes Society, which includes giving talks to seniors about Burnaby Mountain parks. She also talks about kinds of accessible activities that people can do on Burna…
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:05:09
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson’s volunteer activities with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and Dania Homes Society, which includes giving talks to seniors about Burnaby Mountain parks. She also talks about kinds of accessible activities that people can do on Burnaby Mountain.
Date Range
2000-2015
Length
0:05:09
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Swedish Canadian Rest Home and Manor
Dania Home
Subject
Recreational Activities
Geographic Features - Parks
Persons - Volunteers
Persons - Seniors
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Maureen Olofson

Less detail

Interview with Maureen Olofson by Kathy Bossort October 14, 2015 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory576
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson telling several stories about events she remembers from her childhood on her parents mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain and going to Sperling Avenue School.
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:06:57
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Maureen Olofson telling several stories about events she remembers from her childhood on her parents mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain and going to Sperling Avenue School.
Date Range
1942-1952
Length
0:06:57
Name
GAK Fur Farm
Sperling Avenue School
Subject
Recreational Activities
Persons - Children
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 14, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Maureen Olofson conducted by Kathy Bossort. Maureen Olofson was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Maureen Olofson’s memories of growing up on her parent’s Burnaby Mountain mink ranch between 1942 and 1950 and about the operation of the farm. She also talks about her parents’ history, her teaching career, and her thoughts about the beauty and value of Burnaby Mountain’s natural area.
Biographical Notes
Maureen Olofson was born 1938 in Glote, Harjedalen, Sweden, to Axel (1906-1998) and Kerstin Margareta (1906-1980). Axel and Kerstin Olofson, who had separately immigrated to Canada in 1928 and 1913 respectively, married in Canada and then returned to Sweden where Maureen was born. They moved to Burnaby in 1942 with their daughters Maureen and Anita Lea, and bought land and a mink ranch on Burnaby Mountain with their partners Gus Skofteby and Karin Ericksson (Kerstin’s sister). The GAK Fur Farm, located in the old Hastings Grove subdivision on 4th Avenue near Curtis Street, was one of the largest mink ranches in BC, an award winning operation with over 1200 mink animals. In 1950 the partners sold the land and the Olofson family moved to rented homes on Sperling Avenue. In 1952 Axel sold the last of his minks and opened a sporting goods store on Hastings Street. In 1954 the family moved to North Vancouver where Axel Olofson reestablished his sports business. Maureen attended Sperling Avenue School from Gr. 1 to Gr. 8 and Burnaby North High School to Gr. 11, completing school in North Vancouver, before going to UBC where she trained as a teacher. She returned to Burnaby in 1977 to teach, retiring in 1997. She is a volunteer with the Swedish Canadian Rest Home Association and the Dania Homes Society. Maureen continues to enjoy activities on Burnaby Mountain and works toward preserving the natural beauty of the mountain.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:19:04
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Olofson, B. Maureen
Interview Location
Maureen Olofson's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-004_Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Maureen Olofson

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory582
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s views on the pressures on the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area from the SFU community and utility corridors; managing the edges of the conservation area on Barnet Highway; the history of the Burnaby Mountain Parkway; and a further explanatio…
Date Range
1950-2015
Length
0:22:57
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s views on the pressures on the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area from the SFU community and utility corridors; managing the edges of the conservation area on Barnet Highway; the history of the Burnaby Mountain Parkway; and a further explanation about kinds of park dedications, the origin of the covenant , and the protection status each provides. Also explained are the terms of the 1995 Memorandum of Understanding between the City of Burnaby and SFU.
Date Range
1950-2015
Length
0:22:57
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby Mountain Parkway
Subject
Geographic Features - Parks
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Parkway
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Alekxos Sarter by Kathy Bossort October 16, 2015 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory584
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s explanation of the City of Burnaby’s Official Community Planning process and its application to development of SFU’s UniverCity.
Date Range
1995-2015
Length
0:12:25
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Alekxos Sarter’s explanation of the City of Burnaby’s Official Community Planning process and its application to development of SFU’s UniverCity.
Date Range
1995-2015
Length
0:12:25
Name
Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Simon Fraser University
UniverCity
Burnaby Planning and Building Department
Subject
Public Services - Municipal Services
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
October 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Alekxos Sarter conducted by Kathy Bossort. Alekxos Sarter was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland on Burnaby Mountain from Alekxos Sarter’s perspective and experience as employee in the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. The interview provides an excellent explanation of the history and function of kinds of park dedications used by the City of Burnaby; an overview of issues around including the Trans Mountain tank farm in the conservation area; and the background to the land use and ownership disagreement between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University, its resolution, and the subsequent development of SFU’s UniverCity. Alekxos Sarter talks about Richard Bolton, Burnaby’s Acting-Commissioner who was responsible for dedicating the first park on Burnaby Mountain in 1942, and the creation of a park named after him in UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Alekxos Sarter was born in Vancouver in 1961, to Daine and Kasandra Sarter. She grew up in North Vancouver and since 1994 has lived on a sailboat in False Creek. After attending UBC where she studied landscape architecture, she was hired by the City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services in 1986. Working first in parks design, Alekxos quickly moved into parks planning, her preferred career. As Research Officer she covers research, planning, public consultation, parks and facility inventory, parkland acquisition, among other duties.
Total Tracks
9
Total Length
2:20:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Sarter, Alekxos T.
Interview Location
City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services meeting room
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-005_Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Alekxos Sarter

Less detail

Interview with Ron Burton by Kathy Bossort November 16, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory615
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ron Burton’s memories about his childhood, education and career. He talks about the sports he enjoyed growing up, getting his first mountain bike in 1980, and first experiences riding on Burnaby Mountain. He also talks about his work as a Burnaby school truste…
Date Range
1954-2015
Length
0:08:52
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Ron Burton’s memories about his childhood, education and career. He talks about the sports he enjoyed growing up, getting his first mountain bike in 1980, and first experiences riding on Burnaby Mountain. He also talks about his work as a Burnaby school trustee.
Date Range
1954-2015
Length
0:08:52
Subject
Education
Recreational Activities
Sports - Cycling
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 16, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Ron Burton conducted by Kathy Bossort. Ron Burton was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the founding, goals, and activities of the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association as told by one of the founders and President of the club, Ron Burton, and about the development of mountain biking and trail construction on Burnaby Mountain, both prior to and after the creation of the conservation area in 1995/96. Ron Burton also talks about his childhood, his work as a Burnaby school trustee, and the sports and recreational activities he has enjoyed on the mountain.
Biographical Notes
Ron Burton was born in Burnaby in 1954 to Fred and Shirley Burton. He grew up in East Vancouver and attended Hastings Elementary and Gladstone Secondary schools. He worked on the waterfront for Viterra, became a member of the Grain Workers Union and joined the NDP in 1972. He and his wife moved to Burnaby’s Vancouver Heights in 1982 and Forest Grove in 1988. He has served as a Board of Education Trustee in the Burnaby School District since first being elected in 1987, currently serving as Board Chair. Ron is founder and President of the Burnaby Mountain Biking Association and an active rider on Burnaby Mountain since 1988. The Association was founded in 2000, registering as a society in 2005, with the goals to build sustainable trails on Burnaby Mountain, to provide education about trail riding, and to advocate for and improve the image of mountain biking. Under Ron’s leadership the Association has successfully recruited members and formed a cooperative relationship with Burnaby’s Parks staff and with other park trail users.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:01:32
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Burton, Ronald C. "Ron"
Interview Location
Meeting room at the Burnaby School District office
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-010_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Ron Burton

