12 records – page 1 of 1.

Across the Pacific subseries

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museummultipleformat14767
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019-2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Subseries
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) + 8 sound recordings (mp3)
Scope and Content
Subseries consists of a video clip and sound recordings created by the Burnaby Village Museum for the 2019 "Across the Pacific" exhibit in Stride Studios. The short video clip was displayed within a frame on the wall within the exhibit and came to life as vistors entered the space. In this short vi…
Administrative History
In May 2019,The Burnaby Village Museum opened a new exhibit, titled "Across the Pacific". The exhibit explores the history and legacy of Chinese-Canadians in Burnaby since the late 1800s and was curated by Burnaby Village Museum’s Lisa Codd and University of British Columbia (UBC) doctoral student …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Across the Pacific subseries
Description Level
Subseries
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) + 8 sound recordings (mp3)
Scope and Content
Subseries consists of a video clip and sound recordings created by the Burnaby Village Museum for the 2019 "Across the Pacific" exhibit in Stride Studios. The short video clip was displayed within a frame on the wall within the exhibit and came to life as vistors entered the space. In this short video, museum interpreter, Elwin Xie greets visitors to the exhibit. Elwin Xie personifies, Chinese Canadian immigrant Der Hoy. Sound recordings in eight different languages were part of an interactive activity callled, "Have you Eaten Yet". The recordings were accessible with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China.
Administrative History
In May 2019,The Burnaby Village Museum opened a new exhibit, titled "Across the Pacific". The exhibit explores the history and legacy of Chinese-Canadians in Burnaby since the late 1800s and was curated by Burnaby Village Museum’s Lisa Codd and University of British Columbia (UBC) doctoral student Denise Fong. The exhibit evolved from a Community Heritage Commission research project in commemoration of Burnaby’s 125th anniversary in 2017. In creating this exhibit, the museum collaborated with the descendants of some of Burnaby’s Chinese farm families, including those who continue to farm in the city’s Big Bend area. The exhibit was presented in three written languages – English as well as traditional and simplified Chinese and includes audio components featuring several Cantonese dialects, making the content accessible to the community’s diverse Chinese-language speakers. The exhibit first opened in May 2019 and with limited access due to COVID in 2020, the exhibit remains open in 2021.
Accession Code
BV020.42
Date
2019-2021
Media Type
Sound Recording
Moving Images
Notes
Title based on contents of subseries
Less detail

Across the Pacific video with Elwin Xie

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo14768
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (4 min., 11 sec.) : digital, 23 fps, col., sd., stereo
Scope and Content
Item consists of a short video clip that was displayed within a photograph frame on the wall within Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit. The video portrait came to life as vistors entered the exhibit space. In this short video, museum interpreter, Elwin Xie greets visitors to the …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Across the Pacific subseries
Date
2019
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (4 min., 11 sec.) : digital, 23 fps, col., sd., stereo
Material Details
The video appears horizontal since this was the format of the original recording. The video was displayed on an LCD screen which was rotated ninety degrees to appear upright.
Attached image from video clip has been rotated ninety degrees to appear upright
Accession Code
BV020.42.1
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a short video clip that was displayed within a photograph frame on the wall within Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit. The video portrait came to life as vistors entered the exhibit space. In this short video, museum interpreter, Elwin Xie greets visitors to the exhibit. Elwin Xie personifies a Chinese Canadian immigrant by the name of Der Hoy (birth name Fong Wah On). Der Hoy conveys his story of growing up in a small farming village in Yinping (Enping) in the southern part of Guandong and immigrating to Canada with his Uncle Der to be reunited with his father who had immgrated to Canada years earlier. He explains how he travelled on the Empress of Japan steamship with his Uncle Der and how he learned later in life that his father had purchased immigration documents for him so that he would be identified as his uncle's son.
History/Biography
The wall where the video portrait was displayed within the "Across the Pacific" exhibit, included other photographs and portraits of Chinese Canadian immigrants. Text on the wall next to the video portrait reads: "Home: Canada / Chinese migrants who came to Canada maintained strong social networks based on family and village relationships, and supported each other during periods of need. Many Chinese men arrived alone and lived as bachelors". Der Hoy is a fictional character. The story he tells is based on actual experiences. From 1923 to 1947, the Chinese Immigration Act limited the entry of most Chinese with the exception of merchants, diplomats, students and Canadian-born Chinese. Paper sons or daughters were migrants who entered into Canada by illegally purchasing identity documents that allowed them entry into Canada. After the Act was repealed, limited entry was extended to spouses and children of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. In 1960, the Chinese Adjustment Statement Program offered amnesty to all paper sons and daughters.
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Migration
Names
Xie, Elwin
Burnaby Village Museum
Video

Across the Pacific video with Elwin Xie, 2019

Less detail

Cantonese (Guangdonghua) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14774
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:04 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Cantonese of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along wit…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Across the Pacific subseries
Date
2019
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:04 min)
Accession Code
BV020.42.7
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Cantonese of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Images
Audio Tracks

Cantonese (Guangdonghua) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Less detail

Chungsan (Zhongshan) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14773
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:02 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Zhongshan dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visito…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Across the Pacific subseries
Date
2019
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:02 min)
Accession Code
BV020.42.6
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Zhongshan dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Images
Audio Tracks

