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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3883 Imperial Street
Associated Dates
1969
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3883 Imperial Street
Associated Dates
1969
Heritage Value
On 26 April 1969 Swangard Stadium held its official opening. Named after Vancouver Sun former Managing Editor, Erwin Swangard, the stadium was funded entirely from private donations and civic and provincial grants.
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Maywood Area
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 3883 Imperial Street
Images
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Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3883 Imperial Street
Associated Dates
1891
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3883 Imperial Street
Associated Dates
1891
Heritage Value
In 1860, as the Royal Engineers constructed the road from New Westminster to Vancouver (now Kingsway), a military reserve was set aside at the trail's highest point along the ridge. This reserve provided a particularly good scenic look-out since the original forest had burned down prior to 1860, the remaining stumps offered unobstructed views. By the 1880s, the city council of both New Westminster and Vancouver eyed the reserve as potential recreation ground. As construction of the tram line was underway, the Provincial Government moved to designate the whole reserve as a park. On January 14, 1891, the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia proclaimed it as a public recreation ground.
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Maywood Area
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 3883 Imperial Street
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Kitchener Elementary School

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark614
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
1351 Gilmore Avenue
Description
School building.
Associated Dates
1925
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
1351 Gilmore Avenue
Associated Dates
1925
Description
School building.
Heritage Value
This landmark school was designed by the architectural firm of Bowman & Cullerne, specialists in the design of educational facilities. After Harold Cullerne (1890-1976) returned from service during the First World War, he joined J.H. Bowman (1864-1943) in a partnership that lasted from 1919 to 1934. The firm’s projects include the Seaforth School (1922, now relocated to Burnaby Village Museum), Burnaby North High School (1923), and the Nelson Avenue School (1927). This was originally designed as a two-storey, four-room building in 1925, with two-storey four-room wings added two years later. The building has been altered with the addition of stucco cladding over the original siding and replacement windows, but has retained its original form and massing, as well as its domed roof ventilator.
Locality
Vancouver Heights
Historic Neighbourhood
Vancouver Heights (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Willingdon Heights Area
Architect
Bowman & Cullerne
Area
20478.11
Contributing Resource
Building
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 1351 Gilmore Avenue
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Confederation Park

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark672
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
250 Willingdon Avenue
Associated Dates
1927
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
250 Willingdon Avenue
Associated Dates
1927
Heritage Value
North Burnaby’s first park began its life as the Capitol Hill subdivision during the land boom of 1909. In 1914 the boom went bust and many owners of unoccupied lots failed to pay the property taxes owing and the land became the property of the Municipality of Burnaby. By 1922, Burnaby had so many lots that it decided to reserve land for future park use and dedicated a narrow 26 acre site adjacent to the ravine. During the 1920s, the Heights area boomed again and many new residents wanted a playground for their children. A local women’s group took on the cause and enlisted local residents and businesses to raise the necessary funds. On June 25, 1927 crowds gathered to officially dedicate “Confederation Park” named in honour of the Diamond Jubilee of Canada’s Confederation (1867-1927).
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Capitol Hill Area
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 250 Willingdon Avenue
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
Less detail

Burnaby North High School

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark745
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
250 Willingdon Avenue
Associated Dates
1923-1982
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
250 Willingdon Avenue
Associated Dates
1923-1982
Heritage Value
Burnaby North and Burnaby South were the first high schools built in the City. Before the high school opened, Burnaby students had to travel to Vancouver if they wished to pursue education beyond an elementary level. In 1921, arrangements were made to use the basement of the Presbyterian Church for instruction of local students. By 1922 the Burnaby North High School opened at its first permanent location (4375 Pandora Street - which is now Rosser Elementary). In 1945, the Willingdon Avenue site was built and was used until a new building was constructed in 1961 on Hammarskjold Drive. From 1962, the school was used as Burnaby Heights Junior High school, but it closed in 1982 and the junior high students went to the new Burnaby North on Hammarskjold.
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Capitol Hill Area
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 250 Willingdon Avenue
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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Bill Copeland Sports Centre & Burnaby Lake Arena

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark819
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3676 Kensington Avenue
Associated Dates
1965
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3676 Kensington Avenue
Associated Dates
1965
Heritage Value
In February 1965, the Planning Department presented to Burnaby Council a preliminary Development Plan entitled "Pacific Sports Centre," for the area immediately west of Burnaby Lake. This report proposed a conceptual plan for a comprehensive range of indoor and outdoor sporting facilities adjacent to Burnaby Lake. The idea was accepted by Council and led to the construction of the Burnaby Lake Rink beside the C.G. Brown Pool. In 1973, Burnaby and New Westminster jointly hosted the Canada Summer Games for which a rowing course and pavilion were built at Burnaby Lake and the success of the games and the sports facilities added within Burnaby Lake Park provided further stimulus for the creation of the sports and recreation facilities at this site.
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Ardingley-Sprott Area
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 3676 Kensington Avenue
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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North Burnaby Cenotaph

