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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Description
The Vorce Station is a modest utilitarian passenger tram shelter, originally constructed at the foot of Nursery Street as part of the British Columbia Electric Railway Company’s Burnaby Lake Interurban Line. In 1953, it was moved to a local farm by the Lubbock family, and in 1977 it was relocated t…
Associated Dates
1911
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Associated Dates
1911
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
The Vorce Station is a modest utilitarian passenger tram shelter, originally constructed at the foot of Nursery Street as part of the British Columbia Electric Railway Company’s Burnaby Lake Interurban Line. In 1953, it was moved to a local farm by the Lubbock family, and in 1977 it was relocated to Burnaby Village Museum. The wood-frame structure has a rectangular plan and hipped roof. It is enclosed on three sides, with an open side for access to the train platform and a single long built-in bench across the back of the station.
Heritage Value
The heritage value of the Vorce Station is as the last remaining interurban station in Burnaby and one of the few extant structures left in the Greater Vancouver region that were once part of the extensive British Columbia Electric Railway (BCER) interurban system. The Vorce Station was designed and built by the BCER, and is typical of the small local passenger stations on the Burnaby Lake and Chilliwack interurban lines. It was named after C.B. Vorce, the Chief Engineer for the company. The impact of the interurban line on local development was extremely significant, as it connected the cities of New Westminster and Vancouver, and enabled the residents of Burnaby to form a cohesive municipality from the mainly rural lands remaining between the two larger centres. Much of the early development in Burnaby was due to the growth of the interurban rail lines. The heritage significance for this station also lies in its interpretive value within the Burnaby Village Museum. The Vorce Station is an important cultural feature for the interpretation of Burnaby’s transportation history to the public, and is an important surviving feature of the BCER interurban system.
Defining Elements
The character defining features of the Vorce Station include its: - rectangular form and pyramidal roof with overhanging eaves - simple vernacular design and utilitarian nature - cedar shingle wall cladding - cedar shingle-clad roof with galvanized pressed tin roof ridges - interior vertical tongue-and-groove panelling - heritage graffiti: initials and messages carved and scrawled on the walls - identifying sign with large letters visible at a distance
Locality
Deer Lake Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Person
C.B. Vorce
Organization
British Columbia Electric Railway
Burnaby Village Museum
Function
Primary Current--Museum
Primary Historic--Rail Station
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 011-030-356 Legal Description: Parcel 1, District Lot 79 and District Lot 85, Group 1, New Westminster District, Reference Plan 77594
Boundaries
Burnaby Village Museum is comprised of a single municipally-owned property located at 6501 Deer Lake Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
38,488.63
Contributing Resource
Building
Structure
Landscape Feature
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - 4900 Deer Lake Avenue
Images
Less detail

Thomas Irvine House

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/permalink/landmark536
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Civic Address
6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Description
The Thomas Irvine House is a very small, two room wood frame cottage, originally located on Laurel Street in Central Burnaby (now the site of the Burnaby Lake Sports Complex - West), and now relocated to the Burnaby Village Museum.
Associated Dates
1911
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Other Names
Tommy Irvine House
  2 Images  
Repository
Burnaby Heritage Planning
Other Names
Tommy Irvine House
Civic Address
6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Associated Dates
1911
Formal Recognition
Heritage Designation, Community Heritage Register
Enactment Type
Bylaw No. 9807
Enactment Date
23/11/1992
Description
The Thomas Irvine House is a very small, two room wood frame cottage, originally located on Laurel Street in Central Burnaby (now the site of the Burnaby Lake Sports Complex - West), and now relocated to the Burnaby Village Museum.
Heritage Value
The Thomas Irvine House is representative of an extremely modest, vernacular working-class cottage of the early twentieth century, once common but mostly now demolished. Irish-born Thomas Irvine (1864-1964) and his friend, Robert Moore, constructed the house in 1911 to suit the simple needs of a bachelor. Irvine worked on the construction of the British Columbia Electric Railway Burnaby Lake Interurban Line and was a pile driver by trade. The house consists of two rooms, a living room/kitchen and a bedroom. There were some improvements made throughout the fifty years Irvine lived there, such as running water in 1929, and electricity in the 1950s, but the essential character and form of the house remained intact. Irvine was a well-known local character and pioneer of Burnaby. The heritage value for this house also lies in its interpretive value within the Burnaby Village Museum. The site is an important cultural feature for the interpretation of Burnaby’s heritage to the public. The Thomas Irvine House was moved to the Burnaby Village Museum in 1975 and was restored to its 1920s appearance.
Defining Elements
The character defining elements of the Thomas Irvine House include its: - rectangular form and simple massing - bellcast hipped form with cedar shingle cladding - cedar shingle cladding stained dark brown - double-hung 1-over-1 wooden-sash window on front facade; simple double wooden-sash casement on west facade - interior layout of the house with 2 rooms, a living room/kitchen and bedroom - V-joint tongue-and-groove wood interior paneling
Locality
Deer Lake Park
Historic Neighbourhood
Burnaby Lake (Historic Neighbourhood)
Planning Study Area
Morley-Buckingham Area
Organization
British Columbia Electric Railway
Burnaby Village Museum
Builder
Thomas Irvine (Owner)
Robert Moore
Function
Primary Current--Museum
Primary Historic--Single Dwelling
Community
Burnaby
Cadastral Identifier
P.I.D. No. 011-030-356 Legal Description: Parcel 1, District Lot 79 and District Lot 85, Group 1, New Westminster District, Reference Plan 77594
Boundaries
Burnaby Village Museum is comprised of a single municipally-owned property located at 6501 Deer Lake Avenue, Burnaby.
Area
38,488.63
Contributing Resource
Building
Landscape Feature
Structure
Ownership
Public (local)
Documentation
Heritage Site Files: PC77000 20. City of Burnaby Planning and Building Department, 4949 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 1M2
Name Access
Irvine, Tom
Geographic Access
Burnaby - 6501 Deer Lake Avenue
Burnaby - 4900 Deer Lake Avenue
Images
Less detail

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