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Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1909
  1 Image  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Associated Dates
1909
Heritage Value
In 1908, construction began on the British Columbia Electric Railway Eburne tramline which was to connect Eburne (now known as Marpole) with New Westminster. It opened on September 15, 1909 and its tracks were built across the bog of the Fraser Arm district with little regard to the fact that virtually no one lived there. However, within one year an hourly passenger service, a milk train and three-times weekly freight service used this level fast-running connector. With the completion of the Chilliwack interurban line and various other steam railroads which were funnelled onto this line it became one of the most important industrial freight lines in the Lower Mainland.
Historic Neighbourhood
Fraser Arm (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Big Bend Area
Images
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Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Description
The Vorce Station is a modest utilitarian passenger tram shelter, originally constructed at the foot of Nursery Street as part of the British Columbia Electric Railway Company’s Burnaby Lake Interurban Line. In 1953, it was moved to a local farm by the Lubbock family, and in 1977 it was relocated t…
Associated Dates
1911
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Associated Dates
1911
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
The Vorce Station is a modest utilitarian passenger tram shelter, originally constructed at the foot of Nursery Street as part of the British Columbia Electric Railway Company’s Burnaby Lake Interurban Line. In 1953, it was moved to a local farm by the Lubbock family, and in 1977 it was relocated to Burnaby Village Museum. The wood-frame structure has a rectangular plan and hipped roof. It is enclosed on three sides, with an open side for access to the train platform and a single long built-in bench across the back of the station.
Heritage Value
The heritage value of the Vorce Station is as the last remaining interurban station in Burnaby and one of the few extant structures left in the Greater Vancouver region that were once part of the extensive British Columbia Electric Railway (BCER) interurban system. The Vorce Station was designed and built by the BCER, and is typical of the small local passenger stations on the Burnaby Lake and Chilliwack interurban lines. It was named after C.B. Vorce, the Chief Engineer for the company. The impact of the interurban line on local development was extremely significant, as it connected the cities of New Westminster and Vancouver, and enabled the residents of Burnaby to form a cohesive municipality from the mainly rural lands remaining between the two larger centres. Much of the early development in Burnaby was due to the growth of the interurban rail lines. The heritage significance for this station also lies in its interpretive value within the Burnaby Village Museum. The Vorce Station is an important cultural feature for the interpretation of Burnaby’s transportation history to the public, and is an important surviving feature of the BCER interurban system.
Defining Elements
The character defining features of the Vorce Station include its: - rectangular form and pyramidal roof with overhanging eaves - simple vernacular design and utilitarian nature - cedar shingle wall cladding - cedar shingle-clad roof with galvanized pressed tin roof ridges - interior vertical tongue-and-groove panelling - heritage graffiti: initials and messages carved and scrawled on the walls - identifying sign with large letters visible at a distance
Locality
Deer Lake Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Person
C.B. Vorce
Organization
British Columbia Electric Railway
Burnaby Village Museum
Function
Primary Current--Museum
Primary Historic--Rail Station
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 011-030-356 Legal Description: Parcel 1, District Lot 79 and District Lot 85, Group 1, New Westminster District, Reference Plan 77594
Boundaries
Burnaby Village Museum is comprised of a single municipally-owned property located at 6501 Deer Lake Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
38,488.63
Contributing Resource
Building
Structure
Landscape Feature
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - 4900 Deer Lake Avenue
Images
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Thomas Irvine House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark536
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Description
The Thomas Irvine House is a very small, two room wood frame cottage, originally located on Laurel Street in Central Burnaby (now the site of the Burnaby Lake Sports Complex - West), and now relocated to the Burnaby Village Museum.
Associated Dates
1911
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Tommy Irvine House
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Tommy Irvine House
Civic Address
6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Associated Dates
1911
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
The Thomas Irvine House is a very small, two room wood frame cottage, originally located on Laurel Street in Central Burnaby (now the site of the Burnaby Lake Sports Complex - West), and now relocated to the Burnaby Village Museum.
Heritage Value
The Thomas Irvine House is representative of an extremely modest, vernacular working-class cottage of the early twentieth century, once common but mostly now demolished. Irish-born Thomas Irvine (1864-1964) and his friend, Robert Moore, constructed the house in 1911 to suit the simple needs of a bachelor. Irvine worked on the construction of the British Columbia Electric Railway Burnaby Lake Interurban Line and was a pile driver by trade. The house consists of two rooms, a living room/kitchen and a bedroom. There were some improvements made throughout the fifty years Irvine lived there, such as running water in 1929, and electricity in the 1950s, but the essential character and form of the house remained intact. Irvine was a well-known local character and pioneer of Burnaby. The heritage value for this house also lies in its interpretive value within the Burnaby Village Museum. The site is an important cultural feature for the interpretation of Burnaby’s heritage to the public. The Thomas Irvine House was moved to the Burnaby Village Museum in 1975 and was restored to its 1920s appearance.