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark550
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
250 Willingdon Avenue
Description
The North Burnaby Cenotaph is located in Confederation Park at the north end of the park on axis with the adjacent sports oval. The form of the memorial is of an obelisk atop a solid rectangular base, adorned with plaques commemorating those lost in the First World War, Second World War and the Kor…
Associated Dates
1953
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
250 Willingdon Avenue
Associated Dates
1953
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
The North Burnaby Cenotaph is located in Confederation Park at the north end of the park on axis with the adjacent sports oval. The form of the memorial is of an obelisk atop a solid rectangular base, adorned with plaques commemorating those lost in the First World War, Second World War and the Korean War.
Heritage Value
Built in 1953 by stonemason and First World War Veteran, Walter Holmes Morrice, the cenotaph was erected by the North Burnaby Legion Post #148 and is one of four memorials to citizens of Burnaby whose lives were lost at war. Strategically placed in an active and vibrant public park that was dedicated in 1927 and is used for sports, family outings and social gatherings, the cenotaph celebrates the freedoms that soldiers gave their lives to protect. The cenotaph is still used as a memorial site and bears witness to annual Remembrance Day ceremonies. Built of irregular granite blocks, the cenotaph is a solid structure of modest ornamentation that visually anchors the north end of the park. The site of the cenotaph and its adjacent gardens are surrounded by a simple barrier of continuous chain supported by low metal fence posts, providing a sense of solemnity and ceremony to the site.
Defining Elements
The character-defining elements of the North Burnaby Cenotaph include its: - axial location in the park and setting among active municipal facilities such as a school and library - strong symmetry of massing and design - obelisk form set atop a rectangular base - limited palette of materials - random coursed granite used as primary building material - bronze plaques commemorating the First and Second World Wars and the Korean War - surrounding pathways and flowerbeds
Historic Neighbourhood
Capitol Hill (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Capitol Hill Area
Organization
North Burnaby Legion Post #148
Builder
Walter Holmes Morrice
Function
Primary Current--Park Fixture
Primary Historic--Park Fixture
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 017-040-752 Legal Description: Parcel 1, District Lots 122 and 188, Group 1, New Westminster District, Plan NWP87902
Boundaries
The property (Confederation Park) is comprised of a single municipally-owned property located at 250 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
184,160.00
Contributing Resource
Landscape Feature
Structure
Ownership
Public (local)
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 250 Willingdon Avenue
Images
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Jubilee Grove Arch

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark533
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3883 Imperial Street
Description
The Jubilee Grove Arch sits at the corner of Kingsway and Patterson Avenue. Located within Central Park, the ceremonial arch and its decorative plantings provide a visual anchor to the northeast corner and entry point to the park.
Associated Dates
1939
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3883 Imperial Street
Associated Dates
1939
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
The Jubilee Grove Arch sits at the corner of Kingsway and Patterson Avenue. Located within Central Park, the ceremonial arch and its decorative plantings provide a visual anchor to the northeast corner and entry point to the park.
Heritage Value
Jubilee Grove Arch was dedicated as part of the municipality’s celebration of the Jubilee of the coronation of King George V and was dedicated during Burnaby’s annual May Day celebrations in 1935. Much of the construction work was carried out by local citizens under the direction of the Burnaby Engineering Department through a Depression era work relief program that provided a way for local residents to pay their taxes. The garden was also chosen as the site for the ceremonial planting of an oak tree from the Royal Forest at Windsor, in honor of the Coronation of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth in 1937. The original bronze garden dedication plaque and oak tree remain at the site today. The decorative stone arch was erected in 1939 as a symbol of Burnaby's, and the Lower Mainland of British Columbia’s, strong ties to the English monarchy at the time, and the arch’s unveiling during May Day ceremonies shows the social role that such a commemorative feature played both to the local government and people of Burnaby. It was erected just prior to the Royal Visit of 1939, the first time that reigning British monarchs had travelled to Canada. Built of Haddington Island sandstone, the arch itself was reconstructed from a salvaged architectural element of a historic Vancouver landmark. The arch originally framed the entrance door to the Vancouver Club building in Vancouver, built in 1893-94 on West Hastings Street and designed by architect C.O. Wickenden. The building was demolished in 1930, however the arch was stored and rebuilt as the focal point of the Jubilee Grove after being bought by the Municipality of Burnaby. The work was undertaken by Italian-born stone mason Rizieri Stefanini (1879-1954), the owner of Burnaby Monumental Works. The re-use of the arch symbolizes the close tie between Vancouver and Burnaby and the joint evolution of the neighbouring cities.
Defining Elements
The Jubilee Grove Arch has character-defining elements that recognize it both as a remnant of a past building and as a new and individual structure. These include its: - axial diagonal placement and prominent corner location marking one of the entries to Central Park - visibility and accessibility as a public monument - hand carved stone blocks of Haddington Island sandstone - decorative twisted-rope motif carved to outline the arch - supporting rusticated sidewalls with planting urns - original bronze dedication plaque - flanking ornamental gardens - Royal Oak tree and plaque
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Maywood Area
Organization
City of Burnaby
Architect
C.O. Wickenden
Builder
Rizieri Stefanini
Burnaby Monumental Works
Function
Primary Current--Park Fixture
Primary Historic--Park Fixture
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 017-767-172 Legal Description: Block B of Lot 2 Except Firstly: Part on Plan 8669 and Secondly: Part on Plan LMP4689 District Lot 151, Group 1, New Westminster District, Plan 3443
Boundaries
The property (Central Park) is a municipally-owned park that lies at the western edge of Burnaby, between 49th Avenue to the south, Kingsway to the north, Boundary Road to the west and Patterson Avenue to the east.
Area
853,403.82
Contributing Resource
Structure
Landscape Feature
Ownership
Public (local)
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Name Access
Burnaby Monumental Works
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 3883 Imperial Street
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
Less detail