Less detail

Interview with Leonard Evenden and Allen Seager by Kathy Bossort November 18, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory621
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Evenden and Dr. Seager’s description of their early years at Simon Fraser University. They talk about the challenges to commuting up and down Burnaby Mountain and the solutions people used, particularly hitchhiking. Dr. Seager talks about living in Monteci…
Date Range
1925-2015
Length
0:12:50
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Evenden and Dr. Seager’s description of their early years at Simon Fraser University. They talk about the challenges to commuting up and down Burnaby Mountain and the solutions people used, particularly hitchhiking. Dr. Seager talks about living in Montecito in the 1980s. Dr. Evenden talks about the early use of Burnaby Mountain and its undeveloped state when the site for SFU was proposed in 1963.
Date Range
1925-2015
Length
0:12:50
Name
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Education
Transportation
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Historic Neighbourhood
Lochdale (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Sperling-Broadway Area
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 18, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Dr. Leonard Evenden and Dr. Allen Seager conducted by Kathy Bossort. Leonard Evenden and Allen Seager were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about aspects of Simon Fraser University’s history that is related to its site on Burnaby Mountain, as told by two retired SFU professors, Dr. Evenden of the Geography Department and Dr. Seager of the Department of History. The interview ranges over campus access and housing issues created by the isolated mountain site; the relationship of the university to the local community and the dispute over land ownership and control with the City of Burnaby; SFU’s environmental stewardship; the development of UniverCity; and the future of parkland in the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Dr. Leonard J. Evenden was born 1937 in Beijing, China, to parents and Salvation Army missionaries Leonard Evenden and Elsie Pearl March. Dr. Evenden attended McMaster University (B.A. 1960), University of Georgia (M.A. 1962) and University of Edinburgh (Ph.D. 1970). He was appointed to Simon Fraser University’s Department of Geography in 1966, shortly after SFU opened in the fall of 1965, and retired in 2002. Dr. Evenden’s research has focused on Canadian urban geography. He edited a collection of essays about Burnaby titled “Suburb of Happy Homes: Burnaby centennial themes” (1995), and directed “Voices of Burnaby”, an SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee oral history project (1992). Dr. Evenden is married with three children. Dr. Allen Seager was born 1953 in Montreal, Quebec, to parents C.F.B. Seager and Evelyn DeGex Chesam. Dr. Seager is a retired Simon Fraser University professor, being a member of SFU’s Department of History from 1981 to 2014, and has current links with SFU as an instructor for Continuing Studies. His research interests include history of Canada and Western Canada, and labour and working class history, particularly in the coal mining and railway industries. Dr. Seager moved to Burnaby and the Montecito area in 1981 where he continues to live and enjoy the hiking trails on Burnaby Mountain and the amenities at SFU. Dr. Seager is a member of the Burnaby North NDP, and has volunteered with Scouts Canada and the Burnaby Centennial Committee.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:11:28
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Evenden, Leonard J.
Seager, Allen
Interview Location
Clubhouse at Burnaby Mountain Golf Course Restaurant
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-011_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Dr. Leonard Evenden and Dr. Allen Seager

Less detail

Interview with Leonard Evenden and Allen Seager by Kathy Bossort November 18, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory622
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Evenden’s description of the Simon Fraser University campus after it opened in 1965. Dr. Evenden and Dr. Seager talk about aspects of how the university site was chosen, its impact on the local community, and events in 1967-1969 that affected town & gown r…
Date Range
1965-1970
Length
0:06:32
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Evenden’s description of the Simon Fraser University campus after it opened in 1965. Dr. Evenden and Dr. Seager talk about aspects of how the university site was chosen, its impact on the local community, and events in 1967-1969 that affected town & gown relations.
Date Range
1965-1970
Length
0:06:32
Name
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Buildings - Schools - Universities and Colleges
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 18, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Dr. Leonard Evenden and Dr. Allen Seager conducted by Kathy Bossort. Leonard Evenden and Allen Seager were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about aspects of Simon Fraser University’s history that is related to its site on Burnaby Mountain, as told by two retired SFU professors, Dr. Evenden of the Geography Department and Dr. Seager of the Department of History. The interview ranges over campus access and housing issues created by the isolated mountain site; the relationship of the university to the local community and the dispute over land ownership and control with the City of Burnaby; SFU’s environmental stewardship; the development of UniverCity; and the future of parkland in the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Dr. Leonard J. Evenden was born 1937 in Beijing, China, to parents and Salvation Army missionaries Leonard Evenden and Elsie Pearl March. Dr. Evenden attended McMaster University (B.A. 1960), University of Georgia (M.A. 1962) and University of Edinburgh (Ph.D. 1970). He was appointed to Simon Fraser University’s Department of Geography in 1966, shortly after SFU opened in the fall of 1965, and retired in 2002. Dr. Evenden’s research has focused on Canadian urban geography. He edited a collection of essays about Burnaby titled “Suburb of Happy Homes: Burnaby centennial themes” (1995), and directed “Voices of Burnaby”, an SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee oral history project (1992). Dr. Evenden is married with three children. Dr. Allen Seager was born 1953 in Montreal, Quebec, to parents C.F.B. Seager and Evelyn DeGex Chesam. Dr. Seager is a retired Simon Fraser University professor, being a member of SFU’s Department of History from 1981 to 2014, and has current links with SFU as an instructor for Continuing Studies. His research interests include history of Canada and Western Canada, and labour and working class history, particularly in the coal mining and railway industries. Dr. Seager moved to Burnaby and the Montecito area in 1981 where he continues to live and enjoy the hiking trails on Burnaby Mountain and the amenities at SFU. Dr. Seager is a member of the Burnaby North NDP, and has volunteered with Scouts Canada and the Burnaby Centennial Committee.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:11:28
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Evenden, Leonard J.
Seager, Allen
Interview Location
Clubhouse at Burnaby Mountain Golf Course Restaurant
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-011_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Dr. Leonard Evenden and Dr. Allen Seager