Defining Elements
The character defining elements of the Thomas Irvine House include its: - rectangular form and simple massing - bellcast hipped form with cedar shingle cladding - cedar shingle cladding stained dark brown - double-hung 1-over-1 wooden-sash window on front facade; simple double wooden-sash casement on west facade - interior layout of the house with 2 rooms, a living room/kitchen and bedroom - V-joint tongue-and-groove wood interior paneling
Locality
Deer Lake Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Organization
British Columbia Electric Railway
Burnaby Village Museum
Builder
Thomas Irvine (Owner)
Robert Moore
Function
Primary Current--Museum
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 011-030-356 Legal Description: Parcel 1, District Lot 79 and District Lot 85, Group 1, New Westminster District, Reference Plan 77594
Boundaries
Burnaby Village Museum is comprised of a single municipally-owned property located at 6501 Deer Lake Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
38,488.63
Contributing Resource
Building
Landscape Feature
Structure
Ownership
Public (local)
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Name Access
Irvine, Tom
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - 4900 Deer Lake Avenue
Images
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Central Park Entrance Gate

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark544
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3883 Imperial Street
Description
The Central Park Entrance Gate is the ceremonial entrance to Burnaby’s historic Central Park from Kingsway, and consists of two massive stone pillars, approximately 7.5 metres high and 1.8 metres square, adjacent gate posts and a low flanking stone wall that curves into the park to the east.
Associated Dates
1913
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
3883 Imperial Street
Associated Dates
1913
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
The Central Park Entrance Gate is the ceremonial entrance to Burnaby’s historic Central Park from Kingsway, and consists of two massive stone pillars, approximately 7.5 metres high and 1.8 metres square, adjacent gate posts and a low flanking stone wall that curves into the park to the east.
Heritage Value
The Central Park Entrance Gate is significant as a ceremonial entry to a major park, for its connection with the early history of the British Columbia Electric Railway (BCER) and as an important design by an accomplished British Columbian architect. When the original interurban line between Vancouver and New Westminster was constructed in 1891, one of the first stations was located where the tramway crossed the Vancouver-Westminster Road (now Kingsway) within the newly-created Central Park. The interurban line ran through the park on a diagonal right-of-way (the current SkyTrain line, opened in 1986, follows this original alignment). In 1912 an agreement was reached between the successor interurban company, the BCER, and the Central Park Provincial Park Board, to deed additional land for an expanded right-of-way through the Park in exchange for improvements that included the construction of an ornamental stone wall and gate with an iron arch, with an illuminated 'Central Park' sign, adjacent to the interurban station on Kingsway. This was an early and rare example of an electric sign used for a public recreation facility. The Gate is also significant as a surviving early design by Robert Lyon (1879-1963), an Edinburgh-born and trained immigrant who was one of the most accomplished of British Columbia's early architects. After he moved to Vancouver, he was employed by the BCER from 1911 until 1918, and worked on a broad range of projects including some of the grandest and most innovative local industrial structures of the time. The arch was built by the Westminster Ironworks Company, one of the leading firms of its kind in Western Canada, operated by John Reid of New Westminster. The Gate was completed in 1914; in 1968 the decorative ironwork was removed due to corrosion and placed in storage.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the Central Park Entrance Gate include its: - two subtly tapered massive stone pillars, which rise in stages from a larger base to a shaft with random coursed multi-coloured granite with roughly formed grey granite quoins, to a top formed of finely finished grey granite blocks with a coved and bracketed cap - adjacent gate posts with monolithic pyramidal granite caps - low flanking stone wall that curves into the park to the east, constructed of random coursed multi-coloured granite with a river rock triangular cap
Historic Neighbourhood
Central Park (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Maywood Area
Organization
British Columbia Electric Railway
Central Park Provincial Park Board
Architect
Robert Lyon
Builder
John Reid
Westminster Iron Works Co.