Central Park Entrance Gate

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark544
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3883 Imperial Street
Description
The Central Park Entrance Gate is the ceremonial entrance to Burnaby’s historic Central Park from Kingsway, and consists of two massive stone pillars, approximately 7.5 metres high and 1.8 metres square, adjacent gate posts and a low flanking stone wall that curves into the park to the east.
Associated Dates
1913
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3883 Imperial Street
Associated Dates
1913
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
The Central Park Entrance Gate is the ceremonial entrance to Burnaby’s historic Central Park from Kingsway, and consists of two massive stone pillars, approximately 7.5 metres high and 1.8 metres square, adjacent gate posts and a low flanking stone wall that curves into the park to the east.
Heritage Value
The Central Park Entrance Gate is significant as a ceremonial entry to a major park, for its connection with the early history of the British Columbia Electric Railway (BCER) and as an important design by an accomplished British Columbian architect. When the original interurban line between Vancouver and New Westminster was constructed in 1891, one of the first stations was located where the tramway crossed the Vancouver-Westminster Road (now Kingsway) within the newly-created Central Park. The interurban line ran through the park on a diagonal right-of-way (the current SkyTrain line, opened in 1986, follows this original alignment). In 1912 an agreement was reached between the successor interurban company, the BCER, and the Central Park Provincial Park Board, to deed additional land for an expanded right-of-way through the Park in exchange for improvements that included the construction of an ornamental stone wall and gate with an iron arch, with an illuminated 'Central Park' sign, adjacent to the interurban station on Kingsway. This was an early and rare example of an electric sign used for a public recreation facility. The Gate is also significant as a surviving early design by Robert Lyon (1879-1963), an Edinburgh-born and trained immigrant who was one of the most accomplished of British Columbia's early architects. After he moved to Vancouver, he was employed by the BCER from 1911 until 1918, and worked on a broad range of projects including some of the grandest and most innovative local industrial structures of the time. The arch was built by the Westminster Ironworks Company, one of the leading firms of its kind in Western Canada, operated by John Reid of New Westminster. The Gate was completed in 1914; in 1968 the decorative ironwork was removed due to corrosion and placed in storage.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the Central Park Entrance Gate include its: - two subtly tapered massive stone pillars, which rise in stages from a larger base to a shaft with random coursed multi-coloured granite with roughly formed grey granite quoins, to a top formed of finely finished grey granite blocks with a coved and bracketed cap - adjacent gate posts with monolithic pyramidal granite caps - low flanking stone wall that curves into the park to the east, constructed of random coursed multi-coloured granite with a river rock triangular cap
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Maywood Area
Organization
British Columbia Electric Railway
Central Park Provincial Park Board
Architect
Robert Lyon
Builder
John Reid
Westminster Iron Works Co.
Function
Primary Current--Park Fixture
Primary Historic--Park Fixture
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 017-767-172 Legal Description: Block B of Lot 2 Except Firstly: Part on Plan 8669 and Secondly: Part on Plan LMP4689 District Lot 151, Group 1, New Westminster District, Plan 3443
Boundaries
The property (Central Park) is a municipally-owned park that lies at the western edge of Burnaby, between 49th Avenue to the south, Kingsway to the north, Boundary Road to the west and Patterson Avenue to the east.
Area
853,403.82
Contributing Resource
Structure
Landscape Feature
Ownership
Public (local)
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 3883 Imperial Street
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
Less detail

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