Chungsan (Zhongshan) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Less detail

Have You Eaten Yet? video

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumvideo15265
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (1 min., 38 sec.) : digital, 23 fps, col., sd., stereo
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video highlighting the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" in different Chinese language and dialects. It links the dialect or language to a region of China through animation. This phrase a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This video was…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Across the Pacific subseries
Date
2021
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 video recording (mp4) (1 min., 38 sec.) : digital, 23 fps, col., sd., stereo
Accession Code
BV020.42.10
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Media Type
Moving Images
Scope and Content
Item consists of a video highlighting the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" in different Chinese language and dialects. It links the dialect or language to a region of China through animation. This phrase a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This video was created in 2021 to accommodate Provincial Heath Order requirements when opening "Across the Pacific" exhibit during Spring Break 2021.
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Video

Have You Eaten Yet? video, 2021

Less detail

Hoiping (Kaiping) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14776
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:02 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Kaiping dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Across the Pacific subseries
Date
2019
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:02 min)
Accession Code
BV020.42.9
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Kaiping dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Images
Audio Tracks

Hoiping (Kaiping) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Less detail

Mandarin (Putonghua) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14769
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:01 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Mandarin of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Across the Pacific subseries
Date
2019
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:01 min)
Accession Code
BV020.42.2
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Mandarin of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Images
Audio Tracks

Mandarin (Putonghua) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Less detail

Museum exhibits series

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museummultipleformat16037
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
1990-2021
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Series
Physical Description
1 digital illustration (pdf) + 1 painting (tiff) + 9 sound recordings (mp3) + 2 video recordings (mp4) + 6.5 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
Series consists of photographs, graphic materials and other records pertaining to Burnaby Village Museum temporary and permanent exhibits. A selection of temporary exihibits are described by title and year. Series have been arranged by exhibit title into the following subseries: 1) Burnaby's Best …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Description Level
Series
Physical Description
1 digital illustration (pdf) + 1 painting (tiff) + 9 sound recordings (mp3) + 2 video recordings (mp4) + 6.5 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
Series consists of photographs, graphic materials and other records pertaining to Burnaby Village Museum temporary and permanent exhibits. A selection of temporary exihibits are described by title and year. Series have been arranged by exhibit title into the following subseries: 1) Burnaby's Best Baby contest subseries 2) Across the Pacific subseries 3) Agents of Change subseries 4) Museum materials for exhibits subseries
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Accession Code
BV020.5
BV019.36.1
BV019.61.1
BV020.42
BV021.14
Date
1990-2021
Media Type
Sound Recording
Moving Images
Graphic Material
Textual Record
Arrangement
Series are arranged by subseries by exhibit title and year.
Notes
Title based on contents of series
Further accruals expected
Less detail

Poonyue (Panyu) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14770
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:02 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Panyu dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors a…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Across the Pacific subseries
Date
2019
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:02 min)
Accession Code
BV020.42.3
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Panyu dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Images
Audio Tracks

Poonyue (Panyu) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Less detail

Sundak (Shunde) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14771
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:02 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Shunde dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Across the Pacific subseries
Date
2019
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:02 min)
Accession Code
BV020.42.4
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Shunde dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Images
Audio Tracks

Sundak (Shunde) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Less detail

Toisan (Taishan) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14772
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:02 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Toisan Taishan of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors alon…
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Across the Pacific subseries
Date
2019
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:02 min)
Accession Code
BV020.42.5
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in Toisan Taishan of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Images
Audio Tracks

Toisan (Taishan) language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Less detail

Yinping (Enping) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

https://search.heritageburnaby.ca/link/museumsoundrecording14775
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Date
2019
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:03 min)
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Enping dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors …
Repository
Burnaby Village Museum
Collection/Fonds
Burnaby Village Museum fonds
Series
Museum exhibits series
Subseries
Across the Pacific subseries
Date
2019
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 sound recording (mp3) (0:00:03 min)
Accession Code
BV020.42.8
Access Restriction
No restrictions
Reproduction Restriction
No known restrictions
Scope and Content
Item consists of a sound recording in the Enping dialect of the phrase "Have you eaten yet?" This is a common Chinese greeting. Asking if someone has eaten yet is a way to express care. This audio clip was part of Burnaby Village Museum's "Across the Pacific" exhibit and was accessible to visitors along with seven other language dialects with an exhibit panel that included a map of southern China and Guangdong Province. Viewers were asked to listen to the same phrase pronounced by speakers from different regions in southern China. English text on exhibit panel reads "Mandarin a northern variety of Chinese, was adopted as China's official language after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. Aside from Mandarin, there are many other regional varities of spoken Chinese. Early Chinese migrants spoke in a variety of regional Cantonese dialects such as Taishanese. Some also spoke standard Cantonese commonly used in Guangzhou and Hong Kong."
Media Type
Sound Recording
Subjects
Persons - Chinese Canadians
Names
Burnaby Village Museum
Geographic Access
China
Notes
Title based on contents of sound recording
Accompanying image of exhibit panel "Have you eaten yet?"
Images
Audio Tracks

Yinping (Enping) dialect language recording - Have you eaten yet?

Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 1.