Function
Primary Current--Park Fixture
Primary Historic--Park Fixture
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 017-767-172 Legal Description: Block B of Lot 2 Except Firstly: Part on Plan 8669 and Secondly: Part on Plan LMP4689 District Lot 151, Group 1, New Westminster District, Plan 3443
Boundaries
The property (Central Park) is a municipally-owned park that lies at the western edge of Burnaby, between 49th Avenue to the south, Kingsway to the north, Boundary Road to the west and Patterson Avenue to the east.
Area
853,403.82
Contributing Resource
Structure
Landscape Feature
Ownership
Public (local)
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 3883 Imperial Street
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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George S. & Jessie Haddon House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark508
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
5558 Buckingham Avenue
Description
The George and Jessie Haddon House is a symmetrical two-storey Dutch Colonial-style house with a side-gambrel roof and shed dormers. It is situated in the Burnaby Lake neighborhood in East Burnaby.
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
5558 Buckingham Avenue
Associated Dates
1922
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 12064
Enactment Date
19/06/2006
Description
The George and Jessie Haddon House is a symmetrical two-storey Dutch Colonial-style house with a side-gambrel roof and shed dormers. It is situated in the Burnaby Lake neighborhood in East Burnaby.
Heritage Value
Built in 1923, the George and Jessie Haddon House is a significant example of the romantic period revival styles that were popular during the period between the two World Wars. These traditionally styled homes reflected ongoing pride in past traditions but also recognized the modern ideals of economy and good design. At the time, houses displayed traditional and readily-identifiable historical styles as a hallmark of good taste. The use of the various Colonial Revival styles had gained new popularity during the 1920s, and this design could have originated in a residential pattern book, which were in wide circulation and used to expedite residential projects. This house displays the typical features of the Dutch Colonial style, imported from the eastern United States and relatively rare on the West Coast. The house originally featured an unusual porte-cochere with tapered supports, that indicated the growing importance of automobiles at the time. The house was built for George Samuel Haddon (1886-1971) and his wife Jessie (née Reade) Haddon, whom he married in 1915. George Haddon, who was born in British Columbia, was a prominent Vancouver figure and served as Secretary of the Vancouver General Hospital. Following Jessie's death, George Haddon was remarried to Alice Margaret Currie (1890-1951). The George and Jessie Haddon House is further valued for its connection with the continued development of the Burnaby Lake neighbourhood in the 1920s. The area was highly desirable to wealthy Vancouver and New Westminster residents because of its scenery, and easy access was provided by the British Columbia Electric Railway 'Burnaby Lake' interurban line, which opened in June 1911. The Haddon House illustrates the evolving nature of regional transportation and the growing communities made possible by increasing options for transportation. The house originally stood on a larger lot, and was relocated in 2006 to allow for subdivision and legal protection. The current owners restored the porte-cochere in 2014.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the George and Jessie Haddon House include its: - location within the Burnaby Lake neighbourhood - residential form, scale and massing as expressed by its two-storey height and gambrel roof with shed dormers - rough-cast stucco cladding - Colonial Revival details such as the symmetrical façade and massing, and side-gambrel roof with shed dormers - additional exterior features such as an interior chimney, exposed purlins and window boxes supported on large projecting brackets - wooden front door with glazed insets - interior features including original staircase, and wooden door and window trim
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Person
George Samuel Haddon
Alice Margaret Currie
Jessie Haddon
Builder
William Dodson
Function
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D.026-745-127
Boundaries
The George and Jessie Haddon House is comprised of a single residential lot located at 5558 Buckingham Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
1080
Contributing Resource
Building
Ownership
Private
Documentation
City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, Heritage Site Files
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 5558 Buckingham Avenue
Burnaby - 5520 Buckingham Avenue
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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H.T. Ceperley Estate 'Fairacres' Mansion

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark526
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6344 Deer Lake Avenue
Description
'Fairacres' is a large, two-and-one-half storey estate house in the British Arts and Crafts style, located in Deer Lake Park, with four associated original outbuildings.
Associated Dates
1911
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Henry Tracy & Grace Ceperley Estate
Burnaby Art Gallery
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  3 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Henry Tracy & Grace Ceperley Estate
Burnaby Art Gallery
Civic Address
6344 Deer Lake Avenue
Associated Dates
1911
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
'Fairacres' is a large, two-and-one-half storey estate house in the British Arts and Crafts style, located in Deer Lake Park, with four associated original outbuildings.