Less detail

Interview with Leonard Evenden and Allen Seager by Kathy Bossort November 18, 2015 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory625
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Evenden and Dr. Seager’s description of proposed ideas for improving access to SFU’s campus on Burnaby Mountain, stories about weather related events on the mountain, and whether UniverCity will solve the problem of SFU’s isolation. Dr. Evenden mentions th…
Date Range
1965-2015
Length
0:11:43
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Evenden and Dr. Seager’s description of proposed ideas for improving access to SFU’s campus on Burnaby Mountain, stories about weather related events on the mountain, and whether UniverCity will solve the problem of SFU’s isolation. Dr. Evenden mentions the ideas of Dennis Roberts and Peter Knowlden.
Date Range
1965-2015
Length
0:11:43
Name
Simon Fraser University
UniverCity
Subject
Transportation
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 18, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Dr. Leonard Evenden and Dr. Allen Seager conducted by Kathy Bossort. Leonard Evenden and Allen Seager were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about aspects of Simon Fraser University’s history that is related to its site on Burnaby Mountain, as told by two retired SFU professors, Dr. Evenden of the Geography Department and Dr. Seager of the Department of History. The interview ranges over campus access and housing issues created by the isolated mountain site; the relationship of the university to the local community and the dispute over land ownership and control with the City of Burnaby; SFU’s environmental stewardship; the development of UniverCity; and the future of parkland in the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Dr. Leonard J. Evenden was born 1937 in Beijing, China, to parents and Salvation Army missionaries Leonard Evenden and Elsie Pearl March. Dr. Evenden attended McMaster University (B.A. 1960), University of Georgia (M.A. 1962) and University of Edinburgh (Ph.D. 1970). He was appointed to Simon Fraser University’s Department of Geography in 1966, shortly after SFU opened in the fall of 1965, and retired in 2002. Dr. Evenden’s research has focused on Canadian urban geography. He edited a collection of essays about Burnaby titled “Suburb of Happy Homes: Burnaby centennial themes” (1995), and directed “Voices of Burnaby”, an SFU/Burnaby Centennial Committee oral history project (1992). Dr. Evenden is married with three children. Dr. Allen Seager was born 1953 in Montreal, Quebec, to parents C.F.B. Seager and Evelyn DeGex Chesam. Dr. Seager is a retired Simon Fraser University professor, being a member of SFU’s Department of History from 1981 to 2014, and has current links with SFU as an instructor for Continuing Studies. His research interests include history of Canada and Western Canada, and labour and working class history, particularly in the coal mining and railway industries. Dr. Seager moved to Burnaby and the Montecito area in 1981 where he continues to live and enjoy the hiking trails on Burnaby Mountain and the amenities at SFU. Dr. Seager is a member of the Burnaby North NDP, and has volunteered with Scouts Canada and the Burnaby Centennial Committee.
Total Tracks
6
Total Length
1:11:28
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Evenden, Leonard J.
Seager, Allen
Interview Location
Clubhouse at Burnaby Mountain Golf Course Restaurant
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-011_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Dr. Leonard Evenden and Dr. Allen Seager

Less detail

Interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse by Kathy Bossort November 24, 2015 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory632
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse talking about Simon Fraser University and problems created by its isolated site on Burnaby Mountain. They talk about the building of the Burnaby Mountain Parkway, and tell stories about the cooperative planning between City and S…
Date Range
1963-2015
Length
0:16:58
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse talking about Simon Fraser University and problems created by its isolated site on Burnaby Mountain. They talk about the building of the Burnaby Mountain Parkway, and tell stories about the cooperative planning between City and SFU staff for UniverCity.
Date Range
1963-2015
Length
0:16:58
Name
Simon Fraser University
UniverCity
Burnaby Mountain Parkway
Subject
Buildings - Schools - Universities and Colleges
Transportation
Public Services - Municipal Services
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Park
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain Parkway
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 24, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse conducted by Kathy Bossort. Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland by dedication on Burnaby Mountain, the 1974/76 delineation of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and the dispute between Burnaby and Simon Fraser University over land ownership and control on Burnaby Mountain, as discussed by two retired participants in these events from the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department, Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse. They also talk about their interaction with the public in developing policies, particularly for the 1974 report “The Public Meetings - Phase One”, and the importance of a strong policy base for long range planning and the patience needed to assemble land for large parks. They talk as well about their careers, their close working relationship in the department, and the cooperation between City and SFU staff in the development of UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Basil Luksun was born and educated in South Africa, immigrating to Canada and Burnaby in 1972 to escape the harmful effects of apartheid. He holds a BSc degree from the University of Cape Town and a Post-Graduate Diploma in Town Planning from the University of Witwatersrand. He joined the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department in 1973, working his way up through the organization to Director of the department before retiring after 39 years in 2012. When he started work in the 1970s, the City of Burnaby was focusing on green space planning projects and he takes great pride in these projects as well as the city’s focus on long-term planning. Basil lived in the Capital Hill area from 1972 to 1990. He currently resides in Vancouver and has two sons, Warren and Derek. Jack Belhouse was born in 1946 in Vancouver and attended UBC, York University and SFU (1965-1972), majoring in urban geography. He began working in Burnaby’s planning department as a summer student in 1968, and was offered a full-time position when he graduated from university. He became Director of the Planning and Building Department before retiring after 38 years with the city in 2006. He and Basil Luksun worked closely together in long range planning in the department. Jack lives in Coquitlam with his wife Linda and has two children, Brad and Lori.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:58:23
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Luksun, Basil
Belhouse, Jack
Interview Location
Basil Luksun's home in Vancouver
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-012_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse

Less detail

Interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse by Kathy Bossort November 24, 2015 - Track 8