Heritage Value
'Fairacres' is important as a record of the early years of Burnaby, specifically the Deer Lake area, as a place of tranquility and beautiful scenery in which the wealthy and successful in the burgeoning cities of New Westminster and Vancouver chose to retire or to make their family homes. The main house, which anchors in style and setting the outbuildings on the estate, demonstrates the social, cultural, and aesthetic values of local wealthy businessmen and women of the early twentieth century - values such as appreciation of architectural elegance and grand interior spaces, leisure and recreation, formal landscaped gardens and scenic views. Also important is the association with the English-born and trained architect Robert Percival Sterling Twizell (1875-1964), as this was one of his grandest residential commissions. Steeped in the current architectural trends in Great Britain, Twizell designed this sprawling mansion in the Arts and Crafts style, reflected in the architectural detailing and proportions. The style was common at the time and was often used for estate mansions as a symbol of affluence and good, modern taste as well as an affinity for all things British. Quality is displayed inside and out in the finishes and materials, orchestrated by prominent local contractor, James Charles Allen, including imported English materials of specific value such as imported Medmenham tiles in the fireplace surrounds, one of the earliest documented use of these tiles outside the United Kingdom. Detailed features of the interior woodwork were carved by Scottish-born master wood carver George Selkirk Gibson (1867-1942), who was best known for his many commissions for prominent British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure. The outbuildings at 'Fairacres' are an important record of the functioning of a large estate of the time. The Garage and Stables and the Chauffeur’s Cottage accommodated the use of automobiles, horses and carriages, and in concert with the estate's location near the new British Columbia Electric Railway 'Burnaby Lake' interurban line, illustrate the evolving nature of regional transportation and the growing bedroom communities and estates made possible by increasing options for transportation. Other outbuildings accommodated the agricultural activities that helped support the Ceperley estate. The estate was conceived and funded by American-born Grace E. Dixon Ceperley (1863-1917), who had achieved significant wealth through a bequest from her brother-in-law, Vancouver pioneer Arthur Ferguson. Her husband, Henry Tracy Ceperley (1850-1929), also American-born, was a successful and well-respected businessman who made a significant contribution to the development of the City of Vancouver. The construction of 'Fairacres' spawned the transformation of the Deer Lake area from a farming community into a preferred location for elite suburban homes. 'Fairacres' is significant to the City of Burnaby as its first civic heritage conservation project. Acquired in 1966 for conversion to Burnaby’s first art gallery, it was dedicated in 1967 to mark Canada’s Centennial of Confederation.
Defining Elements
Key elements that define the heritage character of the ‘Fairacres’ mansion include its: - setting in relation to the gardens, its former market garden, and the vistas to Deer Lake and other grand homes in the area - side gable roof with prominent dormers and cedar shingle cladding - verandah across the eastern (garden) facade, with its view over the landscaped gardens and the distant mountains - porte cochere with its side steps for those arriving by automobile, and central raised step for those alighting from horse-drawn carriages - rich variety of exterior elements that demonstrate the typical Arts and Crafts use of local materials such as cobble stone chimneys and foundations, wide wooden siding and half-timbering - mixture of double-hung and casement wooden-sash windows, many with multi-paned sash - lavish interior spaces, designed for entertaining on a grand scale, including a billiard room with a beamed ceiling and an inglenook fireplace, and generous living and dining rooms arranged off a central hall - quality of the interior materials such as imported Medmenham tiles in fireplace surrounds, window hardware by Hope and Sons, and leaded stained glass - interior wood work including the staircase, and carvings by George Selkirk Gibson - remaining formal Edwardian garden landscape elements, including the cross-axial plan that reflects the relationship of the mansion to its 'outdoor rooms'
Locality
Deer Lake Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Person
Ceperley, H.T.
Ceperley, Grace
Architect
R.P.S. Twizell
Builder
James Charles Allen
George Selkirk Gibson
Function
Primary Current--Museum
Primary Historic--Estate
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 004-493-311 Legal Description: Block 3 Except: Part subdivided by Plan 26865, District Lot 79, Group 1, New Westminster District, Plan 536
Boundaries
‘Fairacres’ is comprised of a single municipally-owned property located at 6344 Deer Lake Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
17,065.00
Contributing Resource
Building
Landscape Feature
Ownership
Public (local)
Other Collection
City of Burnaby, Visual Art Collection: Original rendering by R.P.S. Twizell Burnaby Historical Society, Community Archives: Ceperley Photograph Album Burnaby Village Museum, Collection: Carved dining room panels by G.S. Gibson and other hardware items
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Name Access
Ceperley, H.T.
Ceperley, Grace
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6344 Deer Lake Avenue
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
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T.O. Townley Estate 'Deerholme'

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark545
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6110 Price Street
Description
The T.O. Townley Estate, 'Deerholme,' is located on a lake front property on the north shore of Deer Lake Park. The main house is a two-and-one-half storey symmetrical-massed wood-frame Colonial Revival structure, with flanking one-storey wings, a side gable roof and a central front entry.
Associated Dates
1913
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Thomas & Frances Townley Estate, Loftus House
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Thomas & Frances Townley Estate, Loftus House
Civic Address
6110 Price Street
Associated Dates
1913
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
The T.O. Townley Estate, 'Deerholme,' is located on a lake front property on the north shore of Deer Lake Park. The main house is a two-and-one-half storey symmetrical-massed wood-frame Colonial Revival structure, with flanking one-storey wings, a side gable roof and a central front entry.
Heritage Value
'Deerholme' was built as the retirement estate of Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Owen Townley (1862-1935) and his wife, Frances M. Townley. Townley was a pioneer resident of the Lower Mainland of British Columbia: he served as a lawyer, Registrar of Land Titles for New Westminster District and Mayor of Vancouver for one term in 1901. Built in 1913, this is one of the most significant of the Deer Lake estate houses and was the last of grand Edwardian era mansions built on the lots surrounding the lake. The area had been opened up for development two years earlier by the construction of the British Columbia Electric Railway Interurban Line. The estate speaks of a gracious way of life achieved by society's elite during the Edwardian era, supported by the use of domestic servants. Grand in scale, architecturally sophisticated and set in a bucolic landscape, this residence demonstrates the social status of the owner in the privileged classes of the rapidly developing social structure of Burnaby. The house is also significant as one of the earliest designs by the son of Thomas and Frances Townley, architect Fred Laughton Townley (1887-1966), who had graduated in architecture in 1911 from the University of Pennsylvania. In this house for his parents, he demonstrated his deft understanding of the American Period Revival styles learned during his schooling in the United States. The prevailing local taste for British-derived architecture dictated that this was a style he was rarely able to use until the Colonial Revival styles became more popular in the 1920s. F.L. Townley was a founding partner in Townley and Matheson, which achieved significant success as one of the most accomplished local architectural firms, culminating in their best-known commission, Vancouver City Hall, 1935-36.
Defining Elements
Key elements the define the heritage character of ‘Deerholme’ include its: - integration with its south-sloping lakefront site, which contains many original landscape features (extant rockeries, formal drive, tennis lawn, open fields, and specimen shrubs and trees) - two-and-one-half storey form with flanking one-storey wings - side gable roof with symmetrical shed dormers, three at the front and three at the rear - complex fenestration, including multi-paned wooden-sash double-hung windows, 6-over-1 on the ground floor and 6-over-9 on the second floor, and multi-paned wooden-sash casements in the dormers - pair of prominent exterior brick chimneys on each side elevation, clad with rough-cast stucco up to the roof level, and each with four chimney-pots - rough-cast stucco cladding - design elements typical of the Colonial Revival style, such as composed classical formality, side gable roof and balanced symmetrical massing - exterior architectural elements, such as classical columns, window shutters, fanlight feature window, multi-paned quarter-round windows flanking the chimneys, and projecting square brackets in the gables - superior level of design and craftsmanship throughout, including refined interior woodwork such as fireplaces, interior columned screen between hallway and living room and a staircase with Colonial Revival details - significant mature trees (such as Red Oaks, Silver Maples, and Copper Beech). - original guest house and stables, which survive on an adjacent property at 6176 Price Street
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Douglas-Gilpin Area
Person
Thomas Owen Townley (Owner)
Frances M. Townley (Owner)
Architect
Fred Laughton Townley
Function
Primary Current--Estate
Primary Historic--Estate
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 002-652-111 Legal Description: Parcel 'C' (Explanatory Plan 12891) , Blocks 4 and 5, District Lot 79 Group 1, New Westminster District, Plan 536
Boundaries
‘Deerholme’ is comprised of a single municipally-owned property located at 6110 Price Street, Burnaby.
Area
14,099.52
Contributing Resource
Building
Landscape Feature
Ownership
Public (local)
Other Collection
City of Vancouver Archives: T.O. Townley Residence, Original Plans, Add. MSS. 1399, Temporary No. 61, Location 920-D
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6110 Price Street
Street View URL
Google Maps Street View
Images
Less detail

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