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory634
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse talking about the 1991 Burnaby/Simon Fraser University Liaison Committee, its mandate and issues discussed in the committee; the factors that lead to the resolution of the dispute between the City and SFU; and the current dispute…
Date Range
1990-2015
Length
0:17:59
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse talking about the 1991 Burnaby/Simon Fraser University Liaison Committee, its mandate and issues discussed in the committee; the factors that lead to the resolution of the dispute between the City and SFU; and the current dispute with Kinder Morgan and assessment of risk of Trans Mountain pipeline and Westbridge Terminal operations in Burnaby.
Date Range
1990-2015
Length
0:17:59
Name
Simon Fraser Liaison Committee.
Simon Fraser University
Blaney, Jack
Drummond, Douglas P "Doug"
Stevenson, Michael.
Trans Mountain Oil Pipeline Company
Subject
Public Services - Municipal Services
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 24, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse conducted by Kathy Bossort. Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse were two of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the history of setting aside parkland by dedication on Burnaby Mountain, the 1974/76 delineation of the conservation area on Burnaby Mountain, and the dispute between Burnaby and Simon Fraser University over land ownership and control on Burnaby Mountain, as discussed by two retired participants in these events from the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department, Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse. They also talk about their interaction with the public in developing policies, particularly for the 1974 report “The Public Meetings - Phase One”, and the importance of a strong policy base for long range planning and the patience needed to assemble land for large parks. They talk as well about their careers, their close working relationship in the department, and the cooperation between City and SFU staff in the development of UniverCity.
Biographical Notes
Basil Luksun was born and educated in South Africa, immigrating to Canada and Burnaby in 1972 to escape the harmful effects of apartheid. He holds a BSc degree from the University of Cape Town and a Post-Graduate Diploma in Town Planning from the University of Witwatersrand. He joined the City of Burnaby’s Planning and Building Department in 1973, working his way up through the organization to Director of the department before retiring after 39 years in 2012. When he started work in the 1970s, the City of Burnaby was focusing on green space planning projects and he takes great pride in these projects as well as the city’s focus on long-term planning. Basil lived in the Capital Hill area from 1972 to 1990. He currently resides in Vancouver and has two sons, Warren and Derek. Jack Belhouse was born in 1946 in Vancouver and attended UBC, York University and SFU (1965-1972), majoring in urban geography. He began working in Burnaby’s planning department as a summer student in 1968, and was offered a full-time position when he graduated from university. He became Director of the Planning and Building Department before retiring after 38 years with the city in 2006. He and Basil Luksun worked closely together in long range planning in the department. Jack lives in Coquitlam with his wife Linda and has two children, Brad and Lori.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:58:23
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Luksun, Basil
Belhouse, Jack
Interview Location
Basil Luksun's home in Vancouver
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-012_Track_8
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track eight of interview with Basil Luksun and Jack Belhouse

Less detail

Interview with Ron Baker by Kathy Bossort November 27, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory635
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker’s stories about the beginnings of Simon Fraser University, how he became involved, and the attraction of being able to try different things with little interference. He talks about SFU Chancellor Gordon Shrum’s ideas for all year quarter system a…
Date Range
1963-1965
Length
0:18:05
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker’s stories about the beginnings of Simon Fraser University, how he became involved, and the attraction of being able to try different things with little interference. He talks about SFU Chancellor Gordon Shrum’s ideas for all year quarter system and for large lecture/small tutorials, and his counter proposal for a trimester system. He also describes his working relationship with Dr. Shrum.
Date Range
1963-1965
Length
0:18:05
Name
Simon Fraser University
Shrum, Gordon M.
Subject
Education
Occupations - Teachers
Academic Disciplines
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 27, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Dr. Ronald James Baker conducted by Kathy Bossort. Ron Baker was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the founding of Simon Fraser University from the perspective of SFU’s first faculty member and Director of Academic Planning, Ron Baker. Ron Baker talks about John B. Macdonald’s report on higher education in BC (1962) and how it lead to the provincial government’s decision to establish a new university and to put it in the Burnaby area. He tells stories about how the site on Burnaby Mountain was chosen; about the building of the campus; and about the challenges of planning the academic structure of the university. He also talks about the attraction of creating with little interference an institution trying out new ideas and tells stories about his working relationship with Gordon Shrum. He considers the problems created by building universities in out of the way places and the ideas such as UniverCity for dealing with SFU’s isolation.
Biographical Notes
Ron Baker was born in London, England, in 1924, and served in the Royal Air Force during WW2. He emigrated to Canada in 1947 and studied at UBC where he obtained a BA degree (1951) and MA degree (1953) in English Language and Literature. He served on the faculty of the UBC English Department beginning as a lecturer in 1951 and advanced to positions of Assistant Professor (1958-63) and Associate Professor (1963-65). He was a contributor to John B. Macdonald’s 1962 report “Higher Education in British Columbia and a Plan for the Future”, and continued to make significant contributions to the establishment of the community college system in Canada throughout his career. In 1963 the newly established Simon Fraser University hired Ron as its first Director of Academic Planning, serving also as first head of SFU’s English Department. In 1969 Ron left SFU to become the first President of the University of Prince Edward Island, a position he held until 1978. In 1978 he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada for his contributions to higher education. Ron has contributed to many organizations, including serving as a member of the Board of Directors of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, on Canada Council, and as President of Association of Atlantic Universities and the Association of Canadian University Teachers of English. In 1990 Ron Baker was asked by the government of BC to prepare a preliminary report on the establishment of the future UNBC in Prince George. Now retired Ron Baker lives in the Edmonds area of Burnaby.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:33:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Baker, Ronald J. "Ron"
Interview Location
Ron Baker's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-013_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Dr. Ron Baker

Less detail

Interview with Ron Baker by Kathy Bossort November 27, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory636
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview continues Dr. Ron Baker’s stories about the beginnings of Simon Fraser University, including why Chancellor Shrum was able to build the university in a short time period, how the road was built to the campus, the relationship between Dr. Shrum and SFU President McTagga…
Date Range
1963-1965
Length
0:10:29
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview continues Dr. Ron Baker’s stories about the beginnings of Simon Fraser University, including why Chancellor Shrum was able to build the university in a short time period, how the road was built to the campus, the relationship between Dr. Shrum and SFU President McTaggart-Cowan, and reasons behind the architectural design of the campus
Date Range
1963-1965
Length
0:10:29
Name
Simon Fraser University
Shrum, Gordon M.
McTaggart-Cowan, Patrick D.
Subject
Buildings - Schools - Universities and Colleges
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 27, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Dr. Ronald James Baker conducted by Kathy Bossort. Ron Baker was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the founding of Simon Fraser University from the perspective of SFU’s first faculty member and Director of Academic Planning, Ron Baker. Ron Baker talks about John B. Macdonald’s report on higher education in BC (1962) and how it lead to the provincial government’s decision to establish a new university and to put it in the Burnaby area. He tells stories about how the site on Burnaby Mountain was chosen; about the building of the campus; and about the challenges of planning the academic structure of the university. He also talks about the attraction of creating with little interference an institution trying out new ideas and tells stories about his working relationship with Gordon Shrum. He considers the problems created by building universities in out of the way places and the ideas such as UniverCity for dealing with SFU’s isolation.
Biographical Notes
Ron Baker was born in London, England, in 1924, and served in the Royal Air Force during WW2. He emigrated to Canada in 1947 and studied at UBC where he obtained a BA degree (1951) and MA degree (1953) in English Language and Literature. He served on the faculty of the UBC English Department beginning as a lecturer in 1951 and advanced to positions of Assistant Professor (1958-63) and Associate Professor (1963-65). He was a contributor to John B. Macdonald’s 1962 report “Higher Education in British Columbia and a Plan for the Future”, and continued to make significant contributions to the establishment of the community college system in Canada throughout his career. In 1963 the newly established Simon Fraser University hired Ron as its first Director of Academic Planning, serving also as first head of SFU’s English Department. In 1969 Ron left SFU to become the first President of the University of Prince Edward Island, a position he held until 1978. In 1978 he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada for his contributions to higher education. Ron has contributed to many organizations, including serving as a member of the Board of Directors of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, on Canada Council, and as President of Association of Atlantic Universities and the Association of Canadian University Teachers of English. In 1990 Ron Baker was asked by the government of BC to prepare a preliminary report on the establishment of the future UNBC in Prince George. Now retired Ron Baker lives in the Edmonds area of Burnaby.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:33:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Baker, Ronald J. "Ron"
Interview Location
Ron Baker's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-013_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Dr. Ron Baker

Less detail

Interview with Ron Baker by Kathy Bossort November 27, 2015 - Track 3

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory637
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker describing how the site for SFU was chosen. He talks about the study of driving times in the Macdonald report that suggested that Burnaby provided best access for the maximum number of students, the alternate sites considered for the university i…
Date Range
1961-1965
Length
0:13:39
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker describing how the site for SFU was chosen. He talks about the study of driving times in the Macdonald report that suggested that Burnaby provided best access for the maximum number of students, the alternate sites considered for the university in New Westminster and Burnaby, and Reeve Alan Emmott’s role in choosing Burnaby Mountain. He also talks about the problem of isolation of SFU on Burnaby Mountain, and why out of the way places are often chosen for universities in BC.
Date Range
1961-1965
Length
0:13:39
Name
Simon Fraser University
Emmott, Alan H
Subject
Buildings - Schools - Universities and Colleges
Planning
Transportation
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 27, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Dr. Ronald James Baker conducted by Kathy Bossort. Ron Baker was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the founding of Simon Fraser University from the perspective of SFU’s first faculty member and Director of Academic Planning, Ron Baker. Ron Baker talks about John B. Macdonald’s report on higher education in BC (1962) and how it lead to the provincial government’s decision to establish a new university and to put it in the Burnaby area. He tells stories about how the site on Burnaby Mountain was chosen; about the building of the campus; and about the challenges of planning the academic structure of the university. He also talks about the attraction of creating with little interference an institution trying out new ideas and tells stories about his working relationship with Gordon Shrum. He considers the problems created by building universities in out of the way places and the ideas such as UniverCity for dealing with SFU’s isolation.
Biographical Notes
Ron Baker was born in London, England, in 1924, and served in the Royal Air Force during WW2. He emigrated to Canada in 1947 and studied at UBC where he obtained a BA degree (1951) and MA degree (1953) in English Language and Literature. He served on the faculty of the UBC English Department beginning as a lecturer in 1951 and advanced to positions of Assistant Professor (1958-63) and Associate Professor (1963-65). He was a contributor to John B. Macdonald’s 1962 report “Higher Education in British Columbia and a Plan for the Future”, and continued to make significant contributions to the establishment of the community college system in Canada throughout his career. In 1963 the newly established Simon Fraser University hired Ron as its first Director of Academic Planning, serving also as first head of SFU’s English Department. In 1969 Ron left SFU to become the first President of the University of Prince Edward Island, a position he held until 1978. In 1978 he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada for his contributions to higher education. Ron has contributed to many organizations, including serving as a member of the Board of Directors of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, on Canada Council, and as President of Association of Atlantic Universities and the Association of Canadian University Teachers of English. In 1990 Ron Baker was asked by the government of BC to prepare a preliminary report on the establishment of the future UNBC in Prince George. Now retired Ron Baker lives in the Edmonds area of Burnaby.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:33:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Baker, Ronald J. "Ron"
Interview Location
Ron Baker's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-013_Track_3
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track three of interview with Dr. Ron Baker

Less detail

Interview with Ron Baker by Kathy Bossort November 27, 2015 - Track 4

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory638
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker talking about Dr. Shrum’s attraction to the mountain top as site for university and his grand ideas for the university, including scholarships for an athletic program. He also talks about how original SFU faculty was more West Point Grey centered…
Date Range
1963-1970
Length
0:11:00
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker talking about Dr. Shrum’s attraction to the mountain top as site for university and his grand ideas for the university, including scholarships for an athletic program. He also talks about how original SFU faculty was more West Point Grey centered and preferred to commute from the North shore, and how this changed for new faculty who settled in Burnaby and Coquitlam.
Date Range
1963-1970
Length
0:11:00
Name
Simon Fraser University
Shrum, Gordon M.
University of British Columbia
Subject
Academic Disciplines
Planning
Transportation
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 27, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Dr. Ronald James Baker conducted by Kathy Bossort. Ron Baker was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the founding of Simon Fraser University from the perspective of SFU’s first faculty member and Director of Academic Planning, Ron Baker. Ron Baker talks about John B. Macdonald’s report on higher education in BC (1962) and how it lead to the provincial government’s decision to establish a new university and to put it in the Burnaby area. He tells stories about how the site on Burnaby Mountain was chosen; about the building of the campus; and about the challenges of planning the academic structure of the university. He also talks about the attraction of creating with little interference an institution trying out new ideas and tells stories about his working relationship with Gordon Shrum. He considers the problems created by building universities in out of the way places and the ideas such as UniverCity for dealing with SFU’s isolation.
Biographical Notes
Ron Baker was born in London, England, in 1924, and served in the Royal Air Force during WW2. He emigrated to Canada in 1947 and studied at UBC where he obtained a BA degree (1951) and MA degree (1953) in English Language and Literature. He served on the faculty of the UBC English Department beginning as a lecturer in 1951 and advanced to positions of Assistant Professor (1958-63) and Associate Professor (1963-65). He was a contributor to John B. Macdonald’s 1962 report “Higher Education in British Columbia and a Plan for the Future”, and continued to make significant contributions to the establishment of the community college system in Canada throughout his career. In 1963 the newly established Simon Fraser University hired Ron as its first Director of Academic Planning, serving also as first head of SFU’s English Department. In 1969 Ron left SFU to become the first President of the University of Prince Edward Island, a position he held until 1978. In 1978 he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada for his contributions to higher education. Ron has contributed to many organizations, including serving as a member of the Board of Directors of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, on Canada Council, and as President of Association of Atlantic Universities and the Association of Canadian University Teachers of English. In 1990 Ron Baker was asked by the government of BC to prepare a preliminary report on the establishment of the future UNBC in Prince George. Now retired Ron Baker lives in the Edmonds area of Burnaby.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:33:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Baker, Ronald J. "Ron"
Interview Location
Ron Baker's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-013_Track_4
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track four of interview with Dr. Ron Baker

Less detail

Interview with Ron Baker by Kathy Bossort November 27, 2015 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory639
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker’s description of the attraction SFU had for mature students; the reasons for making courses in languages, etc. non-compulsory; the pressure from the public in Burnaby and elsewhere to offer certain kinds of courses. He talks about the desire expr…
Date Range
1963-1968
Length
0:15:36
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker’s description of the attraction SFU had for mature students; the reasons for making courses in languages, etc. non-compulsory; the pressure from the public in Burnaby and elsewhere to offer certain kinds of courses. He talks about the desire expressed for theological courses and how he responded.
Date Range
1963-1968
Length
0:15:36
Name
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Academic Disciplines
Planning
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 27, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Dr. Ronald James Baker conducted by Kathy Bossort. Ron Baker was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the founding of Simon Fraser University from the perspective of SFU’s first faculty member and Director of Academic Planning, Ron Baker. Ron Baker talks about John B. Macdonald’s report on higher education in BC (1962) and how it lead to the provincial government’s decision to establish a new university and to put it in the Burnaby area. He tells stories about how the site on Burnaby Mountain was chosen; about the building of the campus; and about the challenges of planning the academic structure of the university. He also talks about the attraction of creating with little interference an institution trying out new ideas and tells stories about his working relationship with Gordon Shrum. He considers the problems created by building universities in out of the way places and the ideas such as UniverCity for dealing with SFU’s isolation.
Biographical Notes
Ron Baker was born in London, England, in 1924, and served in the Royal Air Force during WW2. He emigrated to Canada in 1947 and studied at UBC where he obtained a BA degree (1951) and MA degree (1953) in English Language and Literature. He served on the faculty of the UBC English Department beginning as a lecturer in 1951 and advanced to positions of Assistant Professor (1958-63) and Associate Professor (1963-65). He was a contributor to John B. Macdonald’s 1962 report “Higher Education in British Columbia and a Plan for the Future”, and continued to make significant contributions to the establishment of the community college system in Canada throughout his career. In 1963 the newly established Simon Fraser University hired Ron as its first Director of Academic Planning, serving also as first head of SFU’s English Department. In 1969 Ron left SFU to become the first President of the University of Prince Edward Island, a position he held until 1978. In 1978 he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada for his contributions to higher education. Ron has contributed to many organizations, including serving as a member of the Board of Directors of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, on Canada Council, and as President of Association of Atlantic Universities and the Association of Canadian University Teachers of English. In 1990 Ron Baker was asked by the government of BC to prepare a preliminary report on the establishment of the future UNBC in Prince George. Now retired Ron Baker lives in the Edmonds area of Burnaby.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:33:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Baker, Ronald J. "Ron"
Interview Location
Ron Baker's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-013_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Dr. Ron Baker

Less detail

Interview with Ron Baker by Kathy Bossort November 27, 2015 - Track 6

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory640
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker’s discussion about the choice of branding SFU the “engaged” university at the time of its 50th Anniversary, and the need for university Presidents to fund raise. He talks about the relationship between UBC and SFU, and the reasons for hostility t…
Date Range
1950-2015
Length
0:10:17
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker’s discussion about the choice of branding SFU the “engaged” university at the time of its 50th Anniversary, and the need for university Presidents to fund raise. He talks about the relationship between UBC and SFU, and the reasons for hostility towards UBC in the 1950s, especially from interior BC communities.
Date Range
1950-2015
Length
0:10:17
Name
Simon Fraser University
University of British Columbia
Subject
Education
Public Services
Events - Anniversaries
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 27, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Dr. Ronald James Baker conducted by Kathy Bossort. Ron Baker was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the founding of Simon Fraser University from the perspective of SFU’s first faculty member and Director of Academic Planning, Ron Baker. Ron Baker talks about John B. Macdonald’s report on higher education in BC (1962) and how it lead to the provincial government’s decision to establish a new university and to put it in the Burnaby area. He tells stories about how the site on Burnaby Mountain was chosen; about the building of the campus; and about the challenges of planning the academic structure of the university. He also talks about the attraction of creating with little interference an institution trying out new ideas and tells stories about his working relationship with Gordon Shrum. He considers the problems created by building universities in out of the way places and the ideas such as UniverCity for dealing with SFU’s isolation.
Biographical Notes
Ron Baker was born in London, England, in 1924, and served in the Royal Air Force during WW2. He emigrated to Canada in 1947 and studied at UBC where he obtained a BA degree (1951) and MA degree (1953) in English Language and Literature. He served on the faculty of the UBC English Department beginning as a lecturer in 1951 and advanced to positions of Assistant Professor (1958-63) and Associate Professor (1963-65). He was a contributor to John B. Macdonald’s 1962 report “Higher Education in British Columbia and a Plan for the Future”, and continued to make significant contributions to the establishment of the community college system in Canada throughout his career. In 1963 the newly established Simon Fraser University hired Ron as its first Director of Academic Planning, serving also as first head of SFU’s English Department. In 1969 Ron left SFU to become the first President of the University of Prince Edward Island, a position he held until 1978. In 1978 he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada for his contributions to higher education. Ron has contributed to many organizations, including serving as a member of the Board of Directors of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, on Canada Council, and as President of Association of Atlantic Universities and the Association of Canadian University Teachers of English. In 1990 Ron Baker was asked by the government of BC to prepare a preliminary report on the establishment of the future UNBC in Prince George. Now retired Ron Baker lives in the Edmonds area of Burnaby.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:33:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Baker, Ronald J. "Ron"
Interview Location
Ron Baker's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-013_Track_6
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track six of interview with Dr. Ron Baker

Less detail

Interview with Ron Baker by Kathy Bossort November 27, 2015 - Track 7

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory641
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker’s story about the challenge of bringing different traditions and institutions together to create the new University of PEI for which he served as President from 1969 to 1978. He talks about Dr. McTaggart-Cowan’s efforts to respond to the public’s…
Date Range
1964-2015
Length
0:14:40
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Dr. Ron Baker’s story about the challenge of bringing different traditions and institutions together to create the new University of PEI for which he served as President from 1969 to 1978. He talks about Dr. McTaggart-Cowan’s efforts to respond to the public’s interest in the higher education system and his talent at engaging with community groups as opposed to his problems with dealing with SFU faculty. He talks about Hugh Johnson’s book “Radical Campus” about the history of SFU. He concludes by seeing positive role for UniverCity and more student residences to bring feeling of community to SFU.
Date Range
1964-2015
Length
0:14:40
Name
University of PEI.
Simon Fraser University
McTaggart-Cowan, Patrick D.
UniverCity
Subject
Education
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
November 27, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Dr. Ronald James Baker conducted by Kathy Bossort. Ron Baker was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about the founding of Simon Fraser University from the perspective of SFU’s first faculty member and Director of Academic Planning, Ron Baker. Ron Baker talks about John B. Macdonald’s report on higher education in BC (1962) and how it lead to the provincial government’s decision to establish a new university and to put it in the Burnaby area. He tells stories about how the site on Burnaby Mountain was chosen; about the building of the campus; and about the challenges of planning the academic structure of the university. He also talks about the attraction of creating with little interference an institution trying out new ideas and tells stories about his working relationship with Gordon Shrum. He considers the problems created by building universities in out of the way places and the ideas such as UniverCity for dealing with SFU’s isolation.
Biographical Notes
Ron Baker was born in London, England, in 1924, and served in the Royal Air Force during WW2. He emigrated to Canada in 1947 and studied at UBC where he obtained a BA degree (1951) and MA degree (1953) in English Language and Literature. He served on the faculty of the UBC English Department beginning as a lecturer in 1951 and advanced to positions of Assistant Professor (1958-63) and Associate Professor (1963-65). He was a contributor to John B. Macdonald’s 1962 report “Higher Education in British Columbia and a Plan for the Future”, and continued to make significant contributions to the establishment of the community college system in Canada throughout his career. In 1963 the newly established Simon Fraser University hired Ron as its first Director of Academic Planning, serving also as first head of SFU’s English Department. In 1969 Ron left SFU to become the first President of the University of Prince Edward Island, a position he held until 1978. In 1978 he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada for his contributions to higher education. Ron has contributed to many organizations, including serving as a member of the Board of Directors of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, on Canada Council, and as President of Association of Atlantic Universities and the Association of Canadian University Teachers of English. In 1990 Ron Baker was asked by the government of BC to prepare a preliminary report on the establishment of the future UNBC in Prince George. Now retired Ron Baker lives in the Edmonds area of Burnaby.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:33:46
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Baker, Ronald J. "Ron"
Interview Location
Ron Baker's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-013_Track_7
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track seven of interview with Dr. Ron Baker

Less detail

Interview with Lee Rankin by Kathy Bossort December 2, 2015 - Track 1

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory642
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Lee Rankin’s experience attending Simon Fraser University 1973-78, why he liked its physical environment and its treatment of mature students, and why its isolation is a drawback. He describes reasons why the site was chosen by Gordon Shrum and talks about the…
Date Range
1963-2015
Length
0:14:20
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Lee Rankin’s experience attending Simon Fraser University 1973-78, why he liked its physical environment and its treatment of mature students, and why its isolation is a drawback. He describes reasons why the site was chosen by Gordon Shrum and talks about the lack of documentation for the land transfer from City of Burnaby to the university and the results for their relationship. He also talks about why he went into law as a career.
Date Range
1963-2015
Length
0:14:20
Name
Simon Fraser University
Subject
Education
Occupations
Buildings - Schools - Universities and Colleges
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
December 2, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Lee Rankin conducted by Kathy Bossort. Lee Rankin was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Lee Rankin’s involvement in finding a resolution to the dispute between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University over land ownership and control on Burnaby Mountain. He talks about the origin of the dispute, the positions taken by the two sides, the key people who brought about a resolution, and the main features of the agreement between the City, SFU and the province of BC. He talks about how the agreement met SFU’s goals, fostered trust between the City and university, and removed uncertainty from protecting parkland on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Lee Rankin was born in 1953 in Vancouver. He attended SFU 1973-78, completing his BA degree in 1985. He earned his law degree at UBC in 1988, was called to the Bar in 1989, and practiced in immigration and refugee law. Lee has lived in Burnaby since 1976 and was a member of Burnaby Council for 22 years, from 1983-1999 and 2002-2008. His particular interests as a Councillor were in community planning, housing and environment. Among other duties and accomplishments as Councillor, Lee served as chair of the Simon Fraser Liaison Committee and was involved in the negotiations with the province and SFU that resulted in the university returning more than 800 acres of land to the City, which was dedicated as part of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. He has also served on the GVRD, volunteers as a coach for team sports in Burnaby, and has served on numerous community and business associations and committees. Lee is married to Ragini Venkat Rankin and has one son Henry.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:50:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Rankin, Lee A.
Interview Location
Lee Rankin's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-014_Track_1
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track one of interview with Lee Rankin

Less detail

Interview with Lee Rankin by Kathy Bossort December 2, 2015 - Track 2

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory643
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Lee Rankin talking about why he chose a career in politics and what kept him interested being a Burnaby councillor for 22 years. He tells the story about the land swap that he helped engineer with the School Board that enabled the building of the new Burnaby S…
Date Range
1963-2009
Length
0:10:40
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Lee Rankin talking about why he chose a career in politics and what kept him interested being a Burnaby councillor for 22 years. He tells the story about the land swap that he helped engineer with the School Board that enabled the building of the new Burnaby South Secondary School. He relates that this experience in the late 1980s would become key in finding a resolution for the City/SFU dispute. He talks about the positions held by the university and the City over land ownership and control on Burnaby Mountain. Rezoning for Discovery Park and the 1964 Simon Fraser Townsite Master Plan (1964) are discussed.
Date Range
1963-2009
Length
0:10:40
Name
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby School Disctrict no. 41
Burnaby South High School
Subject
Education
Officials - Aldermen and Councillors
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
December 2, 2015
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Lee Rankin conducted by Kathy Bossort. Lee Rankin was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Lee Rankin’s involvement in finding a resolution to the dispute between the City of Burnaby and Simon Fraser University over land ownership and control on Burnaby Mountain. He talks about the origin of the dispute, the positions taken by the two sides, the key people who brought about a resolution, and the main features of the agreement between the City, SFU and the province of BC. He talks about how the agreement met SFU’s goals, fostered trust between the City and university, and removed uncertainty from protecting parkland on Burnaby Mountain.
Biographical Notes
Lee Rankin was born in 1953 in Vancouver. He attended SFU 1973-78, completing his BA degree in 1985. He earned his law degree at UBC in 1988, was called to the Bar in 1989, and practiced in immigration and refugee law. Lee has lived in Burnaby since 1976 and was a member of Burnaby Council for 22 years, from 1983-1999 and 2002-2008. His particular interests as a Councillor were in community planning, housing and environment. Among other duties and accomplishments as Councillor, Lee served as chair of the Simon Fraser Liaison Committee and was involved in the negotiations with the province and SFU that resulted in the university returning more than 800 acres of land to the City, which was dedicated as part of the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area. He has also served on the GVRD, volunteers as a coach for team sports in Burnaby, and has served on numerous community and business associations and committees. Lee is married to Ragini Venkat Rankin and has one son Henry.
Total Tracks
8
Total Length
1:50:35
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Rankin, Lee A.
Interview Location
Lee Rankin's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-014_Track_2
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track two of interview with Lee Rankin

Less detail

Interview with Mary Lumby by Kathy Bossort January 8, 2016 - Track 5

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/oralhistory675
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about her move to UniverCity in 2007, why she likes living there and some of the disadvantages. She talks about the challenges of creating a sense of community in UniverCity, comparing it to the active involvement of Forest Hills and Forest …
Date Range
2007-2015
Length
0:17:35
  1 Audio  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Summary
This portion of the interview is about Mary Lumby talking about her move to UniverCity in 2007, why she likes living there and some of the disadvantages. She talks about the challenges of creating a sense of community in UniverCity, comparing it to the active involvement of Forest Hills and Forest Grove residents in civic affairs, and about problems of isolation on the mountain top, and separation between campus and the residential area.
Date Range
2007-2015
Length
0:17:35
Name
Simon Fraser University
UniverCity
Subject
Geographic Features - Neighbourhoods
Public Services
Planning
Persons - Volunteers
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Interviewer
Bossort, Kathy
Interview Date
January 8, 2016
Scope and Content
Recording is of an interview with Mary Lumby conducted by Kathy Bossort. Mary Lumby was one of 23 participants interviewed as part of the Community Heritage Commission’s Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project. The interview is mainly about Mary Lumby’s experience living in Forest Hills, raising her children there, and her involvement in community groups and advocating for improved community services in the Forest Hills and Forest Grove neighbourhoods, and her later move to UniverCity. She talks about the history of the Forest Hills subdivision and what she liked about living there, its links with Forest Grove, and challenges facing both communities as a result of their isolation. Her description of living in UniverCity provides an interesting comparison in how community is created. Mary Lumby also talks about her teaching career, her volunteer activities especially related to the environment, the relationship Trans Mountain tank farm had with adjacent neighbourhoods when she lived in Forest Hills, and what the Burnaby Mountain Conservation Area means to her.
Biographical Notes
Mary Lumby was born in Vancouver B.C. She moved to Burnaby and the Parkcrest area in 1977, and then to the new Forest Hills subdivision. Later she moved into another developing community, UniverCity, at the top of Burnaby Mountain and adjacent to the Simon Fraser University campus. Mary has been an active community member, volunteer and community advocate. She has been particularly interested in environmental issues, as a teacher, volunteer coordinator for civic events, and citizen representative on Burnaby’s Environment Committee. She continues to be active in community affairs and enjoys living on Burnaby Mountain.
Total Tracks
7
Total Length
1:31:47
Other Tracks
View All Tracks
Interviewee Name
Lumby, Mary M.
Interview Location
Mary Lumby's home in Burnaby
Interviewer Bio
Kathy Bossort is a retired archivist living in Ladner, BC. She worked at the Delta Museum and Archives after graduating from SLAIS (UBC) in 2001 with Masters degrees in library science and archival studies. Kathy grew up in Calgary, Alberta, and, prior to this career change, she lived in the West Kootenays, earning her living as a cook for BC tourist lodges and work camps. She continues to be interested in oral histories as a way to fill the gaps in the written record and bring richer meaning to history.
Collection/Fonds
Community Heritage Commission Special Projects fonds
Series
Burnaby Mountain Oral History Project series
Item No.
MSS196-016_Track_5
Media Type
Sound Recording
Audio Tracks

Track five of interview with Mary Lumby

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Historical Society members

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivephoto34061
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
November 27, 1959
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 10.4 x 14.5 cm
Item No.
005-001
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of Burnaby Historical Society members at the first Society dinner at the Burnaby Pavilion. Four men are looking at documents, including newspapers.
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
November 27, 1959
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives Collection
Series
Burnaby Historical Society Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
005-001
Accession Number
BHS2007-4
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 10.4 x 14.5 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of Burnaby Historical Society members at the first Society dinner at the Burnaby Pavilion. Four men are looking at documents, including newspapers.
Subjects
Organizations
Events
Names
Burnaby Historical Society
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Images
Less detail

Burnaby Historical Society's first annual dinner

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivephoto34657
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
November 27, 1959
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17.0 x 15.1 cm
Item No.
082-001
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of people at the Burnaby Historical Society's first annual dinner. Left to right (as identified on the back of the photo): Barry Mather, president; Miss B.P. Choate, secretary-treasurer; and Fraser Wilson, director. They are holding photograph of Robert Burnaby. The banner behind them r…
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
November 27, 1959
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives Collection
Series
Burnaby Historical Society Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
082-001
Accession Number
BHS2007-4
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17.0 x 15.1 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of people at the Burnaby Historical Society's first annual dinner. Left to right (as identified on the back of the photo): Barry Mather, president; Miss B.P. Choate, secretary-treasurer; and Fraser Wilson, director. They are holding photograph of Robert Burnaby. The banner behind them reads, "First Annual Dinner: Burnaby Historical Society / Burnaby Centennial Pavilion [on Burnaby Mountain] / Friday, November 27, [1959].
Subjects
Organizations
Events
Names
Burnaby Historical Society
Choate, B.P.
Mather, Barry
Wilson, Fraser
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Images
Less detail

Burnaby Historical Society's first annual dinner

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivephoto34669
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
November 27, 1959
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 20.4 x 25.5 cm
Item No.
088-001
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of the Burnaby Historical Society's first annual dinner held at the the Burnaby Centennial Pavilion on Burnaby Mountain on November 27, 1959. Men and women are seated at rows of tables.
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
November 27, 1959
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives Collection
Series
Burnaby Historical Society Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
088-001
Accession Number
BHS2007-4
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 20.4 x 25.5 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of the Burnaby Historical Society's first annual dinner held at the the Burnaby Centennial Pavilion on Burnaby Mountain on November 27, 1959. Men and women are seated at rows of tables.
Subjects
Organizations
Events
Names
Burnaby Historical Society
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Stamp on back of photograph: "Columbian Photo / Rm. 5 / 35 Sixth St., New Westminster, B.C. / LA 1-2662--6"
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Images
Less detail

Burnaby Historical Society's first annual dinner

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/archivephoto34670
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
November 27, 1959
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives Collection
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 20.4 x 25.5 cm
Item No.
088-002
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Scope and Content
Photograph of the Burnaby Historical Society's first annual dinner held at the the Burnaby Centennial Pavilion on Burnaby Mountain on November 27, 1959. Men and women are seated at rows of tables.
  1 Image  
Repository
City of Burnaby Archives
Date
November 27, 1959
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Historical Society Community Archives Collection
Series
Burnaby Historical Society Photograph Collection
Description Level
Item
Item No.
088-002
Accession Number
BHS2007-4
Storage Location
A/V Storage
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 20.4 x 25.5 cm
Media Type
Photograph
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
May be restricted by third party rights
Scope and Content
Photograph of the Burnaby Historical Society's first annual dinner held at the the Burnaby Centennial Pavilion on Burnaby Mountain on November 27, 1959. Men and women are seated at rows of tables.
Subjects
Organizations
Events
Names
Burnaby Historical Society
Notes
Title based on contents of photograph
Stamp on back of photograph: "Columbian Photo / Rm. 5 / 35 Sixth St., New Westminster, B.C. / LA 1-2662--6"
Geographic Access
Burnaby - Burnaby Mountain
Planning Study Area
Burnaby Mountain Area
Images
Less detail

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